Diamondback Release 3 - Review

Mar 1, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  




There hasn't been a whole lot of news from Diamondback over the last two years, a quiet period that began shortly after the launch of the Mission 27.5, their aluminum-framed, 160mm all-mountain rig. What was the reason for this radio silence? It turns out an entirely new suspension platform called Level Link was being developed, a dual short link configuration that's claimed to “create a light and efficient pedaler that descends like a big bike.” Those are bold claims, which is why we've been putting the Release, Diamondback's first model to feature the new design, to the test over the last few months.

Release 3 Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Rear wheel travel: 130mm
• Wheel size: 27.5''
• Head angle: 66°
• Hydroformed aluminum frame
• 73mm threaded bottom bracket
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Weight (as shown, size L w/o pedals): 31 pounds (14.06 kg)
• MSRP: $3,900 USD
www.diamondback.com / @diamondbackbikes

The Release's aluminum frame has 130mm of rear travel paired with a 150mm fork up front, giving it a relatively slack head angle of 66 degrees. There are three models in the line, with prices ranging from $2,500 for the base model on up to $3,900 USD for the Release 3 reviewed here, which comes well spec'd with a Rock Shox Pike RCT3 fork, Monarch Plus shock, Guide RS brakes, and a 1x11 drivetrain.


Diamondback Release 3
The brake, derailleur, and dropper post lines are routed along the top of the down tube.
Diamondback Release 3
The lack of pivots around the rear thru-axle makes for a seriously stiff rear end.


Frame Details

I can't remember the last bike that came in for review with two different colored rims, but it looks like Diamondback is trying to start (or restart) a trend with the Release's black and red color scheme. Looks are subjective, but I'll go on record as saying that I wish the rear wheel matched the front, if only to avoid the inevitable “What's up with those wheels?” line of questioning out on the trail.

At first glance, the shape of the Release's aluminum frame is a fairly straightforward affair – there aren't any outlandish tube shapes or wild angles, but a closer look reveals that the area around the bottom bracket has some interesting details. For one, the lower portion of the seat tube is curved to the non-drive side, and the lower link is offset in that direction as well, to provide additional chainring clearance. The rear swingarm is also asymmetrical, with a brace on the non-drive side for extra stiffness.


Diamondback Release 3
The lower link is offset towards the non-drive side to make room for the chainring.
Diamondback Release 3
Even with a 2.3" Hans Dampf mounted up there's still plenty of clearance between the tire and frame.


The Release has a 12x148mm rear end, but the decision to go the Boost route wasn't done arbitrarily. Luther Beale, the bike's designer, said that the wider spacing afforded the room necessary to have both short, 425mm chainstays and room for wider tires, along with the option of running a front derailleur. An extra three millimeters of room to play with on each side (compared to 12x142) may not seem like much, but for designers who are used to working with tenths of a millimeter, it's significant.

Save for the stealth dropper post routing through the seat tube, there's no internal cable routing to be found – all the housing runs along the top of the down tube. This means there's no room to mount a water bottle inside the front triangle, but according to Diamondback, although our bike didn't have them, mounting holes will be in place on the underside of the down tube for the next run of frames.

Other details include ISCG 05 tabs for mounting a chain guide, expanding collet hardware at the majority of the pivot locations, and a threaded 73mm bottom bracket shell – always a welcome sight.


Diamondback Release 3
Two counter-rotating links make up the heart of the Level Link suspension design.

Suspension Design

The Release's Level Link suspension design is a major departure from the link-driven single pivot designs that Diamondback had been relying on up until this point. Comparisons will inevitably be drawn to Santa Cruz's VPP layout, and for good reason. It's the expiration of the patent on the VPP design that made Level Link possible, since it relies on two counter-rotating links. By changing the length and location of those links designers can precisely control the amount of chain growth that occurs as a bike goes through its travel. There's more chain growth early on in the bike's travel for better pedaling performance, and then the amount of growth decreases to allow the shock to absorb larger impacts.

The most visibly obvious difference between VPP and Level Link design is the positioning of the lower link. Santa Cruz's link is positioned diagonally, running from a point just above the bottom bracket to a point on the chainstay that's inline with the center of the crank arm, while the lower Level Link yoke is located entirely above the bottom bracket, affixed to the seat tube and then extending at a slight downward angle toward the swingarm, an angle that becomes parallel to the ground when the bike is at its sag point (hence the name).



Geometry

DB



Specifications
Specifications
Price $3900
Travel 130mm
Rear Shock RockShox Monarch Plus RT3
Fork RockShox Pike RCT3 150mm
Headset FSA N057E
Cassette SRAM XG 1150
Crankarms Race Face Turbine 30t
Bottom Bracket Race Face outboard bearing
Rear Derailleur SRAM X1
Chain KMC X11L
Shifter Pods SRAM X1 11 speed
Handlebar DB 35 780mm width
Stem DB 35 40mm length
Grips DB4L lock-on
Brakes SRAM Guide RS 180mm rotors
Wheelset Diamondback Blanchard 28R
Tires Schwalbe Hans Dampf 2.35"
Seat WTB Volt Pro
Seatpost KS Lev Integra

Diamondback Release 3






Setup

It took a few rides and a bit of experimenting in order to dial in the Release's rear suspension. I started by running the Monarch Plus at 30% sag, the usual starting point for most trail and all-mountain bikes these days. With that amount of sag there weren't any issues on the climbs, but the suspension felt too firm on the descents, and more than once I found myself checking to see if I had inadvertently put the rear shock into the middle compression setting. I eventually settled on putting two volume spacers into the air can of the Monarch Plus to prevent it from bottoming out too quickly, and then dropping the air pressure until I was running 40% sag. That number may seem excessive for a 130mm trail bike, but it worked well on the trail, without any wallowing, and came closer to achieving the feel I was looking for.


Diamondback Release 3
Seated, standing - no matter how you climb, the Release maintains its composure.

Climbing

The Release's 780mm bars and 40mm stem are right in line with my personal preferences, and I felt at home from the instant I swung a leg over the bike. The same goes for the 450mm reach for a size large – the Release's geometry fits in with the recent push for longer front centers, and it was a comfortable fit for my 5'11” height.

When it came time to climb, the Release proved itself to be a very efficient pedaler, and even when running the aforementioned 40% sag there was never any need to reach down and flip the blue compression lever into a firmer setting. Whether I was seated or standing, no matter how awkwardly I mashed on the pedals the rear shock remained relatively unaffected, free of any bobbing or unnecessary movement. It's not that it's switching a rear shock from one compression setting to the other is a difficult task, but when it's not necessary it becomes even easier to pay attention to the fun stuff, like actually riding.

Of course, as efficient as the Release's rear suspension is, there's no escaping the fact that it weighs 31 pounds without pedals, and that extra heft meant I was more likely to sit and steadily grind up a steep climb rather than standing up and sprinting to the top. Even though it has slightly less travel than what would typically be considered an all-mountain bike, the Release's geometry, especially the 66-degree head angle, will feel very familiar to riders who are accustomed to spending time on longer travel machines. The same climbing techniques are required - a little extra muscle to steer the front end through twisting climbs, and a little extra 'oomph' to power through extended technical bits – but as long as you have the horsepower, the Release will steadily clamber its way on upwards.

Diamondback Release 3
Once it's up to speed, the Release will happily take flight. Rider: Matt Russell

Descending

The Release has a stout and sturdy feel to it – this is a bike that can handle being thrown sideways into corners and launched deep into the landing of a drop without even a hint of unwanted flex. The rear suspension feels very supportive, which makes it especially enjoyable on trails filled with berms and rollers to pump and manual, trails where riding bikes with loads of travel can make it feel like you're bouncing on a waterbed.

On rougher terrain the Release loses some of its luster - it isn't quite as adept at smoothing out the small bumps and square edged hits, and the threshold at which the rear end began to go through its travel seemed fairly high. At times the back wheel felt more likely to bounce over roots and other mid-trail obstacles rather than suck them up, making for a slightly jarring ride. Granted, this is a bike with 130mm of travel, but there are other bikes in the same category that have a more supple suspension feel – Transition's Scout comes to mind, or on the pricier end of the spectrum, Yeti's SB5C.

Diamondback Release 3
bigquotesThe Release has a stout and sturdy feel to it - this is a bike that can handle being thrown sideways into corners and launched deep into the landing of a drop without even a hint of unwanted flex.


At slower speeds the Release felt reluctant to leave the ground, especially compared to the Scout, a bike with the manners of an excited puppy, one that's happiest bounding down the trail popping off of natural lips. It's not that the Release isn't maneuverable – those 425mm chainstays help take care of that, and it'll rip through corners with ease – but it has a glued-to-the-ground feeling that makes bunny-hopping over roots and rocks, or doubling up natural features require more effort. However, when it comes to hitting man-made jumps, the Release will happily take flight, lofting as high and as far as you want. Speed seemed to be the key to waking up the Release, along with a take-charge riding style – this is a bike that behaves best under a more aggressive rider, rather than one who's only along for the ride.


Diamondback Release 3
There weren't any dropped chains, even without a chain guide.
Diamondback Release 3
They're nice and wide, but the Blanchard rims are a pain when it comes time to change a tire.

Component Check

• Wheels: The Release rolls on a house-brand wheelset, and while Diamondback's Blanchard 28R rims have a nice and wide inner rim width of 28mm, getting a tire on and off is a frustrating experience – the fit between the tire bead and rim is extremely tight. I can't remember the last time I broke a tire lever, but I managed to snap two during my time on the Release. It wasn't just the Schwalbe tires either – it also took a solid round of thumb wrestling to get tires from Maxxis and Specialized installed.

• Schwalbe Hans Dampf tires: The Hans Dampfs were the tire of choice not too long ago, and they still work well in most conditions, although wet roots tend to be their nemesis. They're a safe spec choice, but given the Release's rowdy manners, I'd say it's an ideal candidate for the ridiculously fun Magic Mary front / Rock Razor rear combo.

• SRAM X1 / Race Face Turbine 1x11 drivetrain: Despite the lack of a chain guide, there were no dropped chains during the test period. I did manage to snap a link on the KMC X11 chain, but I'll chalk that up to my winter diet of donuts and cake, and otherwise the drivetrain was trouble free.


Diamondback Release 3


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotes The Release is an interesting machine, one that's difficult to categorize. Its slack angles give it the handling of an all-mountain rig, but the reduced travel and rear suspension feel make it a better choice for ripping through berms rather than plowing through rock gardens. It's not going to be for everyone - there will inevitably be those who want the extra margin for error that another 30mm or so of travel provides, while others will find their gaze drawn to bikes with quicker handling and a little less heft. But for riders looking for something a little different, a rugged all-rounder with very efficient pedaling performance, the Release might fit the bill. - Mike Kazimer




Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this review




About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 33 • Height: 5'11” • Inseam: 33" • Weight: 155lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None
Twenty years deep into a mountain biking addiction that began as a way to escape the suburban sprawl of Connecticut, Mike Kazimer is most at home deep the woods, carving his way down steep, technical trails. The decade he spent as a bike mechanic helped create a solid technical background to draw from when reviewing products, and his current location in the Pacific Northwest allows for easy access to the wettest, muddiest conditions imaginable.



276 Comments

  • 677 5
 Should have called the Angry Baboon.....you know because the red butt...I'll let myself out
  • 28 88
flag scottzg (Feb 29, 2016 at 23:05) (Below Threshold)
 *horny
  • 69 2
 I like how the reviewer decided to colour coordinate his clothing to match the bike!
  • 33 1
 @albe23 That comment is pure gold. I dont know where this stuff comes from.
  • 60 6
 "The Release is an interesting machine" = "the house is full of character"

But yes, why would I ride a 130mm bike that weighs 31lbs – and looks like a Stumpjumper from 6 years ago.
  • 19 36
flag torero (Mar 1, 2016 at 3:36) (Below Threshold)
 The Stumpjumper is weaker compared to this. The Diamondback looks like a mini-freeride.
  • 34 3
 When your attire matches your bike you can go much faster.
  • 12 2
 i wonder if bike manufacturers get nervous before a Pinkbike review? Cause the stuff people say is just to damn funny!
  • 16 3
 Why is your back wheel red? Cause I'm a badass BRAAAAAAAPPPP!!!
Makes fun of the colors even though there is an awesome contrast color shot of the bike and rider - don't hate - that thing looks awesome with the right kit on and the test rider had exactly that.
  • 34 2
 I may be crazy, but I like the look.
  • 5 2
 Red rocket
  • 12 3
 Or perhaps the Mullet? Business in the front, party in the back.
  • 2 2
 Here comes the lipstick!
  • 158 5
 Looks like one of those bikes that was self spray painted.
  • 14 3
 Couldn't agree more, was also my first impression!
  • 22 1
 "Had a Marlboro racing orange rattle can lying around....couldn't help myself...
  • 3 1
 Look at the pic of the side of the swing-arm and the paint has already chipped off on the upper bearing. I'd give it the benefit of the doubt but yeah the finish doesn't look great.
  • 3 0
 I think they're painted at the factory on-one use.obviously.
  • 3 0
 Brand new bike department store bike locked outside and someone has already stolen the front wheel.
  • 4 0
 The front half of the bike looks ehh... half decent from afar. I just don't know what went wrong on the back half...
  • 6 0
 It got 'overhauled!'
  • 2 0
 By trip let loose.
  • 4 4
 white rockers look whack
  • 26 0
 That's racist.
  • 8 2
 yeah maybe tommy lee looks whack, but Dave grohl looks like a normal bloke
  • 5 1
 What does "normal" look like?
  • 8 0
 ironically there's a beautifully shot 5 minute video to release the model. maybe the blatant mismatch in quality of the bike's design and the video's cinematography is supposed to reflect the paint job? i totally get art.
  • 80 5
 Oh how cute the rim matches the rear triangle
  • 1 10
flag Aksel31 (Mar 1, 2016 at 13:51) (Below Threshold)
 Cute?? I wouldn't call that ...paint scheme...or whatever it is... cute. But nice effort though indeed
  • 59 0
 PB reviews an insanely expensive full carbon, top spec dream bike and the commenters lose their mind about bikes being so damned expensive.

PB reviews an entry- and mid-level price point bike that actually performs and people complain about how it's ugly, looks cheap and how the brand is devalued by selling in the mass market as well.

*sigh*
  • 6 0
 Well said! My riding buddy just bought a DB Mission and loves it, faster times on the DB then the Spesh.
  • 55 8
 This bike seems to have all the characteristics of an 'Enduro' bike, except the long(er) travel.
I don't know about anyone else, but if I'm pedaling around a 31lbs bike with 66deg of head angle,
I'm gonna want the 160mm of travel that should come with it
  • 42 6
 So it's a very short travel bike after you've dialed in 40% sag, with no pop a weight problem that looks fuglyfully.
looks cheap and nasty to me in the closer up pics. Isn't the whole point of 130 bikes to be poppy and light
  • 3 0
 wondered that myself. If you give up the playfulness then you might as well be on a longer travel machine which in today's world will probably be lighter too.
  • 9 0
 40% SAG and the bike didn't "POP".... mmmm wonder why that could be...? for the extra thousand bucks difference with the scout they tested you could fix the weight problem.

Though for sure they missed an opportunity with such a polarizing paintjob.
  • 6 0
 Right let me see, 66 degree head angle, 31 lbs, why the hell would I buy that bike over a modern "enduro" or burly all mountain rig? My Altitude weighs 30 and has more travel, the same seat angle, same chainstay length and a very similar reach. What am I paying for here Diamondback?
  • 6 0
 But duuuude, shorter travel all-mtn bikes are the latest trend!!
  • 14 0
 I love the geo; don't need the travel. I think it makes sense if you want to huck some sketchy steeps that don't involve a 15 foot drop.

Steepness dictates HA. Size of biggest hit dictates travel.
  • 1 2
 @AllMountin But the HA is not particularly slack for steeps!?
And 40% Sag would only make sense if the frame had a considerably progressive suspension design, but that doesn't seem to be the case either, as the tester had to put in 2 volume spacers to prevent it from bottoming out or feeling harsh all the way?
I'm always a fan of a VPPish double link design, I really looooooved the old Lapierre DH 920 for example... the one before Pendbox that is. But like @markg1150 says... here the numbers just don't add up. The engineers should refine their work and make that beast out of carbon. I can see a lot of potential if it's done right.
  • 2 1
 Seems to have the same review as all of the latest 130-140 travel bikes these days (with a few exceptions) - "does everything a longer travel rig will do, except it gets twitchier at high speeds... and doesn't soak up roots/rocks very well... and isn't any faster... and isn't any lighter..." Miss anything?
  • 5 0
 You make a good point. Perhaps the 130mm bike should be compared to 100mm bikes. I mean no compares 160mm bikes to 200mm DH monsters do they?
  • 2 1
 40% sag, it will ride a little slacker than the numbers. 40% sag and 31 lbs also explains "no pop." Meh... Close, but no cigar.
  • 33 1
 I.... actually don't at all mind it. You could totally make it in to a fun little park/dj/light FR bike that you could still kick around on which would be perfect where I am... Maybe a bit of 4x in it's blood? haha
  • 7 0
 For 2500? I like that.
  • 1 1
 Yeah they do seem a bit steep for the price point, but the base model comes with a Yari so for what I'm describing that's what I'd go for.
  • 33 2
 40% sag? on a 130mm travel?............
  • 2 0
 And it doesn't "pop" fir some reason....???
  • 5 0
 Yes, that's the number that made the bike feel the best, and is based on the recommendations of the bike's designer, as well as my own trail testing.
  • 2 0
 Appreciate the reply, your review left the impression you were "experimenting" and came up with 40% and two volume spacers. But 40% sag seems an excessive amount for 130mm and in light of the lack of "pop" or the bike feeling "glued to the ground", (in a negative way), it seems like more experimenting would be the obvious move and worth while for an honest review? I looked earlier today when you posted this reply and I didn't see any reference to DB sag recommendations?

This bike reminds me of when Giant first put out the Reign. Seems like a lot of people are dismissing it out of hand considering it's source? (well and maybe just the choice of paint?) In 10 years maybe this bike will also prove itself as a worthy choice compared to it's peers like the Reign.

At the very least, it didn't break chain stays, or tear off a brake mount..? Smile But they did use that "pre-production" excuse for no water bottle mount so...
  • 22 0
 Yeah, yeah the colorway leaves a bit to be desired. However, DB stuff is caried by REI, Performance and is typically on sale. So while it's probably not the bike most PB riders would have any interest in, it does provide for more people to have access to decent rig. I did not realize the VPP patent was already up. I'm looking forward to seeing what other companies will do with it.
  • 16 0
 I'm using the DB8 as a shop demo... it has an extra little link that is similar to the Tr500. ...TOTALLY different from the Retreat 3 but, man, what a great ride. It can huck with the best.

DB doesn't have that mega bling factor but, they make great stuff when it comes to the nicer bikes... down side, they're killing their brand with those cheap Dick's Sporting Goods level POS's...I guess that's where the money is. (???).
  • 3 0
 +1 here. I also have a DB8 as well as a Sortie 29 and a few other high end DB's. They're great bikes at a price point that is hard to beat.

I see your point but, I think the business model makes sense. The low end bikes really aren't THAT bad for the price points either but, with that huge diversity in their line and sales from 1000+ brick and mortal retail stores it allows them to still R&D and produce some really sweet bikes. The company is run by great people who ride just like any other bike brand. I'd say the only flaw is that there really aren't any places for most people to see and buy the nicer bikes. I suppose it's a trade off. If they only sold the high end bikes in shops I don't think they'd sell very well but, if they sell the low end stuff in mass it allows them to still build and sell the higher end stuff to the people that find and love it.
  • 2 1
 yup -- totally agree -- there's a fair of companies like DB who have the backing to make some seriously sick stuff but, they seem to follow the more affordable market. KHS for example -- the make sick stuff for the team riders but, most KHS sold are the cheaper hybrids and casual bikes. I'm always impressed how well the DB8 rides.. really impressed for a bike I picked up just for kicks. I was actually waiting on getting a new Lapierre 727 until I learned they dropped DH completely...my only beef for DB = Jenson
  • 3 0
 long long long, really long time ago, I bought a used DiamondBack full squish from someone back in geeez, mid 80's? even though it was a tick too small for me. I really liked that bike.
  • 8 0
 Was it Don McLean?
  • 7 0
 Did you ride it to the levy?
  • 2 0
 I wonder why DB doesn't take on a new name for either it's discount line or nice line? It's not like they have a really nice brand reputation with either because of the low end stuff....
  • 5 0
 Can you teach me how to ride real slow...
  • 3 0
 Was the levy dry too?
  • 2 0
 Please release 3 let me go...cause I don't love you anymore....
  • 1 0
 So come on, diamondback be nimble diamondback be quick
  • 17 1
 " Unfortunately, this means there's no room to mount a water bottle" and that how new "standards" like boost stopped being bikers top enemy. It's time for room for water bottle now Wink
  • 11 0
 Or hell a water bottle system designed for small framed bikes....
  • 4 0
 Different shaped bottles for particular frames might help.
  • 13 1
 That's why I love my Intense Spider 275. Fits a water bottle, 419mm rear end, 142mm spacing. BOOM!
  • 22 8
 Wear a pack like a man.
  • 19 3
 If I can't fit my 40 oz OE then this bike is not for me.
  • 2 3
 @TFreeman actually I do. Always Wink
  • 5 1
 Let's do a new standard!
  • 5 2
 For all you water bottle lovers: just go get a handlebar bottle mount adaptor. It's meant for kids, but if you need a bottle that badly it'll totally work for you. /s
  • 3 3
 @allix2456 ROTFL Smile For people like me, who loves a good backpack, water bottle is something like straight and narrow handlebar... I simply don't get it Smile
  • 3 0
 not a big fan of backpacks here. It depends on where you ride the most, for example where I ride the most, is long enough and hot enough that drinking something refreshing is necessary during the ride, but not far enough that one would need to bring a bag pack full of water, spare tubes and tools. So using a bagpack makes no sense for me on that trail. So that's why for me good positioned bottle cage is mandatory. I haven't pulled the trigger on the SB6C just because of that.
  • 3 0
 I want a water system built into my bike so that every time I drop the seat water shoots up like a water fountain... turn my frame into a giant squirt gun!
  • 5 0
 @stiingya

For some reason I thought you meant using a dropper post to get it to actuate. Sounded like you were wanting a bidet Smile
  • 3 0
 @EverythingisFire Well I do try to stay fresh on the trail...

I remember riding in Arizona in 109* heat, I'd have taken water shooting out of my seat or anyplace else at that point!!! Smile
  • 22 3
 I like the look
  • 15 0
 It always seems like Diamondback puts a bunch of effort into bikes that I have never actually seen for sale or on a trail. Will VPPish suspension change that?
  • 8 91
flag mhoshal (Mar 1, 2016 at 1:58) (Below Threshold)
 It will still never be maestro which has proven to be the best suspension design lol. Sorry Giant fanboy here lol
  • 6 81
flag mhoshal (Mar 1, 2016 at 4:07) (Below Threshold)
 I knew the neg props were coming but its all good id take my 29lb 150mm Reign any day over this 130mm 31 lb bike
  • 7 86
flag mhoshal (Mar 1, 2016 at 4:11) (Below Threshold)
 Don't believe me watch a video on the axle paths maestro is the only system that makes the wheel go straight up and down there is zero arch which no other suspension setup has been able to duplicate no matter how hard they try. Long live maestro!!!!!
  • 34 4
 Mhoshal yer boring us.bog off
  • 49 2
 Oh look, someone who believed that BS marketing video giant made 6 years ago
  • 10 0
 @mhoshal, keep going! Somebody needs to win this race to the bottom!
  • 6 0
 Canfield Jedi and many other modern Dh and enduro bikes have a rearward axle path. @mhoshal
  • 3 0
 I think I saw the same video. The one where funnily enough the single pivot bike (Cannondale Prophet maybe) was really close in performance. So for 6 extra bearings and a snapping linkage (at the time) you could get a slight performance increase. Sign me up! Wink
  • 3 6
 @mhoshal

Of all the suspension designs you picked just about the most boring, wooden feeling one to fanboy over. I mean come on; the suspension design is one of the worst, they come spec'd like XC bikes, the company has zero customer service ability, and they look like absolute garbage.

Looks are a personal preference, but you can't excuse the rest of that.
  • 5 0
 I own an anthem,ride it when I'm 'poodling'about.but I can honestly say I've never banged one out over the shock link.
  • 5 2
 Maestro is a dirty platform and due to the way it came to be I won't support it based on principle alone. Regarding the DB though, we are in an exciting time with FSR and VPP patents expiring thus those platforms will become more available, adapted, and affordable due to lack of licensing.
  • 3 1
 @KottenGin I call BS. Giant was working on crazy suspension platforms for years before DW came along. it's not like they were just doing simple single pivots, DW showed up and TA DA they invented Maestro. Not the way it happened...

It's not that DW didn't have the time or money to fight them in court. It's that he didn't have a case... so he dropped it.
  • 1 6
flag mhoshal (Mar 3, 2016 at 1:51) (Below Threshold)
 Funny you say it's boring, than why does every other bike company on the market have a bike that tries to rip off giant. Look at the upper links on any bike and you can see what I mean giant was making those links way before trek ever did. Shit they were making them when treks still had ugly kona or Ellsworth looking links.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya But they did invite DW to meetings, negotiated licensing options, DW showed them prototypes, and they signed a Development Agreement which was under negotiations for years. IF these meetings had never happened, sure it could have been a fluke that both systems came about around the same time with similar designs, BUT those meetings did happen and it seems like dirty business.
  • 1 4
 I've had some AWESOME personal idea's; that I thought were totally original and worth a mint. Only to find out somebody already did it. I had an idea traveling a couple years ago that I never bothered looking into only to see an article about a similar idea shown in Outside magazine that they got near 10 MILLION in kickstarter funding this past December because they moved on it first. Not because it was original or better than what I had thought of! Smile And even though there is an aspect of my idea that I think is better than theirs. No way would anyone "believe" that I had thought of it first and that there was something better about my design. They would assume I copied and was just trying to make money off of someone else's idea.

Anyway, point is DW is not the only person with good idea's to develop better mountain bike suspension. And it's totally possible that Giants bike riders, designers and engineers created their own version of a dual mini link suspension design without using DW's patent as a cheat sheet. (as it's been noted many times, DW did not invent the dual mini link and so he could NOT patent that, he patented a specific application of it.) So maybe Giant goes to patent their design and finds DW's work. Met with him to evaluate "if" they needed to pay him royalties. Decided that "no" they were not infringing upon DW's specific application. But for whatever reason they for sure did start a co-development of the G+ suspension design. (Maybe they saw DW's genius and thought they'd get the jump on next generation suspension design? Maybe they weren't 100% sure they'd win a patent suit and did it just to keep DW's lawyers at bay? IDK) Anyway, Giant says G+ did not meet the criteria laid out in their contract. DW said something like what Giant wants is contrary to the laws of physics. Something like that. Anyway, so Giants perspective is DW isn't holding up to the contract and stop paying him. Then DW sues for breach of contract AND patent infringement. He also was suing Trek in the same manner, even though Trek also had been developing BEFORE they contacted DW and also got their own patent. He lost the suit against Trek. And he dropped the suit against Giant.

Maybe this is a case that DW's lawyers just can't compete with the financial power and corporate entities of Trek and Giant? Little guy getting screwed by the big guy? That is totally possible? OR maybe it's a case that even though Trek and Giant are financially powerful corporate entities, that "also" they did nothing wrong? So far, from what information is publicly available from the courts, the latter has factual support to be true. So I see no reason to blindly support DW just because he says different. Sorry, I don't know him. I don't have any reason to believe him over the bike companies. I work in product development. I come up with what I think are new and creative idea's all the time! (some of them really suck, sometimes they end up too much like what somebody else is doing and we do not pursue them, but some are awesome and at least one of them made a million! Smile ) So if someday my company gets sued saying we copied an idea I would totally stand up and defend my work. Just because I work for a corporate entity does not make my idea's invalid or only possible if I copied an independent. Plus I know that just common everyday e-mails and meeting planners/recaps will always be ample and easy evidence as to when and what kind of development occurred. (course some people will just think that when we say we spent the afternoon brainstorming assembly techniques that what were really doing is browsing through patents looking for idea's to steal...)

And also, typing all this out after having lots of beers and watching McGregor get his big mouth choked out by the only other guy with probably a bigger mouth just gave me another "maybe" good "bike" related idea. Totally gonna do a kickstarter on this one. Probably go down in flames, raise no funding, OR before that I'll find out somebody already did it. BUT at least I'm not gonna wait till somebody else moves on it first this time! Smile
  • 1 0
 Forget that,read on my dashboard
  • 12 0
 You can understand why Rob Roskopp sold up Santa Cruz last year. VVP is no longer exclusive to SC and Intense.
  • 1 0
 It's certainly interesting. It will be nice to see what happens in the next few years. What companies will change up they're suspension design.
  • 6 2
 Yes because since FSR expired, a lot of companies have jumped in on it. I bet the same will happen with this. It's a great design, after all
  • 3 0
 Good point but SC and Intense have years of engineering experience mating their bikes with VPP which keeps them ahead of the curb and their competition. This bike is an example of not getting a "VPP like" suspension right and will take some time before it's dialed in.
  • 5 4
 No it's not. It's shit. Non-counter rotating links make far more sense.
  • 2 0
 @slave2trails Just FYI, the phrase is "ahead of the curve."
As for the topic of these comments, SC and Intense will be just fine. People are not going to buy the DB over a SC just based on the VPP platform. People have their brand preferences/stigmas. While there will be a small percentage of people that may switch when patents expire any competent business will forecast and make the adjustments to compensate. Also like slave2trails said, it will take the new adaptations time to catch up to how dialed in the original patent holders have it and while the patents are now open the original patent holders sure aren't going to divulge all the little "tweaks" they have developed.
  • 2 2
 I bet you only see crap brands use VPP. Nobody who has R&D and currently uses a Horst 4-Bar or dual-link will switch.
  • 2 0
 It wouldn't be hard to just measure a Santa and replicate it
  • 1 0
 VPP is a version of a dual link.
  • 17 5
 lookin clean
  • 20 13
 It looks like a baboon in heat.
  • 2 2
 Might just be me but the asymmetrical look of some VPP type designs seems to throw me off a little... I've always liked nomad better than the bronson, etc. Still quite a pretty bike though!
  • 10 0
 DiamondBlack Release 3 vs SantaCruz Hightower (Kinematic analysis)

www.youtube.com/watch?v=23SaezKikDw
  • 2 0
 Whoa, that's pretty interesting there.

It seems to me like a lot of people feed off negative connotations around DB as a brand.
Granted the high-tower is carbon and much lighter the designs here are very similar.

From a scientific perspective there are alot of variables that are factored in to "bike-performance"

Not to say you will feel the same thing on either bike......... but rather the fact that modern vpp designs are being introduced into DB bike make me think that they are trying to reach a broader market with their high/mid-end mountain bikes.

Would be interesting if they started manufacturing carbon, but perhaps that's not economical for them to invest in at the moment.....

I love the shape of the bike, not so much the color scheme or paint job though. But hey, if it shreds it shreds.
  • 6 0
 Rad bike". Rad paint job! It's great to see a company push outside the normal black wheels neon accent bullshit we have been seein so much of lately. Who wants a teal bike with pink decals. I guess a shit ton of people. What eves.
  • 5 0
 Seems like a lot of bike companies are jumping on the low-to-mid travel bikes with slacked out geometry. Personally I think that is a good thing for the area I live in. I'm from the northeast region of the states and the XC places I ride don't call for more travel but I like the handling of a slacker bike. I think more people need to consider the area and type of terrain they ride and purchase bikes for where they ride and not for where they want to ride.
  • 5 1
 It's interesting about the Monarch. I had the Monarch Plus (prior to the Debonair can) and had to run a lot of sag, or rather lower pressure to use full travel. Of course the bike felt dead, for lack of a better word. With the rebound open (full fast) it still wouldn't smooth out fast chatter (say a 10m section of roots). Personally I thought this was an issue with air shocks if you're a lighter rider, low pressure to get full travel, but then there's not enough support for trail riding.
Nonetheless the Diamondback looks cool, my first serious mountainbike was one. I like the colour scheme as well. Bit different.
  • 4 0
 looks great to me, Seems like a better choice however, would have been to go back to preboost standards, add a waterbottle cage, and drop the component specs a tad. make this a more entry level trail/ enduro bike for new riders. This would make it a great upgrade bike for that market as well, so folks could buy the frame and swap everything over. then weight, price, and compatibility would all be within the scope of that target audience.
  • 4 0
 Diamond Back always seems to come up just short. They are so close to having a pretty dialed bike. It looks like a 90's prototype Santa Cruz. It doesn't seem to have a very finished look for a bike that's getting ready to hit the market. The two different color rims gives it that department store feel. Not to mention 31lbs for a 130mm trail bike. It is going to be interesting to see what other bikes come out with a vpp set up now that its available for use.
  • 1 0
 Ya if your gna go Al you need hydroforming ala giant&trek. Ok entry level option for teenager.
  • 7 0
 I wonder if the paint job would receive such criticism if it were released by YT...
  • 4 2
 Next time Dirtmag does their bible, I'd love to see them do a blind test on all the bikes. Do the ride, the write up and then let them know what they were riding. They'll have an idea about who put it out based on geometry etc, but could reduce brand bias.
  • 9 4
 geo an travel looks pretty standard to me. cant really see what could be wrong with it apart from it not having santa cruz written down the side
  • 6 0
 The red rear end is ugly, no doubt. Those white links are horrible though... outta no where.
  • 6 0
 Looks like you broke the rear triangle and the warranty replacement was in red.
  • 5 1
 Geometry looks pretty darn fun to me. But I could not live with miss matched wheel colour. Otherwise there is not much to fault.
  • 4 2
 @mikekazimer , in the "Suspension Design" paragraph you stated "Level Link yoke is located entirely above the bottom bracket, affixed to the seat tube and then extending at a slight downward angle toward the swingarm, an angle that becomes perpendicular to the ground when the bike is at its sag point (hence the name)." I think you meant the lower link would be PARALLEL to the ground when the bike hits its SAG point. Hence the "Level Link" name. I'm having a hard time seeing that lower link going perpendicular to the ground.
  • 6 0
 @southoftheborder - good catch, and yes, the link is parallel to the ground when the bike is at its sag point.
  • 4 4
 Awesome work Mike. Really awesome.
  • 5 0
 Rudolf the red nosed reindeer... Oh, no...
  • 22 0
 Rudolf the rear end reindeer
  • 8 0
 Looks more like a red-arsed baboon to me... But I do like the look of the frame. With a black rear wheel, it'd look better IMO
  • 5 4
 The brake, derailleur, and dropper post lines are routed along the top tube, which unfortunately doesn't have any water bottle mounts. That, Sir, is not a top tube. I think. Like the idea behind the colors, don't know if I like the result though.
  • 4 0
 If you could actually read, you'd see that he said top of the down tube. Which yes, that is the down tube.
  • 5 1
 Since I copy-pasted the line, I suspect the article has been edited after my remark. Guess I can read after all.
  • 3 0
 Both of you win!
  • 2 1
 If I'm not mistaken, the VPP patent says nothing about counter rotating links (in the patent pictures they actually rotate together). The patent is based primarily around the 2nd derivative of the axle path (aka the rate of change of the axle path) and the rate of change of chain stretch.
  • 13 0
 @crazy-canuck, there are a few different patents related to VPP, but number 6,488,301 states that "The link members are mounted so as to rotate in opposite directions as the suspension is compressed."
  • 8 0
 Sweet, thanks for the reference.
  • 6 1
 did they run out of paint while spraying ?
  • 1 0
 Ha ha
  • 3 0
 A lot of criticism of this bike, but check out the "Dream" video posted on Pinkbike today. Looks like the bike can handle some crazy terrain with the right rider.
  • 1 0
 Dream video, and ad behind the homepage, coincidence?
  • 4 0
 'Catch' and 'Release'. The Release is mocked up to look like a spawning salmon. It's a Northwest thing.
  • 1 0
 Looks like fun. My DB Mason FS has been a blast, and a few upgrades along the way has turned it into quite the little ripper. This bike solves almost every complaint I had about my mason. Slacker HA, shorter chainstays, shorter wheelbase, and more travel up front where it counts.
  • 1 0
 The spec looks really good for the price, and the geometry is interesting given the travel. This would be a really spiff rig if it were lighter. I'm no weight-wennie but 31 pounds combined with 66 head angle is going to be brutal climbing. Why the hell are all of DB's bikes outrageously heavy? It's like they are doing it intentionally or something...
  • 1 0
 it's 3900 bucks, and less than 31 lbs in a size large. What bike are you comparing it to at that price with these components that is SO much lighter in a size large? I can think of others with less capable forks/shocks and no dropper posts that are a "little" lighter for around that price. Course they are probably posting the weight of a small/medium compared to this large...

Pink bike has recently tested or showed several "trendy" brand bikes that weighted more and cost WAY more...

For sure, DB should have done one more model 4500-5000 range and further addressed the weight/wheels. But for what this costs everything is fine except the department store color scheme. Especially the white links... WTH?
  • 2 0
 I like it, but I can't say it's my favourite bike of all time. I would rather two rims that are the same, and red isn't my favourite colour. Also the asymmetrical swing arm is a bit of a deterrent.
  • 1 0
 Not bad! Pretty impressed really. I'm thinking level one has some serouis history with mtb suspension. I'm all about short travel bikes with agressive geo. Being a tall rider I hope they have a 29er in the works to compete with the evils following. In aluminum of course.
  • 5 2
 Black with coloured links and maybe wheels, that's what this bike needs to look sexy.
  • 6 6
 I wish someone at DB would fix that f'd up excuse of a website. It's damn near impossible to see anything on an iPhone in the wide screen position with the top header covering the whole upper half of the screen and a big 'leave a message' button covering most of the lower right corner. I'd rather just not be bothered with going there, totally aggravating. Even the header link on the PB ad just takes you to some log in page rather than the Level Link page. I had to click through several more pages to get tgere and then can't hardly see anything. Just said f'it and closed the webpage, just not worth it.
  • 6 3
 Obviously they're designing the webpage for REAL computers... not pricey name brand tricorders...
  • 4 0
 Are they them great big tower things my kids use for gaming?the same things I need a sub station to run and have internal cooling fans the size of windmills,that keep me up all night with noise?
  • 5 1
 Get that berm wrong and you're Pond life!
  • 5 2
 Is it me or did i see rust colour around the bearings just above the non drive crank arm in the 4th pic?
  • 4 1
 I noticed that also,could be assembly lube??you'd hope so.
  • 1 0
 Would have thought it would be cleaned before it leaves the production line. Would be a shitter if the bearings rust that easy
  • 1 1
 One does have to wonder why their first modern suspension design in years has to be hampered by that paintjob...?

Probably going to put a dent into Santa Cruz's aluminum bronson/5010 sales due March/April?

Also, the irony that now a horst link bike is being touted as superior to a VPP bike??? But I'm sure it has nothing to do with the name on the downtubes... Smile
  • 4 1
 If anything was gonna cut into SC sales it'd be intense, not this hunk of junk.
  • 1 0
 Well obviously they arent going to win over any bike snobs! Smile

But I think a good number of people will just see the VPP and compare on cost and spec alone. And then compared to a "foundry" build on an intense, or a "RS Sektor " build aluminum bronson/5010 there will definitely be a fair number that grab a Diamondback with great suspension , drivetrain, abd brakes and then save up for a carbon framed Bronson. Etc...
  • 1 0
 Can't really get on with the color scheme. Don't mind the two-tone idea, but I would rather see the black up front paired with something like the gray on the front rim out back.
  • 8 5
 How can someone built a bike ugly like that one??? People study to do this? Uglyest bike ever seen
  • 1 1
 throw it in the Turner-section...and the colours don´t really do it any favour either
  • 2 0
 Diamondback makes solid bikes, I had a few missions, great bikes, but ......ummmmm, there are so many bike choices, I don't like it when the rear does not match the front
  • 1 0
 Omg what a bad color combo. Totally not something Gwin would ride. I gotta represent my team through my matching kit. Man I gotta scrub that sand outta my chamois. Love you guys
  • 2 0
 as a consumer, not much makes me happier than expired patents... wonder if anyone else will jump on VPP, or if they've been too busy crowding horst link.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer have you tried the newer missions and if so how does it compare? I'm stuck in between which to get... build on the mission pro is sick and I'm looking for a heavy duty trail bike... how might they be different??
  • 4 0
 Release of the Release..
  • 2 1
 Gash! Could have been a decent playful bike...but that weight! My 4yr old blur TRC is a similar style of bike and is 25lbs. I'd have that over a new 'budget' bike any day.
  • 2 0
 Transition's Scout 1 is about 1.5 lb lighter, but almost $1k more. The Transition also has less travel. Not too outrageous, but I get ya. Would have been good to see it come in at 30 lb or less.
  • 3 0
 Cool to see Diamondback come out with something new.
  • 1 0
 definitely like the pricing don't like the white suspension links, all black front and links with a red rear triangle and black rims would be better
  • 3 3
 Holy shit that is so ugly... looks like it's 10 years old already and the links and rear end were replaced with whatever was laying around when they couldn't find a matching set.
  • 1 0
 I had a 2006 Aluminum Nomad with a mismatched front rear (black / white). This thing looks almost the same. Just with a lower link that get's around the VPP patent.
  • 1 0
 Sorry Diamond Back, but 30+lbs for a 130mm bike with a paint job that would be right at home with Walmart bikes is not enticing in the least. Not even VPP can save you.
  • 1 0
 you don t wanna lose the front in that turn... haha otherway not really convinced by this color game with frame and rims .. weird
  • 1 0
 If you're going to design a frame with extra tire clearance and 148 spacing, you could be consistent and spec a fork to match.
  • 2 0
 Can't get enough of this colour scheme! Looks like it was assambled from two different bikes
  • 1 0
 Almost like a Nukeproof Mega TR. Short travel, burly and slack. More than enough for 95% of my riding. Just a shame it's so horrifically ugly!
  • 1 0
 I think it's beutiful. Known brand. Clever use of expired patent with a tweak. Simple, bold and yet pretty. Winner winner, chicken dinner!
  • 6 4
 The look of it is beyond terribad.
  • 2 1
 I really like the colour scheme. But I like things which are a bit quirky so maybe in just weird
  • 1 0
 Is there where bike companies are trying to sell bikes? Colour match the rear wheel to the rear triangle.
  • 4 5
 @typx- really? this looks like a ripper. I'm all on board to try one, this looks cracking!!! 40% sag? I routinely run half sag.........F*** the name Diamondback, this looks like game on.
  • 1 1
 Does Someone knows why SC VPP patent expired so soon?
It doesn´t makes sence to me so large and successfull company suddently doesn´t renews it´s patent?
  • 3 0
 I believe they bought the patent from Outland, who originally patented it in 1995 or 1996. I remember seeing it for the first time when I was in high school, wondering how the funk it worked. Everything was single pivot or horst link back then, except GT. I just coukdn't get my head around it.
  • 6 1
 Exactly.. Santa Cruz just as Specialized before them, didn't invent anything. They simply bought someone else's patented design. Santa Cruz when they started out were doing single-pivot monoshock bikes (remember the heckler, superlight, bullit and super-Cool . Specialized PAID Horst Leitner to design their first suspension bikes, both of which used horst-link dropout pivots so it was a no brainer for them to buy his patent when he decided to transition out of the bicycle world.
  • 2 1
 Dido.....far too many people seem to think frames designs are unique to only the companies who use them...Marin had a great design with the Quake series but, it wasn't their work..they were just paying to use it...I think Whyte actually owned the patent and the time...neither companies still offer something with that design now.
  • 1 0
 does any one know why Marin stoped with this design?
  • 3 0
 My Marin rep said it was cause they didn't want to deal with going after the patent...too time consuming, costly. .. I really liked the Quake. ..was sad to see it go. Even the little brother Wolf Ridge and Attack Trail was a money bike. ..
  • 1 0
 Thank you - Well, I think they missed a big chance.
I have an "old" Mount Vision and I also like it.
  • 7 1
 DB Release 3 vs SC Hightower VPP kinematic analysis.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=23SaezKikDw
  • 2 0
 cool link ... thanks
  • 5 3
 Different colour wheels... not for me
  • 5 2
 peugeot 308 Gti style...
  • 2 1
 I like the lack of decals. Or the fact that they are discreet. Looks clean.
  • 1 0
 They fell off with some of the paint exposing the primer!
  • 2 1
 Nice...But I prefer my rear rim to be Orange (like it is). After all it is the new black. Razz Wink
  • 1 1
 450 reach hardly modern....if thats so the geometry of my 2013 commencal must have been light years ahead of its time. guess mine has forward geometry too....
  • 1 0
 5mm longer reach than a 2016 size L bronson...? My 2010 Enduro is 457. So yea some bikes were for sure ahead of their time geo wise...
  • 3 2
 Looks cool, they just need to lower the weight, add a cage, and improve the aesthetic.
  • 2 0
 So basically go back to the drawing board lol
  • 3 1
 That paint + boost probably killed 98% sales, wth?
  • 5 2
 Intended use: fishing
  • 1 0
 haha
  • 2 0
 looks like a stolen bikes paint job
  • 1 0
 Minus the two different wheel colours.....does any body else think this looks like a session?
  • 2 0
 Nice job dimondback, you forgot the bottle cage
  • 2 0
 Not gonna hate on the color, its inovative.
  • 2 0
 If you squint really really really hard, it looks nice.
  • 1 0
 how did they get the look of this sooooo wrong?! (the red end.....piles? baboon rear end?)
  • 2 0
 130mm for 4k?
1998 called, they want their bike back.
  • 1 0
 Bike honestly wouldn't look half bad if it didn't have the such a cheap-looking two tone paintjob.
  • 2 0
 Looks like they have warranty chainstays already installed.
  • 2 0
 Polish links and rear triangle.
  • 1 0
 or which would you recommend? I live in tahoe so we have northstar and quite a few fun all mountain rides
  • 1 0
 It has something. I don't know if I love it or not.
  • 1 0
 Why in Australia do we not get these bikes? Come on DB!
  • 1 0
 I will buy one and ship it to you +50% usd. You pay shipping of course. Holla.
  • 2 1
 I like it but it has 30mm too little travel out butt.
  • 3 1
 That is indeed what she said.
  • 2 1
 Another enduro mcbike. Yay
  • 6 5
 OH MY WORD, that ghastly Home Depot paint job.
  • 5 4
 Home Depot called, they want back there shopping trolley!
  • 1 0
 Ya Russell, killing it! He can rip any damn bike.
  • 1 1
 Zzzzzz..... Yet another comprimise for chain growth, what a waste of time.
  • 3 2
 Looks a lot like that new Peugeot 208 GTi..?
  • 1 0
 very similar to a 2015 Mega AM
  • 2 3
 Why not a 150mm rear end? I'd buy the frame, scrape 1mm off each side and slap a 150mm on there. Just because I think Sram belongs in the chum bucket! Smile
  • 4 0
 Because 150mm rear hubs represent Backwards technology.
  • 1 0
 Wait, is that sarcasm or are you actually defending the production of something that is utter nonsense? Since we have a 135 and a widened 142, why not use the already out there 150? Not that I will ever buy a Sram product or anyone supporting them, but I am quite aggravated by this bafoonery and to a certain extent interested in its development and what the sheep's take on it is. Or as Johnny Bravo would say "I am sickened, but curious."
  • 3 0
 142 is the same as 135 other than the axles. Its not actually any different in terms of hubs/wheels because the hub shells are the same standard, its only the type of axle that changes... from an open dropout hollow-axle that's 10mm in diameter with a QR skewer to a closed dropout thru-axle that's 12mm in diameter. 150mm is built to the same hub standard but uses a thru-axle fit into an open dropout frame with a longer axle spacing. It really doesn't do anything better than 135 and in fact the lack of closed dropouts makes it worse than 142. 157 is the equivalent spacing to 142 for DH but again, its not better than it other than frame clearance, and in many ways its worse because in order to clear a front derailleur and multiple chainrings, you need to also run an 83mm BB shell width.

The only utter nonsense is the thinking of folks like yourself who don't seem to grasp the basic facts of the different axle/hub standards and seem to think that 148 is something only SRAM will be supporting. Shimano is already producing cranksets for the new chainline standard and hubs will be following.
  • 1 0
 I am running a 135x12 on my DJ bike right now. If someone were to make a 142 DJ frame, I could just put two cups on the hub and there I go, done. 135 and 142 have the same hub body.
On my DH bike, I run a 150mm spaced one and I do not run the faux 150mm Hope hubs, that are basically "longnecks", I am running a proper wider hub body, where you can actually have an advantage of a stronger wheel. I do not see the advantage of 148 over 150. In all fairness, if you can have a normal BB with 148, what is exactly the problem of having it with a 150? Is the math that hard?
  • 1 0
 It looks like it is pretty much trying to be a Nukeproof Mega TR.
  • 2 1
 WTF Diamondback thinking?
  • 1 0
 damn, looks good! Something new...
  • 1 0
 Sorry, no. It has odd wheels....
  • 1 0
 Diamondback has it listed as $4400 on their website?
  • 1 0
 Hmm, the diamondback I had as a kid looked nothing like this...
  • 1 0
 so they made a banshee spitfire..
  • 1 0
 Two separate color wheels for a stock build is blasphemous.
  • 1 0
 I like the industrial almost done at home paint job...
  • 1 0
 COPY OF INTENSE TRACER 275 ???
  • 2 0
 that cable routing…
  • 1 0
 Those are some ugly welds
  • 3 3
 Looks inspired by an old Nomad/Bronson.
  • 2 2
 No it looks like a Yeti SB66 minus the switch link. I see a close resemblance in the rear triangle.
  • 4 4
 Really digging the bike and frame design but that colours just not for me.
  • 1 1
 Galby with the testing location!! FTW!
  • 1 0
 there is a 28r now!
  • 1 1
 Blagh! Release it back from where ever it came from!
  • 1 1
 'I can't remember what year' called it wants its nomad back.
  • 1 1
 I just can't figure it out... Why only 130mm travel?
  • 1 0
 Looks like a nomad
  • 1 0
 this is soooo 2015
  • 1 0
 Looks like a frankenbike
  • 4 6
 looks kinda cheap and nasty - colour scheme doesnt help
  • 1 2
 Release 3 what
  • 1 3
 hell ya id buy that at walmart
  • 1 2
 April fools
  • 5 8
 DONT LIKE
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