DMR V12 Mg - Review

Dec 12, 2014
by Paul Aston  
DMR V12 Mg dmrbikes

Evolution of a classic. I'm sure we will see this great re-design as a rider's favorite for another 10 years.


It was 1996 when the DMR's original V pedal came out, initially based on an open mould design from Wellgo, but a few years later, the V12 as we know it was born, a modern, smoother shape, double concave, with replaceable pins and reliable bearings. A decision to open up tooling for this product was a make it or break it moment for the tiny company back then. I personally had a pair given to me by a peer after two years of abuse, and I went on to use those for nine more years on my BMX without service - they still spin smoothly to this day. DMR employee and pro rider Olly Wilkins said, "It was quite a big move really, changing the V12, I felt a bit scared about it. It was such an iconic product - it's not something that is that easy to change," but the new design has now hit the shelves, taking design influence from its new big brother, the huge DMR Vault, but not losing its legendary feel.

The new V12 Mg (magnesium) runs on fully sealed bearings and a cro-mo axle. All pins on the pedal are replaceable and tunable to your preferred grip. DMR say that they're 10% larger, 35% lower, and 20% lighter than previous incarnations. The pedal is now 16mm deep which is not the slimmest on the market but thinner isn't always better when it comes to pedals, it's all about shape. The V12 continues to offer a 9/16" wrench to keep the dirt-jumpers and BMXers happy, as well as a 6mm allen key on the back of the axle. The magnesium version comes in Diamond Black, Pure White, and Mag Grey colours whereas the standard V12's with the aluminum body have a few more colour options. If you still want the previous version, the cheaper V8 continues to use the same pedal body. Weight is 350g per pair, and the MSRP is $89.85 USD. DMR Bikes

DMR V12 Mg dmrbikes

The new V12 retains its classic concave profile that feels so snug with a flexible shoe, providing the same feeling as the old pedal with just a little extra.



Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesThe third evolution of this classic doesn't disappoint. Underfoot it retains that well-known feeling with a good concave, just a little bigger than the older version. Grip levels aren't too far from the more extreme Vault, with noticeably more clearance due to the smaller body and less pronounced pins on pedally stuff. I found the V12 offered enough grip for most riding situations, only wanting more on really chopped out sections of downhill track and braking bumps. At the dirt jumps with a more flexible skate shoe, my foot sat comfortably in the pedal, and was easy to re-adjust when needed. The bearings will no doubt last forever in true DMR style, and its refreshing not to see a price hike following the re-design. - Paul Aston


View additional and high-res images in the gallery



113 Comments

  • + 14
 These pedals are a breath of fresh air....PEDALS WITH CONCAVE!! Most pedals these days seem to be more focused on how thin they can be rather than how good they feel, flat pedals don't anchor the foot as well as concaved pedals which then meant you had to run super sticky shoes to make up for the flawed grip. I found these shoes don't offer any feel and you may as well be standing on a bit of wood....I like to feel everything when I ride, thin grips, no gloves and thin shoes. I love My V12s, they have the best feel of any pedal I've tried and are super grippy with my skate shoes. I highly recommend them.
  • + 19
 You like to feel everything.....soooo....you go in raw?
  • + 35
 Bite the pillow, Ali's coming in dry...
  • - 9
flag jibber420 (Dec 12, 2014 at 9:26) (Below Threshold)
 Breath of fresh air? These are an old design slightly modified would just as soon ride wellgos.
  • - 9
flag rickaybobbay (Dec 12, 2014 at 13:24) (Below Threshold)
 Canfield Crampons. they win, sure, they're 120 dollars, but they won't ever break, and they're super thin, super light, and concave as well my friend.
  • - 7
flag jibber420 (Dec 12, 2014 at 13:41) (Below Threshold)
 Yes canfields are great pedals but I'll take three pairs of dietys for the same price and I don't think your going to kill three pairs any time this decade
  • + 6
 Well going on that logic aren't all pedals just ripping off an old deign then... They're all just slightly modified platforms with an axle and bearings.
  • - 9
flag jibber420 (Dec 12, 2014 at 15:59) (Below Threshold)
 These are still very similar to o pedals from 10 years ago very slightly changed were a lot of new pedals are a quite a bit different. So if you used logic you would see that
  • - 6
flag jibber420 (Dec 12, 2014 at 16:24) (Below Threshold)
 If you look through the comments almost everyone talking down on DMR is getting neg propped must just be a bunch of Sally's who don't ride hard that love DMR for some reason. So if your a crappy rider or you get sponsored by DMR ride them but if you are someone who rides hard stay away from everything but their top end pedals.
  • + 3
 I'm with you bud, a good deep concave will feel And grip better than Any amount of super long pins
  • + 2
 Deity bearings are terabad
  • - 2
 Deity bearings have been hassle free for three seasons for me
  • + 4
 I must have a duff set because my bearings died after 3 rides.1 at chicksands and 2 at my local.love dmr pedals,always have but the caption above that says the bearings will last forever is bull$¥%t.thats why they sell so many replacement bearing kits then
  • - 1
 Watch out the DMR lovers well come and neg prop the hell out of you
  • + 1
 Don't get me wrong mr jibber i do like dmr pedals and have ridden them on most of my bikes through the years but they aren't all the made out to be,but they are cheaper than most and easy to maintain.im not a lover or a hater of dmr i just buy and run what i like.
  • + 1
 Diety compounds are twice as cheap and just as easy to maintain wit better pins and the plastic body glides off rocks with ease. Plus they're thinner and lighter
  • + 2
 I've read a lot of people on here saying they paid over a hundred for these pedals,I paid half of that for my pair.tbh I'm not fussed by the weight and weather they are thin or not I just require a comfy gripy pedal that's a good size.....and plastic I almost threw up when you said that haha
  • + 2
 I thought they would only be good on my dj when I got them but qfter riding them for a few I put them on my trail bike and dh bike couldn't be happier with them even on nasty rough trails and they have held up very well for three seasons. Best pedal I've ever had. Never heard anyone who's riden them have anything but good things to say about them only people that have not.
  • + 2
 Some people like dmr, you think they are mad. You have a boner for deity. The end.
(Does that sum up?.)
  • + 1
 I had a mate who run plastic pedals on his park/street bike and he ruined them pedals that's why I've never realy tthought of getting a pair.i understand people have a faith to a particular brand,I know I do I love fox racing products and used to be religious about running Rockshox forks,until I bought a set of 36's that is so I understand brand loyalty or whatever but honestly I just try and run the components I feel are right for me
  • - 1
 If DMR treated me decently I wouldn't talk down on there pedals tires and frame that all failed quickly on me, then to be offered a 10% off crash replacement price I wouldn't talk bad about them.
  • - 1
 The plastic body's hold up great by the way no issues with about 10 people who I know that have them, and mine have been going for 3 years
  • + 4
 If you were a fan of the old v-12 back in the day, but want more platform by present day standards, you will probably like these. Feel nice with 5:10s. Having said which, I bought the alloy ones so I didn't have a particular destroyed wallet to weigh up against it.
  • + 3
 I've got these on my Yeti 575 in the Mag version, so not really a BMX or DJ haha, but they have really been amazing. I've been riding them for quite a few months with some serious abuse and they've taken it really well. Not sure if this is an even newer incarnation of the V12, but they are pretty fat, especially when comparing them to my friends Vaults, and can clip easily on roots if your on a technical climb. But, if you don't wanna drop that much cash on a pedal, want something light, grippy, and tough, I would really suggest buying these.
  • - 19
flag jibber420 (Dec 11, 2014 at 22:17) (Below Threshold)
 Or you could buy two pairs of diety compound pedals and a six pack and have a Pedal that looks decent.
  • + 17
 A plastic pedal vs an iconic pedal known for lasting for extreme lengths of time without servicing...I bet one pair of these would last longer than 4 pairs of a polymer pedal.
  • - 19
flag mate1998 (Dec 11, 2014 at 23:25) (Below Threshold)
 You would probably loose your bet
  • + 6
 Funny you said that, I was running the Deity Compound prior to the DMR V12. Loved the looks and price of that pedal but when it came to grip from pedal design and the pins, I'd take the V12s any day of the week. (And note I rode both with five ten freerider vxi's and noticed a difference) I'm not slamming the compound though, fine pedal for the buck. But if your willing to put in a bit more cash for a better product go V12.
  • - 6
flag jibber420 (Dec 12, 2014 at 0:49) (Below Threshold)
 Been running compounds for three years on my dh bike trail bike and dj I kill pedals and all of mine are fine never had any problems with grip just enough to still be able to move around. Would rather support a good company like diety than DMR who offered me a 10% crash replacement price on their bike frame that came misaligned in the first place brand new. The compounds glide off rocks when you do strike and there super cheap to rebuild if you need to everyone I know loves their diety compounds. Plus the dmrs look like relics.
  • + 2
 Just get Kona Wah Wahs...mine have been on for five years, never a service. Still spin smooth. Never lost a pin.
  • + 0
 I can see there being a difference between the pedal design, but marixman how are the pins different? they all look the same to me.
  • + 1
 weird that people are comparing a 90$ pedal to a 45$ plastic pedal. the deity decoys are actually pretty comparable in price, id like to see how people think the dmr v12 compares to that pedal, or any other pedal in its price range.
  • + 4
 Price shouldn't determine how good a pedal is, or anything for that matter. I went through 2 sets of crankbrother pedals in a year and they were $80 a pair. I have been on the same deity compound pedals for almost 2 years now and they were $40. I think people are getting mad cuz they dont wana believe that a set of pedals for half the price are probably just as good or at least close to the quality of higher end pedals. dont knock em' till you try em'.
  • + 3
 I own the deity composites and they have been faultless for this season.
  • + 1
 The deity compound pedals are one of the best platform pedals in the industry. They are cheap only because they are cheap to produce and deity is an honest and passionate company. They are far more durable than alloy pedals, offer just as much grip with pins, super thin, have a convex platform instead of idiotic anti-ergonomic concave. Just because you are used to a concave platform doesn't mean it is good or healthy or right. Everything we get used to feels right. Humans adapt to what they use, even if it is bad and wrong. Your foot placement is all wrong when you use a concave pedal because the ball of your foot wants to sit on the middle of the pedal where it is deepest. Convex makes it so that you place the ball of your foot in front of the axle, with your arch resting on the highest point on the platform directly above the axle. That is proper pedaling position. It is bad for your body to drive through the ball of your foot. I would never ride concave pedals again after using convex ones.
  • + 3
 Also, I use Canfield crampon ultimates and they cost me 180, I'm not cheap with components. I really appreciate the high end. But my brother uses deity compounds and we swap bikes at the mountain every few runs. The Canfield pedals are thinner and have much sicker bling, but really the deity pedals are so damn good that it is hard to justify buying any other pedal. I'd still buy a pair of crampons if I could turn back time, but I'll probably buy deity for all my other bikes.
  • + 0
 @ md ripper the pins on diety compounds and most new pedals have the bolt or screw heads on the backside instead of where they well hit something which makes replacing them much easier.
  • + 1
 @ banjberra, thats an interesting perspective. I found the convex shape of the Compounds kinda strange and I sold them pretty quick but I never considered that it could be really good once I got used to it. If Diety made a concave version, I'd give that a go.
  • + 1
 Can somebody explain the whole 9/16" vs 6mm thing? I've had both, used both, on DJs, DHs, & trail bikes, & I've never had a pedal come loose. I even saw in the gear bazooka video where he was complaining about those pedals without 9/16" loosening on him, but still don't see WHY. Maybe it's cause I'm crap at DJ & don't push the equipment hard enough? anyway, genuinely curious.
  • + 1
 It is far easier to summon the gods of torque using the common crescent wrench than a clumsy folding allen wrench tool with 2"-3" of handle. Most people don't own a basic set of allen keys with long arms even though it only costs $10-$15 for a good set and it will last your entire life.
  • + 5
 I love Allen key pedals. If anything happens on a trail ride or if I'm out riding without any tools I am a lot more like to have an Allen that a crescent wrench..
  • + 2
 Allen key all the way. Crescent wrench pedals never fit a damn crescent wrench. Never had an issue tightening my pedals with my multitool either.
  • + 1
 I personally agree, & thought wrench flats were going the way of the dodo, until I saw this & the gear bazooka review. I've got one of those 6mm pedal wrenches from Pedro's, strong steel with a big grip on it, so maybe that's why I've never had a problem.
  • + 2
 @thinkbike you really shouldn't have to put your pedals on super tight. 99% of road bike pedals use either a 6mm or 8mm Allen key on the back to tighten them. Imagine the amount of power that pro road cyclists put out, and try to think like a pedal manufacturer. Would you want something unreliable being the method my which your pedal is attached to the bike?
  • + 1
 I am imaging Matt Macduff at the work bench with his sewing machine oil and allen wrenches...
  • + 1
 typical pedal axle -> crank arm torque is 30nm for FSA and SRAM cranks, around 35nm for Shimano cranks and 40nm for Campag cranks
  • + 4
 It's nice to have the big wrench to get over tightened pedals off but it's easy to over tighten them as well would way rather have a 6mm Allen key and not go crazy tightening them down. The big wrench is for the meat fisted goon.
  • + 1
 I will agree with that: throwing a bunch of muscle, at trying to pull super tight pedals off of friends bikes, is probably the most common way I've hurt myself working on bikes.
  • + 1
 It's just as easy to get ample leverage on an Allen wrench to get off stubborn pedals. If not, you can always put the bike on the ground and stand on the wrench.
  • + 0
 Yes just as easy to get the same leverage with something that's about 6 inches longer than an Allen wrench not like it can't be done though.
  • + 2
 A pedal wrench isn't much longer than a Park Tool Allen wrench. Plus a breaker bar is easy enough to slip over one if you need.
  • + 2
 My pedal wrench is massive and it has a handle bar grip but you can get any pedal off with an Allen wrench just a little easier with the big grip. But I never use one if I can use a 6mm
  • + 4
 Heck yeah! This is why I have always loved DMR. Excellent products without breaking the bank.
  • + 1
 Best pedals I have ever had. Offer so much grip and a good price. Plastic pedals will never compare. Only downside had these for 2 months now, the paint has already started to wear off.
  • + 0
 Totally agree, got seduced by the nukeproof plastics, feel like I'm stood on them instead of in them, and a couple of stacks and one of the corners is basically missing. But really it's a grip issue, the dmr double concave just works.
  • - 3
 Plastic pedals have been better than every other pedal I've owned bought the diety compounds for my dj bike originally and they were so good I got them for my trail and dh bike. So yes they do compare and in my opinion there way better light weight glide off rocks when you do pedal strike and when their still going strong after three years I'm a believer.
  • + 10
 Learn the difference between "their" "they're" and "there" please... You are a native speaker...
  • - 8
flag jibber420 (Dec 12, 2014 at 13:26) (Below Threshold)
 When all else fails jut point out errors in spelling I'm no editor so I don't give a crap
  • + 0
 Does anyone else find Mag a useless material for pedals die to them being destroyed in UK weather!?

My aniverssary DMR ones corroded to nothing in next to no time on route iirc bk from trails.

Still rockin the V12s mind just in alloy rather than Mg.

For folk who are bending pins etc try better technique of rotating cranks at correct timing.

Had a wee look at those Deity compound ones but they didn't look quite upto the job.

I've also tried £5 plastic pedals on my old SS steel ht that were great cause they weighed naff all!
  • + 1
 I've had nothing but trouble with Magnesium pedals - old style DMR V-12 Mag, Syncros Mental Mag and Wellgo MG-1.

Either from rock strikes taking a pedal pin out and ripping the thread out of the body, rendering that contact point useless

or in the longer term, the softer magnesium alloy allowing the harder steel bearing or inboard bushing to "flog out" the insert socket, allowing loose movement and clicking / creaking

Quickly destroyed 2 pairs of V-12 mag on my BMX doing repeated jump box tricks, and 3 pairs of MG-1 on the MTB from doing freeride and dirt jumping. worked in bike shops so got these on deals.

In contrast, DMR V-8 and V-12 were solid, Syncros Mental alloy were solid, Specialized Bennies have been solid and all of the aluminium alloy BMX pedals I've had have been bomber solid- just slightly heavier than the magnesium version. I would only buy aluminium alloy pedals now
  • - 1
 @ Titan I didn't think the dietys were up to the job at first either but after ridding them on my dj for a while put them on my trail bike and thy are the best pedals ever don't knock me till you try them
  • + 1
 how does mag get destroyed in UK weather? Other than rock strikes
  • + 1
 yep, knackered some £185 nukeproof neutron mag-ti pedals on my their very first outing at Glen Coe, but that was rock strike tearing four pins out rather than weather, managed to glue some pins back in and they are fine on my smaller bike, definitely wouldn't use mag again for DH
  • + 2
 @BryceBorlick Magnesium is quite a reactive metal, so it can easily corrode when in is subjected to lots of water/mud (unless it's been treated or something?)
  • + 1
 I had the old v8s. Loved them. Now running vaults as I like the wide and thin platform. They are super grippy too. Not that I am discounting any other brand, haven't bothered to try any others as I'm happy with my dmr's.
  • + 3
 I'm excited to see what negatives people will come up with for these!
  • + 47
 My friends uncles girlfriends dad bought these and they lasted 4 rides before catching fire and exploding. The burning metal attracted the bears and they ate his arm. 1/10 do not buy.
@karaknic, this do?
:end sarc.
  • + 5
 LoL. In all seriousness though, I've had the Alu version of these for a few weeks. Only negative so far is that pins were falling out left, right, and centre, until I loctited them all. Now they stay in even when they take a hit. Solid pedal with a large and grippy platform. I am a happy customer.
  • + 1
 Yep, I learned mountain biking on a set of V8s, which lasted a good 11 UK winters. They, along with some V12s I got later, are still going strong on some other bikes. I'm sure these will be just as good!
  • - 1
 Yeah the pins in the DMR pedals are the type that suck to gt out when they get bent or shaved off well the diety compounds have easy to replace pins and if you need more grip maybe you should learn some technique.
  • + 3
 Jibber, you work for deity? If you do you are doing a terrible job at viral marketing.
  • - 2
 No just love dietys product and all my experience with DMR has been terrible. When a company offers you 10% off for a crash replacement price like DMR did it's a joke. However diety has been awesome to deal with and I love all the products I have from them and everyone I've met that runs the compounds loves them. So go ahead and buy your old ugly styled DMR pedals jut know there's way better options out there.
  • + 2
 used to have some DMR pedals on my BMX, never had to worry about those things breaking!
  • + 2
 I have a pair of these, and they surprisingly grip more than alot of other pedals out there, great pedals, would recommend
  • + 3
 Whats wrong with Wellgo?
  • + 1
 wellgo are utter garbage. The spikes are basically robinson drill bit heads and start to wear and have zero grip soon after buying them. NRG tasters choice are the same basic thing but with replaceable pins that work a lot better.
  • + 0
 Vaults are amazing and if these are similar I figure they're pretty good, but I'm not sure I want to go to a peddle with less grip than my Vaults
  • + 14
 Just keep riding your vault's then...
  • + 1
 Just got these in the mail yesterday...I guess I made a solid choice. Haven't even put them on the sled yet.
  • + 2
 they still make thick pedals?
  • + 0
 I don't see this as an competition to my Syntace NumberNine Titan...Sorry Mr. Paul Aston...
  • + 1
 "No, my pedals are better"
-every pb fanboy

stfu and ride your bikes!
  • + 1
 Chromag pedals always seem to outdo everything else...
  • + 9
 For twice the price... Figures
  • + 5
 that is the one major downside of them, and DMR makes some sick pedals!
  • + 3
 ..... Chromag scarab and contact pedals are both being sold at 100$-110$....
  • + 0
 not up here they aren't...
  • + 1
 Yeah Chromag contacts are 100 and scarabs are 109 soo not twice the price.
  • + 0
 Ok my bad they're 120 CAD still not double
  • + 1
 My lbs has them for $160...
  • + 2
 Don't buy them from that lbs.. Sorry but there are such good deals online its not worth it. And here
www.bikebling.com/SearchResults.asp?Search=Chromag+pedals
  • + 1
 Nice to see a company peddling good parts at a decent price
  • + 1
 CLIP IN!!!!!!
  • - 3
 Just when I thought these pedals were perfect, they come with an IMPERIAL measurement for the wrench. You almost had me DMR... ALMOST. IT's not metric!
  • + 1
 Every pedal with wrench flats is either 9/16" or 1/2". They almost never measure in millimeters. Notice how steer tubes are still measured in inches? 1 1/8", 1.5", etc. Some things are SAE, and some are metric. It doesn't make a huge difference as long as you have the right tool for the job.
  • + 4
 I was merely making fun of something completely irrelevant to JUST make fun of it, I wasn't being serious. Neg propped to death though, you turds are no fun.
  • - 3
 Two worst company's I've ever self with the other being azonic
  • - 2
 DMR and azonic should join forces to become the worst mtb company ever
  • - 2
 better pedal exist for a lower price, that's all I see
  • - 7
flag jibber420 (Dec 12, 2014 at 9:31) (Below Threshold)
 Think we have a bunch of DMR lovers here they don't respond to logic.
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