This $220 DNR Designs Tool Will Help You Align Your Handlebars

Nov 6, 2020
by Ed Spratt  


DNR Designs have released a new tool that takes away the guesswork from achieving a perfect handlebar alignment.

The 'Keep it True' tool clamps onto your bars using bands at either side of the stem clamp, and the tool then runs down to your fork stanchions. You simply need to adjust the bars until the two prongs at the bottom fo the tool touch the stanchions evenly. Although not a necessary tool for home mechanics it does look to massively simplify the process of getting a good alignment between the bars and front wheel.



The DNR Designs Keep it True tool is available now for $220. You can find out more here.


260 Comments

  • 219 2
 This tool, at $220, belongs in that Mopar Jeep.
  • 85 2
 Is it April already?
  • 32 3
 Belongs in every bike shop.
  • 4 2
 So using a scrap 2X "tool" isn't cool enough anymore?
  • 3 1
 @makripper: Beat me to it...
  • 1 1
 @makripper: beat me to it
  • 6 0
 Sad thing is people will actually buy this.
  • 83 0
 I like my bars 1 mm off and $220 in my pocket.
  • 2 0
 @ReeferSouthrland: That's just blasphemy
  • 2 0
 @jrocksdh: at least in everybody´s saddle bag! Big Grin
  • 3 0
 @ReeferSouthrland: I'd settle for 2mm even
  • 12 0
 @ReeferSouthrland: Me too. I compensate by rotating the saddle 1 mm the opposite direction.
  • 73 3
 We need someone to run the numbers of how long this would take to pay for its self in a bike shop environment. Like how long does it take to align bars with and without the tool vs wage of said bar aligner.
  • 127 1
 approximately 300 years.
  • 105 1
 Those metric or imperial years?
  • 10 0
 @RobKong: at 5 bucks an hour it may take longer
  • 76 3
 (I work as a tech in a shop so I'm gonna try my best to figure this out because I had the same thought when I saw this thing) Alrighty, lets generously say that it takes 2 minutes to align fussy handlebars. If the cost per labor hour is 90 bucks in said bike shop, that would mean that it costs the customer about 3 dollars (hypothetically, I don't know any bike shop that charges someone to straighten out their bars) to align the handlebars without the tool and you still have 220 dollars in the bank. If this tool takes 20 seconds to align bars that means the labor cost would be 30 cents. That means you would have to straighten 733 handlebars to break even on the cost of this tool. If we're just counting service bikes, higher traffic shops might see this many bikes come through the shop in a few months but others it could be up to a year. To conclude, that's a lot of cheese for such a tiny job. Thanks for coming to my ted talk.

TL;DR - You would have to see up to a years worth of bikes come through the shop to break even on this tool.
  • 12 1
 @NorCalNomad: Yeti shop? Not that long...
  • 105 6
 You guys have never gone through a sales seminar. If you want to justify the price of a tool, you must justify the price to your clients by offering it as a simple upcharge with 100% straight guarantee.

Not a single eyeball out there can guarantee a straight pair of bars. But the tool can. Simply look your client in the eye and say "We set the bars as best we could with our untrained eyes. We have a new tool, but there's a $10 service fee to 100% guarantee they are indeed straight no matter what you think your eyes or grip or balance are trying to tell you. If you'd like. We can set the bars with it first tune up at $5 for you. I'd feel better if we did. So you want me to do it?"

Some guy just handed you between $50 - $150 bucks to install a headset or cut a steerer tube. Is he going to tell you "NO...I'll take the eyeball alignment" Plenty of guys will hand you $5.00. 40 bikes and you profit.

Most importantly, you've just added a level of accuracy to the service department that people didn't know they needed, they now trust you more & they're going to send their friends to you. If you "work" for a shop and are talking down about the tool, you need to go to your shop owner, discuss your compensation scale and ask for training to get you to a better mindset so you can help customers and your shop stay in business.

This isn't available from YT or Canyon right?
  • 5 0
 @strikeeagle17: How do you know if they are truly straight though?
  • 9 3
 @strikeeagle17: My two cents.

Part 1 - Issue. Looking at the production model on their website (has a threaded bar clamp mechanism)...... an experienced bike technician would have the bars straight and torqued to spec in the time it takes to put this contraption on and take it off. Setup and removal time may out-weight the benefit of the tool in a professional environment.

Where this tool may be useful is in new bike assembly as each bike would need the headset preload checked and bar/stem setup?

Analysis. At a $90/hr shop rate you're looking at $1.50/min. To answer the question, if this tool somehow saved 30 seconds per bike it would take 293 bikes to recoup the $220 initial cost.

Side note... Why would they make an advertising video using a prototype bar clamp which varies from the production model? I get the fun in a father son business, but if you're going to ask a premium price, at least try to have a somewhat professional appearance.
  • 4 2
 @blowmyfuse: I see you. Just wrote a comment from the cost saving aspect. Cheers to the value proposition.

However, if the technician isn't able to align the bars by eye, that would be a concern for me as a customer and/or shop owner.

I'd see it more so as a tool to differentiate the shop from another. We have this tool and the other shop doesn't.
  • 3 0
 @blowmyfuse: save the pitch and just increase price moving fwd
  • 7 3
 @sendit4: You know a mechanic whose eyes can measure a bar and fork to a perfect 90 degree angle? Stake a paycheck on it? Beer
  • 30 3
 Wow its laughable the number of people who don't know how to align your bars... tighten the star nut correctly and leav the stem bolts loose, then use one eye and make sure the tyre is centred with the stem then move back or forwards until the back of the bars has a tiny gap of light between it and the fork crown.... tap the grips with a tool until the gap of light is exactly the same each side, while making sure your eye is centres with the stem and tyre... hey presto, done!
  • 8 0
 @blowmyfuse: Upsell straight bars that any competent mechanic should do regardless? Sounds like it should be packaged in a discount tune with $120 chain lube for the muffler bearings.
  • 1 1
 @strikeeagle17: if you have that sort of business sense, why are you working as a tech at a bike shop?
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: damn son.
  • 7 0
 As if mounting bars straight way such a hassle.
And still, 220$ is massively overpriced for this thing. It's just some anodised aluminium plate and a few blocks that wrap around the handlebar.
Do these "techs" also need an alignment tool for the saddle? Do they run a feeler gauge between the tool and the forks for perfect alignment?
  • 9 0
 @ctd07: Yup. And I do the left eye/right eye blinking method with a set perspective between top tube and down tube. It’s damn near 100% accurate if u have ur technique down. And takes all of 20 seconds...
  • 6 0
 @blowmyfuse: when you put it like this I’m now thinking of coming just to get my bars straightened. So I can be certain they’re straight.

While I’m there getting the job done I’ll probably pick up a few things too.
  • 7 0
 @ctd07: This is the tool to tap your grips with!
  • 6 0
 @blowmyfuse: if you have a mechanic that consistently sets bars at 90 degrees to the forks I'd say you probably need a different mechanic
  • 8 0
 @blowmyfuse: is your day job selling ice to alaskans?
  • 2 0
 @NorCalNomad: Pluto years...
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: I believe in you
  • 2 0
 @PB-J: haha
  • 3 0
 @DirtbagMatt: the hilarious fail is that this tool doesnt align the bars for you, you still have to gauge the gap from the stanchions each side by eye, so will take even longer to do as you also have to fit the tool in the first place
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: perfectly stated - you have just articulated one of the reasons local shops struggle.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: Thank you, that made me chuckle. Also, would you mind straightening my bars..? I’d be happy to pay!
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: first rule in sales! Never sell on price!!!!
  • 1 0
 @strikeeagle17:
Equation could be improved to take into account the average amount of time it takes without this tool.
  • 2 0
 @pbmo: let's see... dig the tool out of whatever drawer its kept in, hook it to the bars, spend a few seconds aligning bars, tighten, remove tool from bars, put tool back in drawer.

or... spend a few seconds aligning bars, tighten.

I think we have a clear winner.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I would tell them to f*ck off, it's a requirement to get my bars straight when you worked on my bike, don't care how you do it, get done with it. If you want to buy a tool to save your employees time and frustration and make their life easier with all the positives for your bussiness I ain't paying for it. also eyeballing worked fine so far
  • 1 0
 @RobKong:
That was my point, that he is dividing the cost of the tool by the labor to use the tool, but not take into account the time to do it without the tool.

E.g.
With hypothetical number here...
With tool: 60s
Without tool: 90s

ROI needs to then be calculated in 30s intervals, not 60s. To reach the ROI will take a whole lot longer than just dividing the time it take to align the bars with the tool by the gross profit from the labor (cannot use the labor rate directly either). Just saying that the ROI analysis take into account too few factors.
  • 5 0
 @pbmo: Hypothetically using *competent* professional mechanic it's:

Without tool: 15s
With tool: 60s (fetch tool, install)

There is no ROI if you factor in time.
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: smooth elaboration, you rotten bastard. Big Grin I tip my hat to you!
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: This tool only works if:
Your bars either have no backsweep, or are perfectly centered in the stem and the tool is perfectly centered around the stem. Does it guarantee a straighter bar that most people can provide by eye? Probably. Is it perfect? No. There's too much variability in clamping, placement, and how previous parts of the bike are set up.

Personally I'll take my chances lining up my bars by eye, but you make a good argument.
  • 2 0
 @tacoma73: Yeah, my point was that people don't really understand the reason bike shops fail. If they can't provide truly top notch service to their clients and provide a better value proposition to their customer as the mechanic on duty....slide your butt to the back corner stand and don't talk to the customers."

Let the shop manager or owner work with the customer and build value for the service and go fondle a micrometer while the people who comprehend the value proposition take care of the customer.
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: best advice!! You got my 5$.
  • 2 0
 @DirtbagMatt: It's nice to hear that other people have come up with the same techniques as myself when it comes to setting up a bike. No longer will I feel like an idiot when I'm alone in my garage straddling the top tube winking at the stem like I'm trying to seduce my bike.
  • 1 0
 @ridesmoothbro: line it up with your eye to see if it's straight
  • 1 0
 @drjonnywonderboy: can you prove it's straight though? Dead Horse
  • 44 0
 I actually prefer my handlebars to be just off just a tad.
  • 5 0
 I'll use it to help me straight-line down all the jank!!
  • 9 0
 My left arm is just slightly longer so I need a slight bend to the right
  • 29 1
 @adrennan: .....now I understand why so many guys run their saddle a little to one side...
  • 6 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: maybe get that checked out by a doctor
  • 1 0
 For those ultimate whips. I smell what you're steppin' in
  • 8 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: makes sense, the left one always sits lower
  • 4 0
 i like to install an angle headset sideways to achieve this
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: The green jacket is yours, shooter's gonna choke.
  • 28 0
 Give me ten minutes inside a Home Depot near all the L brackets and I'll produce a 96% shitty replica that gets you 80% close to perfectly aligned.
  • 18 0
 ...100% of the time
  • 8 0
 60% of the time, it works every time.
  • 27 0
 It needs a lazer beam. And a $15 pricetag.
  • 2 0
 You can have the laser beam with the Tune Spurtreu, but not the pricetag.
  • 1 0
 And some ball bearings to boot
  • 21 0
 I made a 3d printed gizmo that holds a line-beam laser pointer that does a better job for $20... $200 is just thievery
  • 8 0
 Bingo. Mass produce it.
  • 5 1
 Post to thingaverse please.
  • 6 0
 just had a look. laser, way cooler!
  • 4 0
 Even cooler you can 3d print and build your own version of the spurtrue!
I give you the Tark Pool SAG-1
i.imgur.com/oT5lbnj.jpg
  • 15 0
 Wait, what month is it...
  • 15 0
 Maybe $20 I would consider it
  • 13 0
 Why so cheap, surely worth twice that price???

Is it made in canada or US?
  • 7 1
 I’ll pay more no problem if a product is made in us or Canada but could not find that info in article or company website. They do have a little USA desk flag perched on it, those are almost universally China made though, so where is this product made? I pay way more for my us made flags for my flagpole than the China made us flags cost and same goes for other stuff.
Currently using my eyeballs for bar alignment as they are us made.
  • 1 0
 These tools are fabricated and assembled in the USA @delamar:
  • 1 0
 @srespass: honestly, that does justify the price to a large extent, thank you
  • 15 1
 No thanks I have two good eyes.
  • 8 0
 I have one good eye and still don't have a problem putting my bars straight.
  • 4 0
 @RonSauce: straightening bars is one situation where monocular vision is superior.
  • 12 0
 Why can't bike companies make a mark on on the front end components a standard?
  • 1 0
 both stanchions and steerers move (twist)
  • 11 0
 Once I get that torque wrench for my dust caps, I’m getting three of these suckers!!
  • 10 0
 Apparently my handlebars have been at 45* from my center of steer. Thanks DNR!
  • 11 0
 I'm sorry, $220?
  • 10 1
 We can all hope it was a typo and it's truly $2.20 as that's about what it looks like.
  • 2 0
 @maz-mtb: $22 seems about right
  • 6 0
 I think bar alignment is actually something fork manufacturers and stem manufacturers should address and solve once for all. Fork manufacturers have it easy, all it takes is a vertical strip on the rear of the steer tube. They just need to assure that it doesn't wear off. Once fork manufacturers do this, stem manufacturers can take advantage of it by providing an alignment mark or feature. I can imagine a future where you are bummed because a certain stem doesn't have an alignment feature - how the hell are you going to align the bars, by eye???
  • 9 0
 what's with Napoleon Dynamite
  • 2 1
 It was a good video regardless of the product.
  • 6 0
 As an ocdAF person on bike stuff like this, I'm all for it. A forty-five minute stem aligning session isn't unusual for me. I'm sure a knock-off version could be made cheaper!
  • 10 0
 Holy shit dood, how long does it take you to align calipers? Take a few months to build a wheel?
  • 1 0
 @Eatsdirt: The problems are with stems and drop bar levers mostly, other stuff does not seem to worry me as much. I give myself 1mm each way.
  • 6 2
 You need to get out more, although if you're spending this long aligning your bars I can see why you don't.
  • 3 0
 just take off your wheel and push the bike against a wall with the stem loose.
  • 1 0
 For me it's 3-5 minutes eyeballing, then I get on it and realize it's a mm off. so i barely loosen and tap what I hope is a mm the other way but it's usually 2mm, etc. Drives me nuts. I'd be putting it on the Christmas list right now, but that's just too much $.
  • 6 0
 Thanks for putting your brain cells to creating this. I will now 3d print and plasma cut some aluminum and call it a day. Probably $20 in materials and 2 hours tops.
  • 6 2
 Tools like this are what make bike mechanics look like hacks. Seriously,
has the trade never seen what precision tools cost? Whats next, Allen sets that cost 2x more, $30 adjustable wrenches, $15 dollar screwdrivers? Come on.

If you can't put my bars on straight DO NOT touch my bike.
  • 1 0
 Funny thing about that...Many professional mechanics have spent $50 or more on their adjustable wrenches (knipex or other brand plier wrenches). Also, a good JIS screwdriver is likely to cost around $15. I cannot tell what if any of your comment was sarcasm...you basically gave examples for what professional tools do cost...but I agree, this particular tool just takes up space that a more practical tool could occupy. And all the professional mechanics I know gets bars straight efficiently without any gadgets. To me, this thing doesnt fall into the tool category. It is more of a 'as seen on PBTV' gadget.
  • 3 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: the park tool 30 dollar adjustable wrench is not on par with knipex. Baundhaus allens will last forever and cost a third of what park cost, and half what Pedro's cost. 90% of bike tools are just for show, like titanium hammers. If you think a bike requires a $15 screwdriver... well have at it.

I've been a trade mechanic for over 15 years, im well aware of what tools cost, and im well aware of what an overpriced tool is.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: I think you missed my point. I wasnt comparing park to knipex. Quite the opposite actually.
I was saying that quality tools are expensive, they are worth it, and they must be evaluated for their purpose and quality independent of the brand stamped on them. Most tool brands source their tools from different manufacturers. Park tool is overwhelming garbage. Pedro's is not far behind. Quality tools are usually german or Japanese these days. And they do cost a lot. Abby is for show, I think their designs are terrible. I pick my tools by their quality and function alone. There is a wide range of brands in my collection. Also, I have been a craftsman of many trades, and a bicycle and ski mechanic for 17 years. Try not to jump to conclusions about what you know about me or my tool preferences...we probably see things more similarly than you realize. As for expensive screwdrivers, there are far more variables to consider than most people realize. What you plan to use it for, whether you need high quality for that or not, multifunctional reasons. Many tool decisions come down to how often it will be used, what you require of it when it's used, and how often you want to replace them. Quality tools pay off in the end if they are used enough and used in an appropriate manner.
  • 7 0
 Buys one...realizes only has a downhill bike
  • 3 1
 For those $220,you could buy a used BMX or even a nice 26" mtb.
  • 5 0
 Align the handlebars like this, it's free:
bikemag.com/videos/bike-hack-get-straight-go-forward
  • 3 0
 I rode my bike for weeks with slightly off alignment. happened in a small crash. then one day I was looking at my cockpit and suddenly realised it was askew!! and NO my strava times were not affected..
  • 2 0
 I work as a mechanic and I honestly don't have a problem eyeballing the handlebars. I think it's really cool that someone finally made a tool for this, though. Hat's off to you. But it does look like more work to use this tool than to just look down the bar, fork, and wheel. Oh, and if your mechanic can't reliably straighten your bars for little to no charge, you need a new mechanic.
  • 6 2
 So, that's kind of the orthodontics of bikes. DNR, you understand your addressable market well!
  • 1 0
 Quality statement!
  • 5 1
 Hmmm looks quite patriotic, maybe it could be used to re-align the US political issues ????
  • 6 1
 I can see the slogan now. Make American bars straight again. Although it could lead to problems when misconstrued.
  • 1 0
 @commental: What is wrong with our FABulous gay bars?
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: Comment of the year
  • 5 0
 Why didn't I think of that? Oh yeah, because I don't need it. That's it.
  • 4 0
 Another solution to a problem that doesn't exist.Should have stuck a bottle opener on it aswell,kind of a multi tool.
  • 1 0
 really? ok, im fussy about it being straight but I bet using this tool, mine would not be far off if at all, 1-2mm aint gonna make me a WC rider! oh and lets not get too fussy and even dare assume "what if my tool is bent lol. rubbish expensive tool, that could be made cheaper or a diff way by yourselfs to get a fair accuracy I think, maybe its for dentists?
  • 1 0
 what are the actual handlebar manufacturing tolerances? yes this tool will aim to align the stem but not the handlebar outer tips. since this tool aligns so far inbound from the tips I would expect a fair amount of error could be introduced by either the tool tolerance or the bar thickness tolerance or even the handlebar symmetry or combination of all. also how would anyone detect 'perfect alignment' unless they witness the fitting in person?
  • 1 0
 I'm a junior part time tech at a small independent shop. We have the following:

- A wide scope of customer ranging from zero bike repair knowledge and little money to knowing a lot with a lot of money. And all the combos in between. The mere existence of this tool might have one of our customers demanding we have it and use it.
- A wide variety of tools. Some we still don't have and should, because we already have necessary tools that people in the comments section would expect a shop to have but only get used a couple of times a year.

Does this tool have a place and purpose? Sure. Does it for you? Maybe, maybe not. You can quit ragging on people's eyesight problems or lack of ability or a shop's ability to assess things for themselves. Having options in the world is a good thing (tools, cars, investments, cancer treatments, food), and things that don't work well will sort themselves out (tools, cars, investments, cancer treatments, food).

Post up your diy tools for assessment please.
  • 1 0
 What if my bar is straight and it is actually my stanchions that are crooked...how much is the tool to check that? As well do you have a model that will work with my lefty...A well I will wait for the bluetooth model that can send a signal to my garmin so I know it is always straight. Plus I am with custard country, no laser no deal.
  • 1 0
 Wow, DNR apparently is just a bunch of money-grabbing douchebags. $220 for this? Come on, now. It's a few bucks in materials and some basic R&D (it's some clamps and a freaking slider, you could mock this up with cardboard) for a tool that makes life easier, but is absolutely superfluous. I'd consider it at $50-60, but this is just laughable.

I'll just wait for the Amazon-special rip-offs that make the same tool for $15. Maybe then they'll come down to something more reasonable, thereafter.
  • 1 0
 Given that I've never known of any shop to charge extra to align the bars, how long it'll take to pay off this tool depends on what the local labor wage paid to the actual staff of the shop is. If you're mechanic is being paid $15/hr, and this tool saves 2 minutes off the time he/she would spend aligning the bars without the tool.. then its going to pay itself off after 440 bar alignments. Longer if you have to account for exchange rates, taxes, import/shipping fees, etc. I checked their website and shipping to where I am is listed as $55 extra. So that's another 110 alignments needed. Are the website prices in US Dollars ? Then that's adding a third more to the calculations for me.
  • 1 0
 its cool that some one was thinking of this... but they need to be realistic on pricing .. although im sure its aimed at the shop that works on multiple bikes ... i can see this getting a chinese rip off clone on wish for 12 bucks in a few months
  • 1 0
 hold on. you fix it to your bars which are potentially tapered / rolled and theres no way of knowing if its in the middle of the bars?

so it could be to one side and then its out of this fantastical alignment that you cant get without the tool?

I like tools but this is rubbish.
  • 1 0
 If the guy straddled over his bike the right way, aligning the handlebars on the stem isn't all that difficult. It'll save you $220USD for a few days of meals or even buy you and your friends quite a few beers! Now, if someone can come up with a device that can center the handlebars on the stem... (no, those markings don't work when the stem's bolt plates don't have a hole and even if the bolt plate does have an opening, the handlebar still gets misaligned).
  • 1 0
 Hands up all those who have ridden with their bars out of alignment? Would you carry this with you on the trails incase you had a crash and had to re-align the bars before you could ride again? A gnats here and there doesn't matter to me perhaps I'm crap.
  • 1 0
 Great concept and execution. Congratulations and my thanks to the creator for bringing this to market. Despite the many very complimentary comments and helpful suggestions for alternative methods of achieving similar results in aligning and having the hub and handlebar axes be parallel there is also a great deal of cynicism and misunderstanding of the basic manufacturing costs associated with producing such an item within the United States and more generally even. This is no doubt a misperception arising from falsely equating this particular niche product with items available from popular bicycle tool manufacturers employing mass production techniques and a false sense of pricing awareness disregarding economies of scale. Factoring in the costs associated with: design equipment and software, prototyping, testing, appropriate materials, anodizing to protect and demarcate, computer numerical control machining to provide the accuracy and repeatability this gauge should ensure before mention of a sensible mark-up to pay for the time of those responsible for bringing this onto the market and for providing continued availability and customer support into the future all seems very reasonable. I say bravo for achieving all of stages of productisation and long may it continue. I for one would like to suggest four product ideas: a bar tilt angle gauge as I have seen used by Honda Motocross Race Technicians as a follow up and complementary product to this one. Another handy gauge might be for setting pedal cleat alignment (which I own but in plastic) or for dishing pedal traction pin heights into a concave pattern to match the curve of the shoe sole or a flywheel disc which could be installed onto a pedal's threaded spindle and spun to check for trueness and alleviate leg injuries due to unknowingly pedalling slightly bent components. All the best with the new business, gauges are few and far between in the bicycle industry so this is a great way to get started. The possibilities are endless!
  • 2 0
 I just hold a plumb bob on the middle of my faceplate and that's good enough for the rare occasion I need to straighten my bars.
  • 4 0
 Don’t push me cause I’m close to the edge.
  • 2 0
 I'm trying, not to lose my head haha ha-ha ha.
  • 3 0
 thee are some people in the world that will need this tool...................
(looks at the flag pic an chuckles)
  • 2 0
 I made one of these with a cnc and some mdf for about 50p hahahhahaaaaaaaaaa I mean I can cut you a deal if anyone wants one? £100?
  • 2 1
 I hope you do not try to sell these as they are patented just saying.
  • 3 0
 @srespass: Really? I was just thinking of how to solve this problem the other day, and came up with something like this basically, it doesn't need to be done with these materials but the basic shape and attachment places were the same. I didn't go through with it because I came up with an even simpler method. I don't think something like this can be patented, it's too basic.
  • 1 1
 Looks great and I really admire the ingenuity. I can't have been the only cyclist with differing arm lengths for whom this type of alignment would be inappropriate. An in-situ technique brought better results for me personally, I felt, but what do I know....... only that my barber told me that peoples' ears are rarely in the same position on both sides so one can't assume that we are all symmetrical. On the other hand, If straight aligned bars are what the customer wants then the customer is always right. Great comments section by the way.
  • 1 0
 My buddy 3D printed a handle bar alignment tool that used a laser. Was dead simple and I think about $50. Pretty sure he patented it as well, but never did anything with it.
  • 1 0
 I designed a tool that does the same thing only it uses the stem and handlebar with a laser pointer to avoid issues when using it on motorcycles vs bikes. Interesting idea and for bicycles this seems to be a good idea.
  • 1 0
 I worked in shops for over 20 years. There is an inverse relationship between the quality of the mechanic and their ability to straighten bars. Great mechs are more likely have crooked eyeballs. For reals.
  • 2 0
 Semenuk probably has one strapped to his bike now. That man refuses to have off-kilter handlebars
  • 3 0
 So simple but soooooo expansive ;--;
  • 3 0
 There is the most expensive tool, with the least amount of use.
  • 3 0
 You had me at the Knight Rider theme song.
  • 1 0
 I am disappointed that you are the only comment about that and you only had one upvote. The moment I saw 'K.I.T.' I had a picture of a black Trans Am. Ahhh KITT and The Hoff. God I loved that show.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: I can’t think of a more iconic duo. Plus the red LED light on KIT’s grill was dope.
  • 2 1
 Next standard in the bike industry:
a dimple in the inner of the stem, which slides into a groove machined on the steerer tube.
Ocd solved.
  • 5 0
 impossible to manufacture with close enough tolerances. only way this could ever work is if you buy your fork and stem as a system i.e they will have been QC checked for alignment at the factory. accuracy required not to impart less than 0.01 of a degree into the interface. dia is tiny so 0.05mm is 1 degree roughly speaking.
  • 4 0
 You trust the fork makers to get the steerer in straight? Hahahaha
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: It would obviously be done after insertion. Not even a machined groove necessarily, just a laser etched line. The stem would just need to have a marking somewhere. Simple and effective.
  • 2 0
 @DavidGuerra: but where will they print the line? also is eyesight good enough to align to 0.02mm?? at 0.05 out of accuracy on a tiny steerer diameter the size of a coin. sounds like the perfect solution but the reference is so minuscule that will be impossible to eradicate error. a tiny mark on the stem but where to reference on the steerer when you have spacers and freely moving top cap? crazy tolerances required to produce a bar/fork that is perfectly aligned id guess you can expect another 80-100 to the price of the bar/stem. if the stem from one maufacture is off .5 degree and fork from other also .5 degree then you have a useless system that wont align to within 1 degree. 1 degree will actually look wonky and id guess the average hack can easily get a better fit.
  • 1 0
 @a-d-e: I think it would work really good. The precision is in the final stage of production, align the fork axle vertically (easy) and laser engrave a thin line precisely on the middle (from the horizontal level) of a silver steerer (not difficult). This is for a lateral line, so that the line doesn't go through the stem slot bolting area, where there is no aluminum. Then the alignment can be done with a similar laser engraved mark on the top of the stem. You don't need top spacers at the alignment stage, you can see the connection between the two lines, it's really easy to line up perfectly. I see complete accuracy at every stage of this process, much more than with this dnr tool for instance. Of course custom devices are needed for the alignment/printing stage. The products are attached through the interfaces that need to be aligned (the stem's bar clamp and the fork axle, the rest lies is in the precision of the printing device itself, which only needs to be set up once.
  • 2 0
 Way to completely ignore everything @a-d-e pointed out. You're creating a new set of problems to solve another problem that simply doesn't exist. If you can align marks on the components, you can align the components without any reference marks. If you're really struggling, use a plum line.
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: It's true, I can, but it would take much longer than doing it through other methods. Done industrially, it's a quick and easy step, and would indeed save plenty of time to the user. For me, it's not as much the time as the complete accuracy it would provide.
  • 2 1
 1. Loosen 4 stem faceplate bolts. 2. Roll handlebar forward. 3. Tighten 4 stem faceplate bolts. 4. Remove front wheel. 5. Loosen 2 steerer tube clamp bolts. 6. Put bike nose down on a hard floor, so that fork dropouts and grips outer edges are the four only contact points with said floor. 7. Bar Is now straight, tighten 2 steerer tube clamp bolts. 8. Put front wheel back on, reset correct handlebar roll.
  • 2 0
 I ride my bars squint to compensate for the side my balls sit... so said Danny Hart.
  • 2 0
 What does the DNR stand for in their name? I'm guessing Definitely Not Required.
  • 2 0
 Still not straightened my bars since the last crash, makes riding more interesting.
  • 1 0
 I used to align my handelbars for 20-30 mins, but nowdays I just close my eyes andfeel it with the hands if it feels good it feels good. Works every time!
  • 1 0
 This is amazing. It's so necessary because all arms are perfectly straight and never deviate from straight ever. Thank you DNR!
  • 2 1
 Abbey might be able to pull off a $220 price tag but not some after school business. This could easily be made and sold at 40-50$
  • 2 2
 I have actually used this tool on many different bikes in my shop and it's amazingly quick and simple to use. Not to mention how many times bars were off center and by how much.
  • 2 0
 Don’t worry amazon is reading your comments and should have one ready Monday for $20
  • 1 0
 OMG, we've been riding misaligned bars our entire lives! Most probably designed by someone that JUST discovered biking, and created a tool for a problem that never existed.
  • 1 0
 ...and if I catch any of my mechanic friends with one of these in their tool kit, I'm kicking you square in the junk.
  • 3 0
 Too sad it wears US colors, I'd pay 300 bucks for french colors.
  • 1 0
 220 dollars to replace closing one of my eyes and a little patience. for 220 dollars this thing better wipe my ass or make sandwiches. Absolutely ridiculous!
  • 3 3
 So how did you guys align my bars the last time? I was charged $90 and it still pulls to the left.
  • 1 0
 @onemind123: your left arm is too short!
  • 3 0
 Lol!
  • 3 0
 That price...
  • 4 3
 I actually really like this idea. I'm super OCD about this kinda thing, down to the fact I'd use this on a DH bike.
  • 1 0
 Let me add to your OCD by saying that most bars are crooked. A 5mm difference in height from one side to the other is normal, a very straight (symmetrical) bar is an exception. I actually ordered a bunch of bars and tested this precisely using a custom-made device. Stems can also induce small deviations, up to 2mm at the end of the bar. I'm referring to aluminum bars, carbon ones are more reliable in this aspect.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: Oh believe me, I already know. I've sent bars back for warranty for excessive deviations. I generally check a few bars before I settle on the ones I run. Generally I run carbon though with the exception of alloy on my pump track bike.
  • 2 0
 I’m totally replicating this out of an old cutting board
  • 2 0
 I can make that out of cedar for free
  • 2 1
 I thought Mercedes-Benz having a $500 windshield wiper arm alignment tool was crazy
  • 4 1
 $220, You can keep it
  • 1 0
 Left permanently on my bike for field adjustments and as a front roll rack, it seems like a bargain.
  • 3 0
 Yikes. Just... yikes.
  • 1 0
 I'm still waiting for a splined steerer-stem interface... Not. Don't even think about it, SRAM!
  • 2 0
 You'd have to be a tool to buy it.
  • 1 0
 I like the way it works. But, does it enhance my freedome and if so, do i need to get stars and stripes version?
  • 2 0
 A solution for the problem I never knew I had! Or don't have
  • 1 0
 I get around it by running dual crown forks on my bikes. My only conundrum is handle bar roll.
  • 2 0
 Do one. Another reason that's slowly killing my love for MTB
  • 1 0
 Jeez, you should get off Pinkbike and go ride
  • 1 0
 @PeterT: love you
  • 3 0
 What if I ride a leftie?
  • 2 0
 The juice is definitely not worth the squeeze with this tool
  • 2 1
 Steer tubes that are lightly oval with matching stem to mate it too, solved for ever!
  • 3 0
 Even better, just make the streerer square!
  • 2 0
 my handlebars are always straight, puny little single crown mortals...
  • 3 0
 I think they meant $2.20
  • 1 0
 Also, how has no one mentioned the cinder block "bench" and commented on how many tools are probably lost to those abysses.
  • 1 0
 I already figured out how to make a jig to do the same thing, but you can still align your bars to your fork using eyeballs.
  • 2 0
 I going to make one and sell it for 100.00 > : ) 99.00 profit
  • 1 0
 Step 1: Buy one - Step 2: Bet everyone a 6 pack if their front end is 100% aligned or not. - Step 3: Profit
  • 2 0
 Your telling me this is going to touch my Kashima, even my wife cant.
  • 1 0
 The picture of the aluminium parts touching the Kashima made me feel physically sick.
  • 1 0
 this tool is is clearly for when you are so hungover it is nearly impossible to align your bars
  • 1 0
 I think I'll wait for the cheap chinese version of this to come out, or better yet just build one myself for a few dollars.
  • 1 0
 Loving my bit of 2x4 about the width of my bars that sits against fork stanchions... for free
  • 1 0
 When someone is so stupid they can not align the bars by the look they should pay for it =D Or at least it feels like that
  • 1 0
 Great idea, horrible price point! That's it I'm going to market one for $29.95 lol
  • 1 0
 In the video I think the guy actually lined it up quicker eyeballing it than with his tool.
  • 1 0
 With little to do now the US election is over, Russian trolls have moved to Pinkbike...
  • 1 0
 This is the kind of nonsense people come up with during the quarantine, yet another Thneed for all the dentists to buy.
  • 2 1
 This will make way more sense after I finish my bottle of Teslaquilla
  • 1 0
 Maybe, if it could double as a ball washer.
  • 1 0
 Put me down for 2. In case I want seconds.
  • 6 9
 I have this tool and use it every week in my shop. I gotta be honest. I have had customers ask me to align their bars, just to see how close, or far, they were from straight knowing O have this tool. Most of the time they are off quite a bit more than the eyes can see. There is much satisfaction in knowing that every bike out the door is 100% aligned. I haven't had a customer yet say, "why bother." They have all been very thankful that things are lined up proper. Customer service and customer relations is well worth the price of the KIT.
  • 7 3
 I had you guys align my bars and the difference was amazing. I did pr on all my Strava routes the next time I rode after your exquisite alignment process. Thank you!!!!
  • 2 1
 I can see this. Expecily with certain decal that play tricks on your eyes. I’ve had bars I was sure were straight n then start convincing myself they’re a smidge out. KNOWING it’s right is a great way to give confidence.
  • 1 0
 i seriously cant tell if youre joking....
  • 1 0
 @onemind123: What bike did we align for you?
  • 1 0
 tools, we never missed...
  • 2 1
 Who cares about handlebar alignment
  • 1 0
 I’ve never had an issue using my eye balls. If it was $40 then maybe
  • 1 0
 I'd buy it if it was $50 bucks.
  • 1 0
 Just buy a dual crown fork!
  • 1 0
 It will match the full face I wear on my gravel bike.
  • 1 0
 Can't wait for the Triple clamp version ????
  • 1 0
 If you need a tool, better put that 220$ in glasses!
  • 1 0
 Only if it comes with an optional handle grip alignment tool.
  • 1 0
 Just what the world needs. Another solution looking for a problem...
  • 1 0
 At that price id rather ride a misaligned bike
  • 1 0
 I'd rather have bars a degree off and keep my $220.
  • 1 0
 Bringing ideas and turning them into products for the sport. Good job!
  • 2 0
 Do Not Resuscitate
  • 1 0
 Lee Valley sells winding sticks for $33
  • 1 0
 Does it have lasers? If not then I’m out.
  • 1 0
 What if your bars are bent???
  • 1 0
 What’s their follow on tool, something to align your saddle ?
  • 1 0
 I want the $2,000 tool that makes sure this is straightWink
  • 1 0
 Well, if i lose the ability to judge symmetry, they have my money.
  • 1 0
 Hahahahahahah. The price, and then the little yank flag, oh hell no
  • 1 0
 Close enough always works and save $220
  • 1 0
 Does it comes with an app?
  • 1 0
 Just make sure it is calibrated before you use it!!
  • 1 0
 Can it double as a number plate too?
  • 1 0
 What if your wheel is bent?
  • 1 0
 DnR means Does not Ride? Does not wRench?
  • 1 0
 This is up there with Campagnolo's $300 cork remover.
  • 1 0
 I'm selling a tape measure made of recycled condoms for $249.99!
  • 3 2
 I’ll take 2
  • 1 1
 The most useless useful tool I have ever seen
  • 1 1
 pinkbike , you loose your credibility just posting this
  • 1 0
 I just.. I.. nope.
  • 1 0
 Most useless tool ever?
  • 1 1
 Tune Spurtreu, Im joke for you??
  • 1 0
 God exists.
  • 1 0
 What
  • 1 0
 Quill Stems 4 life!
  • 1 0
 220... um... no.
  • 1 0
 Just use a ruler!????
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