Ridden And Rated - Six Dropper Posts

Feb 26, 2016
by Mike Levy  
dropper posts


Do you remember when high-end trail and all-mountain bikes didn't come equipped with dropper seat posts straight from the factory? That feels like it was sometime after the Middle Ages and before the industrial revolution, but it was probably more recent than that. Sure, there will always be riders who will never be convinced and who don't need a dropper post to have fun and feel confident on the descents, but they're probably in the minority these days.

Thankfully, there are now a boat load of different dropper posts to pick from, some of them better than others, and all a bit different in design and function. While almost all of them depend on an air spring to bring the seat back up, companies have come up with all sorts of different ways to control their post's travel: some depend on a purely mechanical design, while a bunch of others employ hydraulic cartridges to get the job done.


Cannondale Trigger review test
No one needs a dropper seat post, but there's no arguing that they can add an immense amount of fun and flow on rolling terrain.
Cannondale Trigger review test
We can now just pedal up to a steep roll-in and, with the push of a button, drop in without any hesitation.


Regardless of how a dropper post works, the bottom line is that it simply needs to work, which is apparently something that took some figuring to do. Many early designs were about as reliable as a Ford Pinto, but to be fair, dropper posts don't burst into flames (just picture how bad that would be.) Durability has improved greatly over the past few years, although it always could be better, and there are now more options than ever to choose from when it comes to dropping your seat and upping the fun factor. Below are six choices that each have their own merits, as well as their own drawbacks.


Proven Contenders

The lineup of seat posts below is by no means an all-inclusive list of every model out there, but rather a round-up of the droppers that we've spent enough time on to provide some real-world feedback. I'm talking multiple years with some of these droppers under us, not just a three-ride "test" that you might read elsewhere. We've taken them completely apart to learn how they work, and then we put them back together to see if they still worked - most of the time they actually did.

There are some exciting new seat posts that we can't include simply because they're too new to make a call on yet, including the new Race Face dropper that uses technology from 9point8, and yet to be released models from Fox, Gravity, and even Crankbrothers.

Perhaps the most interesting up and comer is the wireless electronic Vyron eLECT seat post from Magura, a dropper that could be one of the few fresh products worthy of the cliché ''game-changing'' tag line. A lot of the mountain bike community sure seems hesitant about batteries, but I can come up with a handful of reasons why this would be a worthy place to use one.
Magura Vyron eLECT wireless electronic seat post
Magura's Vyron seat post is controlled via a wireless remote.

There are also a few that have been out in the wild for awhile now but that we just haven't ridden enough to judge, Giant's Contact post, the GravityDropper, and X-Fusion's Hilo included, although you can expect to see full reviews of those and others in the near future. In the meantime, here are six dropper posts that we have spent a hell of a lot of time on.






SIX DROPPER POSTS WORTH LOOKING AT




9Point8 Fall Line review test
9point8 Fall Line


The Fall Line seat post can be summed up in two words: reliability and options. It's expanding brake, dubbed the 'Mechanical DropLoc', holds it in place anywhere in its stroke, and 9point8 has also built-in a nifty quick-disconnect feature that makes removal a cinch. More importantly, it has proven to be extremely trustworthy, more so than almost any other dropper on the market, making it the one I'd recommend to anyone who's bike accepts an internally-routed post. Which brings me to my one quibble: the Fall Line isn't available with external cable routing, meaning those who own certain bikes won't be able to use it unless they change to a different frame, or they're confident with a drill and don't mind voiding their frame's warranty. Riders can choose from many travel and length options, and word is that 9point8 will also soon offer 175 and 200mm stroke models.

Fall Line Dropper Full Review


Fall Line Details

• Total travel: 75, 100 ,125, 150mm
• Travel type: infinite
• Routing: internal only
• Mechanism: mechanical
• Spring: air, adjustable for rebound speed
• Weight: 507 - 605g (incl. remote and cable)
• MSRP: $379 USD
www.9point8.ca


• Great, positive action
• Impressive reliability
• Remote can be configured to your liking

• Tricky installation
• Internal routing only










Fox D.O.S.S. dropper post.
Fox D.O.S.S.


While the Fox seat post's ungainly remote made it the butt of a lot of jokes when it was first released, the dual-lever design is intuitive and ergonomic when mounted on the underside of the handlebar in place of a front shifter. Run a front derailleur on your bike? Then it needs to be mounted on top where it's exceptionally annoying to use. Remote aside, the D.O.S.S. never did top a lot of people's lists due to its weight and head-mounted actuation cable, but it has also been by far the most reliable dropper post on the market. If you ask me, that last point in itself makes the D.O.S.S. worth considering. I'm also a fan of its lightening quick rebound that gets the seat back up with zero delays. It looks like Fox is close to releasing a new design, so here's hoping that they've been able to carry over some of their original post's dependability.

Fox D.O.S.S. Full Review


D.O.S.S Details

• Total travel: 125, 150mm
• Travel type: indexed w/ 40mm stop
• Routing: external only
• Mechanism: mechanical
• Spring: air, adjustable for rebound speed
• Weight: 620g (incl. remote and cable)
• MSRP: $299 USD
www.ridefox.com


• Unbeatable reliability
• Quick rebound and smooth operation
• Remote can be mounted top or bottom, left or right

• One of the heavier options
• Massive remote doesn't play nice with front shifters
• External routing only and cable attached to post's head









RockShox Reverb
RockShox Reverb


The Reverb has been around since 2010, which is hard to believe given that its hydraulic actuation still makes it seem ahead of the curve - many options employ hydraulic internals, but not actuation. This layout means that the RockShox dropper is based on a relatively complicated design that can make it more prone to failure, and when it does fail, it's sometimes not a simple repair job. The pluses? Non-indexed travel that can be stopped anywhere through its stroke, a quick turn of a dial can adjust its rebound speed, and it's basically impervious to the elements - no rusty cables or much maintenance required. That final point makes the Reverb ideal for someone who spends a ton of time riding in the rain and mud. There are also two versions to choose from: the standard Reverb with an external hose, and the Stealth model that features internal routing.

RockShox Reverb Full Review


Reverb Details

• Total travel: 100, 125, 150mm
• Travel type: infinite
• Routing: internal or external
• Mechanism: hydrualic
• Spring: air
• Adjustable rebound speed
• Weight: 520g (external), 560g (internal)
• MSRP: $400 USD (external), $471 USD (Stealth, internal)
www.rockshox.com


• Infinite height adjustment makes small changes easy
• No cable and housing to get contaminated
• Easily adjustable rebound speed via dial on remote

• Isn't as reliable as some other options
• Slow rebound speeds in cold weather
• Not as easy to work on as a cable operated post









Specialized Command Post
Specialized Command Post IRCC


The Command Post probably doesn't get as much aftermarket action as other droppers from third-party companies, but it's priced competitively and works well. It uses a collet design that locks the post into position, and the IRCC features a three-stage travel system. The top 25mm of travel is non-indexed, but below that is 45mm of micro-adjust with ten different positions to choose from in that 45mm. The bottom 50mm of travel is non-indexed, so you're either running the post fully lowered or up 50mm so that it locks into the lowest micro-adjust position.

Command Post Full Review


Command Post IRCC Details

• Total travel: 75, 100, 125mm
• Travel type: indexed
• Adjustable air spring
• Cable operated
• Routing: internal
• SRL and grip-mount remotes incl.
• Diameters: 30.9mm, 31.6mm
• Weight: 586 grams (post and SRL remote)
• MSRP: $350 USD
www.specialized.com


• Includes two great remotes
• Quick rebound speed w/ audible top out
• Partially indexed travel

• Internally routed only
• Partially indxed travel









Thomson Elite

Thomson Elite and Covert Dropper


The Thomson name is one that's often associated with high-end aluminum components that are manufactured in the United States, and that also is true of their externally routed Elite and internally routed Covert dropper seat posts. Both are controlled via a pint-sized remote that sits up against the grip, and both employ the same hydraulic cartridge that allows the seat to be positioned anywhere in their 100 or 125mm of stroke. Thomson is also one of the few companies to offer a 27.2mm diameter dropper post, a big deal for riders with older bikes or steel frames.

Thomson Elite Dropper full review


Elite and Covert Details

• Total travel: 100, 125mm
• Travel type: infinite
• Routing: external (Elite), internal (Covert)
• Mechanism: hydraulic
• Spring: air
• Weight: 592g (incl. remote and cable)
• MSRP: $449 - $479 USD
www.bikethomson.com


• Tiny, thumb activated remote takes up next to no room next to the grip
• Internal or external routing options
• Reliable

• Non-serviceable hydraulic cartridge
• Cable attached to post's head on external routed version









KS LEV Integra

KS LEV Integra


The internally routed version of KS' LEV dropper post has a lot going for it, including ultra smooth operation and it's Southpaw remote that mimics the position and action of a front shifter, and it's also available in a 150mm travel option for those who need some extra length. A hydraulic cartridge is used to control the post's stroke, allowing the seat height to be set anywhere in the post's travel, and an air spring brings the seat back up when it's time to pedal. Early models were far too finicky when it came to cable tension, and the design of the actuation assembly meant that even the smallest change in tension could keep it from doing its job. Thankfully, KS has rectified this with an updated design that presents no such issues, and the latest LEV Integra has proven to be reliable.

KS LEV Integra Full Review


LEV Integra Details

• Total travel: 100, 125, 150mm
• Travel type: infinite
• Routing: internal
• Mechanism: hydraulic
• Spring: air
• Weight: 550 - 635g
• MSRP: $395 - $450 USD


• Infinite travel adjustment
• Creak-free two-bolt head
• Super smooth travel

• Not the best reliability record
• Plastic OE remote is prone to cracking









Which Dropper Is The Best?


Dropper posts get a lot of heat for not being as reliable as other components, which is still largely true, but things sure have gotten better over the last few years. Yes, the D.O.S.S. has always been close to indestructible, but its odd remote made it a no-go for many people, while KS, Specialized, RockShox, and Thomson have all been improving on the durability front. I might sound a bit optimistic when I say that while we used to just hope to end up with a dropper that worked well for a bunch of rides only a few years ago, now we're looking for the dropper the best suits our needs.

Do you like infinite travel adjustment, or do you prefer indexed height settings? Mechanical versus hydraulic? Is 125mm of travel enough, or do you need 150mm to feel comfortable? As with anything, you need to pick the right tool for the job if you want the best results.

My needs, in order of importance, look like this: it has to be reliable, of course, and I need to be able to work on it when the time comes. I want a remote that I don't ever need to think about, and it also needs to have 150mm of travel and not cost as much as a decent aluminum wheelset. With all that in mind, I would spring for a Fall Line from 9point8 if I needed to purchase a new dropper post tomorrow. It's durable, offers the infinite travel adjustment that I prefer, and it even costs less than most of the other options.
9Point8 Fall Line review test
9point8's Fall Line seat post.




Must Read This Week

367 Comments

  • + 828
 Yes! Finally, Pinkbike, a head to head review! More of this, PLEASE!!!
  • + 171
 A head to head to head to head to head to head! Thats like, 6 heads!
  • + 66
 Yes, more comparisons like this!

What about the 2016 Giant Contact 150mm ?
  • + 517
 There will be many more of these head-to-head comparisons, including articles on wheels, brakes, forks etc.
  • + 44
 this style of review is awesome!
  • + 33
 dreams do come true @mikelevy
  • + 101
 Avid better start funding pinkbike before articles on brakes.
  • + 16
 Before I opened the article, I knew this would be the top comment. Its been years in the coming.
  • + 6
 yay! more please!
  • - 7
flag mellowk (Feb 25, 2016 at 23:55) (Below Threshold)
 I'm surprised the reviewer didn't levy the ks lev
  • - 19
flag Mattin (Feb 26, 2016 at 0:10) (Below Threshold)
 Missing what seat post diameters these come in. Quite an important thing if it fits your frame or not Smile

Only post where it's mentioned is a company i that I will never even give 1 cent. #f*ckspecialized
  • + 6
 I hate the command post simply because it uses that side mounted side bolt saddle clamp, its the same design they used on their fixed seatposts i've had these slip too many times under an impact and will never buy another seatpost that uses that design
  • + 8
 Methinks on a price to performance rating the Giant would have killed these big buck jobs.
  • - 1
 I've heard it's a great post too
  • + 1
 Yaaaaaay!
  • + 3
 @headshot @christillott I had the black 2014 one on my old trance, and aside from the normal 'slop' after a few months, it remained reliable as hell for a good year or so, but then the grit got in eventually. Managed to get a fresh one under warranty though, impeccable service and great value I recon.
  • + 2
 Agreed on these kind of reviews on PB. I appreciate the to-the-point reviews with pros and cons - no bullshit. And I have the Fall Line and am very pleased with it. Zero issues thus far through the wet season. Installation isn't necessarily difficult but getting cable tension perfect can be a little challenging. Easy to get the lever perfectly positioned as well and the clamp is a work of art. Yep, I'm a fan.
  • + 3
 Great. Now bike group tests please!
  • + 15
 I took the plunge and bought the 2016 Giant with 150mm. I love it.
Positives:
- $299 new ($240 with coupon)
- New version has 0mm offset
- Can be purchased in multiple lengths
- Can be routed internally or externally very easily
- Infinite position adjustment
- Sealed cartridge is cheap to replace and very easy to replace
Negatives:
- Only comes in 30.9mm diameter
- Cartridge is non-serviceable (but as mentioned it's cheaper than most services cost to replace)
  • + 2
 @Harlsta Yeah that post is ultra easy to strip down... Mine ended up being a problem with the desk-chair esque cartridge coupled with grit migration.. but it was a very good post. New reign had a reverb and has been fine for 12 months, but I had to send her back as it was giving me the dreaded 10mm drop! all sorted now though
  • + 1
 Thanks Mike for the head2hed!
  • + 7
 Just glad that someone finally posted that Reverbs aren't that reliable. Mine lasted about a month with maybe 6 rides on it, rebuilt by Rockshox, returned to me, failed before even one ride, rebuilt by LBS that does warranty work for Rockshox, failed after 4 months. My old KS? replaced a cable once in 5 years.
  • - 1
 Had a first-gen Giant post that came with my previous bike. Worked OK, but only came in 100mm. And then the grit got to it, and it destroyed itself. On taking it apart after it failed, I realized I should have put some tape or something over those stupid openings to keep grime from getting in, but that hadn't been apparent to me when I got it, and wasn't mentioned by the shop either. No warranty on that, of course.

Replaced with a Reverb - loved the ability to dial in how fast it rises, loved the smooth adjustability. Never failed on me in well over a year, despite being ridden in both dusty (traveling in the summer) and sloppy (any other time of year here in the PNW) conditions, and despite me being a big guy (230#). Just started developing a little sag (you get it all the way extended, and it would "give" up to 1/2" when you sit down on it) - my girlfriend's Reverb is doing the same, and I'm told that's common and not a big deal, just needs a bit of a rebuild similar to how shocks do. Oh well.

My new bike came with the KS Lev Integra. So far, it feels smooth, although the remote doesn't have that magic feeling of the hydraulic Reverb remote of course. Noticed that sometimes it doesn't want to come back up, it's like it's stuck at the bottom (I press the remote, and clearly it's releasing as I can give the seat a little nudge and it's coming right back up as it should - but if left to do it on its own, it just stays down). I'm guessing that's just an adjustment issue. Looking at the clamp mounting the remote to the bars, I'm shaking my head. Seriously chintzy. Not sure why they couldn't spring for a regular ring-style mount instead of that split affair on the "Southpaw" lever - this piece must have been more expensive than just reusing something that's already available, and it's just waiting to break.
  • + 10
 My Reverb is 2 seasons old and zero issues. My buddy just had his KS Lev rebuilt after a few months of use. You never know with these things.
  • + 5
 @CircusMaximus

Exactly. Bought a gen 2 Reverb and have had it for over two years with not a single issue and its only been bled once at install. I will bleed it for the 2nd time soon as it might have some air in the system. Other than that, not a single problem.

Lovin' the Reverb so far.
  • + 1
 YES, FINALLY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! KEEP IT COMING!!!!!
  • + 1
 Really good review!
  • + 3
 I was on an older Spec Blacklight Command Post 100mm and I only had to service it myself once in 2 years. I picked up the new IRCC model in a 125mm and am using their Sram style remote with my matchmaker system. So far everything has been extremely reliable and simple. I like the fact that servicing my post only takes a strap wrench, shock pump/floor pump because of low psi requirement, small amount of grease, a bottle of 90% isopropryl alcohol, and 10 minutes of time. I would have picked up a 9 Point 8 but I got both Spec posts for $250 total and was able to install them myself.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy Love the format! Thank you! Something that covers wheel widths, and the best tires to run on them would be great too.. While 27.5+ is gaining popularity, I think I lot of riders would like something in the middle between plus and a 'traditional set up' of 2 years ago. Slightly wider, slightly bigger, without going 'full plus bike'. Thanks!
  • + 6
 @CircusMaximus Indeed, you never know... I've got a Crank Bros Joplin 4 that's been rebuilt once in 5 years of service. Based on what I've heard on PB, that thing should have imploded somewhere between the box and initial installation.
  • + 1
 good job. no new raceface though
  • + 2
 I had two Reverbs. First one was the first gen I bought in 2011, it was screwed up in a way that it needed bleeding once a month. 15 minutes every time, oooh what a horribly arduous work to do... NOOOOT! It never failed suddenly, it was always getting bad steadily. It finally got really bad and needed overhaul. After two years. So I sold it and bought another one since it is difficult and a dirty job to service it on my own, while giving it to my local service would cost the half of what I paid for my second one, bought as almost brand new. The second one from the second generation (black collar, revised internals) is relatively flawless, apart form the fact that it is delicate to carry by the saddle if I forget about it.

Then I had a KS Supernatural and LEV - pretty good, but the cable performance is nowhere close to how well Reverbs hydraulic actuation works.
  • + 1
 Yeah man great suff! Quite a nice peace of gear reviewing. Thanks! Nonetheless, one can only ask for pinkbike to expand the testing a report more of it. We need real world use comparisons with expanded details on the products and their behavior during the tests.
  • + 4
 @g-42 and anybody else who can answer this question: My two Reverb's (stealth and external hose) both developed the 1-1/2 inch of sag you described. This problem is not due to a drop in air pressure. I figured no problem, I'll download the service manual and do a rebuild this winter. However, the service manual clearly states that if your post develops this issue, send it to SRAM for a warranty claim. Is this correct, or will a DIY rebuild fix the issue? Are there any online posts or other documentation that specifically addresses this issue (Reverb sag...how to fix it)?

Ps not sure why your getting some neg props for providing neutral consumer feedback??
  • + 2
 I had the same issue. Multiple repairs. Three of them as warranty replacements. The third one stayed in the box and I sold it on Pink Bike. I heard Giant has a good post not too sure. Once bitten twice shy.
  • + 2
 Reverb sag issue:
I figured out a procedure to do it on my own. But it took me whole day getting a porcedure to achieve reproducable results. Now it takes about 30 minutes for one post. So, no, you needn't send it to RockShox if you're very patient ;-)

But I hate riding a post, knowing I have to rebuild it a few weeks later. :-/
  • + 1
 @mountaincross I have the same issue and would be very interested in a do it yourself solution.
  • + 2
 The compact form goes like this (for the top-cable verrions, but the main idea works also for reverb):
- extend post completely
- depressurize the air spring
- open top valve, take it out
- pump a litlle amount of pressure again on the air chamber, just enough the divide-piston between air an oil chamber comes up to the upper position
- depressurize the air chamber
- fill the system with oil to the height, where the o-ring from the topvalve takes place in mounted position
- knock gently to ensure a cpomlete air removal
- remount the top valve
Now the most imorptant step to avoid the need of a special tool:
- open the valve by pushing it in manually and drop the post about 10mm (this step ensures, that the post will be able to fully extend after procedure)
- pull the post back to fully extended position manually
- redo the procedure of filling oil and knocking bubbles out
- remount top valve and close the system
- refill remote system and remove air with standard procedure
- repressurize the air chamber to recommanded pressure
Done.

The main idea of this procedure is to adjust the position of the air-oil-piston (in image "IFP") hydraulicly:
ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb7346907/p4pb7346907.jpg
  • + 1
 @CaptainSnappy: Same here. My bike came with an X-Fusion Hilo which gave me no end of problems. I replaced it with Reverb and only wish I'd done so much sooner. It's been rock solid reliable for almost a year. I have just discovered that the cable connection to the remote is vulnerable to being snapped off if you crash in a certain way (even with a lefty remote mounted upside down), but spares are fairly cheap and easy to find.
  • + 126
 "[The Reverb is] basically impervious to the elements"

Yea okay, try my six month old Reverd on a cold day. A 70 year old who forgot to take his Viagra rises faster.

Edit: I didn't read the thumb up / thumb down where the cold issues is mentioned.
  • + 9
 Thank you, that comment just made my day.
  • - 8
flag willybos (Feb 25, 2016 at 21:55) (Below Threshold)
 Reverbs suck! As a mechanic, i dont think i have to explain how fragile the cable system is... and an above bar non-adjustable lever? C'mon
  • + 6
 I recently broke the barb on mine, and damn is it a pain to fix. Bled the system, still stuck down. At least it isn't stuck fully extended I guess
  • + 16
 Must be your first rodeo, not arguing reverbs don't have the best track record. However most of us run a right side lever upside down on the left. Works excellent with matchmaker. The cables work fine its the internals that causes the issue.
  • + 7
 You can run the lever under the bar if you want - flip it to the other side. I've got two reverbs that I've run for the last 3 years, riding just about everything from enduro's to mutliple day stage races and have never had an issue with cables, reliability, or anything for that matter. I just think that some people never clean or maintain their bikes and when equipment fails 6 or 12 months down the line they wonder why.
  • + 2
 Never tried any other dropper post, but I do love my Reverb Stealth. I do ride it in the tropics though, so no cold weather impacts. Just had to bleed it after about 6 months because it started to slowly show a bit more resistance (15min job with the kit that came with the dropper). After that all perfect again.
  • + 2
 I used to run right side lever upside down on left. But I got the original post warranty'ed and forgot to tell the mechanic at the bike shop it was a right hander upside down and he got SRAM to replace with left hander. Didn't wan't to deal with getting a new remote on there so I just got used to it being above the bars.
  • + 4
 Reverbs are brutal in cold weather. I've had two and this last one has been rebuild two times this past year and now needs a third rebuild. Not going to happen and I'll buy the Raceface Turbine drop post instead.
  • + 1
 @averageadventurer running the lever upside down wouldn't have helped, the hose got yanked weird in a crash and the barb got broken off.
  • + 3
 Having had 2 different Reverbs and 2 warranty repairs, numerous bleeds, and sagging issues I moved on. Got a Fox DOSS on a XMas sale for $179. Loving it and not looking back.
  • + 3
 I just got a reverb after a years of owning a KS. Loved my ks and never had an issue. Overall I like the reverb but I'm not a fan of the lever, even with it under the bar. Also, it developed a bit of side to side play after about 2 months.
  • + 37
 "As a mechanic, i dont think i have to explain how fragile the cable system is... " - as another mechanic, I'll point out that Reverbs don't have cables Razz
  • + 2
 btw, did anyone actually break the knob mounting it the right way? I use to worry about it but after much time having the right lever on the up side, I really think it was unjustified...
  • + 2
 Reverb was great but bar mounted trigger was fragile to say the least?

Riding in a car park before setting out, snagged the trigger on my shorts (very lightly) and trigger snapped clean off

luckily my buddy had a spare bike with a Thomson Elite post the right size for my Devinci Dixon, we swapped it out and off we rode...
  • + 3
 I snapped the lever once in a slam and they are mega expensive to replace.
  • + 3
 Command Post doesn't do great in cold weather either. Specialized suggests a different grease for cold weather. Most of us aren't going to dis-assemble our dropper and re-grease for the season where we do the least riding and then do that again in the spring for the main riding season. I've found the Command Post stops getting full return just below 32 degrees. It returns to full height but doesn't catch. So you sit, and it drops down to the middle setting. I've resorted to "crotch pulls" for winter riding.

Also, why doesn't specialized use the "cold weather" grease by default? There must be a trade-off in durability or performance.

All that said, the post has lasted 2.5 years with minimal maintenance. I expect it'll start rebounding vigorously to full height once the weather warms.

One last note: for folks with externally routed droppers, go with the Hope seatclamp with the dropper cable stop over the Promax version.
  • + 1
 @thook sorry man, my comment was in response to willybos. Didn't actually see your comment until I refreshed. Bummer about your post.
  • + 2
 Ks....like butta
  • + 2
 I had the D.O.S.S. for a summer / winter season and though it was very reliable I found it loud.
When topped out it would "click, click, click " when I was climbing or shifting my weight while in the saddle.

I sold it and bought a Reverb stealth

The reverb was broken right out of the box, so I sent it in for a repair, it worked well until the temperature dropped below freezing;

Now it works when it wants, I need to bleed the lever every other week, and it freezes.

Fox FTW so far.
  • + 1
 @averageadventurer haha no problem man. Luckily it's happened to other people, but the fix seems to be a four arm job. Maybe I'll build a robot to help.
  • + 3
 If it's cold enough to affect my Reverb, chances are I'm not riding anyway.
  • + 0
 Sorry guys, but can't agree with you on the cold weather Reverb issue.
We ride in bellow -10 C (14 F) and the only posts working were the Reverbs.
Any other cable actuated got frozen (the cable inside the mantle).

One Reverb refused to get up in cold weather, but it only needed a bleed, no more issues afterwards.
  • + 3
 @bfm-team That's a summer day in some places in this glorious country we have. That's not cold
  • + 0
 @AverageAdventurer And you experienced problems with Reverbs in your country because of cold - er weather ?
  • + 1
 Well yeah, naturally. Personal and at a shop level.
  • + 1
 I don't know specifically how a Reverb works internally but could you use an oil in the dampener that is less viscous at low temperatures to fix the problem you can get synthetics that work well at low temperatures
  • + 1
 @multialxndr & @bfm-team. -10 is a nice day. You cant just throw any oil in there. I have to "prime" the plunger to get it to work properly. My D.O.S.S. never gave me problems, the cable never froze and I rode at -25 ( -14F ) with it. BTW; If ever you have a problem with cables inside housings freezing, it's because of water or oil in the housing. Clean it out. You don't need grease or oil in your housing to help the cable move, the housing is already lined with a Teflon tubing that ensures free movement of your cables. Water can get in there too so seal the ends of your housing with proper housing caps.
  • + 36
 What about the tried and true Gravity Dropper. Nothing is as easy to service as those. Just a couple of springs and a pin. They dont get any simpler than that. They are also one of the most affordable posts out there. Sure they arent internally routed but atleast the cable doesnt move when the post is dropped. Gravity Dropper always seems to get forgotten.

EDIT: MADE IN AMERICA!!
  • + 24
 Totally, they do get left out all too often, something we're guilty of as well. Easy to only want to be on and review the latest and greatest. We'll get one coming.
  • + 15
 I have 2 Reverbs and one Gravity Dropper. The Gravity Dropper is 5 years old and I have NEVER had a problem with it. I cant say that about the Reverb. The Gravity Dropper is the most reliable dropper out there.
  • + 2
 4 years on my DNM ASP dropper. not even a single rebuild. It's air sprung and adjustable in all of its 110mm travel. that said it's only available in 110mm.
  • + 9
 I'm also a gravity dropper owner. The same post already moved with me to 3 different bikes. No issues no problems. They also have great customer service.
  • + 7
 Same here, the GD classic is working without fuss for 6 years now.
When it starts to get sturdy: open it, clean it and close it.
Easy serviceable even on the trails.
Only the remote lever broke but i replaced it with a KS one, works like a charm.
  • + 4
 I'd add the RSP Plummet/Satori Sorata. Bomb proof, simple to service, 27.2, as cheap as £65.
  • + 2
 Agree! If the Plummet can cope with my fat 99 kg ass for over two years witout complain, it really should be taken into consideration!
  • + 1
 My Gravity dropper Turbo wasn't the most reliable. It kept dropping me. Unwanted I must add. Very annoying. After I used a Dremel tool to square out the hole where the pin goes in, it was reliable again. I geuss too much wear in that area. It does have a lot of slop now, up/down, but you don't notice that until you pick the bike up by the saddle.
  • + 11
 Another ancient Gravity Dropper her, mine is a 2007 GD Turbo. In that time it's had, 1 new remote lever (crash damage), three or four new cables and a new inner post to take it from two to three position. I doubt even the 9point8 or the DOSS would get anywhere near that level of reliability after almost nine years.
.
GD are awesome to deal with too, need one bolt because you dropped it and lost it? All the details are on the exploded diagrams on their website. Or they'll just sell you that one bolt.
  • + 9
 I've also had the Gravity Dropper for over 5 years. I've had two other droppers on other bikes that have failed one way or another. I just wish the Gravity Dropper could improve its looks and not look like a suspension post. It's by far the most reliable!!!
  • + 7
 I own 3 GD's (none ever serviced at all) and one Reverb. While the Reverb has all the luxurious flash, in actual use, the GD 3-position is faster and more usable as you always know where its going to be. Isn't it also the lightest? The lever may look lame, but I've been in dozens of big crashes with them and never broke one. The rubber boot can be removed to look like any other one, but don't do that. The boot clearly is part of its reliability. You will replace your bike long before you will replace your dropper post. That said, GD does need to introduce a 6" version which is why I have not sold the Reverb.
  • + 7
 I have had a GD since 2010! Extremely reliable, and works well in cold weather, great for fat bikes where it now resides (Reverb on my Tallboy LT). When I bought it, I needed a 30.0 mm post. I called the company, got the president on the line, and he ran out to the shop and custom machined it for me. Talk about customer service!
  • + 6
 Been on GDs for nearly 10 years. I have done some trips to far off places, and seen a lot of posts fail. Nothing sucks more that having your dropper post stop working in the middle of the Himalaya or in the Andes. As for me, strangely enough my Gravity Dropper kept working no matter the conditions or where I was. Plus the refurb costs can't be beat when you want to get it tuned up. Top notch company, extremely reliable, and possibly lightest option out there? And yes I have tried others and had them need service in under 6 months, and I used to carry around a GD on road trips when I was testing out the other droppers!
  • + 8
 +1 for Gravity Dropper
  • + 7
 My Gravity Dropper went through 4 tours in Iraq and 3 in Afghanistan @mikelevy
  • + 3
 @mikelevy I think you mean "Easy to only want to be on and review the latest."
  • + 5
 +1 for Gravity Dropper. And +1 for the company's service.
  • + 5
 Love gravity dropper. Everything about the company is great. However I think they loose a ton of mass appeal on the looks of the post. As far as I can see that's the main reason they're not more popular. Shock boots went out of style around 1995
  • + 3
 Gravity dropper were the original and I'm still on my 5 year old one, seals and bushing replaced once and inner post too. OK my lev is better in action and use but the GD is by far the most user serviceable and reliable one out there, mines on my winter hardtail so it may get used less these days but it's done several mehavalanches a few seasons of enduro racing and it's still got that reassuring ball whacking clunk whenever I use it !
  • + 3
 @zonoskar - that happens when the threaded ring at the top is screwed down the wrong amount.

I have 3 gravity droppers, the oldest one a '07, and have never serviced any of them. No need! It's amazing to me that people buy the newer posts.
  • + 6
 Yes, the good old Gravity Dropper needs more love! No infinite adjustment but who cares, it's the lightest and most reliable post out there!
  • + 7
 Gravity dropper does not pay for adverstising
  • + 4
 I think you guys just sold me.
  • + 3
 I'll never get back the time I've wasted adjusting the Reverb every few rides or having to make it back home on a slowly sagging post. The nail in the coffin for me was during an overseas trip and seeing a dude at the top of a mountain just in front of me having a small off which resulted in his hydraulic fluid seeping from a snagged hose.. don't think he would have had a good time on the way back. After that swapped to GDs on a number of bikes and never looked back.

For an even sweeter setup, spend an extra $15 or so on a remote made for Giant adjustable posts - they're one of the few remotes compatible with a GD and have a nice and small profile.Giant make at least two types of cable remotes - it needs to be the one with the ability the bolt the cable at the lever end.
  • + 3
 What's funny is that just a year or so ago, when I or someone else praised the GD in the comments of a review of other posts, a few would agree but most would say something along the lines of "I used one for many years and they are super reliable but now I have Reverb or whatever it is hard to go back." Now, it seems after a year or two of dealing with reliability the tone of the posts are "I have tried the new, fancy ones and I will stick with the reliability of a GD." They just work so well...
  • + 1
 I've only broken the part that clamps the lever to the handle bar but it came with a spare. been with me for 4 years. haven't even opened it up or done any servicing on it, i don't even know how, LOL!
  • + 1
 Any problems using a KS lever with the GD?
  • + 2
 Probably any lever that has a cable pull would work, but what do I know. I have never even changed the cable. It should be said that it does appear the attachment to the post is ready to fail. However, it has looked that.way for years and never given me a problem.
  • + 1
 Hah, yeah where mine attaches to the post is kinked at a weird angle. I think it makes the actuation a little trickier. But again, it's looked that way since the first month I had it.
  • + 2
 The GD lever works the opposite to most other levers on the market in that the cable is inserted from the seatpost end. There is one lever made by Giant bikes that works the same way, has a small profile much like the Thomson one, costs peanuts and is readily available.
  • + 31
 Why you no add lever pictures??
  • + 23
 Click on the links to the full reviews. Much more information and a ton of photos.
  • + 4
 ^yeah but if you're going to have descriptions of levers then how about adding them seeing as they're relevant?
  • + 2
 If you run a Sram brake system or have the matchmaker kit from Problem Solvers the Specialized remote is a great option.
  • + 25
 Just FYI, I've owned three generations of the Giant Contact Switch and done thousands of miles on them.
The first had a few teething problems, but the rest have been great. Infinite travel, cable actuated, comes in 4, 5, and 6" versions. 30.9 only. Cheaper than all the above.
  • + 4
 Interesting to hear. Not one that's been on my radar
  • + 4
 Totally agree. The Giant is 30% less expensive and less problematic overall than any of the 4 or 5 different brands I've tried.
  • + 1
 I'll put in a vote for the contact switch too. I have had one for two seasons and it still works flawlessly. It is the only post I know of that can be installed internal or external cable routing and It's very easy to service too if needed. I have put my 100mm on my fat bike and have just bought the 2016 150mm version for my trail bike.
  • + 2
 Me too here. I've had the Reverb stealth (2, first blew up and got warranted, second still works but feels spongy when you sit on it) and the 125 mm contact simply seems better, up until now at least.
  • + 2
 Yea another vote for the contact here. Running a reverb currently but had a contact on my last bike and my girlfriend currently has a contact. Supper reliable with a bit of grease every now and then and a cable tension check occasionally. Only down side is its no as smooth as the reverb. Oh and they are super easy to change from internally to externally routed should the need arise
  • + 2
 I bought a Contact Switch on sale from my LBS for about $125. It's the one with the screwy one-bolt head. Finicky clamp head aside, it has been rock solid.
  • + 3
 I got my first dropper with my trance. I had no idea that there are problems with dropper posts. No issue for 2 seasons
  • + 1
 @facingtraffic, the latest ones are two bolt and there is no offset which is supposed to reduce stiction and improve bearing wear.
  • + 15
 Group tests when done well are hugely informative AND drive development and competition amongst products. The key is well thought out and honest reporting. Well done on this article. I've been hoping for more of this kind of journalism in the bike industry for a while. There are lots of great examples out there in other markets, including both subjective and objective scoring. See car and motorcycle group tests for example. I'm hoping Pinkbike continues with this in the future. It can only add credibility to the site and help us consumers, who simply don't have the ability to test before buying. Thanks!
  • + 2
 I always went to German biking websites for thorough comparison reviews. Could it be it the advertising deals that prohibited this for Pinkbike?
  • + 1
 Agreed the best thing for consumers here is to cut straight through the marketing bullshit, and straight to the facts. That can only allow us to make more informed purchases, and like mentioned above will only light a fire under the asses of each company, as well as shine the light on design issues that don't seem to be addressed from year to year, which i think we see a lot of...
  • + 9
 Meanwhile, Giant is producing one of the simplest and least expensive droppers on the market with a $60.00 cartridge that swaps out in minutes if ever there is an issue. Now with zero offset head and up to 6" of drop...This should be the true consumers choice. Simple cheap and effective.
  • + 9
 Absolutely love my Fall Line. Honestly, the tricky installation mentioned in the original review had me worried, but in practice, I followed directions, went carefully, and had no issues.

Action’s great, lever is nice as well, and love the company. Kills my previous Reverb by leaps and bounds.
  • + 4
 Where did you buy yours, just out of curiosity?
  • + 1
 Is the Race Face Turbine essentially the same internally? I wanted to get the Fall Line but they haven't been in stock...
  • + 1
 Gotta agree about the installation. It was a piece of CAKE! Mike, you really should have read the instructions before you began ;-)
I began installing mine 30 minutes before a ride and it went fast and easy, even with trimming the cable twice. They are absolutely a piece of cake to remove and reinstall on the bike as well. Love the whole design of the Fall Line, and the service model 9point8 has set up with their online store.
I can also attest to their ability to function in Very cold weather. Have had mine out a few times in -10 to -20F for about 2-3 hours, and though it slowed down, it always came up and locked just the same. They are Very solid in every position, and you can pick your bike up by the saddle!
All the Reverbs I've had (4) have totally shit the bed at about +20F. And just above or below freezing the Reverbs Barely function, but once it gets into the mid to low 20's they crap out and lose all air and can no longer stay up, and later develop play in the top inch of stroke, and fairly quickly develop play in the bushings as well.
My Only quibble about the fall line for me has been the remote. It is versatile and functional and very configurable, but I was not a fan of the "out the front" style of the cable routing. Left a big loop of cable sticking straight forward, and the remote sat a bit too high above the bar for my liking in the vertical orientation that I found most comfortable and easy to reach. But this is all very easily remedied with a front shifter conversion since it is cable actuated. Perfect setup. Very stoked on the Fall Line and 9point8 as a company.
  • + 1
 Turbine is same installation as Fall Line. They should mention in instructions to roll the barrel adjuster on lever to about half way prior to anchoring cable. The system needs a bit of slack to operate properly. Overall I am blown away by the performance over the Reverb. Best of all with the RaceFace/9point8 you can pick the bike up by the saddle at any height with no issues. Or wait, best of all it has lasted more than 3 rides without issues (goodbye Reverb). So good I had to splurge and get one for both bikes. Not in love with the lever, anxious for the new shifter style lever to be available.
  • + 1
 Wonder if they work with the Specialized SRL? got one of those for my LEV & it works great, mimics a SRAM shifter paddle.
  • + 1
 Directly from 9point8. Emailed them, put me on a waiting list. Worked out for me.
  • + 6
 media1.alltricks.fr/ckfinder/images/shemas-tige-de-selle+tableau.jpg
Nice summary of lengths for some posts. If you're wondering whether a dropper will fit your frame (standover height, max extension...)
  • + 1
 That's awesome. Great to know min insertion and total length.
  • + 1
 Awesome info graphic! Thanks.
  • + 5
 Went from RS Reverb Stealth to 2015 Giant Contact SL 150mm (mainly because I wanted the 150mm drop), and have not regretted it. Giant is less than half the price of the RS, way easier & cheaper to maintain and can route internally or externally. Fantastic bang for buck!
  • + 5
 Have to say my Giant Contact has been a dream, i know its cheaper than the rest and sealed unit, but coming up a year and doesn't miss a beat, Had a Ks Lev on old bike which was great, but did need to maintain and care for to keep running smooth.
  • + 9
 how about xfusion hlio 125?
  • + 2
 Hilo is great… I'm running two of them, work great and user serviceable if you need to. I had to add air to one of mine once but XFusion also have a rebuild guide on their website.
  • + 1
 was wondering the same thing. After 3 years of riding one through a wide range of conditions, it just works. it's never been serviced and only had to add air once. Plus you find them for about $165 brand new for the external routed version. Half the cost of most of these. I've never tried any of these droppers but don't see any reason to with that combination of price point and durability. Perhaps the extra $200 these other companies charge is to pay for marketing budgets.
  • + 2
 My son and I have been running these for a couple of years, they have worked well. Went through a crank bros and a specy that didn't last before we got the XFusions. Underrated
  • + 5
 GIANT's 2016 Contact Switch beats most of the above posts on every count.
30.9 only. 440mm 150mm infinitely adjustable travel user can switch from internal or external cable routing fairly easily with basic tools. Has a nice secure 2 bolt thomsonesque saddle clamp.And it's not too heavy.
But best of all they can be had online for £100 ($140 US)
This is what dropper posts SHOULD cost.
  • + 1
 Where'd you get one for £100? Winstanleys currently selling them for £120 but that's the best I can find. I'll hang on if better prices can be found?
  • + 1
 Interested as well...
  • + 1
 Aliexpress. prices fluctuate though. £120 sounds as good a price as you're likely to find from a UK retailer..
  • + 4
 What can be so difficult in designing a sratpost to last more than a year? I'm so fed up with returning my reverb every 6 months... But don't know which other post is the most reliable?

Can anyone (who rides a lot) reccomend me a dropper seat post which lasts 2 years without problems?
  • + 11
 Fox D.O.S.S. or a GravityDropper.
  • + 0
 Thomson... you wont need service it for at least two years, and you can pick the bike up by the post/seat.
  • + 2
 Thanks for the recommendations.... Smile
  • + 2
 Been riding a Reverb Stealth since almost two years w/o any single trouble something like three days a week. In northern Spain winters are very british-like with lots of mud, but I have to say that I never pressure wash my bike and before each ride carefully clean the shaft and apply with my fingers a thin layer of silicone based oil. It increases smoothness and avoid water to entry the internals.

Just my 2 cents...
  • + 6
 See Gravity Dropper comments above. ^^^
  • + 4
 In answer to your question "What can be so difficult in designing a sratpost to last more than a year?" There's still one huge problem that still hasn't been addressed: think about how small the stanchion on your post is, compared with your rear shock or fork. Even on a 31.6, it's tiny, less than 30mm almost always. Would you ride a fork with 30mm stanchions? & that's a suspended mass, while a seatpost is a rigid platform that has to stand up to loading it sideways, backwards, etc.

A larger stanchion will allow larger diameter bushings & seals, which will help prevent bushing & seal wear, which cause play & leakage. I think we're going to see a push to larger seattube diameters in the next few years, along with everything else. There's already a standard, 34.9, & Scott was even using it, but I'm sure we'll have a completely new diameter because that's what we do in the MTB industry these days.
  • + 3
 I see where you're going with this but when it comes to rigidity the dropper posts are stronger than suspension because they have much less going on internally along with having much thicker tubing. The sanchions on a fork have to be milled out to fit an air chamber and damper along with oil.
  • + 2
 and just to be clear, forks are loaded in all directions too. Think about cornering, or off-camber sections, or landing a jump crooked, or skidding off rocks.
  • + 1
 @sbrdude1 Tubing rigidity isn't seal & bushing play, & while not having a curved stanchion moving through the bushing will help, sealing surface durability is positively affected by increased surface area.


@skelldify Of course, but those are momentary loads. The seatpost sealing surfaces have to stand up to you actively weighting, as well as pushing & pulling perpendicular to the interface(unless your seattube angle is 90 degrees, & your pedal stroke is completely vertical, with no side to side hip movement.)
  • + 1
 I have been on a D.O.S.S for over a year now. So far so good I just replace the hose and the cable a month ago and is runing like new. I have a reverb on my second bike and I just wish that thing could work as the fox. Is not only reliability is the ease to sort problems with the lever on travel as basically an old 3 position shifter can do the work given enough tension.
  • + 0
 Thicker walls on the tubing cuts down on flex along with seals that don't get nearly as much movement as suspension. Also the BB area has immense levels of side loads put on it hence why it is the strongest junction of tubes on a bike. Angular contact bearings work well in BBs and headsets due to constant side loads.
  • + 7
 Love my Thomson covert!!!
  • + 5
 Thomson posts are amazing. More thumbs up.
  • + 3
 I also rate the Thomson covert but I swapped the lever for a Specialized SRL lever that fits on my SRAM Matchmaker brake clamp. Best combination I've used and the post is the only one I've used that hasn't developed side to side seat play.
  • + 2
 @avii Lindarets makes an adapter that you can attach to ispec-b/ii and matchmaker to create a shifter like feel with the stock lever. It's a little spendy but totally worth it, I have one on two of my bikes.
  • + 1
 yes, the Lindarets i-spec adaptor is dope.
  • + 1
 It's hard to justify paying what they want for it when I see that it's just a small piece of plastic...I think it'd be worth it when I'm out there though
  • + 2
 I'm running a Thomson 27.2 with a modified XT shifter as a lever (to match my XT shifter). So far so good.
  • + 1
 @jnags: We ought to summon the community and cobble up a design that can be 3D Printed...
  • + 3
 I dunno, I really like my Reverb and didn't think it was too hard to install. I also like that it comes with all the required tools to bleed the hydraulic line as well. I run the right hand remote upside-down on the left side (no front derailluer) and it's in the perfect position IMO. Runs and runs without issue, infinite travel adjust is awesome. These other options look nice too, though. Good review.
  • + 4
 Maybe that's why RaceFace/Easton use the same internals of 9point8 in their droppers. New package on a proven structure. Should be good too. Wanna try them in future. For now, my 150 Reverb performs in a cooperative manner.
  • + 3
 Gravity Dropper needs to be in there, I've been using their posts for the past 10-12 years. I actually have the first Dropper post on one of my bikes today. Their posts just simply work! Flawless!... And their customer service is amazing! Their service fee for their seat posts is usually $15, last one I sent back after 6 years of trouble free use, they replaced almost all the parts except the seat post body! Great product! Awesome company!
  • + 3
 Thomson. They are the best I have used several others and every single one jiggles like crazy, slam your taint and have horrible saddle mounts that strip and basically suck. The Thomson is by far the highest quality but at a hefty price. You want quality, durability and performance, get a Thomson.
  • + 7
 Gotta love the cheap $380 option!
  • + 4
 Sorry PB any shoot out on droppers that doesn't include one of the oldest, most reliable one out- Gravity Dropper, pretty much can't be taken seriously.

Before anyone says anything, I have/had 3 Command Posts, never a GD.
  • + 4
 No need to include GD, it's the best post for riders, and the worst post for fashionistas. Top or bottom of the rankings.
  • + 2
 I get it. Before I needed an internally routed one, I couldn't get over the looks of the GD so I went with a Command Post. It's killing me because I hate Specialized, but I don't care for infinite posts. I actually emailed GD hoping that had an internal one in the works and was told no.
  • + 7
 fuck yes!! Pinkbike showdowns!! Finally!!
  • + 15
 There will be more of these types of articles, but only of products that we've previously reviewed. Wheels, brakes, forks etc.
  • + 3
 Great! Brakes, please!
  • + 1
 Awesome!! Thanks Mike: tup:
  • + 2
 @mikelevy that's a great way to do it. Can go back and see what was written at the time of review and get more information. Also lends credibility to the comparison. (and unfortunately limits comparisons to relatively new products)
  • + 3
 Can't believe you haven't ridden Gravity Dropper enough to add to the comparison. Either you've adapted to droppers really late or there is some reason you don't WANT to include the ONLY really reliable dropper. From this bunch 9Point8 is already known to be one of the most reliable droppers but it has been in the market for only one year or so (tells a lot about the dropper posts reliability in general). GD was in the game way before others, some people has been rocking same units for over ten years and to date it is still the only one that keeps on working no matter the weather. Not dissing 9Point8 or any other brand, but wondering what's behind you're decision not to test DG agains others. It's too ugly? Too reliable compared to others that might be your advertisers? It is even weights less than the rest!
  • + 1
 Adding to that, I been running a first gen Command Post myself for four years and I bought it used. Never failed me. Maybe I'm lucky, but it seems to me that the most practical products are the least sexy ones and rarely get hype.
  • + 5
 Vecnum MoveLoc

30.9
140/170/200 mm

Mechanical, easy to service

Not cheap
  • + 2
 Moveloc is great, if you are able to get your hands on one.

The 9Point8 is 499 € (554 $) in Germany, you get a decent aluminium wheelset for much less.

The X1 adapter only costs 38 €, thats 2,6 times the price in US/Canada.
  • + 1
 The Moveloc would definitely win in this comparison. Problem is as they are a startup to get the production up the scales. Easy self service if even needed, extremely reliable, no hydraulics.
  • + 2
 I went with the Race Face Turbine dropper after my KS LEV gave up on me after 2yrs of working perfectly. So far not too impressed with the Race Face. It failed my first ride. Unable to hold air for more than 30 minutes. Tried a few rides filling it up before each ride and halfway through it would be back at 0psi. Then it stopped locking in the top position even after just filling it up. Hoping for better luck with a warranty replacement. It seems like a really nice post with good action when it has air in it.
  • + 3
 What I am learning from these comments is that dropper post reliability is a crap shoot, there seems to be two people saying "This post sucks!" for every person saying "This post has been hella reliable!" about all of them.
  • + 1
 Nailed it.
  • + 2
 Have the Reverb Stealth. Works well, always in all conditions (for me) until it needs maintenance. Bleeding sucks.

Wifes bike has the KS Lev Integra. Works not bad. Sticky in the top portion of the stroke, have to tap it to make it go down sometimes. Finnicky to set up, once set up works great.

Wifes previous bike had an Xfusion Hilo. Excellent always. Always worked no matter what - and the remote was easy to use and very universal.
  • + 2
 @mikelevy, I'd be interested to know how you've disassembled the fox doss, is there any chance of seing a kind of "tech tuesday" video on how to do it ? OGC sells the tools to do the job and some websites are selling spare parts too but there is no instructions to be found on the interwebs on how to do it.
  • + 1
 Totally agreed please @mikelevy
  • + 2
 I have a DOSS, its going on 3 seasons without any rebuilds or issues. - the external routing is exceptionally annoying, you have to get 3m and protect your frame cause there is alot of cable rub, especially in the mud. - the 3 pos is actually really nice, I got used to it, and now I would rather the CTD than infinit adjust cause its nice to know where the trail mode is every time. - in cold weather its okay, sometimes you gota add more air then suggested in order to keep the air chamber sealed for your whole ride, any less and by the end, it will be out of air. - rebound is way way way to fast, your bound to snag the boys a few times - the lever set up as a shifter is wicked. - I tend to be replacing the shift cable used for the actuator like 3 times a season, it collects water and gets jammed after a wet ride. even with good cable end caps with those little seals. - there is alot of play in the saddle after 3 years of use both up and down and side to side. - don't see this thing dying any day soon.
  • + 2
 I started on the original Spec Command Post and killed three and sold the fourth within a year. Went to the DOSS on the rec. of my LBS. Went through three and sold the fourth within 6 mos. now I'm on a Reverb and after a year of riding it needs its first service.
  • + 1
 The current ones are far removed from the first gen.
  • + 2
 Onto my second reverb in 4 years, this one going on 2 years with minimal issues and I also have my original gravity dropper. now whilst I would agree that the GD is a pretty simple effective and reliable post I still have some issues with it, I have broken the seatbolts twice and now pack a spare bolt with me just in case. Also sometimes you can put a lot of pressure on the cable so you need to ensure that is always in good condition or you are likely to have a fail on your hands
  • + 0
 Gravity Dropper had some problems with defective bolts several years ago (according to them). I had one break too, they sent me some new ones that have been fine. The bolts are too long and the clamp is a bit ungainly.
  • + 3
 Seriously??? the Gravity Dropper post is left out of this shoot out? The one company that makes more size options for older rigs gets completely over looked?

Yay corporate donations!!

Way drop the ball once again PB.
  • + 3
 Also the most reliable, and the original, still Made in USA. I have 2 turbos never a single problem. They don't advertise here though.
  • + 10
 Unfortunately there are a lot of people that feel the gravity dropper is so damn ugly they are not willing to give it a chance. No way it will win any beauty contest, but it's personality is great.
  • + 2
 I have a Thomson Elite dropper and I have to say this...Thomson has the best customer service you can ever ask for...I had trouble with my early model, as did othersFrown but Thomson told me to wait they are working on an improved version...I waited and must say this, my Thomson Elite is now EVERYTHING I expected it would be, having the Thomson name on it...It works flawless in every extreme condition I could put it through...NO side to side play aND it goes up aND down as expected...100% PERFECT !!!!!!! and everything I could ask for in a dropper post....THANK YOU THOMSON for having the best products and equally as good customer support...

I'm really happy with my dropper post choiceSmile
  • + 1
 Eh, the best customer service is the one you never have to use.
  • + 2
 @scottzg good point Smile
Now that manufacturers are kinda getting these things figured out...
When I was originally bought my dropper, I did my research and read a million horror stories about people getting some really bad service and long repair timesFrown
So I went with Thomson because of their great reputation only , because back then all droppers besides Gravity were failing eventually ...that was my point..
but you are correct, and if my current post doesn't hold up as long as I expect it to?
then I will admit I made a mistake..
For the past 6 months it's been flawless..
fIngers crossed ..

I have faith in the Thomson...
  • + 3
 I've had three Reverb Stealths fail on me in the last year, each with less than one hundred miles on them. Luckily SRAM is good about replacing them through the LBS they came from, but I'm never buying a new one again.
  • + 3
 This must be about hydraulic droppers? I own a Gravity Dropper Turbo after having a KS Supernatural. I will never go back to hydraulic droppers now that I have a GD, mainly because the GD dropper should last forever!
  • + 3
 Just got a dropper post at the start of 2016, best upgrade I have made since replacing the stock 680mm bars with wide 760mm deity zinks. Night and day difference, can't imagine ever going back to using a straight seat post.
  • + 2
 Typo Mike strikes again... who proof reads these? I just skim these articles so I'm sure there are even more mistakes than these:

"Partially INDXED travel" (indexed)
"its LIGHTENING quick" (lightning)
"Mechanism: HYDRUALIC" (hydraulic)
"and IT'S Southpaw" (its)
  • + 1
 Nerd!
  • + 2
 Today I learned that taking pride in your own language makes you a nerd. Gotcha.
  • + 1
 Well technically that language would be British. Modern American English would require more hashtags and racial slurs.
  • + 2
 I've had a Reverb since 2011. I've had two, but only had to buy one. My first one failed after about two months. It had a different barb that connected the hose to the post. Rock Shox replaced the entire post for a new one. That post has been in place since October 2011, and not a single problem beyond routine bleeds and refilling the air.

I have had two remotes break in crashes, and while they aren't cheap to replace, they are cheaper than buying a whole new post. The remotes I broke were mounted on the top side of the bar. The latest is mounted under the bar, which might help.

I hope the post continues to hold up, because at $400, the price has gone up considerably since 2011 -- about $150! Holy cow!
  • + 1
 Would like to have someone attempt to service these posts and then write up what it was like to find the replacement parts (even 3rd party O-rings), special tools and rate the rebuild procedure for level of difficulty.

I've got a reverb off Ebay, no warranty, had to service myself, it took some time to kit up the parts and tools but now I can get it back on the trails within one lost evening. Would like to have a more simple design but at this point I would not want to spend the money to cross over.

So yeah, which one of these posts wins on serviceability?
  • + 1
 Newest version of the Giant Contact SL dropper blows all of these out of the water - lower price, better reliability, easier to service when/if it ever needs it (anyone can replace the $45 cartridge in minutes), external or internal routing. For those of you who care about the name on the post, the "Giant" logo is gloss black over the matte black finish, so virtually impossible to see. No one has to know your riding a...Giant..product.
  • + 1
 Im on my second Thomson, it failed after 6 months under warranty it was finally replaced with much headache , their customer service sucks . in between that time I got the ks lev and now cant decide to switch back to the new Thomson ..........its nice to have a choice though
  • + 1
 X-Fusion Hilo. We've had issues locally with every brand, but those suckers are darn near bulletproof! When they do need work, it's usually a seal after a LOT of use, and they're cheap and VERY easy to install locally, without the need to send it out for rebuilds, like most brands. For the price and performance, I don't know how you beat that dropper.
  • + 1
 I had the 2013 Giant contact dropper it was my first ever one and it never ever went wrong on me. I then bought another bike and this time it came with a 2014 Command post it never failed me the whole time I had the bike never even put air in it the thing just worked time and time again. Now to my latest posts! New 2015 internal command post first one failed after 7 rides kept sticking and losing air after 2 rebuilds one by the shop and one by spesh it did the same again. They replaced it under the warranty and the next one did the same too in the end got my money back and paid the extra for the 2016 KS Lev Integra after only one ride it has failed it is losing air and the seat drops when you sit in it...I am gutted and frustrated to death the shop I use is not local to me and its a good 40min drive so the seat post issues have cost me time and fuel money I am now out of pocket. The lads at the bike shop have been great with me I now have no idea were to go from here???
  • + 1
 Until some one releases a sub £50 dropper (haha as if) or I can be arsed to build my own I will be spending 5seconds manually dropping my post. Hell every time I drop my post it means I'm out on the bike longer and that's a winner with me
  • + 1
 Just removed a RockShox Reverb Stealth from my fat bike and replaced it with the Giant Contact mechanical dropper post. Had numerous issues with cold operation, and o-rings with the Reverb, so now it's getting rebuilt, then will sell it. Like RockShox products and own many of them, but not their Reverb dropper posts because they're plagued with issues, especially in cold weather.
  • + 1
 @hampsteadbandit The 2012 & older command post rail clamp needs friction paste between the cup/cone level adjuster surfaces to keep from angling back when accidentally sitting down too hard. Tighten to torque spec, rock saddle to simulate forces that could make it slip, then re-torque.
@SpillWay Cold weather makes the grease thicker. Service techs at "S" told me to try putting a bit (3-5 ml) of fork oil in the post when servicing with the grease.
I had to warranty my IRC command post for not holding air after 6 months. It started doing the same thing recently, so I tried float fluid to help seal up where it leaks (mast head). Holds air now only if I store the bike upside-down. Buying the 9point8 ASAP!
  • + 1
 @RimCyclery

we always use Finish Line carbon paste and torque wrenches on single bolt seat post clamps, but sooner or later they always shift when you hit a pothole on your road bike, or a bump on the trail. You can try increasing the torque setting 10-15%+ above factory spec. but its really the design of the clamp that is an issue

Had this happen too many times to ever consider buying a single-bolt seat clamp seat post - this also includes some bikes with proprietary posts that have this single bolt -whether side load or "ritchey" style vertical
  • + 1
 How is a review from 2013 for the ks relevant to anyone one now considering they've changed a few things, you won't be buying that model. My ks lev dx came with a metal remote. The others have as well. Waste of time, unless you're planning on buying second-hand. If you want info on old models search forums on this and other sites.
  • + 1
 Good point. If you really want to know how well something works, do a search on the mtbr forums.
  • + 1
 Bought myself and son 9point8 posts in November and I have over 60 rides on mine without issue. The only problem I had was set up on mine as the cable had to go around the BB and a pivot point in the frame causing some cable tension. I got it worked out after two rides and it's been fantastic. My son's is on a different frame and set up was perfect.
I'm a big guy, 6'1, 220lbs and the post has zero play-no side to side at all.
Great customer service answered all questions quick. Hands down better then the only other posts I've used (Lev and Reverb)
  • + 1
 Anyone care to remember Decathlon selling £30 droppers which held up fine so I hear.

I literally bought a reverb for 1st time a few days before decathlon selling ones that looked the same but with cable operated lever for just £30 well not true actually £29.99!

My bro was gonna buy one but missed out as they sold out within days of their entire stock available as a one lot jobby type buy they did iirc.
  • + 1
 :o I need to check this out. Decathlon is great.
  • + 1
 Seems it's 31.6 only, and perpetually out of stock. Shame.
  • + 1
 Decathlon don't stock them anymore. I have one I'd sell if he's still interested in one..Only used it a handful of times before I fitted a remote dropper instead. You're right though. They are really well made and would be fairly easy to DIY convert to remote by drilling a couple of holes and fitting a grub screw end bolt/cap to the cable.
The exact same post is sold by Raleigh in the UK and another company in europe for around £130.

Message me if interested.
  • + 1
 We just got our droppers into the market this month so unfortunately missed the deadline for this test but please check us out: www.pnwcomponents.com. We have 2 versions and by selling direct we're able to reduce costs significantly.

We're a group of riders who've designed bikes for years and decided to split off to start our own company. Many more parts to come but our droppers are legit, PM me if you have questions. Thanks y'all!!
  • + 1
 Did KS (or anyone else) ever come up with a fix for their seat clamp issues? Mine, and a lot of other peoples', creaks when pedaling hard while seated, and the seat creeps forward in the clamp. I need to slide it back after pretty much every ride. There was a long thread on mtbr about, but I don't know if there was ever a solution.
  • + 2
 I have owned 3 Levs. 2 of the original version, and on Level Ti. The carbon clamp and Ti bolts on the Level Ti have been great. No creaking, and clamp stays tight. The clamps on the original Level were absolute garbage. They sell the replacemental carbon lower clamp.
  • + 1
 Cool thanks!
  • + 1
 Any ideas where they sell that carbon lower clamp? The KS website mentions the carbon head clamp, but I can't find anywhere that sells just the clamp.
  • + 1
 My Reverb has been going strong for almost a year with no service. Just a good spray with suspension line every week or so... I recently sent my Thomson dropper in for service, which they turned around really quickly and for some reason chose not to bill me for said service. YMMV but I've had great luck with both.
  • + 1
 My vote goes to Thomson. I've had 100 percent failure rate with KS LEVs, including friends. Good luck trying to ever get a hold of KS USA for any warranty work. They never answer their damn phones more return emails. Big thumbs down. Have run Command Posts and Reverbs...those have their issues but at least the companies back up warranties. Been on my Thomson for a year now and first dropper post to give me zero issues, works flawlessly and butter smooth everytime. Winter/summer...Temps do not seem to affect it. Worth every penny!
  • + 1
 My reverbs in for an £85 service after 4 years reliability. It started dropping 1/2" on extending but was told that's from picking the bike up by the saddle. Must change my habits. Lbs have included the labour in my upgrade to under bar lefty too! I got a cheap right trigger on eBay for
£28. I do like the look of the Thompson should I need s new one, does the the winner have uk stockists?
  • + 2
 My own $0.02: I have a KS Lev 150 on my bike, it was on it when I bought it. The thing leaks oil to the point where you need to rebuild it 2-3 times a season.

They're junk.
  • + 1
 Thanks Mike, again a good write-up!
My Thompson Stealth, KS Lev ext., Command IR, and DOSS all have been good for me, with only the DOSS returned for warranty, but it was a "known issue". That said, I am careful not to put excessive load when going down because the mechanical internals will take a beating.
  • + 1
 If any of these new crop of droppers can figure out how to NOT have any rotational play at the saddle clamp that would be truly a step forward. Maybe I'm just ocd, but it annoys the crap out of me that in I can wiggle the seat on any dropper instead of feeling rock solid like on a regular seat post.
  • + 1
 no decent 27.2 option ever Blank Stare only KS has something to offer in this diameter. however not long enough and with short travel... I could "just" change the frame, thing is i love my '08 26" orange patriot, will just have to stck with the thomson i have and drop it by hand like i used to Blank Stare
  • + 4
 @easy
Gravity Dropper makes the Turbo LP in a 27.2. Nice dropper post with very good reliability, dead simple to service, and the appearance of some abandoned military x-project prototype covert rocket launcher. lol.
Really though, if you can get past the appearance, the cable sticking out the back, and the slightly odd actuation, it's an undeniably damn good post that's not going to give you any headaches or break your budget. And the cable out the back isn't really that terrible at all since it is static, rather than attached to the head of the post like most other externally routed options. The remote is delicate, and really just not all that great, but you could substitute it with another suitable cable actuated remote.
  • + 2
 GD has excellent customer service too. Also if you get a 27.2 you can get a shim so you can use it in larger diameter seat tubes as well.
  • + 0
 27.2 GD post is 4" max
  • - 1
 @scottzg - exactly, and looks realy bad too... Cost and travel are simmilar to the KS option...Thanks anyway, never heard of them before anyway
  • + 3
 Bring on the wireless. I've got 2 DOSS and a KS LEV. DOSS review is dead on. KS creak free?? Not my experience.
I'll buy a Vyron when available.
  • + 5
 The Doss is insanely underrated. It's reliability is out of control. I actually like the remote a lot my only gripe is that the cable moves
  • + 3
 Bang on. The D.O.S.S. is super underrated, especially years ago when it was one of the few (only?) posts that was nearly indestructible.
  • + 1
 The only real issue with the DOSS is that if you aren't completely out of the way when you press that lever your voice may go up a few octaves
  • + 1
 Even the convenience of the stealth routing could make me keep my Reverb. Too much maintenance and warranty repairs. Getting on with my DOSS quite nicely now.
  • + 5
 My fox just keeps on working!
  • + 5
 Still waiting on a new review bazooka...
  • + 1
 Late, but not forgotten, lets just hope any upcoming tests are thorough,un-biased with great pics! lets remember,we all love droppers,does an hour or two testing get you the best dropper..? highly doubt it,but fair enough,it has at least begun. PB
  • + 2
 My old ks lev was flawless but the integra has an odd design. It doesn't actually pull the cable - it pulls the housing instead. Nice to hear they've changed this but hope they offer a retrofit...
  • + 2
 My old ks lev never worked.It would slow to a crawl and eventually stop going down completely. It broke multiple times until I finally sold it. I have a friend who has the new integra. The new update ks made makes a world of difference. The new intrega works flawless for him. My old ks lev was the 27.2 version though.
  • + 7
 @powderturns - Agreed. The older design was so finicky with the housing tension. I hated how the smallest adjustment in post height in the frame, or if the housing got tugged just a bit, would totally f*ck everything up.
  • + 1
 I bought the LEV a few years ago, design looked great on paper. The thing stopped working properly within 2-3 rides and the product support in the UK was awful.

Binned the thing and got a reverb, which also broke but at least they fixed/replaced it for me
  • + 1
 The new 2016 integra (with black stanchion unlike the photo in this article) works fine for me. Plus it's the 150mm variant in 30,9 that isnt available with a reverb.
  • + 2
 Does anybody have the supposedly common problem of an externally routed LEV getting stuck as you wait for it to raise? KS support is nonexistent, and I hear you just have to break it in for a month. It's been several, and the LEV still stays stuck down. Seat clamp torque and cable tension has been double checked already. Is there anything you can do to expedite the month(s) long break in?
  • + 1
 @Ron-C I think you just need to do a basic service on the post and get some slick honey in there. KS has videos on how to do this.
  • + 2
 My 2 Command Post's have bombproof the past four years... Isn't this the norm? Have people had problems with them? "KS, Specialized, RockShox, and Thomson have all been improving on the durability front."
  • + 1
 They are great got one on each of my Enduros I've never had a problem with reliability and are very easy to service with a strap wrench. Like anything with a cable in the U.K you just need to replace the cable every so often, other than that flawless
  • + 1
 I've been using 2 KS droppers the last 3 years without any issue whatsoever, not the LEV, the cheapest models that come out at under $200! Only niggle is its a single bolt system and the cable attaches at the top of the post, but no real issues.
  • + 1
 The Reverb's "hydraulic actuation still makes it seem ahead of the curve." No, it makes it a pain in the @ss. Hydraulic lines develop leaks, and are finicky with elevation and temperature changes.
  • + 0
 KS hands down for me. I've owned several models, LEV is the best model. All posts need some service from time to time, the one thing I can say about the KS is they work great until they don't. Just after it's first initial fail (maybe it's a break in thing) they've always come back working better than out of the box and I haven't had the same post let me down twice. Just keep a solid post for a back up, eventually you'll need to send in any dropper post for a service and the down time can keep you from riding if you don't have that back up.
  • + 1
 So the best post needs regular service until it randomly fails, so you need to carry a backup? Seriously??
  • + 1
 whats about auto rise and auto dip. i.e. when the bike goes downhill it auto dips and even with the hill gets more steep the lower the post goes and opposite when you head up hill, ya no?
  • + 1
 I'm glad I have one but If my bike didn't come with one I certainly wouldn't pay 300-500 for one.they are priced like flat plasma to see right when they came out.200 bucks seem reasonable
  • + 2
 This shootout is exactly what we've been wanting! good work. I'm hoping the new RaceFace/Easton dropper will be able to emulate the 9point8's quality!
  • + 8
 There will be many more. Expect wheels, tires, brakes, forks etc. but only products that we've already reviewed and spent a shit ton of time on. We won't be doing any mini-reviews with ratings. Ever.
  • + 3
 Thank you! This is what the community has been asking for! One of the frequent PB authors noted a while back that they disliked shootouts because it led people to believe a specific product was the be all end all. However, I think this kind of pro/con comparison really helps the difference between products shine. One such example would be Enduro bikes. Nearly every review on reputable brands says the same thing: "climbs better than expected and ripped descents". We need a way to compare these options!
  • + 1
 Hey why is having the Cable attached to post's head on external routed version's a Disadvantage. I think its an Advantage it makes it very easy and quick to replace the cable.
  • + 0
 These are all riser posts. Your ass is required to push them down. For any rider who rides undulations NG ups and downs with the occasional spot you can rip with a lowered seat the current dropper design adds no value. I'll give all of my bike part money to whoever releases a bi directional dropper.
  • + 0
 Pink Bikes vague paragraph about the post suggests they didn't really spend much time with the Thomson dropper.

I've had the Thomson for going on three seasons, twice I've had to send it in: once for a defect in the mfg setup that caused a minor issue when they were just getting them out and a second time to change a membrane that they found did not perform well in all temperature ranges (the post would intermittently not return to full height). Both times I sent the post in and they immediately sent me a new copy. The post does not twist and feels solid, and the Thomson service is exceptional.
  • + 4
 Nut smashing should be mentioned in the command post review...
  • + 5
 I prefer the quick rebound of the Command Post and the D.O.S.S., as well as the 'clunk' at top-out that lets you know it's fully extended. I know it looks scary but I don't think that I've ever been tagged in the yams by either.
  • + 4
 It only takes one Mike.
  • + 1
 That's exactly my gripe with the Command Post, it basically an air cannon being let off underneath you. I am normally not standing completely up when I raise my dropper (either Giant Contact of Reverb), so the one time i tried the Command it nailed me bad, and I had to cut my ride short.
  • + 1
 Offset is a consideration for those who have not updated to newer geometry with longer top tubes. Also, Reverbs do better when stored fully extended because of the higher pressures when lowered.
  • + 0
 Great read that. I have had three external Thomson Coverts. Two through warranty. After problems. And then drilled my frame to accept a Reverb Stealth 150mm. Has only required a new hose and bleed recently after it wouldn't return. Has a little play but I find the return speed good. The weight good. Very happy with the RH remote flipped on the left. The 9point8 looks like a good option though.
  • + 1
 You sound like a shitty dropper fetishist.
  • + 2
 Hope should make a Dropper seat post to go with their dropper seat post clamp.....
  • + 3
 so no giant or x fusion test
  • + 1
 First company to make a 200mm that also sells parts for home maintenance gets my money. Personally I hope it's a Reverb. Hydraulic on hydraulic is > others.
  • + 1
 Yass, This is what we need! The review part of PB has been lacking on the parts side.

Now if only the 9point8 was available in europe for a normall price. 400€
  • + 2
 Wait...the Fall Line is cheaper than most other options? Depends on the continent I'd say.
  • + 1
 Reverb - very easy to work on and comes with the tools to bleed. KS Lev, not bad either and good customer service. Crankbros Kronolog - certified piece of poo.
  • + 2
 Dropper posts are a good idea, it's nice to see something that's such a useful innovation for mountain bikes.
  • - 1
 Terrible neutral article, dropper seatpost are just like suspension they have a shelf life and are only designed to work for so long before they and require maintenance of some sort. The problem with most riders who have no mechanical background think that suspension and dropper post are suppose to last forever and when they break the refer to them as crap. Rockshox will tell u that the reverb is good for 60 hours of usage then requires service. Well time you pay a mechanic to work on it it can cost u upwards of a $100 bill. I personally cannot stand cable movement so my choice even though they tend to have reliability issues is the KS LEV. If I need a stealth version I go with Reverb parts are readily available and they are easy to work on. I ride with a person who will run their stuff into the ground then complain that its junk all the while he never puts anytime into servicing or cleaning his stuff then he panics because most places are busy an cannot get to his bike right away. I finally convinced him to have a back up bike and now he rides his hardtail more than his full suspension bike. MTB can be expensive and if you cannot afford to pay someone to work on it you might think about taking up another sport or hobby. All these seat post work and have there pro's and cons if a dropper post is important to you invest in a back up one so when yours goes down you can swap out and have it fixed and not miss a ride because you have a back up.
  • + 2
 How has no one commented on the water bottle and fanny pack / bum bag...so 2016...
  • + 1
 What about X-Fusion? You guys missed one of the top posts. That BAT release lever is the best thing out there for positioning anywhere on the bars.
  • + 1
 I would have loved to pick up a Fall Line but availability should have been made a con. Can't find the damn thing to buy anywhere!
  • + 2
 My first drop post was KS 5 years ago. Never again!!!! The most unreliable part i ever had. Only Reverb since then
  • + 3
 How about a shootout like this, copy editors?

Its / It's
Whose / Who's
  • - 1
 Nuce review!
And I really like the approach that you only compare products which you've tested long-time.

What bothers me about the posts is that the best you can get is 150mm / 600g. That is three times the weight of a normal fixed post and SIX TIMES of the lightest posts available! People got used to this, but come on, this has to be better. There are entire road bike frames with that weight!
  • + 2
 There is more than 6 times as much going on as a standard seatpost which is literally a tube with a clamp welded on top.
  • + 1
 Don't you hate it when your post won't return to full height?
www.pinkbike.com/video/392398
See at 3:13. Air miles for style.
  • + 2
 No mention of how easy it is to service a Spesh command post. My record is 10 minutes on and off the bike.
  • + 2
 New Fox post coming out soon, they should have left the DOSS out.
  • + 2
 Would be nice to see the post diameters on the detail listings.
  • + 1
 Well my Thompson is the bomb and when it comes to replacing it will be with another Thompson for sure Smile
  • + 2
 Command post is available in externally routed
  • + 1
 have had the ks lev for a year now, never serviced, I weigh 110kg and Ive never had an issue with it.
  • + 1
 There a three kinds of people: those that are able to count and those that are not able to count.
  • + 1
 You guys forgot to mention the Giant Contact post and give it 2 thumbs down. Worst post ever.
  • + 1
 We can see from the Rockshox picture that @mikelevy specs his bike with a Reverb. Coincidence?
  • + 5
 That photo is quite old. There's a 9point8 on my bike right now, but before that there was pretty much every other seat post.
  • + 1
 Fair enough. I was just joshing around, but it seems that you stick to your guns and I appreciate that. Great coverage by the way.
  • + 1
 What about the Forca dropper post? Costs only 80 Euros, reliable, sturdy, easy to maintain.
  • + 1
 I had a specialized remote break on me and after trying a friends Thompson remote it got messed up too
  • + 2
 What about the Marzocchi dropper?
  • + 3
 Doesn't sound like it's going to happen now. Not much information in here, but the seat post is mentioned: www.pinkbike.com/news/marzocchi-now-2016.html
  • + 2
 Also XFusion seatposts, Broke a Crankbros and a specy but Xfusions made it through a couple of years of CDC racing and they were cheap!
  • + 1
 The KS heads creak like crazy and KS won't stand behind them. I'll go Fox or 9 Point 8 next time.
  • + 1
 Great Review Mike!

@mikelevy
9Point8 Fall Line is $399 now.. no big deal but letting you know
  • + 1
 How different are the internals of the 9point8 and raceface? Are the travel spacers interchangeable?
  • + 1
 @mikelevy ks lev integra "full review" link goes to wrong article. please fix, thanks!
  • + 1
 oops, nevermind. didn't scroll far enough
  • + 1
 great comparison, but you forgot to mention that the specialized command post doubles as a sort of male birth control
  • + 0
 I've got a Reverb stealth and a Thomson covert. The Thomson build quality is streets ahead and it'll be top of it's game when they make it hydraulically actuated
  • + 1
 Failed to mention that the Specialized command post does come with external cable routing.????
  • + 1
 I can rebuild the reverb head to toe in 45 minutes. Come on over. The water is warm.
  • + 7
 Can the average Reverb user do the same? Better question: are they willing to try? It's not difficult to do, but I'd be willing to bet that those who actually do perform a full Reverb rebuild are in the minority.
  • + 3
 Even my local shop doesn't do the rebuilds anymore, they claim its cheaper labor-wise to send them out and have it done elsewhere.
  • + 3
 No I am a skilled mechanic, and used to work for SRAM's warranty department but I've trained every person that works with me, and even the rookies can do it after 3-4 tries. The ones with hoses coming at the top are REALLY easy. The stealths are a little tricky.

If a shop can't do it, they are straight morons. I can understand a guy without a vise being intimidated but any half stocked shop should be able to do it. It requires 1 specific tool, a dental pick, some oil, and some vise soft clamps. The video they have really overplays how it works, and you don't usually need to do the full service for the "squishy at the top of the travel" failure.

Edit: It's like saying a FIT damper is bad because it can fail and it requires an hour to rebuild and a few specific tools.
  • + 4
 The snag is that if you crack it open and rebuild it, you are voiding your warranty and if you eventually do need to ship it back to RS, you are then going to eat the cost because you tried working on it yourself. It pains me, but I'd rather just ship it back under warranty in this situation, and I HATE sending stuff out. Besides, I Really do not want to be rebuilding the damn thing after every single cold ride. I don't want to do anything to it other than ride it, and service it in an acceptable interval. It's more like saying a damper is bad because it constantly fails to work as intended, requires an hour of service after every ride below freezing. Oh and shit dont forget, do not pick your bike up by the saddle if the post is dropped! I guess for me its been love-hate, but damn, for the last year and after many many headaches it's been almost all hate. I like the post and it feels great when its working, and I don't even despise the delicate remote since its easy to actuate when flipped over to the opposite side, but in practice it's just way too inconsistent. Some last a good long while, some last a week, all will Always fail in the cold. Remote can snag your shorts easily when standing up climbing over a steep feature or anytime your thigh is close to the bars, and is a very delicate and thin steel plunger, and that damn remote is very expensive to replace! Only redeeming qualities are that it feels good when its working, and RS has typically been good about warranty replacements, but you are still without that post for weeks.
  • + 2
 reverb, 2 years use, no service at all, works perfectly... brand new non stealth version 179€!!
  • + 2
 no photos of the triggers???? arent they important either?
  • + 1
 Crankbros has the best lever w/fox one step below.
  • + 1
 Is anybody knows if the KS Lev DX reliability is comparable to the Lev Integra?
  • + 2
 I only use the DX as its the most reliable post KS makes by far. It just isn't internally routed but totally worth it and often overlooked
  • + 1
 The game changer will probably need to be wider seatposts dia so droppers can be telescopic and >160.
  • + 1
 specialized makes an externally routed command post its called the command post blacklite fyi
  • + 2
 Two words. X Fusion Strate. (Ok, two words and a letter) @x-fusion-shox
  • + 2
 My fox is still working
  • + 1
 My reverb is shit RF ftw!
  • + 1
 Thomson cartridge is serviceable Smile ))
  • + 1
 pics of the remotes would have been nice
  • + 1
 Of course, no Nukeproof one ????
  • + 1
 I think ill wait for the Magura vyron.
  • + 1
 an objective, non-biased review on pinkbike?
  • + 0
 I know, I've hardly seen a single 9point8 ad on here. They must just pay PB directly.
  • + 1
 I don't know, I feel let down..
  • + 1
 my wire for my dropper post just broke... so sad
  • + 1
 Creak free head on a KS? I call bullsh!t on that one.
  • + 1
 Where do you get a 9.8 that's less than the costs of the others?
  • + 1
 Am I the only one here who uses a Sunrace lever shifter for my Dropper?
  • + 2
 What is that?
  • + 1
 more more more post like this very useful!!!
  • + 1
 Vernon Felton's presence showing already?!? haha maybe
  • + 1
 Dropper posts are so overpriced. ..crazy
  • + 1
 Heads up, pink bike is going to give us more.... Head???
  • + 0
 My Reverb was too long for my seat tube, so I just cut a couple inches off the bottom. Works like a charm!
  • + 1
 @AZRyder did you cut the reverb? My friend have problem fitting a dropper post to his giant trance. The seat tube was too short.
  • + 3
 Yessir. Cut a couple inches right off of the bottom.
  • + 5
 I'm just kidding. Don't actually do that. It doesn't work like that. You can't just cut it.
  • + 1
 Hang on a sec AZRyder, lemme just put this saw down......
  • + 1
 lol you almost got me Smile )
  • + 1
 I thought it would be funny imagining someone doing that, but then the human in me came out and thought "what if they actually do it and get hurt?". Definitely do not do that. I'm not sure if the reverb uses air or not, but I don't want to somebody to hurt themselves, halfway across the globe or not.
  • + 1
 I got KS LEV Integra 125 mm for $160. That is amazing.
  • + 1
 Funny the 9point8 is roughly the most expensive dropper post in europe...
  • + 0
 No Gravity Dropper = FAIL.
  • + 0
 X-Fusion's Hilo... PURE SHIT...
  • + 0
 I'm hungry!
  • + 0
 fuck yeah 9point8!
  • + 0
 Great stuff
  • - 3
 Hallelujah
  • - 3
 a lever under the seat would be best, no cables, no remote on the bars and would work on any frame.
  • + 3
 there is one and taking ur hands off in a nasty situation can be bad to adjust it
  • + 2
 I used to have one like that from ks. Works great if you just pedal up a road, put the seat down and ride, but for any trail that goes up and down it's pretty annoying
  • + 1
 no way!!
  • + 2
 have the lever under the jewels
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