DT Swiss OPM O.D.L Fork - Review

Jan 21, 2016
by Mike Levy  
You probably think of hubs or maybe rims when someone mentions the DT Swiss name, but the company also offers a lineup of ten forks under the OPM moniker that range from 100mm to 150mm of travel. It's the 120mm travel OPM O.D.L model that's reviewed here, a fork that DT Swiss says is, ''The choice of strong and aggressive riders.'' The $1,159 USD OPM employs DT Swiss' O.D.L damper that allows the rider to choose between Open, Drive, and Lock compression modes, either via a remote or by way of a crown-mounted lever, and the chassis features 32mm stanchion tubes and an interesting looking reverse arch design.

The 29er OPM's 1,673 gram weight stacks up competitively against other 29er trail oriented forks, with Fox's 34 coming in at 1,805 grams and RockShox's Reba weighing 1,662 grams. The OPM's 32mm stanchions and lightweight chassis obviously help in this regard, and the fork better aligns with pure cross-country offerings from DT Swiss' competition. Regardless, the company says that the 120mm OPM slots into the trail / all-mountain spectrum on their performance chart.



OPM O.D.L Details

• Intended use: trail
• Travel: 120mmm
• Spring: air
• Damper adjustments: low-speed compression, three-position compression, rebound
• Low-speed compression tuneable in Open mode
• Remote or crown operated three-position compression
• Stanchions: 32mm
• Tapered steerer only
• 15mm DT Swiss RWS thru-axle
• Weight: 1,673 grams (w/ 16.5cm steerer, axle)
• MSRP: $1,159.00 USD
DT Swiss fork review test

What's Inside the OPM?

O.D.L Damper: The fork's O.D.L damper is a closed unit, but DT Swiss have come up with a pretty clever way to incorporate a floating piston into the design that actually sits outside the damper body. Nearly all rear shocks employ an air-backed floating piston, with its purpose being to compensate for fluid displacement - as the damper rod compresses into the shock, the spring-backed piston also compresses. This design allows the damper to be completely full of oil and have zero air in it, and it also provides important back-pressure to keep the oil from cavitating (foaming) when the shock is working hard. The same basic principles apply to the expanding rubber bladders that RockShox and Fox use within their forks, although the execution is different. DT Swiss, however, has chosen to use a spring-backed floating piston rather than a bladder.


DT Swiss fork review test
  The OPM's NCS air spring assembly at top, and the fork's O.D.L damper below.


The neat thing about the O.D.L damper is that the floating piston actually sits outside of the damper body, between it and the inner wall of the stanchion tube, and a number of small oil bleed holes that allow the oil to travel into and out of the cartridge as the fork compresses and rebounds. And, because the piston is sealed against the inside wall of the stanchion tube with a large O-ring, the cartridge is still a sealed unit without any air in it. Pretty clever.

When the fork is compressed, oil is forced up and through the compression assembly at the top of the cartridge, providing damping. The same oil is then forced out of the aforementioned bleed holes and into a small space between the cartridge and the stanchion tube, just under the fork's top cap. The spring-backed floating piston is compressed while providing counter pressure when the oil returns back through the bleed holes (both shown to the right).

This piston would usually be referred to as an IFP (internal floating piston), but it almost makes more sense to refer to it as an EFP (external floating piston) when it comes to the O.D.L damper.
DT Swiss fork review test
The floating piston sits atop the coil spring, and the bleed holes are just below the top cap's threads.

When the fork is set to 'Open' mode, the oil flows through the low-speed compression channel where it's controlled by a tapered needle rod, the position of which is operated by the blue dial atop the fork leg. When the fork's 'Drive' mode is selected, all of the oil flow is directed to the high-speed compression circuit to provide a firmer feel, and when the 'Lock' mode is engaged, the oil bypasses both the low- and high-speed circuits for the blow-off channel.

Rebound damping is controlled at the opposite end of the cartridge, via the high-speed rebound piston and low-speed rebound orifice. When the floating piston pushes the oil back into the cartridge, it passes through the low-speed rebound channel at slow speeds, but higher shaft speeds force the oil to bypass to the high-speed, shim controlled path where it is better regulated.
DT Swiss
DT Swiss' illustration shows the path that the oil takes in each of the three compression modes.



DT Swiss fork review test
  The NCS air spring assembly consists of a negative coil spring rather than an air-backed design.


NCS Air Spring: The OPM employs a conventional air spring system that's adjusted by way of a Schrader valve at the top of the left fork leg. DT Swiss has gone with a negative coil spring (that's the NCS in the name) instead of a lighter weight air system that is self-adjusting, and while there is probably a slight weight penalty for this, anyone who's had their fork begin to suck down into its travel due to air moving from the positive to the negative chamber isn't going to mind.

There is currently no way to tinker with fork's air volume via volume spacers like you can with RockShox or Fox forks, but DT Swiss do say that they are working on an easily retrofittable design that will allow riders to dial in more or less progression through the stroke.



The OPM's Chassis

The OPM's one-piece magnesium lowers feature a reverse arch that may remind some of us of a Manitou fork, and their reasoning is the same. The company says that the arch's position behind the fork makes for, ''more compact, stiffer construction than bridges that run in front of the stanchions,'' and a peek from behind reveals the lattice design that DT Swiss says is load-optimized to reduce weight without sacrificing rigidity. Plus, it also looks really cool, if you ask me.


DT Swiss fork review test
DT Swiss claims that the reverse arch improves torsional rigidity.
DT Swiss fork review test
The latticed design looks like quite the mud catcher.


The fork's tapered steerer tube is pressed into a slim looking aluminum crown and the OPM sports 32mm stanchions. Now, the diameter of a fork's stanchion tubes has become an easy way to classify it as far as its intentions go, with a 32mm number being what most manufacturers use for their cross-country race forks. DT Swiss, however, say that the OPM is suited to trail and all-mountain riding, and even the 150mm travel OPM fork sports 32mm stanchions.

With that in mind, I'd probably argue that the 120mm OPM O.D.L that's reviewed here should be judged against forks like RockShox's Reba and Revelation (which has 32mm stanchions) and Fox's 34 platform rather than either company's cross-country race offerings.

A 15mm thru-axle ties the legs together, and it's no surprise to see DT Swiss go with their own RWS axle for the job. It's a tool-free setup that threads in from the right side, and the spring-loaded handle can be lifted up off of the splines to better align it when it's tightened up or to clear the fork leg when you're removing it.
DT Swiss fork review test
No tools required.






Riding the OPM O.D.L Fork


Air Spring Performance - Most company's recommended air pressures are too low for anyone who's riding at a decent level, a fact that's proven by many fork manuals still telling customers to run way too much sag. DT Swiss took the exact opposite approach. I started off with 84 PSI, as per their recommendation, but it was pretty obvious that wouldn't work unless I really wanted to rattle my teeth loose. I kept dropping the pressure by a few PSI at a time until the fork began to feel much, much more active, but even when I ended up at 72 PSI, which turned out to be ideal for my weight and terrain, the fork never felt quite as active and as supple as the latest from other brands.


DT Swiss fork review test


The DT Swiss fork uses a pretty straightforward air spring system that employs a coil negative spring and, at least as of right now, no purpose-built volume adjustment system like found in most of the competition. DT Swiss are working on a volume adjustment add-on, I was told, but I doubt that I would have used it even if it was available. There feels to be a good amount of ramp-up to the fork's stroke, and I can't recall a single hard-bottoming moment that would cause concern. Full travel, yes. Smashing down onto the end of the fork's stroke, definitely not, despite running well under the recommended air pressure. Ready to huck, then.



Chassis Performance - The OPM is in the same ballpark weight-wise as a SID or Fox's 32, but there's something about the DT Swiss fork that makes it look like it'd be even lighter than both of those. It's not, but it does feel more resistant to flexing than either and is probably closer to a heavier fork when it comes to rigidity. Given that it has 32mm stanchions, I was surprised at how precise the OPM felt, and I'd say it's more in line with a Fox 34 on this front.


DT Swiss fork review test
  The OPM, with its 32mm stanchions, can't compare to burlier all-mountain forks, but it's surprisingly rigid.


The RWS 15mm thru-axle isn't quite as quick to use as other designs out there, only because you have to clock the handle to clear the lower leg until it unthreads enough to just spin it out, but we're talking about mere seconds here, nothing more. And I have to say that I prefer the solid feel to the RWS axle over a Maxle; it just feels like it would last a long, long time.



Damper Performance - It used to be that the large majority of forks were under-damped from the factory, probably in search of that plush "parking lot feel" that only means they won't work well when you're pushing hard. These days, all of the major players are pretty dialed, and the OPM certainly doesn't suffer from not enough compression control. Actually, it seems like it has the opposite issue, although friction in the damper design could also be a contributing factor. I hard a hard time getting the DT Swiss fork to feel supple, even with the anodized blue low-speed compression dial backed all the way out, set to the 'Open' mode and with relatively low air pressure in the opposite leg. It would be more on par with the competition if this was three or four years ago, but with Fox and RockShox going to great lengths to create suspension that's as smooth and active as possible, the DT Swiss fork feels a bit dated.


DT Swiss fork review test
Out of twenty-seven clicks, I ran the OPM's rebound at eleven from closed.
DT Swiss fork review test
There are twenty clicks of low-speed compression that only affect the fork when the damper is set to Open mode, and I often found myself running it wide open in a search for a more active stroke.


The lowers slide up and down the stanchions with very little effort when the fork's internals have been removed, but it turns out that there's a fair bit of friction within the damper that certainly isn't helping matters. Pushing the damper rod into the cartridge reveals a sticky stroke, and I suspect that much of that is coming from the large diameter O-ring on the spring-backed piston that slides up and down against the inside surface of the stanchion. Also, the fork had an off-putting clunk at the top of its stroke when it was locked out, something that was noticeable when I unweighted the front of the bike while climbing.

The three-position Open-Drive-Lock system does perform as advertised, though, as all three settings offer extremely distinctive ride characteristics. I suspect that many Pinkbike readers would prefer the non-remote version (you can swap between the two pretty easily), but the space-age-looking remote is surprisingly easy and intuitive to use when on the move.

The two levers cycle smoothly and with little effort, and the release lever snaps the fork back into action. I'm not a big fan of using remotes, to be honest, but DT Swiss have done well with theirs.
DT Swiss fork review test
NASA, which button launches this shuttle? Appearances aside, the OPM's remote actually works quite well.



DT Swiss responds: ''We have tested this fork extensively with the input of our professional World Cup racers in Europe. The feel and progression, chassis stiffness, weight, and damper performance are all based on the needs and preferences of these riders. Each DT Swiss fork is hand made by DT Swiss, and as such follows our reputation for precise manufacturing.''




Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesAt $1,159.00 USD, the OPM O.D.L is more expensive than all of its competition, bar the uber-expensive RockShox RS-1. And while it isn't a bad fork - it would have compared well against most of its competition just a handful of years ago - it doesn't offer the same sort of performance that can be had by spending less money. What it is, though, is a lightweight fork that many will see as being exotic, and it's best suited to a weight-conscious rider who wants something out of the ordinary. - Mike Levy




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122 Comments

  • + 75
 I do appreciate that Pinkbike is reviewing other options out there. Not everything is going to be a revolutionary product. But expensive, lacking in performance and not particularly nice looking. Move along. Nothing to see here.
  • + 37
 And its not even electric? Come on man, its 2016!
  • + 4
 I was actually thinking it's a nice looking fork haha
  • + 19
 You've been drinking, haven't you...
  • + 21
 PB, now go the other way and review 180mm Formula ThityFive, the one Liteville specs...
  • + 0
 Sounds like the Suntour Aion is the way to go then. Can that be considered exotic?
  • + 15
 Drinking? just the water in Flint.
  • + 3
 WHERE'S THE CARBON?
  • - 3
 ''...We need green american forks, other product are shit !!11!!11!''
  • - 2
 the front brake line route screams stay away from this and manipoos
  • + 4
 Although i was never considering to buy it i appreciate that this review could help someone from potentially wasting their money on a component when there are much better alternatives. How else do we know what not to buy?
  • - 2
 Not a dual crown fork. Not 8" of travel. Not interested.
  • - 1
 My maxle is still going strong since 08 bud lol
  • + 31
 you put the fork on backwards
  • + 12
 Didn't know Walmart was an ibis dealer?
  • + 26
 even comes with a bell on the handlebar
  • + 10
 Try telling that to Manitou haha
  • + 7
 I have a bell on my enduro. Clears the track just fine...
  • + 4
 A32mm forks for agressive riders... Yeah right
  • + 6
 @freerabbit not that crazy. Maybe not standard now, but not uncommon 10 years ago. Manitou again is the example, I think the Sherman was a 180mm fork with 32 mm stations, and reverse arch. Reverse arch adds nice stiffness to the chassis.
  • + 11
 No need for a bell if u have hope hubs.
  • + 6
 Actually, although it looks goofy, the brace will stop some mud hitting the stanchions.

(If it mentions this in the review then great, but I couldn't be bothered to read the review - i looked at the pictures and skipped to the comments)
  • + 1
 Manitou forks have excellent fore/aft and lateral stiffness. My q/r Tower Pro was stiffer than my qr15 RS Recon..go figure?
  • + 21
 "We have tested this fork extensively with the input of our professional World Cup racers in Europe"....that is where they got off track. WC racers do NOT want a plush fork, we (99.9% of PB readers) do!
  • + 11
 Well, at that price point, to me it seems like it is designed for riders who (want to) ride professionally. Thereby it seems like the fork for a pro rider and not so much for the average Joe. Nothing wrong with that though, just means it is a very quality fork for a small niche market.
  • + 0
 Right. So what your saying is pro riders want expensive and under performing products? That's bullshit. You can get a fork from Fox, RS, or Manitou where you can increase the pre-load on and still have a supple fork. This fork is shit for at $1200.
  • + 3
 @SlowdownU not quite there. Have you ever tried a fork of WC riders? It is nothing you'd like to have on your bike EVER, no matter if it's XC, EN or DH rig. Undeperforming it's the name for all of them. At insane speeds, insane loads and insane trail times undeperforming might be something you need to win. It's just the matter of perception.
  • + 18
 Love Levy's reviews! Well written, and on point, every time.
  • + 4
 Side Note: Raceface cockpit & cranks, SRAM brake levers, Shimano front disc, is that a SRAM rear disc? & what dropper is that? I guess this is a true "test bike". And agreed, Levy's review are great.
  • + 11
 Thanks for the kind words. That bike sees a ton of miles with quite a mix of components on it. The dropper post is a 9point8 Fall Line. Here's the review: www.pinkbike.com/news/9point8-fall-line-dropper-post-review-2015.html
  • + 0
 @mikelevy Will we be seeing a review of the Ripley LS? Would love to hear your thoughts on that bike!
  • + 9
 @jaydubmah - Yup, in the near future. I spent a lot of last year on the previous version of the Ripley, and now I have both the new version (with the updated frame) and the new version with the LS geometry. It'll be a comparison review between the two.
  • + 13
 Please everyone remember this review to insert the link when PB gives a great review to a DT Swiss wheel and everyone starts crying that it is just a paid advertisement, like they always do.
  • + 12
 There are two things I hate in this world:

1. Racial Intolerance
2. The Swiss
  • + 0
 It's the Dutch but I see what ur saying
  • + 9
 'We have tested this fork extensively with the input of our professional World Cup racers in Europe. The feel and progression, chassis stiffness, weight, and damper performance are all based on the needs and preferences of these riders....''

^ Maybe that's the problem... a trail fork is not meant to ride or feel like a world cup XC fork.
  • + 2
 They should market it like the stiction is meant to be there so the fork is more efficient while pedalling.
  • + 12
 Exotic usually means expensive, complains all the time, shows up late for dinner, and your parents don't like her.
  • + 1
 I know from experience that description is usually bang on.
  • + 7
 For the price and lack of performance I'll pass. I'm on the new Fox FIT 4 34 130 29r and it's amazing. RC gave me the inside scoop on the damper and I picked one up last March for a great price. Unless you're doing XC a 32mm stanchion fork is a wet noodle on a 29r.
  • + 4
 As mentioned in the text, that lattice work is going to hoover up mud like noone's business! Why didn't they point the lattice forward? I know it would be fugly from the front end of the bike but it is tucked away behind the stanchions. In terms of not collecting a kilo or so of trail mud it would have been a lot better performance wise.

Why don't manufacturers make little silicone inserts which just pop into the gaps in the lattice work? Sure it's a smidgen extra weight but with a nice low density piece of silicone covering the gaps you're less likely to fill them with mud which is of a higher density.
  • + 1
 nice idea I might just make my own Smile
  • + 5
 Just spray some expanding foam into them and cut off the excess
  • + 2
 @natemeyer - Awesome idea! I think the usual sticker trick would work fine as well, and it's also not that big of a deal that mud gets in there - it gets everywhere - but the foam idea is a good one.
  • + 1
 Maybe muds different over here. Sometimes when it's claggy and there's fibrous bits of woodland material all mixed in you can build up quite a big collection on the brace. Not having holes for it to stick in would make it a lot less likely to build up. Good diy solution idea with the expanding foam though.
  • + 6
 Suntour Aion looks even better now.
  • + 2
 I've always preferred the bronze colour stanchions. It usually meant that it was a higher spec fork. However my Pikes are black, by old 66's were black. But my Shiver SC's were one of the nicest looking forks I'd owned.
And I'd trade them all for an Ohlins RXF in 26"....
Or 650B as a compromise
  • + 2
 USE- trail... I now think that manufacturers use this term to decline responsibility. Because I know such sport disciplines as XC, enduro, DH and FR. But I have never heard about trail competitions. So please tell me can I use details on which it is written trail as enduro details? If not then what is the difference between XC and trail? And eventually how can I use this fork? Thanks for all answers!
  • + 3
 I own a DTSwiss EXC 150 for 4 years.I'm very pleased with my fork and i can't complain.It's easy to service and not even a minor problem.It's true,mine having the same" problem" on small bumps,not so active.
  • + 3
 Like da!
of course it will be light wight then Fox 34..
I prefer few grams more with more stiffness..

But...it's DT swiss..and they rock.^^
  • + 1
 Hope it holds up better than the XMM forks they use to sell. Have a 120mm XMM in my rarely used XC bike and the ODL internals broke within a few rides. Fork was send back to DT Swiss got it back in a week or two and hardly rode the bike after that but last week, took it out for a ride.. and again, malfunction in the ODL. Out of warranty now of course. POS, especially for the price. Never again a DT Swiss fork.
  • + 1
 @Mikelevy

How come no comparison to the Scott Twinloc remote?

I still don't understand how DTSWISS and Fox can have these remotes and not infringe upon any patents from Scott.

Good review by the way. I've always been curious about DTSWISS forks ever since I saw it on Nino's super light Spark.
  • + 2
 @LiquidSpin - I don't think that I've ever used Scott's Twinloc remote. I know RC and Kazimer have both ridden Scotts with it, but I haven't used it enough to comment. Not to sure about the patent question - those things can be complicated!
  • + 1
 @mikelevy ah I see. I'm surprised since I know you've tested more bikes then I can count haha Keep up the great reviews~
  • + 1
 If you like the looks is a matter of taste, but I dissagree with the performance issues, I think it's stiff, light and sensitive after the proper break in time, Another reviewer has simular expierences : twentynineinches.com/dt-swiss-opm-o-d-i-29er-fork-first-impressions .... retail in Europe seems cheaper around 900 USD by the way.
  • + 2
 Uggggghhhh. Can't remember. Who did DT buy their forks from? Was it Pace???? Damn that facial CT scan killing my brain cells!
  • + 2
 Pace
  • + 1
 Thanks.
  • + 2
 Funny, I can't find the word "trail" anywhere on DT's website, particularly for this fork.
  • + 4
 Well there is that performance chart that gives it 4 out of 4 for all mountain/trail and 0 out of 4 for XC as opposed to the race version of the fork which is the opposite.
  • + 2
 @LeDuke - The chart says it all...
  • + 1
 This is close to what it used to say: www.bike24.com/p2108450.html

Or, like this: www.canadabicycleparts.com/dt-swiss-xr-1450-spline-front-wheel-29-inch.html (Yes, I realize that is a wheel).

I.e., they formerly listed it as an XC, and marathon fork.
  • + 1
 Exotic, lightweight, and expensive, DT Swiss' OPM O.D.L fork is very different from what most of us are used to.

BANG FOR THE BUCK?
  • + 3
 White stantions, black lowers
  • + 1
 Anyone else remember Manitou doing the reverse arch thing back in the early 2000's?

Seems like a dud of a product here, more expensive but not as good? No thanks
  • + 2
 I can see that reverse stanchion being a problem on some frames it has a pretty good angle.
  • + 1
 That's a good point I hadn't thought of that
  • + 4
 Get a Reba.
  • + 1
 Did anybody else think of this when they read "OPM"?
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Buwjgi1xV7U
  • + 2
 YES!
  • + 0
 That fork looks like a Pike f$&ked a Manitou, it's the red headed step child no one wants to see! My apologies to all you read heads out there!
  • - 1
 30% sag is too much for an aggressive rider? Someone better let those AMA motocross guys know they are setup all wrong. Just because Gwin can rip on a buckboard doesn't mean every skilled rider needs the same.
  • + 10
 Yup, 30% sag on a fork is insane. Having ridden the bikes of a few World Cup racers, as well as having talked to quite a few of them about setup, I'd be extremely surprised to find that any of them would run that kind of sag up front. In fact, some of the forks literally don't sag more than a few millimeters when you sit on them. I'm far from being a pro, but I know that my bike would handle like a bag of dicks if the fork sagged 30%!

Comparing a motocross bike to a mountain bike doesn't really work. You're better off comparing a professional motocross or supercross racer's suspension to a regular joe rider, and when you do you'll find that yes, the pro runs their suspension quite a bit stiffer for the majority of conditions. More speed usually equals firmer suspension, it's that simple.
  • + 3
 Beautiful frame indeed
  • + 1
 gotta luv "I read about it on the internet" experts and their 4-letter, trigger finger vocabulary ...
  • - 2
 When you drop $1200 on a fork just so you can be "exotic" and "out of the ordinary".
Buy a revelation, buy a 34, don't be the spandex-clad, dad-financed, a**hole who whips up to the trail center with his $12000 trail bike mounted to his tesla.
  • + 19
 I'd be stoked on anything mounted to a tesla ..jealous of anybody who owns a tesla..but ya,I'll stick with my pike rc 26
  • + 49
 Same. I'll take a Tesla and let the hate keep me warm at night.
  • + 6
 To me this seems like a fork marketed towards pro racers, not so much for the average Joe. Even though I haven't ridden it, based on the review it seems like a great fork for pro racers. At that price point I wouldn't expect much average Joes to even consider this fork. Thereby I think it is probably a superb fork for a small niche market. Nothing wrong with that. Not everyone has to market their products specifically for Pinkbike members.
  • + 5
 My wife has a Nissan Leaf - does that count?
  • + 2
 Move to the Bay Area, Teslas are everywhere, they aren't that exciting, then you won't feel the need
  • + 2
 Teslas are exciting. The thing that is not exciting though is dudes in turbo charged +2 litre gasoline fueled cars who think they keep it real by owning a car with such engine and manual gearbox, pressing hard on accelerometer on straight between one line of traffic lights and the other, reaching the incredible speed of +10 of what is allowed. Masturbation comes in many colors but there are very few reasons to cover it up. Especially by gloryfying particular types of cars or bikes, then whining on other particular ones.
  • + 1
 Ya I've driven a few roadsters but would love to own a model s.i drive a non turbo Subaru
  • + 2
 Egh' I've seen it on the buy-sell section on PB for 400 bucks.
  • + 1
 Pls - no camo or leopard ano stanchions although I'm philosophically OK with either pattern in other applications.
  • + 1
 Okay seriously, who had the great idea to put the stanchions in the back?!?!
  • + 1
 Around $700 on eBay from velodyne...not that I'd take this over a 2016 Fox for a bit more.
  • + 1
 You can get the Fox for less. I got a 2016 34 for $630 to my door.
  • + 1
 Intelligent damping system and a incomprehensible lack of plushness, given the DT Swiss experience.
  • + 0
 nice review! it is so clear to see the internal structure! the IFP of the damper is pretty nice design, hope DT will do more revolution of shocks and forks
  • + 1
 'We the OPM clique and that's how we roll Now get some education from my man Shakey-Lo'
  • + 1
 Dt Swiss? Nah, I still prefer Pace. I still own some Rc40 fighters with 20mm axle.
  • + 1
 Sturmey-Archer called, they want they're shifter back.
  • + 1
 TLDR: DT should stick to making wheel parts...
  • + 1
 Agree. At least they are good at it. No more work to do on forks
  • + 1
 Is the remote weight included in total weight? I suspect not so...?
  • + 4
 The total weight does not include the remote, my bad. The remote weighed just 29 grams (w/o cable or housing) on my digital scale.
  • + 1
 Is that an arch or a mud deflector?
  • + 2
 Ouch.
  • + 1
 Is ODL the way DT Swiss spell CTD?
  • + 5
 Overly Damped Lemon
  • + 2
 Oh dear lord.
  • - 1
 Is it just me or is anyone else just not digging the black stanctions look? Like its been over used?
  • + 4
 Its time for a new color. Im thinking oil slick?
  • + 20
 it's just you
  • + 3
 Or atleast rockshoxs could make different colored lowers or something? I just remembered that boxxers were gold and that the only people who had black were world cup winner sponsored by them. Then had the black and gold emblem boxxer with their name on it. It was sweet.
  • + 1
 @chillrider199
you mean gold stanchions?
  • + 15
 Black stanchions certainly look classier than basic hard ano or chrome. My only problem with them is that they are no longer distinctive. When RockShox switched, the world had order - Fox was gold, RS was black, Marz was brown, DVO was green, and BOS was... ah... *champagne*. But now even BOS is swapping over. It's not unique anymore.
  • + 6
 Thankyou @Bluefire you said it right. I kinda suck at this talking thing. But you dont! Haha
  • + 2
 Marz did black stanchions way before RS. But I guess they didn't market it as something special.

My old RS Judy2 had chrome stanchions and I lusted after forks with the classic beige/goldish hard ano. I now have such a fork and lust after cappuccino coating.

Has anybody done purple ano on forks yet?
  • + 1
 If love to see someone do transparent stanchions or to be more to the points "smoke tinted" by using some reinforced perspex or similar, that or an easily interchangeable stanchion kit where you can pick your colour
  • + 2
 check us out
  • + 1
 O.P.M...OPIUM
  • - 2
 120mm+32mm = bad time
  • + 12
 Stanchion diameter is more of a marketing tool than a be-all indicator of stiffness.
  • - 2
 I beg to differ. I have ridden lots of forks and I wouldn't own a fork with a 32mm dia stanchion in anything over 100mm or travel. I also weigh more than most people, which certainly has an effect.
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