DT Swiss Spline ONE EX1501 Wheelset - Review

Apr 1, 2014
by Matt Wragg  

DT Swiss made an unconventional move when they launched their Spline ONE range of wheelsets. They don't scale the wallet-scaring heights of the innovative Tricon and carbon wheels. Instead, DT Swiss have chosen to launch a relatively obtainable wheelset as their flagship offering for 2014 - the Spline ONE - and it introduces updates to virtually every aspect of DT Swiss' previous wheel designs. Spline ONE wheels are available in three models: XR, XM and EX 1501, which cover everything from XC through to enduro racing. We tested a set of the EX1501 wheels - their strongest offering and one which is ridden on the Enduro World Series by riders like Nico Lau, Adam Craig and Manuel Ducci. The XR and XM models are available in all three wheel diameters, while the EX version is only made for 26" and 27.5" wheels, although we hear rumors that a 29" version is in the works right now. Axle adapters are offered to fit 15mm and QR forks at the front and QR and 12mm x 135mm, or 142mm rear axles. Freehub bodies are available for both a standard fitting and the XD driver body for XX1. The pair of EX1501 test wheels tipped the scales at 1730g (claimed) and come with an MSRP of $1035 USD.

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  Our test setup: 27.5" EX1501 wheels, mounted with Schwalbe's Super Gravity tires - since October, we have put hundreds of kilometers in on them.


Details:

• Purpose: All-mountain/trail/enduro
• Sizes available: 26" and 27.5"
• Rim: Aluminum,reinforced spoke eylets, 25mm internal width
• Updated 36-tooth-engagement freehub mechanism
• Tubeless ready
• QR/15mm front axle compatibility
• 12x142mm and QR/135mm rear axle compatibility (12x135mm optional)
• Available with standard and XD Driver freehubs
• Weight: 1730g (pair, claimed)
• MSRP: $1035 USD


Construction

At the heart of the Spline ONE wheels is an all-new hub design. This is a big deal for DT Swiss as they are an update for their classic 240 hubs. Quite simply, the 240s were flawless, they were light, strong and lasted forever, more than holding their own as one of the premium hubs available for longer than we can remember. That was a tough act to follow, but DT are confident that they have surpassed them. The hub shell itself is now a two-piece design they claim has allowed them to create a more complex shape that reduces the overall weight without compromising the strength of the body. Either end of the hub is now a modular design to allow riders to switch between differing axle standards and brake disc mounting system without the need for tools. Internally their ratchet system has been upgraded to a 36 tooth system DT says offers 10 degree engagement and more efficient power transfer.

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  Nearly every part of these wheels is new - from the modular hubs with the improved freehub, through to the unique ball and socket type eyelets in the rims. They are wide, strong and tubeless ready.


The innovation for these wheels doesn't stop at the hub though, the rim has been completely re-designed too. The most obvious change is the internal diameter, which DT Swiss have widened on all the models, with our EX1501 test wheels sporting a healthy 25mm internal width. While the new rim is wider, DT have used a new profile to reduce the weight at the same time. Another change for the rim profile was to improve the shape for tubeless setups, putting less force into the sidewalls. This was coupled with a new rim strip designed especially for the EX1501 wheels. Welding processes to join the rim have been improved too, to the point where it is almost impossible to find the weld joint. While it may look like the wheels are eyelet-less, they feature the Pro Head reinforcement system, where the spoke head and eyelet are inside the rim and work together as a ball and socket, allowing the spoke to move freely and find the more natural trajectory to the hub. They claim that this improves manufacturing consistency, makes truing easier and reduces spoke breakages. The system-specific Squorx nipples can be tensioned in two ways: from inside with a special inverted torx key tool that provides a larger, more consistent contact area; or from the outside with a regular spoke key.

Setup

We have only run these wheels with Schwalbe Super Gravity tires, which are nice to work with for this kind of setup. The wheels were nothing short of a joy to mount tubeless, and they were close to being sealed by just putting the tire on the rim - adding the air seemed like a formality. We even managed to mount a set of tires with a little hand pump. That said, we could push these wheels hard enough to lose air under really hard cornering and some sharp-edged hits, so you will need to check your air pressures periodically.

Riding Impressions

In terms of feel on the bike, there isn't much we can write about the Spline ONE EX1501s. They were stiff enough for hard riding, and we never encountered an issue with wheel flex, no matter how hard we pushed things. Yet they are aluminum rims, so they don't compete in the ultra-stiff carbon territory - which may even be a positive point for some people. Weight is good - 1730 grams is a respectable, if not a superlight weight figure for a 27.5" wheel, which helps keep the bike feeling lively when you don't have gravity to assist you. What makes their weight most impressive, is how strong the wheels are. We first fitted the wheels to our test bike in October and since then, they have followed us through two other bikes. In that time, we haven't had so much as a loose spoke, even on the fast, rocky terrain around Sospel in Southern France. To put that into perspective, we have used some of their direct competitors and some and downhill-rated wheels on this terrain and found dents and loose spokes within a matter of weeks. Talking to one of DT's sponsored racers, at the EWS in Val D'Allos last year, he flatted at the top of a 15-minute descent and rode it out to the bottom. All he needed to do was tighten a couple of spokes and he raced for the rest of the weekend on the same rim. DT probably won't thank us for suggesting this, but we wouldn't be surprised to see weight-conscious downhillers give these rims a try.

Bike Test
  Putting the EX1501s through their paces aboard the Yeti SB75.


We are big fans of the wider rim profile on the EX5101 wheels. DT are a fairly conservative company and in many ways, they don't tend to leap into fashions or trends, yet they have positioned themselves near the forefront, as other manufacturers catch on to the benefits of wider rim profiles. The improvements to the hub are incremental. You shouldn't rush to throw away your 240 hubs, but you will notice the slightly faster engagement out on the trail, and so far it looks like their reliability is in no way compromised. In our time with the Spline ONE wheels, our only issue was busting a spoke when a rear mech' got punched into the wheel. Although that does lead us onto what may put some people off - the rim and spoke technology is proprietary. You cannot use any old spoke, nipple or eyelet with these wheels. However, DT have one advantage over any other wheel manufacturer: they are the main spoke supplier for most high-end and aftermarket wheels. That means that wheelbuilders worth their salt will have accounts with a distributor to buy DT parts. They may not have them to hand, but they should be able to get hold of replacement parts easily enough.


Pinkbike's Take:
DT have simply got these wheels right. Weight is on the money, especially considering how stiff and strong they are. On the rim, the wider profile is something we're big fans of here at Pinkbike and the tubeless performance is good. At the hub, they are a worthy update from the classic 240 hubs. They are a hundred dollars or so more expensive than some of their competitors, but we would say they are worth the extra cash. These are, without a doubt, one of the best factory wheelsets money can buy right now. - Matt Wragg

DT Swiss


112 Comments

  • + 51
 Better release a 559 version too.
  • + 2
 Right on! How could they possibly forget such a major market contender?!?
  • + 4
 So how exactly are these different to their EX1750 wheelsets, the ones pro downhillers have been using for years? Apart from EX1750 are 20mm compatible.
I thought DT used the number to show the weight of the wheelset? 1500 grams would show an improvement.
  • + 0
 On DT site claimed weight for 26'' is 1400g and for 27.5'' is 1460g.

www.dtswiss.com/Wheels/MTB-Wheels-/XR-1501-Spline-sup-%C2%AE-sup-ONE-27-5
  • - 1
 maybe they fit in a 559 enduro specific frame
  • + 2
 TheDHDude...They DO do a 26" verion - www.dtswiss.com/Wheels/MTB-Wheels-/EX-1501-Spline-sup-%C2%AE-sup-ONE-26
Lemondade.. wider rim profile, better tubless compatibility, round gauge spokes so less lateral flex than the aerospoked 1750
  • + 8
 @mitsuoka. Your looking at the weight of the XR1501, not the EX1501
  • + 41
 "don't scale the wallet-scaring heights" - "relatively obtainable" - Excuse me if I am being irrational, but for most average humans, $1000 for wheels is not an easy purchase to justify. While these aren't the MOST expensive out there, the price is really only "obtainable" at a stretch. These are elite wheels, with a price to match.
  • + 10
 JBR - don't look at the cost of carbon wheel sets, you might have a heart atack.
  • + 11
 So then what are ENVEs? Carbon Havens? They are elite wheels, but cost more than double this much. Sure they may be a bit stiffer, but these DT wheels have the same hubs found on most $2k+ wheels, are relatively light, and bulletproof. Personally, I think I would choose these over ENVEs any day.
  • + 5
 No, he's right though, with smart buying, l put together a custom back wheel for $300 then bought a WTB Laserdisc Trail off CRC for $130. That's obtainable
  • + 7
 It's funny; I remember people complaining about the cost of Stan's/Notubes rims and when you actually compare them to Mavic or other equivalents they are quite pricy, especially over here in Europe. I just put together a set of Stan's Crests on XT hubs for my XC bike with DT spokes and the price was a shitload less "wallet scary" for a set of wheels that are of course not as light as their carbon equivalents at 1700g but are vastly superior to the shite DT Swiss wheels that came on the bike (2012 Scott Scale Expert) at 2100g.

Carbon wheel mafacturers have completely lost the plot and, while before I might have said: "the price compared to a carbon frame cannot be justified", it's now the case that frame maufacturers are using the price of carbon rims to justify a hike in carbon frame costs. There is simply no way that a carbon rim has gone through more development and production process, or uses more material than a frame.
  • + 6
 Yeah I'm with mnorris and JBR. What I (and pretty much every normal person) would consider attainable is well under $1k for the wheelset, probably closer to $500. Just because ENVE and other $2k+ wheelsets exist doesn't mean this isn't an elite-level wheelset too. There are always high-price extremes in pretty much any product, but what products are "attainable" is based on what normal consumers can afford, not how the price compares to the most expensive options.

Unless we're saying that financing bike component purchases is the norm now.... then maybe it's attainable. But that'd be a scary trend.
  • + 2
 Relative to any other quality wheel these are pretty darn obtainable. Sure $1k is a lot to drop on a wheelset, but that's retail. If you can find a deal on these for like 20-30% off you'd be looking at a pretty doable price for good wheels. I'd say the standard price range for quality wheels these days is like $700 to $1,700 with a couple outliers on either end. Enve, I-9 carbon, reynolds carbon... those are elite wheels. Look up those prices if you aren't familiar and you'll see some truly irrational numbers.

But you're right about one thing for sure, for most average humans the prices of everything we (avid bikers) buy is completely insane.
  • + 4
 What you're calling "quality wheels" are the same wheels that are coming spec'd on top-level build kits.... so pretty much elite level by definition. Again, "attainable" is based on what most people can afford/are willing to pay, not on how expensive the boutique items are. Just because a Bugatti Veyron costs millions of dollars doesn't mean that a Ferrari can be called attainable. Sure, a $1k wheelset price isn't as shocking as the carbon options, but it's still WAY beyond what most people are riding on.
  • + 1
 All I'm saying is that, for the quality of the wheels, they are coming in at a good price. Looking at the numbers, they are around 200g lighter and have far better hubs than Flows, for about $400 more. Seems reasonable to me, even though they're not exactly what you would call "affordable".
  • + 2
 I think at the upper end of alloy wheels 1k is really the mark currently, much more than that and your looking at Carbon. Light, stiff, durable, and dependable. Its like cars, you can buy the Audi S5 or the Volkswagon Jetta?
  • + 1
 @matthew oh I'm not saying the wheels are a ripoff or anything, they def seem competitively priced and high quality, worth the money if you need that level of performance. I was just saying they're an elite-level item and not really that accessible/obtainable for mere mortals.
  • + 7
 For anyone that needs help justifying $1k wheels to your significant other, just compare it to the cost of a bass boat ($50k), jet ski ($12k), a pack-a-day cigarette habit ($2k a year), cable TV ($1k a year) or sedentary lifestyle-induced depression or diabetes (priceless).
  • + 1
 They seem in line with the competition. You can buy $500 wheelsets too you know, but I bet they won't be as good as these! I find so many comments rather amusing when it comes to high end parts and bikes. People seem to just get mad because they want it but don't want to pay what it's worth. Then they take it out on the reviewer... Do you guys think that the price is so inflated that if you complain about it, it will come down? If so, maybe your thought process is what needs to be questioned. There are bikes and parts for all budgets. Personally, I would be comparing this purchase with a set of Carbon wheels, $1000 fairly is competitive. And some will choose to stick with aluminum over carbon. IMO, the reviewer wasn't way off on his wording. I think you should be looking at reviews for $500 wheels!
  • + 18
 I love that a wheel set over 1k is "affordable". That aside, they look like a great product. And yes, where is the 559 version???
  • + 13
 $ 1035 for a wheelset is affordable? I am sorry, but it is only affordable compared to ENVE wheels or a new bike. Many riders have the money to pay for them, but most are just treading water to pay for broken parts. Please stay true to the people Pinkbike, $1000 for a Wheelset is real money. Pinkbike gets all of their parts from manufacturers for free, the rest of us have to work for it. If you work a minimum wage job at $10 an hour it would take you 103 hours of work to pay for these, before tax, so about 120 hours of work, roughly a month of work with no expenses.Not affordable at all. Durable yes, affordable no.
  • - 2
 Affordable with monthly installments on your credit card. Many people purchase with CC and justify the purchase by having a small payment every month. $5000 over 5 years is a lot easier than $5000 cash today. I believe this is part to do with the escalating prices of bikes and parts, it's in the culture to buy things we can't afford on credit cards. Dont get me wrong. It's high tech. But damn. It's too expensive.
  • + 3
 speaking of SPILNE wheelsets, the top of the line one costs 1000$, their cheapest AM wheelset is 160eur for a 19mm version and 210eur for a 22mm version. Now, if that isn't cheap I don't know what is. Look it am M1900 and E1900. And they are both tubeless ready.
  • + 2
 When you look at the offerings from Mavic and Easton the DT wheels are right there,
Havens are $1000
CrossMax SX are $1000-1100 and hubs don't hold up as well as DT hubs
I-9 Torch wheels are $1200.
On the flip side you can build a nice custom set for the same money. Even with wide 35-40mm carbon offerings. Just curious to see how they hold up.
  • + 9
 Who says you have to work at a minimum wage job your whole life? If you're young and/or working a low paying job then you are not supposed to be buying this stuff. The grown ups with real jobs buy this fancy stuff, they ride it a few times before realizing they are too busy, and the next season you get to buy it for half the price on the used market. Getting so tired of all this complaining about prices. Yes they are crazy, but guess what YOU DON'T NEED THIS STUFF. You don't need to have the latest greatest shiniest fanciest thing on the trail, just ride whatever you can afford and you will have fun. Or if you do feel you need the latest and greatest, quit complaining and work hard so you can earn it.
  • + 3
 sofarider, it's attitudes like yours that caused the recession. you don't buy toys on credit. EVER
  • + 2
 @ironxcross: I think the issue is that people feel like cycling's getting gentrified and so a lot of people who would otherwise be able to compete gear-wise are getting priced out. And no, it's not all about the bike, but even mid- and lower-end components cost quite a chunk. I like mastadon's comment about "treading water" to just replace what you've got. My XC bike's got a collapsed saddle, and my CX bike's rear derailleur is bent from a run-in with black ice and by the time I've saved up enough to replace either one, I have to pray that the chains are still good since if they aren't, then something's not getting fixed. It's a canard that no one needs this stuff: of course you don't, but that's not what the industry tells its customers and the message is that you need this stuff and if you don't get it you can't compete and your current stuff is obsolete. Also, they'll stop making it, or charge you double what it cost in the first place. Only a very small class of society could afford this equipment in time to use it during their physical or competitive prime.

That said, if it didn't mean risking starvation, I would totally want a set of these.
  • + 1
 Enve wheels are close to $3000 ! That's 3 times more. I think he said "relatively attainable" not "affordable". These are some of the best wheels money can buy, not bargain affordable wheels! So many whiners who feel entitled to get the best for cheap!
  • + 16
 hmm , I don't know ,think i'll stick with Flow Ex and pro2's
  • + 8
 Hear! Hear!

215+92+(84x2)=$475 . That's the math.

Light, wide, anvil tough and $560 left over for...

...... tequila or Shakespeare tickets or gasoline or hair products or bicycle tires or gold stock or crayons or deodorant or tokens of affection for your lover or........
  • + 8
 Or an enduro satchel
  • + 5
 Or spokes, nipples and a build?
  • + 2
 plus 64 spokes at $2 each plus labour to build it.
  • + 1
 @Mastadon Just a thought: Stop reading reviews for stuff you can't afford, then you won't have to get so upset and about it. These wheels were not made for those making $10/hr. unless they still live with their parents, don't pay for rent and food, and will still save for them because they are bike addicts. I would suggest you quit wasting your time reading stuff like this, learn some new skills, make some more money, and come back when you're ready. This review was for "Top Of The Line" wheels that are "relatively attainable" not affordable and attainable. ie: go on your $3000-$8000 bike. Yes, there are some ridiculously priced bikes parts now, I agree. But there are also many bikes and parts that are affordable too. Also, times are changing. Precious resources are getting more precious all the time and will continue to do so as the population grows, economies grow, and resources diminish. If you want a chance at the things you want in life, it starts with your attitude!
  • + 6
 I got a set of xm1501s and have put two hundred hard miles on them so far. The XM is not quite as wide as the EX but considerably lighter. The alloy DT uses for these rims is all new. Forget what you know about old soft DT rims, these things are bombproof. No they aren't cheep but the are very, very light for how strong they are. The next step up from these wheels would be carbon at twice the price. Would buy them again for sure, forget $2400 ENVE wheel sets until I win the lottery.
  • + 2
 I'm interested in these wheels as well. Good to hear you are enjoying them. What bike are you running them on?
  • + 1
 Hi Dub. It's a Pivot Mach 6, stealth black. 26.7lbs with these wheels and a xx1 x01 mix. Love the bike and the wheels!
  • + 2
 im also running the xm1501 on my GT Distortion and have to say im really impressed. Also because i have a good relationship with my LBS I bought these well under retail .
  • + 2
 I'm running the Tricon Xm1550's and they are ridiculously good. Super lightweight, i've had them for a year of hard trail riding and still straight as, no broken spokes, tubeless ready, all axle sizes, xd driver compatible. Only thing I wish for is a slightly wider rim.
  • + 4
 The 559 version will be 4% lighter and stiffer and totally enduro Ha. Would love a set but thats about 12000 of my 3rd world currency...
  • + 10
 No no, 275 is Enduro wheel size, 559 is for mountain biking
  • + 7
 No 20mm?
  • + 4
 A 25mm internal width rim I can't use in a 20mm fork? Are manufacturers trying to phase out 20mm or something? Serious question: What size front wheels do they think we are all running?
  • + 2
 Exactly - I just ordered EX1750 splines bcz of the 20mm requirement. I bet 70% or more of us still run 20mm and 26" bcz we ran Enduro long before it got popular ;-)
  • + 2
 I think I have no problem shelling out about $1k for wheels. Aside the cool factor, good wheels are probably one of the most important and critical component any bike has.

There's that f**cking compromise of having a wheel set that is strong, stylish, reliable and reaaaally light. It could be cheaper, but you would have to remove some of the adjectives I used as well.
  • + 2
 No way I'm paying more for rims than my frame cost. I've said it before and I'll say it again sunringle all the way baby I run mtx 33's and wouldn't trade them for any other rims best 350 I ever spent
  • + 1
 Mtx 33 are too soft and ding easily
  • + 1
 what's the weight of those MTX 33s?
  • + 1
 Show me a rim that doesn't ding man. It made of the same 6000 series aluminum most rims are made from
  • + 1
 The hoops are 660 I'm not sure with hubs and spokes though I never weighed them personally I'm one of those care less about weight guys lol
  • + 1
 660g*
  • + 1
 damn, that's over 1300 grams in just the rims. I guess these DTs are just for people who care about weight lol
  • + 0
 In my opinion the lighter they are the cheaper they should it's less material used and all rims are made basically the same from the same machines it doesn't cost dt any more than it costs sunringle to make a rim it's all about greed period that why I will buy almost nothing that's new and if it is its a cheaper brand like sunringle.
  • + 1
 Correction, it's a Trance Advanced SX, carbon version. Same bike but maybe Aluminum SX doesn't have same wheels so thought I would clarify. Any commentors care to share their opinion? Figure I could sell mine for around $500, spend an extra $500 and get something stiffer like these. I'm not convinced that the other $500-800 wheelsets are going to be that much better. The Giant P-TRX1 wheelset weigh 1650g
  • + 1
 So tubeless ready tyres mean what exactly? Now tubeless ready rims? UST have a bead thingy to make them tubeless specific and UST tyres have a matching shape bead profile and thicker sidewalls because of their tubeless intentions. I've used non tubeless ready rims and tyres together with a Stans kit before which performed well until the side walls got a small tear which I was told was because the sidewalls were too thin and the rubber was weakened by the Stans fluid. Can anybody straighten me out as I'm trying to decide on a wheelset?
  • + 1
 I'm interested. I just don't know if I really need them. I just bought a new Trance SX (AM bike) that comes with Giant P-TRX1 wheels on it. They are supposed to be relatively stiff, light, strong and come with DT Swiss internals. Some say wheels are awesome and some say wheels could be better and are a little flexy? Tempted to switch out wheels while they are still new for resale purposes. I'm 6'4 and 210 lbs., riding in the Pacific North West. Will I really notice that much of a difference in ride quality, especially if I'm not Enduro Racing...?
  • + 1
 And to clarify my question, will I really notice a difference in ride quality over the wheels I have? Has anyone swapped out their wheels to these and said "WOW, I can't believe the difference!" ... "bike feels SO much better"...
  • + 2
 I've been running this wheelset for a while now and love it. But I do wish the front axle could convert to 20mm just in case.
  • + 2
 Wow, go figure.. Matt reviews a CURRENT wheel set from DTs offerings with current on trend features and it reviews extremely well!
  • + 3
 I ride a pair of EX1501 for a few months now and I can only confirm what is said in this article. Unbelievable good!
  • + 1
 How are your wheels holding up after a year? Just out of curiosity, how much do you weigh?
  • + 1
 Still happy with it, zero issues so far. My ride weight is approx. 80kg or 176lbs
  • + 1
 Hiderspider what type of riding do you do? Trail/Enduro, DH?
  • + 1
 So far faultless and easy tubeless setup, riding anything and racing some intro DH. Feel just as light as the mavic crossmax Enduro but that 25mm giving tyres a wider stance and overall a better ride.
  • + 1
 How much do you weigh?
  • + 1
 89kg without gear, wheels just being serviced after 1300miles 8races 3uplift days. Rims still true just some play in bearings and a loose spoke.
  • + 1
 Cheers endurofactory
So they've had a really proper test, taken a beating on DH tracks and done quite a few miles? Would you buy again?
  • + 1
 If standards didn't change yes I would buy again, best option for a alloy based hard hitting light weight wheel.
Very happy Smile
  • + 1
 Cheers again
  • + 3
 I'm having an existentialist crisis right now with all of these Pinkbike articles today…what is life?
  • + 5
 you are nothing. you are everything. you are the shell inside an oyster.
  • + 1
 Open yourself to the vast indifference of the world.
  • + 2
 Are you getting all Albert Camus ("the outsider") on us there because if you are it is the "vast indifference of the universe....." i believe. Sorry for my intrusion if you're not and being a brit anyway shouldn't you quote keats or elliot or.... [ad infinitum}-almost traitorous I would say!
  • + 3
 WHEN THE F**K DID $1000 BECOME AN AFFORDABLE WHEELSET?
  • + 1
 At what part of the article do they call them affordable? I clicked ctrl+f affordable, and only comments showed up
  • + 1
 It was in the title of the post on Facebook, we obviously have different opinions in regards to "affordability."
  • + 1
 "a relatively obtainable wheelset" - first paragraph. While the article doesn't specifically say affordable, "relatively obtainable" implies that the average rider has the means to go out and buy a $1k wheel set. I guess i'm below average...
  • + 3
 Bitch bitch bitch. Pick a cheaper sport!
  • + 1
 I have found buying hubs rims and spokes and then spending some time in my basement with the truing stand the best way to get inexpensive quality wheels. You can do it!
  • + 1
 "The Swiss wheel makers best wheelset for 2014 is also affordable" is that the April fools joke? Just messing with you guys, those wheels look good.
  • + 1
 I would like to have seen the inside diameter of the other two rims. The EX150 are pretty heavy
  • + 2
 Hummm... Anyone see the new ENVE wheels on that new nomad?
  • + 3
 The black er, stealth ones are pretty sick.
  • + 3
 That black nomad in general was sick
  • + 1
 Not huge fan of their rims. Would rather get DT hubs and lace them to WTB Frequency. Cheaper too.
  • + 1
 You do know that these are an all new rim right?
  • + 1
 Well, I look at the track record. Maybe this one is better.
  • + 1
 Just 10 years ago $1000 was a price of the most expensive set of wheels, LOL. Now they are calling it affordable.
  • + 0
 At what part of the article do they call them affordable? I clicked ctrl+f affordable, and the only results are in the comments
  • + 1
 It was in the title of the post on Facebook, we obviously have different opinions in regards to "affordability."
  • + 1
 No, what I was getting at is that this isn't being sold as an affordable wheelset, there are plenty of those on the market. But for a high end wheelset that weighs under 1800 grams and has quality hubs, it's a very fair price.
  • + 1
 Go back to the home page, look at a the description of the article. It says: "The Swiss wheel maker's best wheelset for 2014 is also affordable - with wider rims, reinforced spoke eyelets and a new hub design".
  • + 1
 I stand corrected, sorry for being a dick :S
  • + 1
 accepted.
  • + 1
 25 internal width - YES! Does anyone know if DT Swiss still produces their rims at Mavic?
  • + 0
 I know that a part of their line up is made by Cambria Bicycle Outfitter but it doesn't exclude that Mavic does the rest.
  • - 1
 Both wrong!! I can assure you that DT Swiss do NOT have rims made by Mavic, and NOTHING is made by Cambria Bicycle Outfitter..... Really People!
  • + 3
 So where are their rims made if you may enlighten us? Yes I ask you, please tell me. I will appreciate your answer.
  • + 0
 Switzerland of course, DT has there own rim manufacturing.
  • + 2
 I took my time to check it. Aluminium rims are made in Germany, carbon in Asia.
  • + 1
 I can assure you that no DT Swiss rim is produced by Mavic. DT are in fact the only company that manufactures every part of the wheel. DT manufactures the hub, spokes, nipples, AND rim.
  • + 1
 Thank you for posting this. It shows that DT rolls and welds their own rims. I understand how you may have thought that meant the rims were made by someone else, however the raw extrusion is quite different than the finished product. I want to be clear, these are NOT produced by Mavic as you previously stated.
  • + 1
 I did not state anything, I asked using a rumour I heard long time ago. If you have anything to do with DT as your username could suggest you should have cleared this out immediately. Not my job to clear rumours, I could not give two damns if DT does their rims by Mavic, Hope, Shveinstiger, Morgentosser or Whoeverezzi. Give me a 25 mm internal width rims around 500g sold as separate and I'll buy them rayt NAO! Big Grin
  • + 2
 I wonder if pinkbike thinks that the readers are millionaire or something
  • + 2
 Finally kicked the habit on DT rims! Stans FLOW EX for life!
  • + 1
 Only a matter of time before bmx changes too
  • + 0
 At this price I would like to purchase Chris King+ZTR or something else but not this one...
  • + 1
 SO $1000 for a cheap set of wheels?
  • + 1
 I'm interested in them but need a 20mm end cap option...

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