DVO's New Shock, Compression Upgrade Kit, and a Dropper Post for Climbers - Taipei Cycle Show 2023

Mar 22, 2023
by Mike Levy  
photo


The first thing we're looking for at a tradeshow is new suspension and new bikes, and we weren't disappointed on the first day of the Taipei Cycle Show. DVO showed me the new version of their Topaz that was fitted with tool-free adjustment knobs to tune both the low and high-speed compression settings instead of the three-position T3 pedal-assist switch that we're used to seeing on this do-it-all air-sprung shock.

The new damper circuits are contained in an anodized black cartridge that threads into the side of the shock, replacing that pedal-assist switch and making the updated Topaz more suited to riders who want to dial in the performance for descents than those wanting a firm pedaling platform at the flick of a switch.


photo


The Topaz retains its bladder compensator and external low-speed rebound dial, of course, and will be available in both trunion mounting or with a standard eyelet configuration for around $600 USD when it's available later this year.

Almost more interesting than the shock itself is that DVO is also planning on making the new LSC and HSC compression cartridge available as an upgrade kit. Installation should be relatively easy for anyone comfy getting their hands a bit oily – thread out the cap, remove the stock compression switch, thread in the new assembly, and perform a bleed – and DVO is expecting to sell the kit for around $200 USD. It'll fit not just existing Topaz shocks but also their Jade coil-over, which makes a lot of sense.


Taipei Cycle Show 2023


Also new is an updated Garnet dropper post that replaces the rather conventional version with a travel-limiting collar that's turned by hand. But rather than limiting downward travel, it actually keeps the dropper from fully extending by using a stepped internal design that interfaces with a pin on the post's stanchion tube. The idea, DVO says, is to offer a way for riders to lower their seat to a consistent height for technical climbs where the added clearance can be helpful. How is this different than simply using the remote to lower the seat? That works, but you're unlikely to set it to a consistent height each time.

There's 30mm of total adjustment and each click equals 5mm less extension, and DVO will be offering one version with 170 to 200mm of travel and another with 130 to 160mm. The new Garnet will cost $349 USD (including the remote) and be available in 30.9 and 31.6mm diameters.

Attention all lovers of technical climbs: Does the Garnet's adjustable extension make sense, or are you sticking to a remote for those height adjustments?

Author Info:
mikelevy avatar

Member since Oct 18, 2005
2,032 articles

54 Comments
  • 120 1
 I definitely didn't want to see a picture of the whole seatpost, just an extreme close of one part of it will do thanks.
  • 19 1
 Does the whole picture even matter when it's so expensive? I would love to try the dvo dropper but when it's so much more money than a OneUp... Its hard to justify.
  • 2 2
 @ratedgg13: Not sure you read the whole thing but there is the part where the dropper can be setup to not fully extend at a specific height for technical climbing. I asked OneUp to do that a couple years ago, they said they'd think about it.
  • 4 0
 @DizzyNinja: from what it's saying, it's pretty much an external version of the travel adjust on the oneup, no? Stops the post reaching max height? I don't get what's so revolutionary about it
  • 3 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: Sure, but can you do the OneUp adjustment trailside without getting dirt inside the post? Maybe. Obviously it's not for everyone, but there's enough ppl that live close ish to trails where they'd ride flat smooth at full extension then turn a dial to what they want for trail riding.
  • 4 0
 @DizzyNinja: fox made this called the DOSS. It was great for the time. OneUp and PNW own the dropper market now.
  • 3 2
 @DizzyNinja: Yeah, I read the article - thanks. My point is that offering a new product with a feature most riders aren't asking for, at a premium price doesn't seem like a winning tactic.
  • 5 0
 @ratedgg13: nope, because at that price I’m just going to buy a Revive 2.0
  • 3 1
 @adrennan: Don't think they will own it for long. PNW is just re-branded Tranz-X, so why pay more....Constantly having to re-lube my One Up and had to replace a cartridge after 8 months. When it works it's great, but it's finicky. My buddy's SDG Tellis has been flawless, so if I ever buy a low cost replacement that will be the one..... The only Reason OneUp is interesting is the low stack, but otherwise it's just average performance....Bike Yoke Revive is the best as far as I can see, but it's pricey.

Let's see some long term reviews of this DVO. Maybe it'll be worth it...
  • 3 2
 @Marky771: FYI the PNW posts are actually not re-branded Tranz-X. They have very different measurements and features. Similar internals/cartridge but otherwise different.
  • 1 0
 @Marky771: my pnw has lasted longer problem free than the bike yoke dropper I had.
  • 2 0
 @ratedgg13: Maybe. Although you'll prob see Trans-X posts with similar dims and features soon. Trans-X makes PNW posts and PNW does service for Trans-X (JD factory)....Same-same.
  • 3 2
 @Marky771: Sure, but keep in mind that most Specialized bikes are made by Merida, yet nobody complains that Specialized are just re-branded Merida's. Lots of companies design a component and contract out to a manufacturer to make it. PNW has some pretty unique and compelling characteristics, and price point is nearly identical.
  • 1 0
 @Marky771: strange expereince with Oneup. I have 5 throughout my families bike fleet, newest being 1 year old (new bike) and oldest being 5 years old.... havent serviced any of them. Re-pressurize once per year is necessary.Rotational play when the seat is in bottom position is annoying though.
  • 1 0
 @maestroman21: Did you try the oversize pin kit?
  • 1 0
 @davidrobinsonphoto: not yet, but plan to
  • 16 0
 Quick DVO, go trademark “Clopper Post” (the climber’s dropper post; and an homage to technical climbers’ spirit animal, the clip-clopping mountain goat =)
  • 12 1
 The topaz is a great shock already, it will be interesting to see if they improve on the performance with these changes.
  • 5 0
 depends on the ID10T robot turning the dial thingies
  • 12 0
 I don't know why but my brain hates that the reservoir is smooth.
  • 12 1
 Few strokes with a hack saw will sort that.
  • 2 0
 almost the whole shock's smooth
  • 10 1
 This upgrade kit.....DVO shut up and take my money!!!!
  • 3 0
 Exactly my thought. @DVOSuspension when can we expect this to go on sale???
  • 3 0
 But the 3 postion nothing-nothing-rock lever is on the other side of the shock. Does this leave you with HSC/LSC and 3 positions? How do they interact?
Or do you remove the lever and leave a hole?
  • 2 0
 Wish this had been properly explained...
  • 1 0
 There is a shot of the other side in the new video they just posted. On that shock there is no spot for the lever. I would assume you can't have both based on that. I also assume the kit would have something to seal the spot where the lever is, otherwise the whole bladder and upper shock assembly would need to be replaced which seems like too much. Although $200 USD seems excessive if it is just the dial assembly so maybe it is a bigger job than described.
  • 1 0
 @tubby1536: Where do I find the video?
  • 1 0
 @tubby1536: Found the video. The shock Levy is holding has that spot blanked off but still machined for lever clearance.
Looks like it's mockup/prototype at this stage with the design/machining not properly updated.

It also pokes out a long way.
  • 2 1
 So how does this limiting work exactly? Let's say you have it at full extension. If you want it to extend to the limited setting you first push it down, then rotate the knob and then let it come up again? Seems a bit complex. I would like to use a feature like this on flat twisting singletrack but I would prefer to be able to switch quickly. My ideal system would have a remote like a shifter, with two paddles. Each paddle would work similar to a current dropper remote, but one of them would go down to only ~ 50 mm below pedaling height, instead of 210.
  • 4 0
 Didn't specialized used to have a three position post that everyone loved to hate?
  • 2 0
 @deez-nucks: I didn't own one, but to me a 3 position post would be pretty sweet actually. Unless of course the middle position isn't in the place where you want it. So a 3 position post with an adjustable middle position. That's what I want.
  • 2 0
 and the original fox dropper. I learned to live without it, but i used the middle setting a lot when i had it.

www.pinkbike.com/news/fox-doss-dropper-post-tested-2012.html
  • 1 0
 @deez-nucks: correct. I didn't have problems with it, intuitive to operate and pretty good reliability
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: Ding!

The DOSS was great! Indestructible with just a modicum of maintenance, and so simple to use: press little lever to get ~25% drop, perfect for tech climbs and powering through rough traverses, or hit the big lever to go full drop. So easy, and pretty much exactly what I do with every infinitely adjustable post. Much better than Command Post (and IRCC) "release when you get close and suffer through the grinding as it finds the detent".

If the DOSS came back with longer lengths, a bit less weight, and decent price, I'd be all over it, again. For now, I'll go clean and grease my OneUp and rock on.
  • 1 0
 I like the idea of limiting the post extension when I need it techy sections.... but not sure I'd ever use that knob the way they have it designed. I like the comment above about having two different paddles on the control, but not sure I'd actually want that either.
  • 4 0
 Love my Topaz shock! Amazing to see a brand with an update that can actually be retrofitted.
  • 1 0
 So the seat post part keeps posing the question "Would you prefer this or a remote?" Confusing, since the travel adjust complements a remote, not replaces it. I mean, you still need a remote...
  • 3 1
 So I can't have a climb switch AND adjustable compression DVO?
Plenty of other brands manage it.
  • 1 0
 Wait for Topaz 4 in about 2-4 years for that. It took until Topaz 3 to get external compression dials.
  • 9 8
 don´t buy DVO in the EU. Constant troubles with jadeX. Service Partner Comic Sports sucks AF. Thx for nothing!
  • 2 1
 Agree. In the authorized service, it was recommended to replace the piston. After the replacement, the shock absorber was absolutely without compression. I was told by the service that the new piston has larger compression holes than the original one. No solution suggested.
  • 5 0
 Sorry to hear that, I´ve had and still have multiple DVO products and all work great. Service from Cosmic was very good too....as of now
  • 3 0
 sorry to hear that but i have only positive things to say about Cosmic sports. Not only was the service extremely fast but also they shared with me a lot of information about the problem and how it was resolved. So far i had 2 interactions with them and they were perfect both times. Is also worth mentioning that i contacted them although mein shocks were send to them by the retailer....
  • 1 0
 Had a Topaz which needed to be rebuild every ~6 months.

Cosmic Sports always did a pretty great job when DVO had sent them enough spares and also built in the latest new running change parts from DVO.

So it got better over time.
The new, already available Topaz 3 should adress quite a few of the problems which I encountered.
See that video:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RKUywnMrxw
  • 2 2
 and that's a problem. If you're looking to buy a usable shock, the Jade X certainly won't be it, nor will most DVO products. Why they don't just sell the Jade x in two internal tune, for springs up to 500lbs and over 500lbs, when the shock is unable to damp the springs over 500 lbs. The solution of DVO it has to be modified with a piston from an old Jade shock .... unfortunately a half solution
  • 1 0
 Errr.... I'm not sure this adjustable collar does anything that a QR clamp with a dropper doesn't!?
  • 1 0
 I honestly thought thats how adjustable travel posts work in the first place
  • 4 6
 I love to climb. The idea of a lower seat height for climbing appeals to me exactly zero.
  • 3 3
 On technical climbs, I want my seatpost as high as possible so I can scoot up on the nose of the saddle, still get full leg extension and keep weight on the rear tire. I don't EVER stand up for a gnarly climb, unless it's paved. In fact on flat ground, I have my 210 dropper lowered around 10-15mm, precisely so I can hyperextend it for steep seated climbing.
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