First Look: e*thirteen Extended Range Cog

Apr 1, 2014
by Mike Levy  
e.13 EX cog
e.13 EX cog

e*thirteen is set to join the aftermarket cog business with the release of their Extended Range Cog, a nifty unit that can be subbed in to ten speed cassettes in order to increase gearing range. The EX Cog will be available in a few different flavours, with e*thirteen planning on offering both 40 and 42 tooth sizes for Shimano ten speed cassettes, and a single 42 tooth size that can be fitted to SRAM ten speed blocks. It's designed to replace either the 15 or 17 tooth stock cog, and is timed and ramped specific to Shimano and SRAM in order to have the shift aids line up correctly, meaning that you'll have to make sure to order the correct one when you pull the trigger. All of the EX Cogs also come from e*thirteen with a new B-tension screw that is longer than what you'll find used as stock on your derailleur, and it's only a matter of backing out the original screw and turning in the new one in order to provide enough clearance between the EX Cog and your derailleur's upper pulley. Colour choices include blue, black, and red, with all options retailing for $69.95 USD. e*thirteen says that they'll be shipping EX Cogs to shops by the middle of May.

e.13 EX cog

A prototype version of e*thirteen's EX Cog that we spotted at this year's Taipei Bike Show. Production versions will be anodized as pictured above.



Why bother with swapping out the 15 or 17 tooth cog and subbing this pie plate gear in? ''It's for the guys who are okay with ten speed and don't want to spend $1,000 USD to go to eleven speed and get a 42 tooth cog,'' says e*thirteen's Todd Bischoff.

And while e*thirteen isn't the first to the wide range add-on cog party, their reasoning certainly rings true - there are a load of ten speed drivetrains out there that work great but don't offer the gearing range that would allow a rider to easily turn over a single ring setup. Installing a 40 or 42 tooth cog allows many riders to chuck their front derailleur into the parts bin by picking an appropriate chain ring for their terrain, and all at a much more reasonable price than shelling out for a new drivetrain. Depending on your drivetrain components, there is also the option of running a double ring system with the EX Cog, a setup that should give you absolutely no excuses for walking up even the steepest of walls. Check out the compatibility chart below to see what will work for you.

Your local shop isn't the only place that you'll be seeing the EX Cog, with GT planning on shipping it with select Force platforms for 2015. That's a solid hint that GT has ditched the triple setups of 2014 in favour of a double ring, or maybe even single ring, cranksets. Interestingly, it won't come installed but rather as an option that the rider can fit if he or she wants to go that route, a strategy that should keep most everyone happy. ''GT will be including the e*thirteen EX Cog with select 2015 model bikes,'' Todd Seplavy, GT's Director of Product told Pinkbike. ''This will allow riders to get into 1x drivetrains, offering the range of eleven speed at more accessible prices than currently available on the market.''


e.13 EX cog


www.bythehive.com


128 Comments

  • 89 2
 I've been running something similar on my 2003 giant boulder
harriscyclery.net/merchant/370/images/large/FW723.JPG
  • 10 0
 i think i had one of those on my first bike!
  • 10 38
flag HerrDoctorSloth (Apr 1, 2014 at 19:52) (Below Threshold)
 Yes, in essence. But that is a 7 speed cassette, and this is to modify a 10 speed one. I also doubt that it has 42 "wall climbing" teeth.
  • 67 2
 But I have three gears up front so your argument is invalid.
  • 23 1
 ^^^I laughed so hard!!^^^
  • 2 1
 Burt Trollerstone
  • 3 0
 I remember when I had 7 speed, and I thought you could only get 24 speeds on the most pro bikes
  • 13 10
 ok, that is a 2 pound non-durable hunk of steel that cost $20 less than this non-sketchy aluminum lightweight durable ring.
  • 21 10
 233g = 2lbs? Non durable? I have been using this cog for over 4 months and have had zero issues? Shifts when I need it to and is a nice low gear. I ride 4 times a week and in muddy conditions quite often, and there is just a bit of marring to the finish of the cog no mushrooming of the teeth or any other wear issues.

Stay in school and learn your metric to US customary conversions son.
  • 14 1
 Ok but 1/2 lb is kind of a lot for one chainring.... considering the XX cassette weighs 208 grams.
  • 11 15
flag tylerthegiant (Apr 1, 2014 at 22:28) (Below Threshold)
 Vally! We don't really learn metric in merica son!! USA USA USA USA! But canada seems cool! Plan to visit some day.
  • 2 6
flag Quesadilla34 (Apr 1, 2014 at 22:55) (Below Threshold)
 So this replaces the gears from the 15 tooth on? I don't get or
  • 1 5
flag Quesadilla34 (Apr 1, 2014 at 22:55) (Below Threshold)
 *It
  • 57 2
 @Quesadilla34: yeah, so your cassette will look like this (from the outer ring to the inner ring):
11 - 13 - 42 - 17 - 20 - 23 - 26 - 30 - 32 - 36
  • 3 0
 Ssssshh.
  • 8 3
 Mattin
@Quesadilla34: yeah, so your cassette will look like this (from the outer ring to the inner ring):
11 - 13 - 42 - 17 - 20 - 23 - 26 - 30 - 32 - 36

Thumbs up! : )
  • 11 1
 tylerthegiant, maybe you should learn metric, imperial is stupid. Please stop calling it 'English' units as well, it makes us brits look bad.
  • 3 1
 @Mattin, effin hilarious!
  • 7 0
 @valley, notice how thin the steel plate is where it meets the freehub body, and how wide the E-thirteen one is where it meets the body? That's not a co-incidence. The thin steel one will tear through an aluminium freehub body in months, whereas the E-thirteen one looks wide enough to spread the force out over a large enough area to prevent that. Be like E-thirteen; stay in school and learn stress analysis son!
  • 1 0
 @L0reTom, or use a steel freehub body too.
  • 5 1
 Most freehub bodies aren't aluminium though, unless they're on lightweight hubs, and as it happens, if they machined the tolerances right (it IS possible, just because shimano/sram machine loosely doesn't mean aftermarket brands do also) to get zero movement on the splines. As to "durable"... durable what? The cog? Its stainless steel.... its going to outlast an aluminium cog by a significant margin. Given who the seller is and that he's a machinist who runs a machine shop who makes a lot of nifty products, I'd say he did the tolerances correctly.
  • 3 1
 Hope hubs are alu, sun hubs are alu
  • 4 2
 Most decent hubs use aluminium freehub bodies. I'd be interested for you to name some that don't, genuinely cant think of any. The problem of cogs wearing through freehub bodies isn't the tolerances, its the fact that fundamentally a large radius cog with a narrow engagement area puts more stress on freehub body than the aluminium yield stress, so it plastically deforms creating deep gauges which make it difficult to remove the cassette, slightly misalign the ramp and gate teeth and eventually write off your freehub body. Obviously a wider cog engagement area spreads the same force over a larger area, resulting in a lower stress in the elastic region.
  • 6 4
 No shimano hub uses one, and last time I checked Saint, XTR, Dura Ace etc definitely still counted as decent. And the problem IS tolerances... the freehub splines are made the same spec, its cassettes themselves where there's leeway in the manufacturing. Loose tolerances and you have room for movement to happen. American Classic solved the problem using a single steel spacer that fits their freehub bodies along one spline to eliminate the looseness and keep the cog splines from digging into the freehub body. If ONE spline reinforcement is enough to protect all the other aluminium splines... its clearly not the torque. And not every cassette uses an alloy carrier for its largest cogs either. I don't think you quite grasp the gearing today versus 20 years ago... we're not really riding any lower, we're just doing it in a different range. A 20 ring to 28 cog as practically every suntour equipped bike had in 1993, is as low as 30 ring to 42T cog on one of the 1x11 drivetrains can achieve today.
  • 1 0
 im hoping im not the only math guy that sees the relationship between the jump from 20ring/28cog to 30ring/42cog. each one has had a half of itself added on. something about ratios, i can feel it coming...

and its for sure the manufacturing tolerances, i just removed my cassette to install OneUp 42T cog, the largest four gears(smallest cogs) had all dug into the freehub body, i had to spin them back in order to free them up. the whole cassette had that much leeway all the way down to my 36. not a ton of leeway, but enough to jiggle the entire cassette back and forth within their respective grooves of the freehub body at least a degree or two. shimano xt cassette and chris king iso rear, both about 18 months old and serviced regularly.

made me seriously consider switching to xx1 if the driver is that much more "efficient" or "correct"
  • 1 0
 The XX cassette is built so it won't dig in to the freewheel. And as long as you don't use the aluminium big sprocket too often it will last long enough to cost you only about $7 per ride against XX1 about $9. But you can't separate the cassette between 1 to 9 for this big cog shenanigans. Oh, come to think about it..................too expensive to contemplate.
  • 2 1
 Forgot about Shimano always doing things properly, like always using cup/cone bearings and steel freehub bodies. Pretty sure Dura Ace is titanium though. but having just noticed that they never use aluminium freehub bodies, that just proves my point about the tolerances not being the cause. I have never had a Shimano hub come into my shop with slots gauged into the freehub body, but plenty of hopes etc. Cassettes are still just as baggy on a Shimano body as a hope one, and yet only the aluminium body gets torn up. The American Classic situation is the same, where the one steel ridge prevents the cog from digging in as it is locked in place by the one ridge it can't deform. you wouldn't even need the other aluminium ridges there as long as it was tight radially and couldn't deform the steel ridge. Also, a 42 cog will put more force on a freehub than a 28 cog given the same gearing ratio, because the same chain tension is applied to a larger radius from the freehub body, giving a larger moment.
  • 2 6
flag deeeight Plus (Apr 2, 2014 at 10:35) (Below Threshold)
 @LordTom...

Sigh... you're 23 and I hate to play the age/experience card but...you haven't got either enough to know so that doesn't surprise me that you haven't seen shimano hubs with gouge marks (for that matter you apparently don't even know how to spell the word correctly) in the freehub but I have. Lots. It took me all of 60 seconds to pull two out of a bin here with them. Shimano and all other drivetrain makers produce the cassettes with loose tolerances to speed up assembly/disassembly. That it causes extra damage for competitors that use softer / lighter materials for their freehub bodies is just a bonus to them.
  • 9 0
 Please don't play the age card. It's all about knowledge and experience. My grandma is much older than you, that doesn't mean she knows more about bikes than you do.
  • 4 0
 Haha, no need to be a condescending prick about it Smile Thanks for picking up on my spelling error though, completely didn't spot that. I'm a little gutted that 5 years in bike shops counts towards no experience, but I can confidently say I haven't had to replace a shimano freehub yet due to cassettes eating through the ridges, but plenty of hopes/superstars. Back to original point, I wouldn't run the thin cog because it will eat your freehub body faster than the not much more expensive and a lot lighter E-thirteen one.

Cheer up mate,

Tom
  • 2 0
 Freehubs should just be steel end of. When my hopes kick the bucket they will be replaced with steel ones. 6yr old atomlab aircorp has no real signs of damage and nor does the 7yr old GI freehub i have yet my hopes are already pretty beaten up.

Still cant understand why hope dont offer them new with steel considering the prices are the same if not cheeper for the steel, sure theres extra weight but weight vs an extra £60, no brainer. you end up paying £60 to add 60ish grams in weight, how does that work in the modern MTB world? Razz
  • 1 0
 Hahahaha, u suck mattin, not what i meant lmao. That would be a weird ass cassette tho. And sam264, u guys did invent it...and still use it from my experience, so shhhhh
  • 4 1
 @deeeight being a miserable c*nt again
  • 2 3
 And SeaJay being his usual moronic self.
  • 17 6
 I hope those graphics are an April Fools joke... looks like a candy cane....

Just an FYI, if you want to use the Saint or Zee for added beef, the XT Medium cages will bolt on to make a midcage Saint/Zee. You can order them as "replacements" direct from Shimano for about $20. Don't tell them why you want them, just order them.
  • 2 2
 That's interesting... But isn't the upper body of those derailleurs slightly shorter than the SLX/XT? I have seen some cases where the Zee derailleur is touching the cog and a SLX isn't. In this case a bigger cage wouldn't solve the problem.
  • 4 1
 You would need to tighten the clutch with longer cage. Thankfully, you can do it with Shimano.
  • 3 2
 No, it's fine. I'm using a Saint/XT-Mid with the OneUp 42t with no problems. I still have room to go with the B-Tension too. Could potentially fit a 44t, not that I'd need to.
  • 1 1
 Useful! My short cage zee isn't fitting anything bigger than 34
  • 1 1
 rewob, but is it the Zee FR or the DH?
  • 1 3
 Probably the dh since its 9 speed as well. New derailluer is in order to goI wide range I think.
  • 3 1
 9 speed? Wut?
  • 2 2
 It shifts nine times? I literally just left the bike shop when making the above comment and the mechanic corrected me when I said I had a 10 speed. I guess I was confused. I have 9 gears out back but the Shimano Zee is a 10 speed shifter. We on the right track now?
  • 4 1
 I do not have a faintest idea what you are talking about. Zee is 10sp, it can be rigged with a 9sp cassette with an old SRAM shifter and a spacer block for the cable. Which I sincerely doubt you could set up. Zee comes in two varieties, for narrow and wide range cassettes. Narrow goes to 28t, it could probably clear 34, but that is not a good idea.
  • 2 1
 rewob what the hell are you talking about? You should take your bike to a different shop.
axxe you're correct; however, people should be aware not to over-tighten the clutch. Tightening the clutch too much can be worse than running it too loose.
  • 2 1
 Zee Fr shortcage plus a one-up working no problem over here... http://www.pinkbike.com/photo/10511572/
  • 1 1
 @axxe, just so you know, i run X.0 9spd shifter with zee 10spd mech, no spacer block, works great!
  • 1 1
 Same here, zee 10sp with sram 9sp x9 shifter no spacer perfect shifting.
  • 1 1
 There's some crazy shit getting posted right here!
  • 1 2
 Not really. 9 speed shifter and ten speed derailleur works fine. A nine speed der and a ten speed der have the same throw, the jumps in shifting are just different on 9 and 10 speed shifters and the cassettes are spaced differently.
  • 2 0
 Jocko, no they do not all work fine. The only combination that works OK is SRAM 9sp with Shimano 10sp (and it does work better with a spacer) - all other combinations have different cable pull ratios. SRAM decreased it for 10sp, Shimano increased it. You can possibly jerry rig it with one of those pulleys. But, seriously, why?
  • 1 2
 Agreed I was refering to using sram with sram shimano with shimano. Probably should have started with "in my experience".
  • 8 0
 Don't forget that this is $20 cheaper than the other 42 tooth cogs on the market, comes with the longer B screw, and that is MSRP-not street price! Importantly, do not forget to buy a new chain as well because you are going to need a few more links to get around this monster!
  • 4 0
 Someone needs to create a 16t or 18t cog so when you take the 17t out you don't get a mismatched jump in ratios. If that was sold with the 40t/42t cog then it would be a definite winner
  • 1 0
 Exactly! I'm running a 42 tooth on a XT 10 speed cassette and I notice the jump from 15 to 19 and would definitely fit a 16 instead of the 15 to have a 3 tooth step ie. 13-16-19. Can I find a Shimano 16 tooth sprocket? Not in the UK anyway...
Apart from that, I'm loving the single ring setup both performance wise & aesthetically. Was running 22/36 up front with a 11/36 cassette. Have lost the easier ratios for the steep clambers (namely the new Cafall trail at Cwmcarn, although the downhill more than makes up for the climb) as now running a single 32 tooth up front, but shaved 1/2 lb off the bike so I guess its swings & roundabouts.
Now where's that 16 tooth cog...
  • 1 0
 I think some road cassettes have 16t cogs, I found a sram 7 speed cassette with a 16 but the ring is slightly wider so i can imagine it will mess up the indexing
  • 1 0
 OneUp Components now sends 16t's with the big ring, for that reason alone I will pay the extra money for there product.
  • 1 0
 Bastards, I'm going to see if they'll send me one foc as I got an early version without the 16t
  • 3 0
 Ok so I have a process 134dl with an xt medium cage. Raceface narrow wide. Hope 40t t-Rex it all works flawlessly. The t-Rex is shimano/ SRAM specific. The shitf aids are excellent and it comes with an extended b screw. I have a 16 tooth cog in place of the 15 and 17. The xt 11-32 comes with a 16t stock and shimano sells individual replacement cogs. Qbp has them( main bike shop distributor) and a simple Internet search will find a lot of sources. I'm also using an slx cassette. The reason they say it is not compatible is because the cassette is held together with pins that are mushroomed on the end like a chain link. Just drill, file, punch, what ever works for you, the tip of the pin on the smaller side of the cassette. Now you can separate the cogs and your in business.
  • 2 0
 It's an 11-36 slx
  • 3 1
 shimano really need to pull their fingers out and produce a 10speed xt 11-40t cassette theyd sell bucket loads, all these after market modifications coming out its obvious they are missing what the buyers want Ive given up on sram all they want to do is gouge hundreds of quid out of you with new cranks, hubs, drivetrains, shifters etc for their 11speed groupsets
  • 1 0
 Looks good, might buy one to just have extra. Currently running a wolftooth 42t with a zee Freeride der, 32t raceface narrow/wide, x10sl chain and it works great on my Jekyll. Almost 2 months and no drops or problems using zee rear der.
  • 1 0
 Do you ride any big hills? or ever think you need a 34 up front? I want to run a similar setup but I'm worried 32t wont be enough.
  • 1 0
 I would have to say, I do spin out if trying to go down super wide fire road type downhills. But so far in my area, on the local trail, the 32t seems to be perfect.
  • 1 0
 i have the oneup 42t on right now it just bent yesterday on a ride after about a year and a lot of crashes the last few weeks as i learned to use those clip in pedals, going to give this one a try i'd like to hear some longer term reviews
  • 3 1
 Was stoked at first because from the thumbnail I thought e13 was making a BMX sprocket, I'd rock something like than on the dj bike.
  • 1 5
flag MortifiedPenguin (Apr 1, 2014 at 21:13) (Below Threshold)
 In all honesty, you could probably use this as a front cog
  • 4 1
 So why would the 40 not work with the 11-36 Shimano cassette? I seem to be siding with a 40t cog for my gearing...
  • 1 1
 My guess is that the shift points don't line up...
  • 6 1
 They need to make one where it lines up. 40t is perfect for the 11-36.
  • 2 1
 I figured it would be demand projection for the 40. I also like the gearing spacing from a 36 to a 40 a lot. I may be alone though.
  • 1 1
 I love my wolftooth 42t chain ring. It works perfect. Using a raceface narrow wide chain ring with xt casette, xt shadow plus derailleur, xtr chain and shifter. Can't be happier. This is less money and looks a lot better than the others out there. This will be a no-brainer.
  • 2 1
 I have 12 miles on literally the exact same setup as you and it is game changing for sure. No front derailleur is liberating and I don't notice the skip from 15-19 with the 17 tooth cog gone. Shimano seriously missed the boat on the 1x system.
  • 4 4
 Ugh, I have one of the eBay ones that was not so highly thought of in an earlier post. I beg to differ. It doesn't weigh two pounds. It's expertly machined. Fits absolutely perfect and functions flawlessly. Once again here on PB someone is the worlds foremost authority on something they have never seen or tried. Best 38 bucks I've spent, so far. Well see.
  • 2 2
 A company needs to stump up the confidence to shun all the posh & pretty machining and anodized and press one of these babys out of chunky steel. Won't be pretty, won't be light, will last an eternity and most importantly will be CHEAP. Would sell by the boat load to the less wealthy. e.g. young bikers.
  • 1 0
 ive seen a couple of companies at the taiwan show that had 11-40 10speed cassettes on the way , but the price is $350 for the cassette alone cromoly lower teeth and alloy uppers
  • 3 0
 How can they justify pedaling this piece of garbage for $70 when a full cassette costs less than that?
  • 2 2
 Get fitter? By getting fitter you'll save weight/increase performance on the body and save weight/increase performance on the bike by using the actual designed set-ups which will ALWAYS work better than one of these contraptions. A good idea, a well executed product, but hardly a requirement....
  • 1 0
 Kinda grumpy I spent $100 on my one up 42t. Though I guess $70usd will become £70gbp over here anyway... Still a hell of a lot cheaper than xx1 and works perfectly with a Race Face 32t nw up front.
  • 1 0
 Do you ride any big hills? or ever think you need a 34 up front? I want to run a similar setup but I'm worried 32t wont be enough.
  • 1 1
 I totally enjoy walking and occasionally running up steep hills, with my bike and bombing the crap out of the descent, my mind gloriously free of all this minutiae.

Wind howling through helmet vents. Eyes wide. Mind clear. Snapping turns and gapping the chunder.

F#^ck all this bizness
  • 3 2
 Come on Shimano. Where are you? If your waiting till Sea Otter to showcase 11spd or extended range 10spd, you might want to up the debut.
  • 2 2
 I heard Shimano will be releasing 11 speed, but it won't have the range of XX1
  • 3 1
 Crap, just bought my WTC 42t GC for $90. At least it works phenomenally well.
  • 1 1
 I was sorta kicking myself after I got my new Saint derailleur (M820) for my Nomad but after seeing devin-m's post maybe this would be an option for me after all. I'm running a SRAM X9 (PG-1070) cassette.
  • 2 0
 About 5 42T cogs out and shimano still doesn't react... Wtf? Wake up guys!
Seems like they don't want to make money...
  • 2 0
 Or........, We could all Man (or Woman) up, and get stronger! We'll all be pushing a 36 - 36 gear in no time!
  • 1 0
 Hey anyone try one of these expander 40t cogs with a 9 spd transmission? I'm thinking of trying it out because nobody makes anything in 9 spd anymore Frown -
  • 1 0
 After reading this post I now know why I'm a single speed 29+ rigid guy. Also how many of you have actually read the SI manual. I have. Stop it it with all the bullshit.
  • 2 1
 This is exactly what I was waiting for, definitely will try one out as soon as it comes out.
  • 1 1
 I have the one components version of this product on my carbine. Best upgrade ever!! Forget spending 1200 on xx1. JUST MAKE SURE YOU USE A RACEFACE 11 SPEED CHAINRING!
  • 1 0
 Darn, just put a OneUp on my bike, granted the green matches the team colors, but this looks like it'll hold up better!
  • 1 0
 So can I put the 40t on a 36 shimano cassette? The chart just shows the 40t going on the 34 cassette.
  • 1 1
 Why are the SLX cassettes not compatible? Does it really have to be the 15 or 17t cog that you remove?
  • 2 1
 This isn’t compatible with SLX Cassettes, because the 17 tooth isn’t removable(On SLX Cassettes) like it is on XT/XTR Cassettes.
  • 1 1
 Real good info, I wonder if its the same with he hope 40t-rex?
  • 2 0
 Hahaha love it. I get a neg prop for askimg a question.
  • 3 4
 why would they not produce a silver color? most cassettes are silver, a colored upper cog will look terrible.
  • 1 0
 did you even look at the photos?
  • 1 0
 I like the look of the colored cogs, if you don't, black will probably be the best option. @wildwood Did you even read the article? The silver cog was a prototype from the Tapei show, all productions versions will be anodized as seen in the top image.
  • 1 0
 ill take two!!!
  • 1 1
 Me wants one!
  • 4 5
 Too expensive
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