East Bound and Down: Killington, Vermont

Jul 20, 2017
by Brice Shirbach  


Views: 5,107    Faves: 13    Comments: 3

"Nice bike. What brings you to the lovely town of Derby, Vermont today?"

"I'm on my way south to Killington to do some riding," I replied to the United States Customs agent with what surely looked like a nervous smile. For whatever reason, every single time I speak with an agent at the border, I feel like I am hiding something. For the record, I was definitely not hiding anything, and after a quick peek to make sure I wasn't stashing any Quebecois in the back of my car, he sent me on my way.

I was excited about this trip, as evidenced by my speedometer refusing to dip below 80mph (I was back in the States after almost a week in Quebec City, so au revoir kilometers per hour) at any point on 91 South. For me, the state of Vermont represents what might be my favorite part of the country to ride bikes in when the trails are primed. I like to think of it in these terms: take an amazing state from the Pacific Northwest, such as Oregon or Washington, and squish it up into an odd, carrot shaped territory that's maybe a tenth of its original size, whittle the cascades into more modest mountains that are half of their original size while still holding all of their glorious nooks and crannies, and here you have the Green Mountain State otherwise known as Vermont.


East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Welcome to the Beast of the East: Killington, Vermont.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
The weather does as it pleases in these parts, regardless of what the radar is telling you.
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
The "other" Pisgah.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Pico Mountain, Killington's sister resort and peak, perched high above the post-rain steam rising off of the road.
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
A look towards the northeast from Rutland provides ample inspiration in the form of the Green Mountains.

Vermont is the country's second-least-populous state behind another outdoor paradise in Wyoming, and its largest "metropolitan" area, Burlington, has just a hair over 200,000 souls who call it home. With no significant population center, Vermont is instead loaded with quaint, small towns throughout its 9,600-ish square miles of modestly mountainous landscape. It's a place famous for its maple syrup, and kick-starting the ski industry in America. It's also well known for its dense population of Subarus, several amazing breweries, a plethora of farm to table options, cheddar cheese, and of course, Ben and Jerry's. I love Vermont for all of these reasons, to be sure; but without a doubt, there are two primary drivers behind my desire to be a Vermonter: the people here are as good as they make 'em, and riding bikes in the woods in this part of the world is absolutely amazing.

Killington Resort sits almost squarely in the center of the state, just a few miles south of its namesake village, and just west of Rutland, the region's largest city. I've raced and ridden here on a number of occasions, and its nearly 2,000 feet of vertical relief, featuring trails that start at the summit and work their way down steep chutes, rock gardens, greasy roots, incredible flow offerings, and plenty of natural features has always been a favorite among many of those who have ever stepped off of the K-1 Gondola. Killington is four years into a five-year agreement with Gravity Logic as well, which has resulted in a number of additions that have riders making the trip to the mountain in record numbers. The mountain now runs three high-speed lifts, has seen an explosion in beginner to intermediate trail offerings, and some much-needed improvements and additions to their larger flow and jump features.

To date, I've never visited a resort for an "East Bound and Down" story, largely because these narratives are typically community driven; and the word "resort" isn't always synonymous with community. As excited as I was to see some of the changes to the mountain this year, and to get back to riding down some of my favorite bike park trails (largely due to their raw, decidedly un-bike park nature), I was a bit unsure of what to expect from the week and what, if any, sense of community might lie in wait at such a prominent resort-based operation. I had been in town for less than half a day when it became abundantly clear that Killington Resort and its surrounding community were attached at the hip.



East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
The view north from Killington's summit.

East Bound and Down Killington Vermont
Greens and browns blur your vision in the mountains of Vermont.
East Bound and Down Killington Vermont
Ride here for long enough, and you'll be picking loamy bits from your smiling teeth.

East Bound and Down Killington Vermont
The Pittsfield Trails are close by and offer up all of the loam and off-camber action you could ask for.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Rutland is the region's largest town and features a surprisingly extensive network of trails at Pine Hill Park.

"I was not aware of this originally because I'm not from here," Tony Accurso says during our chat at his local bike shop, Alpine Bike Works. "But a disconnect used to exist between the town and area around Killington, and the resort itself (Killington Resort). It no longer exists, and the fences have been mended due in large part to the resort’s attitude towards the community. They (Killington Resort) do a lot. They’ll help the local mountain bike clubs purchase hundreds of tee-shirts. They assist with marketing efforts for the local chamber of commerce. If you go to them with something that will support the local community, these guys are on board. They do more than help with marketing, they host the local chamber’s summer concert series at the resort. They host summer camps as well. It’s way less than the Woodward camps, and they give locals a discount. If you’re a Rutland County resident, I think you get the whole summer at the adventure center for the price of a single pass. There’s this symbiotic relationship at work here. The resort is engaged in the community in a number of ways. They have a bunch of great people working there. Anything that you have that you want to put together, these guys are on board."

Having been in Killington for a few years now, Tony's shop is seeing metro area numbers and is staying open year-round in what has up until this point, been a ski and winter season dominated region. Skiing might still take the cake, but cycling, and specifically mountain biking, is at the forefront of a cultural shift that sees the resort, the town, and other local business working with a reciprocity that was scarce in years past. Originally from Brooklyn, Tony enjoyed a great deal of success in the automotive industry before heading north for a change of pace, and some peace of mind.

"I would say that my motivations for moving here are different than my reasons for opening up a bike shop. I came here because I was at a time in my life where I needed some change. I was living in this big house by myself, and I had the resources to make a change, so I did. I had been in the car business my whole life, and it just wasn’t for me anymore. The reason people like myself live here is that you slow things down a bit, and focus on things that relate more to the quality of life, as opposed to the stresses and rigors that we deal with in other environments."


East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Tony and his team enjoy success as the closest year-round cycling retail operation to the mountain, no small feat in this winter recreation dominated the corner of Vermont.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Local pinner, Jesse Peroline, leads Yeti Factory rider Duncan Nason down one of the park's most popular trails, Cable Trail.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Duncan taking full advantage with a mean lean on those Gravity Logic berms.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Jesse sends the road gap towards the bottom of Jump Start.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
My favorite way down the mountain: Cable to Foxy Roxy to Gambler. Enjoy.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
I shared my week in Killington with some friends from around the country, who were in town preparing themselves for a wet and wild weekend of enduro racing.

Vermonters certainly seem to share a "quality over quantity" mindset, but that's not to say they don't appreciate a lot of something good from time to time, which is appropriate in a place like Killington. The resort boasts the east coast's most expansive trail network, and some of the most vertical you can find at a lift-served bike park in the country. Trails like Foxy Roxy, Scarecrow, and Cable Trail have offered top to bottom fun from the K1 Gondola for several years now, but the resort isn't interested in resting on its reputation for top-to-bottom rowdiness. The truth is, brand loyalty is a vital part of their business model, and that not only includes a renewed dedication to the surrounding community, but a desire to introduce the joys of lift served riding to first timers and families as well. Easy Street, Wiggle, Step it Up and others are all trails designed to remove some of the anxieties associated with riding your bikes between trees and allow for a quick and comfortable sense of progression for those seeking it. Still, even with the efforts put forth to introduce new riders to downhill, the team here hasn't forgotten about its roots. The aforementioned Cable Trail, long a favorite among many who have spent time here over the years, myself included, has seen a refinement take place recently that adds an abundance of speed and style to the ride, and new trails altogether including the big hit flow offering known as Black Magic, and the properly rowdy DH race track, Goat Skull, which will see quite a bit of use in the coming years as the mountain plays host to national and international events. Satisfying the needs of first-timers and seasoned veterans alike isn't an easy task, but the trail crew, led by 20-plus year Killington veteran Jay Rosenbaum, is up to the challenge.

"A few years ago," Jay, who often goes by Rosey, tells me during the Eastern States Cup pre-race dinner. "We only really had the rough and rowdy stuff. We didn’t really do any excavating because it was too burly, and our property lines were limiters. But we have since opened up two additional lifts, and now we have all of this amazing dirt at our disposal, so we can meander all over the mountain as much as we want. With the Ramshead lift, we have the ability to crank out some proper DH runs and jump lines. We want to check the boxes for everyone."

Assisting in the effort to fully develop Killington Bike Park into a "Whistler of the East" is the renowned Whistler-based trail building enterprise, Gravity Logic. Gravity Logic is nearing the end of their 5-year agreement with Killington to help with the assessment and design of the bike park, and as Rosey tells it, their work has not been in vain.

"The best thing that Gravity Logic was able to do was going to the mountain and guaranteeing success." The Killington Bike Park trail crew leader tells me. "They have a proven model of reliability and are able to say that if you follow their plan, they can assure you of the success that will follow. Gravity Logic was able to present a vision and got a 3rd lift opened up for mountain biking, which was kind of unthinkable just a few years ago. They have this established history of success, so when they come to you with a plan, you can feel good about it moving forward. It’s been really good to work alongside them. Dave Kelly and I have spent a lot of time together mapping out this vision for the mountain. I’ll show him where we can and can’t go in terms of zones and property lines, and they, in turn, provide us a few operators every year and work for hand in hand with us on the trail design. We are putting all of the pieces together that we have mapped out for the next few years. We work year by year on this place, and right now we’re trying to make the mountain flow from trail to trail in the best way possible. We want you to be able to step off of the gondola and pick your way down the mountain on a massive network of world class trails. We want to continue to add to Ramshead as well, and add some more intermediate trails off of Snowshed."


East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Rosey and his trail crew have been delivering the goods for years and deserve a great of the credit owed for the growing success the resort and bike park are experiencing.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Tools of the trade.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Jordan Newth is one of the premier talents to emerge from this mountain bike paradise.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Jordan was kind enough to take some time out of enduro practice to film with me for the "Local Flavors" edit at the top of this story. Granted, he knows the place better than everyone else, so practice wasn't much of a priority for him.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
BMX stud turned Enduro stud, Jimmy Smith, styling out the un-fast line on one of the race sections from the weekend's enduro.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
High-speed gondola rides and a sasquatch. What's not to love about this place?

Ben Colona, bike shop manager at Killington and president of the Killington Mountain Bike Club, gave Wall Street a shot for 3 full days after college before packing up and heading back to his roots in the mountains back in 2009. His perspective is especially valuable as someone who has a vested interest in the success of the resort and in the development of a mountain bike culture that extends beyond the bike park boundaries.

"I could not say this two years ago, but right now we have something for everyone at Killington. Young to old, beginner to expert; we have all of the bases covered. Early on, we only had the top of the pyramid covered, where only a small percentage of riders could come here and enjoy themselves. Now we have the entire spectrum taken care of. Trails like Wiggle and Easy Street have helped with that tremendously. It’s amazing how far we’ve come."

Ben has seen the rental fleet grow from 60 bikes in 2012 when he took over management duties, to 160 bikes and 5 different repair and rental locations located throughout the resort. Ben has also witnessed firsthand the growing relationship between Killington Resort, and the communities that surround it. As president of the KMBC, it's a direction that he's keen to continue to move in. His Wednesday night "Bike Bum" race series serves as an example of this powerful, bike driven coalition.

"The partnership between the town, the club, and the resort has really brought a lot of people together," he says. "There’s a really strong group dynamic that is shaping up as our bike culture grows as well. The Bike Bum series has helped with that a lot. We go after grants through VMBA. All of the money that we raise goes straight to trail building. We go through to the town for marketing dollars, as they have a budget specifically to promote our trails and our program. It’s great because we don’t need to dip into our trail fund. It feels good for folks who donate to know that the money goes right into the trails."

"Last year," Ben continues. "Was the first year of our Bike Bum series. It came from the same concept that our Ski Bum series came from, which is something that has been around forever. People love the Ski Bum series in the winter, so we decided to do something like that during the summer. The Ski Bum series doesn’t allow for racers under 21 years of age either. We really wanted to get the kids involved, so we based our classes off of traditional mountain bike age groups. We have a points system and at the end of the year, we do a big party at Long Trail Brewery, who is our main sponsor. Last year we did 7 races, and this year we’re doing 10. Every week we see an increase in the turnout. It’s a part of this great system we have between the club, the town, and the resort. We’re all feeding off of each other. There’s a strong cross-promotional dynamic between us. During the winter, there can be a bit of head butting going on here, but during the summer, we see everyone working together to promote the entire region."


East Bound and Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Ben Colona has a lot on his plate between bike park management and KMBC presidential duties.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Duncan Nason picked this 25-foot long section of trail for his manual out of an available 30+ miles to choose from.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Skipping stones on Solitude.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Simona Croccolo is very familiar with the full faced style of Killington Bike Park but is happy to take us on a tour of nearby Pine Hill.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Upper Cable Trail has plenty of opportunities for fast and flowy style points.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
One of the best things about this place is the singletrack feel found on many of its trails, something not often associated with bike park experiences.

It's refreshing to hear from so many during my time here just how strong a connection there is between the resort and the surrounding community. However, the truth is, that while Killington has made it clear they have every intention on being recognized as the "Whistler of the East", the development of a mountain bike culture in a region that has long seen winter activity as the primary economic commodity takes some time. Whistler, in all of its grandeur and allure, didn't become Whistler overnight. It's a lofty goal, but ultimately it's one that everyone from the top executives on down believe in.

"We offer everything, and that’s what makes us such a great destination." Mike Garceau, Youth Marketing and Action Sports Manager, tells me in his office. It's Wednesday and I'm itching to put a run down this afternoon at the Bike Bum series, but want to hear from one of the operation's key decision makers before heading out to Sideshow Bob for my attempt. "We have it all. Our goal is to be the Whistler of the East coast. Why wouldn’t it be? Everyone, even at the highest executive levels, feels like once we decided to really pump money into the mountain bike operations, our goal was to be known as the Whistler of the East. We’re already the largest ski resort in eastern North America, so we have the infrastructure here to do it. The Gravity Logic guys were a big part of getting Whistler to where it is, have come to Killington and told us that we have something special here."

Yes, the opportunities seem to be nearly endless when it comes to the actual bike park itself. The forest, the dirt, the terrain, three high-speed lifts; it's downright dreamy. However, as great as that may be, the main ingredient for any kind of a culture, mountain biking included, is people. Mike Garceau and the rest of the Killington team already know this.


East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
Mike Garceau is one of the forces behind the cultural shift taking place at Killington.
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
While many locals came here for the winters, it's the allure of warm weather and bikes that have this place buzzing right now.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
You don't even need to bring a bike as you're covered here on or off of the trails.

"I think we’re already seeing a cultivation of a bike driven, summer culture. We don’t have a ton of established riders moving here right now, but there is this sense that the locals who came here for the 200-day ski and snowboard season are becoming multi-sport athletes. I know people who are coming up for our Wednesday night races from Boston regularly now. And even if the number of people moving to town just for the bikes is small, it does exist."

"We’re trying to keep up with our own growth. Our customers are super happy. Our own staff are stoked. Everyone here has completely bought into this culture. There’s no reason why we wouldn’t expect to see us trying to host a World Cup type of event here in mountain biking within the next five or so years. We’re always going to have and host huge events here. But it’s the time in between races and festivals that we’re excited to see growth with. We want to get more and more people involved with us, and we want beginners to experience their first time at a bike park here. We want to develop that relationship with our customers, while also giving everyone the aspirational value of having the absolute best athletes in the world here on a regular basis. Why not strive to be the best bike park on the planet, not just the east coast."



East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont
But yeah, you're going to want to plan on riding. A lot.

East Bound amp Down Killington Vermont

Check Out the Full Gallery of Images


Killington mountain biking trails

East Bound and Down Travel Information:

Killington Resort Info.
Killington Mountain Bike Club Info.




MENTIONS: @briceshirbach / @killingtonbikepark


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62 Comments

  • 24 1
 I love what Killington has done for downhill in VT. They are a model that hopefully can be duplicated at some of our other resorts throughout the state. I'm talking to you Stowe! In the meantime I will drive the 2 hours down to Killington passing Stowe and wondering why Stowe is so far behind the curve.
  • 8 1
 On the opposite end of the state the same can be said about Mount Snow as well.
  • 2 0
 True that! @nyhc00:
  • 6 3
 weddings and other types of tourism make more for the resort... that's about it, really.
  • 9 0
 There's always Burke Mtn. and Kingdom trails in Northern VT.
  • 5 0
 @HouseofDaedalus: agreed, and I've ridden Burke before but being that I live in CT my closest lift access mtn is Thunder. Which is a great place to ride but since Snow also has lift access riding it only makes sense to update their terrain to compete w/Thunder, Killington, Burke & Highland.
  • 4 0
 @HouseofDaedalus: Both Burke and KT are great, but here in Hyde Park we have great local trails and plenty of options just down the road in Stowe. Hopefully with Vail purchasing Stowe (Vail owns Whistler) they will add DH to their operations otherwise m.pinkbike.com/u/scott-townes is right
  • 5 1
 I just cant see Stowe going the bike park route. They wouldn't want to bring all those "ruffians" to the mountain.
  • 2 0
 @Grogtastic: I hear you man, but Stowe was in talks with Gravity Logic at one time, there are a few press releases about them working together. Rumor was they needed act 250 approval or some other governmental bull shit. The more DH options the better, right?
  • 4 0
 @HouseofDaedalus: I gotta say... pine hill part, the Green Mountain Trails and Killington rival KT and Burke now.

The trails are a bit more spread out, but the quality is amazing.
  • 1 0
 @Grogtastic: Even if they did, I bet day passes would be $100.
  • 3 0
 okemos bike park is simply hopeless, they haven't figured out building berms out of sand on top of grass doesn't work too well.
  • 2 0
 @vtracer: I purposely omitted them from the list of possible locations for reasons such as yours. Also lack of actual trail pics is another sign of nothing special going on there.
  • 1 0
 @nyhc00: three trails (honestly) at Snow - all the same paved dirt road - nothing to travel to for anything tech fun, natural fun. Sure they have bits of tech sections - but really? Why nothing right to the bottom? They, like Killington are killing DH biking for the enduro/family/first timer, rent a bike crowd. It's just my opinion - been doing these places since they all opened and I've watched them change. Sure you need the masses to bring in revenue, but lets not forget the more able skilled tech rider. Few places have anything to offer. Stowe had a nice DH run (long ago -and just one really) Sugarbush is the best (they too are showing signs of dumbing down)
  • 1 0
 @Grogtastic: Those ruffians tend to spend a lot money in the coffee shops, grocery and liquor stores.
  • 8 0
 Hands down some of the best riding & racing I've ever experienced! There's something for everyone from beginner to expert. Plus the scenery and people make VT one of my favorite places. It gets a little harder to leave every time. Can't wait for the enduro in September!
  • 5 0
 Killington is such an impressive mountain and it's a bummer they didn't get a stop on the eastern states cup this year. VT is becoming one of my favorite places to travel to and ride.
  • 2 0
 No DH, but Enduro Championships are at the end of September.
  • 1 0
 I've been waiting for a UCI world cup race to happen there. I feel like it's only a matter of time!
  • 6 0
 @bikekrieg: Some locals gave a great idea for a UCI worthy DH track. Off the top near "The Beast" with a huge kicker out of the woods towards Superstar. There is some great technical terrain on that slope. It would be great to see a World Cup happen at Ktown!
  • 7 0
 Another great article Brice. Love the East Bound and Down serie. Good job!
  • 6 0
 I'll be at Killington for the first time in a couple weeks so this article has me all stoked now!! Thanks Brice!
  • 5 0
 Great to see Killington getting with the times. Funny to think I rode my Trek 830 Antelope here and Mt.Snow in the early 1990's. My how times have changed.
  • 3 0
 Killington used to be meh... They have stepped up their game big time and the place is so much fun now. My two kids and I have passes, they absolutely love riding there. I will have a pass as long as I can sling a leg over the top tube.
  • 4 0
 Completely enjoyable to hear and see Pinkbike talk home trails,local shredders,the bike shops and the trail crew that makes it happen!! Thank you everyone up in Killington for sharing the FUN!!!!!!
  • 2 0
 GREAT ARTICLE !!!!!!! I've been a regular there since 1998 !!!! ( im 49 now..LOL) its amazing how much the Mtn. has changed/ progressed ..HUGE props to rosie and the crew for keeping the trails in great shape ..to those who have never been up to our area, ITS DEFINITELY WORTH IT.. this coming from an old school techy/knarly FANATIC !!!!!
  • 2 0
 If I could find an information technology job in Burlington or somewhere, I'd seriously consider leaving Colorado for Vermont. Colorado is getting so overcrowded and I'm craving a slower life with less people. Good mountain biking trails nearby is my number one decision factor in any place I move.
  • 1 0
 Check out UVM Medical Center, huge employer in town. But lots of smaller tech companies around as well.
  • 1 0
 I should have added that a friend of mine actually made the opposite move and is loving it. I stuck around VT and cant really see myself leaving at this point.
  • 3 1
 Playing devils advocate here. Killington is mmk. I worked there for a year. A bit like a small university. Give it a year and you will literally know everyone.Also ive lived in about 8 different cities. Rutvegas being by far, the WORST. 98% white trash. Anyone who moves from colorado to vermont must be smoking yayo
  • 3 0
 Yes sir
  • 3 0
 Props to Tony and Andrew and staff at Alpine Bike Works. Those guys know they're stuff and run a solid business. What an excellent bunch to gather intel from.
  • 2 0
 " I was definitely not hiding anything, and after a quick peek to make sure I wasn't stashing any Quebecois in the back of my car, he sent me on my way. "

best line of the article.
  • 1 0
 While I did have a ton of fun riding there, I will still pick Thunder Mountain over Killington. Its pricey at killington at 60bucks a pop and I was hoping for more trails from the top that are downhill trails, or atleast steep/jump trails. A downhill bike is overkill there for sure. Still a fun resort, just need to keep building and think of the experts etc.
  • 4 0
 My favorite place to ride for a long time. So good.
  • 6 1
 You forgot to add the footnote about sideshow bob cutting thru (and thus closing) a lot of the classics on that side of the mountain...
  • 3 0
 @surfhard987: Yea but at least there's Steel Panther over there. So many other great trails. Still my favorite mountain.
  • 2 0
 @DARKSTAR63: @surfhard987 Steel Panther got re-routed for Sideshow Bob and Black Magic but was closed the majority of last season. The re-route doesn't suck though and is that classic rake and ride style riding that Killington is known for. Some honorable mentions not noted in the article would be Low Rider, Funny Bone and The Beast.
  • 2 0
 @TrueWheelsBikeShop: Yea I realize it was re routed. @surfhard987 and I prefer natural terrain so the introduction of a lot of flow trails is bittersweet. Love the mountain and what has been done, the investment in summer operations is a win. I've been riding Killington since my youth though so sometimes I cant help but feel nostalgic !
  • 2 0
 @TrueWheelsBikeShop: I probably should have checked last time I was there, but can you still push up Snowdon peak and ride those old trails (previously numbered in the teens, i.e. 13, 17, etc)?
  • 2 0
 @DARKSTAR63: We feel ya! The upper mountain has been amazing the past week. The dirt is silly fast and techy!
  • 2 0
 @surfhard987: Upper 13 is now Sideshow but you can still push into 7 off Snowdon. The ramp off the rock on 21 is no longer utilized due to Black Magic. #6 also got some love, and they put chicken wire down on that bridge out there which has made a ton of difference!
  • 7 0
 @surfhard987: That was hard to swallow for me, there was some awesome NATURAL flow in there! The ESC Enduro finals ran a 13+ min stage from the summit down to that area a couple years ago and I thought it was one of the most challenging runs in the northeast.

Killington has always been about raw, natural terrain for me. The flow trails are cool to a point but I start to feel like I'm riding the same trail at every mountain I go to these days. Sometimes I question the cost/benefit and resources that go into making these built up flow trails but that's not my call.

Anyway, I hope management's long term plan includes adding some of the more natural trails similar to those from the past. Think natural terrain with flow enhancing features where needed/wanted (I.E. Trillium @ Thunder Mountain), not flow served on a plate!

Sorry for the mini rant, not mad just don't want to see the place get too NERF'ed with machine built stuff.
  • 3 0
 @CamNeelyCantWheelie: You are in luck, one of the trails they are currently building called Krusty is gonna be like trillium. Also they still have some amazing tech
  • 2 1
 @TrueWheelsBikeShop: The steel panther re-route off side show is not classic rake and ride. They moved a good bit of dirt for that and it feels very sterilized, verging on almost a flow trail. I will say the improvements to Low Rider are great, but that was a pretty minimal section of new trail built for that.
  • 2 0
 @TrueWheelsBikeShop: Im loving what they did to low rider. good mix of tech and fast flowy stuff. then tossing in the bottom section of the old dh course
  • 2 0
 Love Killington. Never biked there, but we've been skiing Killington on March Break for the last few years. Drive from Toronto.
  • 2 0
 Was already planning a trip out this fall with some buddies; this has clinched it!
  • 3 0
 VT represent!! Nice work @briceshirbach
  • 2 0
 Thanks bud!
  • 2 0
 In an article about a bike park, I think I saw maybe 1 person on a DH bike? Just thought that was interesting.
  • 3 1
 Killington is much more fun on an eundro bike, There aren't too many trails there worthy of a full DH rig. Trails off of K1 have some steeper bits but there are bits of climbing and work roads to link it all up. Even goat skull the DH track is arguably faster on a enduro bike then a DH rig. That said It would be nice to get more raw trails, especially steeper ones off the top and on rams head. Link some more trails up and limit the time spent riding a work road off the K1. To be the Whistler of the east they really do need to add in some more impressive natural trails, especially since we've been loosing natural trails at the expense of adding in flow trails on rams head. Anyone can build a flow trail or a jump line, some long sustained natural descents will go a a long way to add more character to the resort. Obviously thats easier said than done with all the permitting and red tape with the state.
  • 1 0
 @build-n-ride: I agree most of the trails are better on a trail bike. That being said I'm not a trail builder but you would figure its much harder and more costly to build a flow trail considering most of the best natural trails are built with a chainsaw, rake and shovel. Also not sure where you are gonna find steep terrain on ramshead. I too would like to see more natural stuff built and I think we will in time.
  • 2 1
 @Bigernmcracken: True about ramshead, goat skull is about as fall line as it gets there and not steep, but you could still have fun single track at ramshead. We are loosing trail 11 the old outback to a new blue jump trail, while that trail was not DH bike friendly it was still one of the coolest natural trails in the mountain since it really had the feel of being away from the resort.

If were going to keep doing the whistler comparisons....anyone who's ever ripped a dirt merchant lap has probably ridden del bocca vista after, while it is a relatively flat green single track that is an absolute blast no matter what bike you are on. So we don't need all steep gnar single track, we just need more natural hand built stuff.
  • 2 0
 @Bigernmcracken: Killington killed it for me - if you rode it a few years back - you rode the good stuff, now it's GL dirt roads - if you rode one GL jump line- you rode them all - anywhere you go - they build no natural features into any of them - not a single drop or jump from natural or man made - table tops are table tops - not jumps that you shoot out of at mad speeds for distance the berms are walls. Honestly, they won't be making more tech trails - just the opposite - the'll be combing those out for more riders to use them all. Nothing is expert in the hands of GL - their DH trail - is unsustainable - cut and forget about it - rut and erode way. They are not fun to ride. If trail bikes are more fun and a better fit - why buy a DH bike - resorts are killing the DH bike. Places are all dumbing down unless you want big tables and slopestyle. (BMX on Steroids) Long live Plattekill - too bad it's not going to be that way.
  • 2 0
 This is why I am a proud owner of a seasons pass.
  • 2 0
 *Riding with her cast on...Smile
  • 2 0
 Of course this video would feature the legend Jordan Newth
  • 2 0
 The Phish from Vermont
  • 2 0
 that Prague Ghost, brah...
  • 2 0
 +1 Killington

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