8 Gorgeous Bikes from the 2019 Handmade Bicycle Show Australia

May 1, 2019
by Dave Rome  


Now in its second year, the Handmade Bicycle Show Australia (HBSA) is a place for Australia’s thriving maker community to come together and show off their wares. Every 10th bike in the room was a gem awaiting trails. Here we bring you eight bikes from the show, seven of which are Australian.



Mark Hester of Prova Cycles is dabbling with titanium. Pictured is his first titanium bike a Ripido Party Ti built for himself to test. My previous steel bike is limited by the maximum downtime length that is commercially available. Whereas this I start with long lengths of seamless tubing and then cut and externally butt for each frame I was actually able to build this frame as I d originally planned for the previous frame. It allows more design freedom you can buy this tubing in lots of different diameters and lots of different wall thicknesses. And then becuase I m custom butting it I can tune it to a particular frame said Hester of his bike that features a very roomy 495mm reach extremely long given he s of average height at 174cm .
Prova Cycles' prototype Ripido Party Ti hardtail combines custom butted tubes and in-house produced 3D titanium printed components. The custom cut titanium tubing removes previous design limitations of the steel model (a bike that won Best in Show at last year’s Bespoke show), and the bike now features a 495mm reach, 1225mm wheelbase, 75-degree effective seat tube angle (with fork sagged) and a "not too steep" 66-degree head angle. It's sized for Prova’s Mark Hester himself, who stands at 174cm. There is no paint on this frame, it's all anodisation done by Nine Volt Colour.


Just like a good breakfast this bike has two yokes. In this case they re 3D titanium printed. As Hester explained rear end frame stiffness becomes an issue with titanium when you re pushing tyre and chainring clearance to the limit. The 3D printed yokes allow clearance and the desired stiffness. Certainly this bike is a sign of things to come.
Both chainstays use 3D printed yokes to add stiffness and allow clearance for 29x2.6in rubber. Chainstays are 430mm.
The Ripido Party Ti prototype uses a 86.5mm T47 bottom bracket shell to provide more width to the chainstays. The frame fits a 29 x 2.5in rear tyre while retaining a 430mm chainstay length.
Hester chooses a wider 86.5mm T47 (oversized threaded) bottom bracket shell as it allows the chainstays to be set further apart.

A look inside the dropout of the Ripido Party Ti. Like many of Hester s other printed lugs it features the same printed lattice construction as used by Bastion.
A cut-away of a Prova 3D titanium printed dropout. Prova Cycles share a workshop space with Bastion Cycles – one of the first company's in the world to use 3D printed titanium in cycling. The lattice internal construction is the genius of Bastion.

The 3D titanium printed dropouts look amazing but they also allow Hester to make hyper specific changes to each frame he ll produce.
The 3D printed dropouts can (and will) be varied for each individual bike. They also provide an incredibly clean look.
Hester even designed his own 3D printed seat clamp for the bike. This twin-bolt design helps to spread the clamping force over a greater surface area and therefore provides a secure hold without causing pinching or stiction issues with dropper posts.
Hester even designed his own 3D printed seat clamp for the bike. This twin-bolt design helps to spread the clamping force over a greater surface area, and therefore provides a secure hold without causing pinching or stiction issues with dropper posts.





TOR Enduro bike - custom steel dual suspension our of Beechworth Victoria.
With the Beechworth MTB Park in his backyard, Shane Flint started building his own steel bikes a few years ago. Last year the fabricator and mechanical designer showed off a 29er trail hardtail, and this year he’s stepped it with this 170/150mm enduro rig.

TOR Enduro bike - custom steel dual suspension our of Beechworth Victoria.
This is the second ever dual suspension from TOR Bikes. It features a 64.5-degree head angle and 75-degree seat tube angle. "It’s downhill centric, with anti-squat better suited to descending than climbing, I then rely on the valving in the shock to get back up hills," said Flint, the bike's creator.

TOR Enduro bike - custom steel dual suspension our of Beechworth Victoria.
"Being a single pivot, keeping it stiff is a challenge. The bearing arrangement is not complicated, but I’ve got needle roller bearings on the inside on a 15mm aluminium axle. And then the swing arm plates clamp onto needle roller thrust bearings to spread the load out over a large area."
TOR Enduro bike - custom steel dual suspension our of Beechworth Victoria.
A little laser cut 4130 steel plate gusset is used to help keep the rear end tracking.

TOR Enduro bike - custom steel dual suspension our of Beechworth Victoria.
Like many steel bikes at the show, this one is fillet brazed together and then hand filed for a smooth finish. Expect to pay AU$4,500 for one of these custom frames.



Egress 29er cross country single speed
Egress started with making BMX's and recently progressed to hardtails and gravel bikes. Pictured here is Egress' latest fast XC 29er hardtail, made for the builder himself. Despite its steel construction, it weighs just 8.3kg.

Egress 29er cross country single speed
Egress 29er cross country single speed

Egress 29er cross country single speed
Egress is a small steel custom bike company run by Jimmy Röstlund out of a workshop in Melbourne, Australia. Paint is done by local painter Bikes by Steve
Egress 29er cross country single speed
Egress is another builder who uses fillet brazing for frame construction. The stainless steel dropouts are silver soldered.



Mone bikes
Cjell Monē of Monē Bikes had flown all the way from New Mexico, USA. to be at HBSA. There he showed his new "fun and poppy" hard-hitting trail bike that's designed to handle 29x2.8" rubber inside its 425mm chainstays.

Mone bikes
The four-bar suspension is said to be "super progressive with a real steep leverage ratio. It effectively pops back and returns the energy." As pictured the bike is setup with 140mm up front, and 130mm at rear. Production versions will likely use a longer stroke coil shock, providing 140mm in the rear.
The frame pivot hardware is from a 2010 Specialized Bighit, designed to be cheap and easy to source replacements. The steel frame construction is brass brazed and left untouched, showing Monē's impressive torch-wielding abilities.



H-Tech mountain bike. Australian made custom engineered wooden bikes.
22-year old Hayden Francis of HTech is changing what you may think of wooden bikes. Pictured is the Perth-based builder's first mountain bike frame. The frames are designed and tested using CAD and FEA (Finite element analysis).

H-Tech mountain bike. Australian made custom engineered wooden bikes.
H-Tech wooden bicycles out of Perth Australia.

H-Tech mountain bike. Australian made custom engineered wooden bikes.
Each frame is fully custom, made with locally sourced hardwood timbers. The joints are CNC-machined, and then hand finished prior to bonding.
H-Tech mountain bike. Australian made custom engineered wooden bikes.
Carbon fibre is used at the chainstays in order to fit the 27.5x3.0in Plus tire.



Woods Bicycle Co Street BMX
Not made of wood, Woods Bicycle Co is run by two brothers out of the coastal town of Byron Bay, New South Wales. They travelled to HBSA to show off this street/park smasher (the only one at the show) and a custom steel road bike.
Woods BiCycle Co Street BMX
The brass head badge is a work of art.



Curve Titanium Battlecat bike packing rig.
Curve Cycling has a new long-distance 29x3.0"-wheeled off-road bike packing machine, the Battlecat. Pictured is the titanium model, fitted with some seven bottle cage mounts, plus mounts for "everything" cages. Unlike many other bikes of this category, this one is purposely *not* suspension corrected and uses Curve's own rigid fork as a result. The anodised artwork on this pre-production prototype was also done by Nine Volt Colour.
Curve Walmer dropbar
Be proud, MTB bar widths are influencing the drop bar world, too. Curve's prototype handlebars will be available in 650, 600, 550mm widths (regular road handlebars are typically between 400-460mm). Due out in July, the bars will be named the "Walmer bars", after the Melbourne-based pedestrian bridge they barely fit through.




Fikas titanium fat bike tourer.
Another for going far. Made in Canberra, this Fikas titanium fat bike looks like it was built for a zombie apocalypse. It's built with Rohloff internal gear hubs, Gates belt drive and a Lauf Carbonara fork.

Fikas titanium fat bike tourer.
What I like most is that the down tube has been turned into a fluid canister, with a filling port up top, and a drain at the bottom. Its owner apparently uses it for stove fuel, but I can think of better things to fill it with.



Dave Rome is a tech editor at CyclingTips.com, Pinkbike's sister site. Find dropbar coverage of the Handmade Bicycle Show Australia over at CyclingTips.


137 Comments

  • + 84
 That wooden bike is a thing of beauty. I don't know if I'd ever want to ride any of these but I'd sure like to ogle them for a few hours.
  • + 97
 And then burn it. Maybe the Eagle drivetrain will turn into a Phoenix...
  • - 8
flag smithcreek (May 1, 2019 at 12:27) (Below Threshold)
 There looks like a whole lotta wood filler in those joints. That's the woodworking version of a poorly welded frame.
  • - 81
flag BoneDog (May 1, 2019 at 12:55) (Below Threshold)
 Wood bikes are fucking stupid. Probably the only material I straight up just think YOU DUMB FUCKING HIPSTER!
  • + 33
 @smithcreek: Looks like a whole lotta something you could never do.
  • + 74
 @ratedgg13: ok, I guess I know nothing about woodworking, www.christopherbassguitar.com
Cool bike, crappy joints.
  • + 45
 @smithcreek: Boom !!!! That's a mighty fine comeback my man Smile
  • + 17
 @BoneDog: Hey ThugLife...why so serious biking so serious? It's called woodworking. A lot of woodworking is for artistic value before practicality. Pretty simple. It's not like they wanna mass produce wood framed bikes and hit the slopes.....now GET OFF MY LAWN! Razz
  • + 54
 @smithcreek: 1994 called and wants it's website back.
  • - 1
 @smithcreek: Yeah what's with the apparent gaps in the joints there? Article says they're CNC'd too, which could surely do a better job...?
  • + 0
 @smithcreek: As a tradesman and wood worker of over 20 years I’d have to agree.
  • + 4
 @Tambo: It could be related to how it assembles. Considering they're joining 2 3D surfaces together ( with whatever you call the joint - dovetail? Idk I'm not a woodworker) it may require a little extra clearance...

Pretty cool none the less Smile .
  • + 7
 Woke up and saw this article, one could say it gave me morning wood
  • + 1
 @smithcreek: Agreed! Cool looking joints, but way too much epoxy in those joints for me.
  • + 13
 @Bikethrasher, @smithcreek ;

At the same time... "22-year old Hayden Francis of HTech is changing what you may think of wooden bikes....." When I was 22, definitely wasn't inlaying carbon into hand built, CNC'd jointed wood bike frames! give the kid a few years experience and see what he comes up with. Gotta start somewhere, this is one hell of a starting point
  • - 6
flag Bikethrasher (May 2, 2019 at 7:03) (Below Threshold)
 @adriemel83: Since when was bonding fiber to wood difficult?
  • + 8
 @Bikethrasher: Not saying difficult, just saying experience has to start somewhere, and this bike looks like a damn good finished product for someone at this stage. I'd love to see what he does next, or after say, 20 years in the craft.
  • + 4
 @Bikethrasher: Would you have been doing this at 22? Maybe you did but that doesn't make you any less of a toxic gatekeeper and the reason why no one wants to go into the trades anymore.
  • + 5
 @Bikethrasher: there are plenty of guys with "20 years of experience" in my trade too and they are still crap at what they do and prone to exaggerating their own skillset. Usually they are the same people who complain about the work of others also. Let's see your work and see how good you are in comparison.
  • + 0
 @Deoratwo: "toxic gatekeeper" lol
  • + 4
 @Bikethrasher: I own the bike. You are a troll. Those are compound curve isoloc joints and the ‘woodfiller’ is epoxy resin. As a 20 year self-assessed woodworker, you’d know this
  • - 2
 @jpc25: Ha Perfect I finally made Troll status on PB. Maybe you should google compound curve isoloc joints and see for your self how they should actually look. You should notice that there should not be gaps that need filled with epoxy. I do hope the builder doesn’t get all butt hurt about my critique but learns from it.
  • + 8
 @jpc25, @Bikethrasher:
It seems these comments have got a bit out of control, normally I don't bother answering comments like this, but in this case I think it is best to do so.

First, thanks James you are all correct.

To Bikethrasher yes everybody can improve, and we are currently evaluating a new manufacturing technique that will allow us to produce tighter joints. However for a few reasons we will never be able to produce joints as your google search provided.

1. The the images you have found are mostly renders and the actual photos and joints made using various jigs on solid timber, compared to our thin walled tube are not possible.

2. Our CNC will not produce our complex tubes as usable parts straight out of the machine, and therefore need to be hand finished so they will fit in together.

3. As a woodworker you will know that epoxy is a very broad term for a range of adhesive and fillers. After extensive testing, we have decided on 6 different adhesives and variations to use for bonding different parts of our frames were they are best suited. The adhesive used in the IsoLoc is a thicker, but very flexible epoxy, that needs some adhesive to remain in the joint. As a tight joint that you are after will cause a dry or starved joint that is very dangerous. This has been told to us by the manufacturer and has been backed up by our own testing.

I hope this helps you understand the reasons for the larger than usual woodworking joint.
  • + 1
 @BoneDog: that's fair enough. Now you go build a bike, out of WTF you want, and we'll compare them aesthetically and on the trail! You are more "bone" than dog!
  • + 1
 @HTechBikes: I applaud you sir!
  • + 46
 That Monē Bikes is possibly the most steam punk trail full suspension I've ever seen. ...also how does that rear wheel rotate with that clearance?
  • + 7
 Yeah does not look like it will spin
  • + 36
 So not to be a dink, but literally all 3D printer slicing software (for FDM printers) not only automatically builds infill lattice, but also include multiple algorithms for doing so (including variable density).

So while titanium 3D printing (SLS) doesn't require infill, I'm not sure I'd refer to the manual use of it as "genius"...
  • + 4
 not to mention plenty of bike companies, empire for one we're using 3d printing in 2011
  • + 5
 *laughs in closed cell aluminium foam*

In all fairness, lattice structures are rarely used in MTB industry and honestly as dentist bikes are already breaking 10k price point, this is doomed to change. Looking at cutting edge industries and performance oriented products, carbon-alu-carbon sandwich seems to be the way to go for load bearing structures that want to utilize benefits of both materials. Before you know it there will be that one bling bling sub 100g XC handlebar made that way. And relative fragility of carbon frames can be easily addressed that way too - with lightweight lattice infill of metal.
  • + 2
 @johny88: agreed, and it won't be too long before new better/faster/stronger shapes (ie not 'tubes') are developed via these new construction & printing methods.

Then of course there will be a 3-5 year period where none will sell because we shop with our eyeballs and they'll 'look funny', but we'll eventually come around.
  • + 1
 I also cringe thinking about the fatigue implications of that lattice structure...
  • + 2
 Does somebody know why they only print component and not a whole frame out of titanium ?
  • + 3
 @Fribour: My understanding is that the limitation to date has been related to printer/machine size. There's a company in Australia (Titomic) who now claim to be able to print an entire bike frame.
  • + 2
 @DaveRome: Oh nice, can't wait to see a finished product, and i've heard that printed titanium is not that expensive
  • + 27
 That Prova ano fade is so insanely nice. I know I know fades are already overdone in the handmade world, but I don't care.
  • + 2
 Yes! That thing looks amazing. The tech too- that cutaway from the dropout made with Bastion Cycles just looks unreal.
  • + 2
 Contender for HT of the year.
  • + 4
 @brianpark check out Nine Volt Colour on Instagram, some pretty crazy stuff
  • + 2
 @fartymarty: Prova's Ripido Party steel hardtail won a "Bike of the Show" award at the 2018 Bespoke show (Bristol). Amazingly, this is his first titanium bike.
  • + 2
 Good god I'd get one of those over a plastic bike any day. It's such a work of art without even trying. And I'm not even super opinionated on frame material. Absolutely gorgeous.
  • + 2
 In the flesh it was even more stunning. The detail was incredible and the ano finish was so smooth it felt like glass.
  • + 18
 And not a single comment on that titanium dropout. My inner tech freak got triggered when I saw the cutout, imagine the possibilities.
  • + 5
 The support matrix is there in lots of 3d printed parts I’m not sure why they make a big deal about it or am I missing something?
  • - 9
flag Mngnt (May 1, 2019 at 18:35) (Below Threshold)
 @kipvr: It's not lots of 3d printed parts - it's one piece. That sort of thing is not possible using traditional machining methods; 3D printing is opening up new ways to control stiffness and other characteristics.
  • + 2
 @kipvr: You're right, the post says the internal matrix is the genius of Bastion, but in reality it's an automated generation based on a user input of matrix density.
  • + 12
 Post needs more hipsters with mustaches.
  • + 2
 And fancy coffee and/or tinctures.
  • + 1
 @boxxerace: and typewriters.
  • + 5
 People have been crafting seemingly unnecessary but beautiful stuff for centuries. Not sure Da Vinci was a hipster. These guys are obsessives. Nothing superficial about it.
  • + 10
 That Mone thing looks like a beach cruiser had sex with a modern trail bike and produced that.
  • - 1
 And should have been drowned at birth
  • + 4
 That's why I think it's beautiful. Some might not like the look, but i'm a fan of curves.
  • + 4
 Steel plate gusset swingarm...bad ass. internal ti reinforcement..wow. Every bike here is sweet and the pictures and reviews are great.
  • + 3
 Mone certainly has an interesting take on building bikes. It's one part Crust, one part Skylar, and whole lotta parts brazing.
  • + 2
 People always mistaken Sklar for being the originator of that bendy top tube. It's been around forever (klunkers, beach cruisers). Monē's deserves to be on his own, he aint knocking off any of those listed brands. biplane forks, klunkers, whatevers...he's one if the only American handmade brazers doing frames right now and its definitely unique.
  • + 1
 @ledude: Except he's not brazing a lot of his frames himself - they are done in China.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: he goes to Taiwan to braze with the factory.
  • + 1
 @ledude: Ah ok. His manufacturing process is kinda hard to follow. I know he's a craftsman himself but wasn't sure how many bikes he was making for production himself.
  • + 3
 The TOR is the sweetest looking steel build I have seen in a long time and also one of my favorite browsers for extracurriculars. Nicely done folks!!
  • + 1
 Ok Guys
I am the owner and rider of the wooden bike. I’m glad some of you appreciate the effort that Hayden put into the build.
So......just to be CLEAR -

I weigh 100 Kg (220lb). I have ridden the bike extensively, including the EWS course in Derby, Tasmania. It handles all terrain without issues. Of course it rides like a hard tail, because it is

It has and continues to perform perfectly. The ride feel is somewhere between Ti and Steel.

It’s a work of utterly functional art and should be appreciated as such.

Cheers
James
  • + 1
 Is this one a full wood build, or does it have the integrated carbon inserts in the tubes as well? Beauty build regardless!
  • + 2
 @adriemel83: Hey. It’s has the SCR (selective carbon reinforcing) around BB, Head and seatpost
Cheers
  • + 1
 Babah bikes also make some good home made steel frame and fully customized what geometry customers want with damn good prices for example bellow;
m.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=165425
  • + 4
 The Monē looks like a Niner that melted in the sun
  • + 1
 All of those bikes are works of art Big Grin the wood frame is cool and the 3D printed dropouts are ingenious! But what I really like is the Fikas titanium fat bike with the downtube able to hold fluid
  • + 3
 hit A gnarly trail on the way to a bbq, rock flies up and sparks on cap. KaBoom.
  • + 2
 Beautiful! I did though chuckle at the mud shelf on the green bike. Around here you'd have about 2 pounds of mud there within minutes.
  • + 5
 Definitely I wood...
  • + 1
 Super flared drop bars look so goofy... And what's the point of widening your aerodynamic profile on the drops? kinda ruins the whole point.
  • + 4
 Aerodynamic profile? This thing has 7 bottle cage mounts and 29x3.0 tires! But seriously, if you have ever tried to descend rough trails on drop bars you would understand the benefit of the wide flare.
  • + 3
 Did we just get told what a seat clamp does?
  • + 3
 Damn, always wondered what that thing did?! I just take them off and throw them away to save grams.
  • + 3
 I'm going to assume you've never had to deal with a crummy clamp that stopped your dropper post from telescoping. Wink
  • + 3
 The Prova is simply stunning.
  • + 3
 anyone know what stem is on that egress?
  • + 4
 I'm pretty sure it's the Intend Grace XC: www.intend-bc.com/products/stems/grace-xc-cc.
  • + 2
 Looks to be an Intend stem
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Beat me to it Smile
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: Intend makes very nice stuff!
  • + 1
 He said he got that part first and built the bike and colour scheme around it. Paint from Bikes by Steve. Beautiful work. Apparently a BMW automotive paint
  • + 2
 @dwojo: Thanks! The colour is called Marrakesh Brown.
  • + 3
 That head tube badge though....
  • + 2
 The Monē Bikes duel suspension one is awesome. Love the exposed and unpainted welds. It's got a steampunk vibe going on
  • + 1
 "The frame pivot hardware is from a 2010 Specialized Bighit, designed to be cheap and easy to source replacements."

a 9 year old bike. Do they still make the Bighit?
  • + 3
 Rad bikes all of them, it soothed my new found love of steel.
  • + 3
 The Egress bike looks incredible. and 8.3 kg, sweet jesus
  • + 2
 Thanks!
Quite happy with the final weight. Compared to my previous frame/bike that I've ridden for almost 2 years (and is still going strong), most weight savings were in the component choice.
  • + 3
 That green thing tho…..
  • + 2
 looks a lot like a Starling but not as nice.
  • + 1
 I'm not sure how cnc machined and 3d printed bikes can be called handmade but it's not my problem.
  • + 1
 You want the tubes to be hand made too? Paint to be brush-on only?

Seriously though, you have to automate some processes to create new and cool bikes.
  • + 1
 I tell ya, one of these days, I'ma gonna put my hard earned money on one of those things.
  • + 2
 That BMX looks strangely familiar to a T1....
  • + 1
 |That Ti fatty for the win.

But printed seat clamp, GTFOOH.... No way no how.
  • + 2
 Hot Damn..those bikes just gave me full wood..
  • + 2
 That wooden bicycle is sick!!
  • + 11
 That wooden bicycle is stick!
  • + 1
 Kinda wish I went to that, found out about it while at mt buller riding my homemade bike haha
  • + 3
 We went to it as a bit of a "yeah lets have a look" type scenario. Photos dont quite do it justice and some of the road bikes had some amazing paint or colours to them.
Being able to ride in and hang the bikes up in the foyer was pretty sweet.

Only part that was a bit of a shame was there werent more vendors or brands there for if you want to build your own bike. Columbus tubing was there but that was about it. That to me would have been awesome to see.

Definitely worth a visit next time round though, some great works to see first hand.
  • + 1
 A lot more mtbs than last year's show.
  • + 1
 Monë bike is weird AF. For sure I won't spend my monë on it.
  • + 2
 Mone is badass
  • + 1
 Sweet baby Jesus, the anod work on the Ripido is genius
  • + 1
 I would break the hell out of all of those bikes.
  • + 8
 Not the BMX is my guess.
  • + 11
 @DarrellW: yup bmx bikes break you
  • + 1
 What would you put in the downtube?
  • + 3
 Whiskey.
  • + 2
 @DarrellW: Or whisky, in Australia.
  • - 4
flag mammal (May 1, 2019 at 14:09) (Below Threshold)
 Certainly not anything that I would consume. Camp fuel seems reasonable, since it probably wouldn't be spoiled by the impurities of the tubes and welding process. Water or booze would probably be a bad idea.
  • + 7
 @mammal:
It is in a ti bike, so if there were impurities and then you welded it, the rider would have a real bad day later.
  • + 2
 @Chris97a: I meant impurities of the tubing, and as a result of the welding process. Or is titanium inherently food-grade clean, after fabrication and welding?
  • + 4
 @mammal: The tubing cannot have impurities in it and then have been welded safely. All metals are very sensitive to impurities while welding but titanium is especially reactive while welding. You must fully surround all sides of a weld with inert gas to insure no impurities are introduced while it is hot.

Giant pain for welding set up and I would not hesitate to consume from it after you give it a cleaning. Don't know if anyone makes the right sort of bottle brush for that though.
  • + 1
 @mammal: Yep, it basically is! It's awesome stuff.
  • + 6
 @Chris97a: that's why you use whiskey to sanitize it.
  • + 1
 Lube... flavored variety
  • + 3
 The wooden bike should have a cavity for booze, so you can 'oak' your favourite tipple a bit longer.
  • + 1
 Correct me if i/m wrong,but is anything 3D printed handmade?
  • + 1
 Are steel tubes handmade?
Tires?
brake's disc?
Ball bearings?
  • + 1
 That mone screams for a gearbox
  • + 1
 Dropping braze dimes...picking my jaw up off the floor now
  • + 1
 I want that jigsaw puzzle bike!
  • + 1
 86.5mm threaded bottom bracket? Great! Another standard! Lol
  • + 2
 Same crank as current "standards", and with a bottom bracket size that's already offered by most aftermarket brands. Finding parts shouldn't be an issue.
  • + 1
 Anyone know which fork that is on the Egress? Thanks in advance.
  • + 1
 It's an Orbea. Not so easy to source.
  • + 1
 #bikeporn #ifapped
  • + 1
 That BMX. Want.
  • - 1
 Sick seat tube angle bro
*scoffs*
  • - 2
 Every industry needs a hipster show
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