Eightpins' Integrated Dropper Post - Eurobike 2016

Sep 1, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  
Eurobike 2016



Eightpins dropper post


Other than oddly colored skinny jeans, roller bags, and goofy haircuts, the one thing that there's no shortage of at this year's Eurobike trade show is dropper posts. You can now add Eightpins to that list, but the Austrian company's product is unlike anything else on the market. The main difference lies in the fact that the post is integrated into the frame of a bike, as opposed to using the more typical double tube design. This design allowed Eightpins to use an oversized 33mm post diameter, and to offer up to 220mm of drop. A thru-axle runs through the seat tube and affixes the bottom portion of the unit in place, while a dust wiper occupies the portion where a seat post collar or quick release would normally sit.

Initially, the Eightpins post will only be available on Liteville bikes, but other companies have expressed interest in the design, and it may start appearing elsewhere as time goes on.


Eightpins dropper post
The amount of available drop will be dependent on frame size.

Height and Travel Adjustments

There will be four travel options, with either 150, 180, 200, of 220mm of drop. The maximum drop a rider can use will depend on their seattube length – since the post needs to go somewhere when the seat is in the fully lowered position, a post with 220mm of drop isn't likely to fit on a small frame.

With the Eightpins, adjusting your maximum saddle height isn't going to be quite as easy as opening up a quick release skewer, but then again, once it's set most riders probably won't need to fuss with their position too often. There's a 4mm hex bolt hidden under the seat clamp, and turning it counterclockwise frees the upper portion of the post. Once that's loosened up, simply move the post to the correct height and tighten the hex bolt back down again. That will now become the highest position the seat will reach. To achieve the maximum amount of drop, the seat post tube can be trimmed down with a saw or pipe cutter. The concept is a bit of a mind bender, but the key point to remember is that the seat height and the amount of drop can both be individually adjusted.


Eightpins dropper post
A small thumb lever controls the Eightpins dropper post.
Eightpins dropper post
The lower portion of the post is secured into the seat tube by a thru-axle.

Activation

The post is cable actuated, and relies on mechanical internals that allow it to be stopped every 6mm as it's raised or lowered. When the small bar mounted thumb lever is depressed, an air spring raises the post upwards.

In the event of a hard crash, the Eightpins seatpost is equipped with an overload clutch that allows it to rotate slightly to minimize any damage. Once you and the bike are done tumbling, the seat can be returned to its original position by hand.
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Eightpins were definitely thinking outside of the box with this design, and it'll be interesting to see if any other manufacturers decide to adopt the technology. Now that dropper posts are nearly mandatory equipment for any mountain bike, a design like this may be the next logical step

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129 Comments

  • + 201
 Holy sh*t this is attractive to me.
  • + 57
 Whoah there, get a room already.
  • + 46
 Gotta say...Drop dead gorgeous...
  • + 12
 @italyn12: It has raised the bar.
  • + 5
 @italyn12: the puns are starting to drop
  • + 27
 im getting sick of these posts...
  • + 8
 @DJTC: my dropper extended
  • + 0
 And on that bombshell it´s time to dropp this post
  • - 2
 I will need to extend my line of credit to be able to drop the cash needed for this beauty.
  • + 4
 Now when your dropper shits the bed in the middle of your Moab trip you can't even grab a standard post from the shop!
  • + 1
 Oh you guys, integrating puns about dropper posts!
  • + 1
 @dthomp325: Actually if you look close it might screw into the mound so it might just be a simple unscrew and replace with standard post
  • + 74
 Just 220 mm??? C'mon, now!
  • + 35
 only 220mm? 2016! expecting 250mm by now, late to the party!
  • + 32
 Yeah I bet you I will have trouble extending and wedging this seatpost in my armpit to fashion a makeshift crutch, or for casually resting my chin against it while standing upright, or for using the nose of my seat as a grappling hook to scale the ramparts. Like I do with my current 125mm dropper.
  • + 50
 A seatpost for ants.
  • + 2
 @thedeathstar: it needs to be at least... 3 times bigger
  • + 28
 It's like every bike manufacturer makes the perfect bike, except for one thing. Recently, that aluminum commencal with pf bb. Liteville with their two different wheelies. And so on. I know every mtb manufacturer can't jump on the same standards across the board, but there should be some we can agree on. Steerer tube diameters, threaded bb s, 20mm axles, etc.

And this is where I might seem crazy, but @vernonfelton alluded to it. Why can't the big guys in the industry get together and come up with a solution a lot of consumers seem to have: dropper posts and seat tube sizes. We've had every seat tube measurement possible, but if you can't see that a 40mm seat tube would allow that much more room for a dropper post and it's internal mechanisms, I don't know what to say.

You f*cked around with half degree head tube changes every year, one degree seat tube angles every other year, 1 cog jumps in gearing every few years. GET IT THE f*ck TOGETHER!

An extended seat post is supposed to support a 100+ kg rider while the terrain beneath them, no matter how soft or supple the suspension, will still cause somebody's bum to bounce and jiggle around on their saddle, attached to a seat post with a stanchion diameter of what, 20mm? Less.

Are we going to see 30.9, 31.6, 33.33, 34.9, 38, 41.220840mm seat posts until you all discover that, wow, more room allows for larger, more reliable seat posts with greater surface areas to distribute these loads? Keyed internals would be easier, stanchions could be larger diameter, thinner walled.

I don't care wtf you do, but figure it out!

Sincerely,

A disgruntled, former mtb consumer
  • + 4
 Yes. I don't understand why, with everything else on bikes changing size these days and dropper posts becoming ubiquitous, the seat post diameter still stubbornly stays at 31.6 at the most when it obviously leads to limitations in post travel and reliability due to cramping everything in such a small space.
  • + 3
 Pretty sure the problem with dropper seatposts is not the stanchion diameter...
  • + 3
 @skelldify: Why not? With more space to work with, they could use bigger seals, which I think are the source of most seat post fails.
  • + 1
 @skelldify: please tell me why we've seen three seat posts at eurobike so far that have forgone the tried and true 30.9 and 31.6 sizes for something bigger
  • + 6
 You may have noticed that Specialized has specced the 2017 Enduro with a 34.9 seat tube instead of the 30.9mm that has been a standard in their lineup for years. That follows Kona who specced the Honzo with another 34.9mm seat tube starting in 2016. It's happening, but it won't be a quick change.
  • + 1
 @SnowChaser: I came here for this exact comment. This uses a 33mm shaft. I would be pretty firm in my belief that they are going to be doing exactly this.
  • + 0
 @SeaJay: those dias were based on steel/al stock availability...
  • + 1
 @SnowChaser: With N=2, I don't anything is "happening".
  • + 31
 DOOD! Just one more reason to drool over liteville
  • - 1
 Yes I love having different size wheels on my bike! Otherwise, yeah, liteville has made some amazing bikes. The 901 is one of my all time favorites
  • + 3
 Sad I bought mine 5 years ago and still have another 5 years until the warranty is up... But definitely the way to go!
  • + 20
 OK, so every new bike within a year or 2 will come with a dropper post. So hopefully this means most dropper post will go down in price. I was shocked to see that the new FOX dropper w/ Kashima was selling $100 below most other high end brands. Maybe we will see dropper posts selling for $100-$150 in the near future.
  • + 14
 however the Fox post does NOT come with a lever and needs to be purchased separately for $100.. There goes your price point.
  • + 12
 use that old shifter you have laying around from those 2X days, save some $$
  • + 1
 @denomerdano: The one I was looking at was $65 MSRP which means you'll find it for $50 soon enough.
  • + 1
 @Grmasterd: Not sure it would work that way. The Fox Transfer uses the nutted end of the cable at the post, not the lever, so for a shifter to work, you'd need to figure out how to connect it.
  • + 1
 @Klainmeister: yup, your correct. I wonder if anyone has tried to solder a "head" and the post end to keep the cable head at the other to utilize a gear shifter. I'm sure some industrious guy or gal out there has figured out something. That being said I actual think the price for the Fox unit is reasonable assuming it proves reliable
  • + 3
 @Grmasterd:

www.apsltd.com/catalogsearch/result/?q=stop+sleeve

There are tools that crimp the stoppers onto the wire. No soldering required.
  • + 2
 @SJP: So your the industrious guy or gal I was referring to!! Smile
  • + 1
 Or the reverse... OEM part prices are pushed so low by the manu's that the consumer price for individual parts needs to go up. Lots of components are spec'd on bikes but cost a fortune, relatively, to buy as a part.
  • + 1
 @Grmasterd: I did just that, but I didn't have to engineer or machine a part. Pretty simple affair, really. I just bought some cable "knarps". Just a bit of filing and grinding to fit and I was good to go.
  • + 1
 @denomerdano: ouch. i didnt know that Frown
  • + 23
 Progress!
  • + 8
 That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for dropper posts.
  • + 8
 Say that when every Specialized, Giant, Trek and so on all come with a frame specific dropper. Nice to see Liteville/Eightpins execute it so nicely, but they've just kicked off the nightmare scenario of seat posts to me.
  • + 10
 Eightpins just dropped a bomb in the world of pleasure posts!
  • + 6
 Pretty bas ass idea... but requires some major frame alternations. No thru axle on my frames seat tube... but very cool thinking.
  • + 4
 That was my first thought is....who has a hole in the in frame for a thru-axle to secure it?
  • + 7
 @k2rider1964: The idea is that frame manufacturers will start installing these as standard equipment on future frames, not that people will buy these for their old frames. Same deal as metric shocks
  • + 4
 Yeah I was amazed at all the positive comments considering that no frame is made for this seatpost.
  • + 1
 Glad I wasn't the only one to realize that.
  • + 1
 Through-axle also allows the seat to always be centered .........one possible negative would be in the event of a crash that would normally just spin the post a tad, might put some unforseen rotational forces on the seat tube. Still worth it though I think.
  • + 3
 @minotro: That's covered by the overload clutch
  • + 1
 Who has a drill?
  • + 5
 Anyone else think that lever looks awesome? Looks sleek and efficient compared to my reverb lever that makes no ergonomic sense...
  • + 2
 Actually, I don't. I've been using different types of remotes and the one that's best IMO (and should be at least optional for all droppers from now on) is the trigger style lever (KS Southpaw/new RF/Easton, etc.). Smaller/vertical levers are harder to reach and not that ergonomic, at least in my experience.
  • + 1
 @cool3: I actually really liked the older style KS one. It fit in this strangely comfortable spot under the first knuckle of my thumb, made it super easy to yank on with plenty of force without much effort. I have the southpaw one now, it's pretty good too, but given the choice I think I'd take the old one back. Reverb levers are by far the worst ones out there.
  • + 1
 @Socket: To each his own. I had the "original" KS lever before and did not like it. The adjustability of the Southpaw is really a winner for me -- it fits exactly where the left shifter would be and is very intuitive.
  • + 3
 Here's the big question, if its integrated using the seat tube to do away with putting a tube in a tube then is it a lot lighter? if not i guess the longer travel is the main advantage but i feel there's an opportunity here as droppers aren't light and are very high up.
  • + 2
 Droppers are one of the best inventions in cycling, ever. And now these droppers start at 150mm......This is just fantastic. Wow, I can just drop 220mm and chill like a villain on my bike. That's like, flat footed, on a big travel bike, sitting in the parking lot, beer in hand. Sick.
  • + 1
 One major and great thing pops to our eyes and understanding .The versatility ,compatibitity of this post.
With diferent size riders but mostly diferent frames.In diameter and anchorage with a thru-axle at the seat tube end.
The ideas are great and the inovation also.But is it a new seatpost who anyone can buy or is it a new Litleville with a new seatpost ?
OK ?Canondalle has Leftys ! Are leftys beeing sold as other forks ?
For now,(as they say to be honest)buying a Litleville with a Eightpins for those who have finish of robbing a bank is a great investment.
  • + 1
 been talking about this for the last year. Easy way to improve performance and save weight. Plus I would love to be able to slam my seat without undoing the QR lever, right now my 150 dropper has about 3-4 inches of seattube exposed to get to ride height and I have to slam it before heading down the fun stuff.
  • + 5
 looks so stealth. Sleeper post Razz
  • + 3
 Interested in the overload clutch...will that be adjustable? I can't imagine that the breakout force should be the same for a 100kg rider as for a 65kg rider.
  • + 4
 It's probably set to force specific to what would damage the post. How much you weigh doesn't change that.
  • + 3
 Seems like it would a massive pain in the arse to repair and/or service- then again, maybe the fact that the internals are the frame makes it less prone to damage? Who knows.
  • + 4
 It the same to service, just unscrew 2 bolts to remove it instead of undoing seat clamp. Its not fully integrated into frame just a bolt in cartridge.
  • + 1
 Best idea I have seen in a while. This is the kind of profuct I feel like anyone could have thought up, but no one did until now. Love the look. Imo droppers are probably the best trend that has taken hold in recent years, but I have always cringed at the look of them. This just really cleans up the lines of the bike again. Good job
  • + 5
 Now that is thinking outside the box!
  • + 27
 thinking inside the tube
  • + 2
 220mm! I'll make sure I have one when my ass needs to plough through a WC DH rock garden!
  • + 1
 It says that you have to have a bolt/quick release on the bottom of your seat tube. Do we have to install this, or am I just missing something? Looks so clean!
  • + 3
 It's a proprietary system, meaning that it will only work with frames that were designed for it. Liteville is currently the only company that has adopted it so far.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: I imagine you'll be able to get it as an optional extra on Nicolai soon
  • + 3
 Just use any standard drill and drill into your frame. Make sure you use a big enough bit so the through axle fits. It works on any 2015 or newer frame.
  • + 5
 Especially carbon - because carbon is stronger.
  • + 1
 @mrgonzo: nah bruz. All the weight from you sitting on the seat is transferred directly to that thru axle. You'd have to reinforce it properly.
  • + 1
 @freeriderayward: missed the sarcasm aye?
  • + 1
 Oh! Haha, yep. Sorry Frown
  • + 1
 I see two possible aplications for this :
-XC hardtails ? Check !
-Cyclocross bikes ? Sorry ... that`s where they stash their motors Smile
  • + 1
 This is very cool, i wonder if any other manufacturers will jump on board...at least those with straight seattubes don't really have an excuse not to...
  • + 3
 Shut up and take my money...
  • + 1
 So if you have the 150 and you set the ride height for pedalling at 20 lower, the drop is now 130?
  • + 1
 I was thinking the same thing. But I was also thinking the adjustment with the hex screw would have a set range to how much you could adjust the height limit. Probably 10mm at most... Confused
  • + 1
 That's it. I'm in. Next trail bike frame I shop for, I'll add this in the Pros column of any options out there.
  • + 2
 BRAVO, however bike with straight seat tubes have limitation with geometry
  • + 0
 Great. Integrate a notoriously unreliable component with the bike frame. That doesnt sound like a bad deal for consumers at all!
  • + 2
 Great design... What about maintenance?
  • + 9
 buy a new frame! easy!
  • + 9
 Maintenance on other droppers seems to be anywhere from throw it in the bin to send it off for 3 months while its serviced. This you just undo a bolt then remove the collar, everything is easily accessible.
  • + 1
 @thepodge: my reverb is 2 plus years old, 3000+ miles, no service, works fine, ( have i doomed it now?)
  • + 1
 Finally... something I've been waiting for so long, a seatpost I want to buy.
  • + 2
 My current 301 just became obsolete. Drats!!! Loved that bike!
  • + 1
 Was thinking about this ( to use seat tube as chamber) few years back,
for XC bikes, boom here we go, nice...
  • + 1
 @nimmo did you see this dropper?
  • + 1
 Intriguing...
  • + 1
 This has been the Year of the Dropper Post I swear to Dogg!!!!!!
  • + 1
 This is progress I can get behind.
  • + 2
 great idea!
  • - 1
 Coming from the guy with pictures of outdated junk in his profile - your on of the people contribute to discussion even when it doesnt effect you are you not?
  • + 1
 TAKE MY MONEY
  • + 1
 awesome vid!
  • + 1
 awesome
  • + 1
 ...
  • + 1
 220mm, just 30mm missing
  • + 3
 250??? Do you ride in a skirt?
  • + 1
 what about weight?
  • + 6
 According to Eightpins' figures, their design ends up weighing around 100 grams less than a Reverb and a seat collar.
  • + 1
 About fucking time.
  • - 2
 Wait... so you have to take the seat off every time you need to adjust your seat height? Facepalm
  • + 5
 Only to initially set the maximum height - after that it's just like a regular dropper post.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: does anybody actually get that perfect on the first try? Apparently so, from the downvotes I'm getting.
  • + 2
 @groghunter:

I'm with you. It would probably take half a day to get it just right. Seat post height changes with seat tilt, and you have to set the tilt first.
  • + 1
 I LOVE the idea of this post, but I had the same thought. I ride with 4 different shoe/pedal combos (flats, clips, summer, winter) and there is about 10mm "stack" difference between them. Definitely have to adjust seat to get in the right climbing height.

Maybe a seat with a taint cutout so you could adjust in place. A few of the best seats are already set up like this.
  • - 2
 Great another frame standard.
  • + 3
 but this one actually makes sense and its a standard fit now not umpteen different sizes of seatpost.
  • + 1
 Yeah, this is a good idea they should do it with rear shocks too.
  • + 1
 I wouldn't expect that this would become a standard... and option that some high end bikes will integrate. Sure. But not a standard. I could see say... Santa Cruz offering it in say the CC versions of their bike. Like you can get the regular carbon without it or get the higher end carbon with it. Who the hell knows. Either way... I think it's cool.
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