Endura Planted Over 1.3 Million Trees in 2020, Aiming to Become Carbon Negative by 2024

Jan 14, 2021
by ECHOS Communications  

PRESS RELEASE: Endura

When we launched their One Million Trees initiative at the start of 2020, we committed to planting one million trees annually for the next ten years to ultimately eliminate the brand’s carbon footprint. With the help of their reforestation partners in Mozambique, the first year’s target was exceeded by 30%, with more than 1.3 million mangroves planted in the Maputo Bay area and plans to start planting here in Scotland soon. With this important milestone met, Endura has now set a bold new target - to become carbon negative by 2024.


Pamela Barclay, Endura’s co-founder and Brand Director, who initiated the One Million Trees project and is leading efforts to reduce the brand’s environmental impact on a number of fronts is naturally delighted with the progress that’s been made. “With Covid-19 tragedy and disruption affecting communities around the world, it has meant so much more to have hit our Million Trees target this year and is a phenomenal start, but it’s just year one. Our ten-year commitment to match this level of planting will deliver real benefits and enable Endura to achieve carbon negative status very quickly”.

Pamela is also quick to add that “reducing our environmental impact is core to everything we’re doing at Endura; carbon offsetting, removing PFCs, designing for longevity, use of recycled fabrics and materials, and in-house repair services are part of a companywide approach that takes us further on our journey. We still have a long way to go, but we’re heading in the right direction.”


The immediate and dreadful effects of the Covid-19 pandemic have dominated headlines throughout 2020, but the climate emergency continues to pose a very real threat to the planet and requires urgent action. In a project led by Endura’s founder and Managing Director, Jim McFarlane, the company’s activities right from fabric production to product end-of-life have been examined to calculate the company’s total carbon emissions in order to quantify the sequestration required to neutralize.

The main driver of emissions for Endura continues to be the production of the materials required to manufacture its range of apparel and accessories. Each step in the manufacturing processes emits CO2 into the environment. Collaboration with other brands in the Pentland Brands portfolio and across the industry will be required to help switch upstream suppliers to renewable energy to make a meaningful reduction in this element. Even so, the amount of CO2 per unit produced is forecast to reduce by 7% per year resulting in a 25% reduction between 2020 and 2025. This is expected to continue to decline at 6% year-on-year as China’s green energy projects start to come on-stream.

The transport of goods from the production powerhouses in the Far East forms the next largest segment of Endura’s emissions, and they plan to reduce the use of air freight by 75% over the next two years, partly by switching to overland train services when sea freight is too slow. Sending orders out to Endura’s network of dealers and direct to consumers also has an impact on emissions but given that the relative distances are much smaller it has a lower impact than the process of moving containers from East Asia to its main markets in the UK, Europe and US.

Endura’s manufacturing, warehousing and design base in Scotland also has a footprint – mainly the electricity and natural gas used to power its 5,000 square meter facility in Livingston. The biggest reductions in emissions will come chiefly by switching to renewables, particularly for electricity, and this is something that is currently being pursued.

Cumulatively, the activities under the direct control of Endura represent around 74% of the total CO2 impact of their clothing. Consumer use – predominantly washing – contributes around 20% to a garment’s environmental impact and significant reductions can be made by influencing consumer behavior in washing and extending the product’s life span.

Endura estimates that retail activities contribute 3% of an item’s emissions, with end-of-life management adding a similar proportion. Endura views end of life management as their responsibility, but from a CO2 emissions point of view, it’s not the lowest hanging fruit. However, planning has started on an initiative to retrieve and fully recycle products alongside packaging such as LDPE bags, something that’s already in place as part of the European Outdoor Group’s Single Use Plastics project.

Whilst aggressively reducing CO2 emissions under their control is a key part of Endura’s future, the One Million Tree Initiative can reduce their net carbon footprint much more quickly. The mangrove restoration project in Mozambique was chosen as it offers particularly high levels of carbon sequestration per plant, but also because the project was ready to start planting immediately. Endura also plans to plant trees closer to home, next to the trails at its charitable trust center in central Scotland, where native woodlands are scheduled to start planting in 2021. This project will create a woodland of 85,000 broadleaf trees, capturing carbon and improving biodiversity on otherwise agriculturally unproductive land.


By pledging to plant one million trees per year over a ten-year timeframe, the carbon capture effect compounds as more and more trees are planted and then begin to reproduce naturally. This will see Endura first balance out the CO2 that their activities produce and rapidly move beyond this to remove much more carbon from the atmosphere than they emit. By 2030, Endura forecast that their net footprint will lock away more than 100,000 tonnes of atmospheric CO2 each and every year.


105 Comments

  • 142 4
 Never looked @ Endura. But this is something that's definitely going to get some of my market share.
  • 25 0
 their stuff is great. I found it through CRC but now getting more in north america. Good features and lasts
  • 12 10
 I want to like them, they're a brand that's local to me and they seem to try to do all the right things, but all their stuff I've owned just falls apart so much more quickly than other brands. It undoes everything they've said they'll do in the article.
  • 5 1
 @lukeb: I was thinking the same thing. I like their designs too but their stuff doesn't seem to last very long, although I should say they are not the worst.
  • 6 0
 @conv3rt: yup. Same here. Shorts, pants, top.

Comfy as f$ck, well thought out and hopefully durable!
  • 18 0
 @lukeb @ichabodchain I've had a pair of Endura Humvee shorts and they've lasted 10 years!
  • 10 0
 @rirkby: I still have mine Big Grin

My issue with Endura is a bit different. Their sizing seems to be a bit, how to put it, random. Sometimes M is too large. Sometimes L is too small...
  • 1 2
 I have some Endura stuff, love the design, but the durability is ok-ish. Never had a complete fail per se, but some details could be improved, for example, I have a wind vest the fabric is good, the fit and the design is good, but the letters making the "ENDURA" brand on the vest have come off, same with the high visibility elements are also starting to come off. And I only wash the vest by hand with lukewarm water and some soap.
And all my Endura stuff is like that, nice products but some details need improvement.
  • 6 0
 FYI Canadians almost any LBS can pull Endura stuff as they are widely distributed by one of the most common distributors in the country!
  • 1 0
 I purchased an helmet from them. The single track ii and its been fantastic. Very good ventilation as described. I recently saw some good looking rainy weather apparel but here in California that's a non issue. After this I will definitely give another item a try to support
  • 1 0
 Good pricing too, in the MTB world of super high dentist only pricing Endura win out as not the absolute cheapest but great value in the long run. I love my 3/4 length winter under shorts
  • 4 2
 @Mesmomesmo: Haha i usually spend time to peel such letters of my clothes with my fingernails since i like the "stealth/plain"-look and don't want to make free advertisement for things i have to buy ^^
  • 1 0
 @lukeb: agreed. Some of the sizing seems odd too. Too short on MTB shorts and tops etc.
  • 1 0
 @Ferisko: agreed! Too short as well!
  • 5 0
 @lukeb: Surprised to read that. I am using the same endura shorts and jacket for already 8 years.
  • 4 0
 Oh? Endura stuff I've had has lasted well. Nice stuff.
  • 6 0
 What are folk doing to have durability issues with Endura? Owned a set of water proof shorts for about 8 years... eventually replaced after literally 1000's of miles of riding, got a waterproof gillet/jacket I've had for 10 years and it's still going strong today.
  • 7 0
 @rirkby: can only agree with you, when the world ends the original humvee shorts will survive. Mine must be nearly 10 years old now as well, they outlasted many supposed new upgrades.

Hopefully they re-launch those, keeping the belt.

The original thermostat tights (before the fabric went a bit naff), those were also great, it took a big crash followed by being cut out of my clothes to destroy them.
  • 2 0
 @lukeb: Can't say I've ever had a bad stitch off them. I've replaced my gloves as they were getting holes about five seasons in, but that's pretty reasonable IMO and they're still useable for guests/spares. The shorts are top notch.

I want to try the MT-500 helmet with the weird Smith-like honeycomb, but finding any large helmet at the moment is next to impossible...
  • 2 0
 @lukeb: The only bit of their kit I’ve had problems with were a pair of overshoes, the rest has been solid. I have a jacket that’s still going after seven years and shorts after five.
  • 1 0
 Shorts are hard as nails
  • 1 0
 @lukeb: Huh that's interesting, I have never owned an endura product that hasn't lasted years (still haven't had a product of theirs fail even after 4 years of wearing their shorts).

We actually sell Endura at the shop I work at and we have only had one warranty claim, and that was only for a cosmetic defect on a jersey.
  • 44 6
 There is no such thing as carbon neutral. It should be called carbon offset. The only way companies can be carbon neutral is not use any carbon. I believe we should all try to do more to protect our planet and produce less carbon.
  • 22 3
 This is a strange concept to me. Instead of trying to offset, we should ideally be trying to reduce. It all comes back to the worst industrial culprits.
  • 5 1
 Microsoft promised to be carbon neutral by 2030 with sucking CO2 out of the atmosphere, while doing big deals with oil digging industries.
  • 12 4
 @makripper: still this is all green washing.
Carbon neutral or negative can not be archived. Only if you use human labour to its maximum extent and even then the humans need tools and they did have a carbon output. Still not possible to negate the carbon output. Tree's should be plantet way more often and the right one's on the right spot. But that doesn't mean your company produces less carbon or even 0.
  • 7 0
 @makripper: it's not like they're mutually exclusive. Rather, they're complimentary.

Reduce what you produce, offset what you do.
  • 12 1
 @Serpentras: "green washing" implies dishonesty. Deliberately misrepresenting green credentials while making no real attempt to be environmentally concious. We shouldn't treat every publicised effort as being green washing.

Carbon is life. We cannot avoid it no matter what we do as you point out. Concepts of carbon neutrality or negativity are pretty well established in a general sense. We know what is meant by these terms.
  • 4 0
 @Esmond @Serpentras It's a cycle of life. Animals produce tons upon tons of CO2 and other greenhouse gases throughout their life by the nature of their existence. These gases are then "absorbed" by plants, only to be released back into the atmosphere when they are broken down by animals, funghi or bacteria.

We're just a bunch of complex animals doing stuff that are not necessary for our survival. Added bonus is that we further accelerate the rate of emissions by obliterating native forests in the process.

As you said, there is no such thing as carbon neutral. Atmospheric CO2 is released in one place and absorbed in another place. Unless you want to go back to living in caves and live on berries and roots, you can't be entirely carbon neutral.

I guess humanity is not willing to abandon their toys and monopoly. That leaves us with the next best option, which is to try to reduce emissions to a point that can be reasonably managed/expected (low-impact materials, more efficient transportation, use of renewable energies, shopping local, cutting out animal products, not driving to the trailhead etc ...), and offset the rest by one method or another (planting trees is the most practical solution at the moment, which has many benefits aside from CO2 absorption, one of them being employment for rural communities.)

Greenwashing is not giving a f*ck but marketing the lie that you do (ie. a huge green "Recyclable" label on plastic bottled water).
Carbon offsetting is about walking the talk and actually reducing emissions where you can AND planting trees to cancel out what you can't.

It is commonly agreed that this is what we mean by carbon neutrality and carbon negativity, and croaking that such a thing does not exist in a practical sense is hair splitting at best.
  • 2 0
 @makripper: C-H-I-N-A
  • 2 0
 @two2pedal: yea they top the list. I forget which companies but they took a few spots in the top ten.
  • 40 0
 If Endura doesn’t give you woods, you might have environmental dysfunction.
  • 2 0
 Hard wood... a real Eucalyptus type of member.
  • 21 1
 Already sold on their awsome clothing and this just reaffirms my brand loyalty - top work
  • 17 1
 very happy to see this. more companies do this, you will get my business.
  • 11 1
 If more companies would do stuff like this we might have a sustainable planet and less ppl claiming to be green while building trails with a bunch of batteries from an acid raining nickel mine.
  • 4 1
 Not to mestion all that Lithium... Evil
  • 11 2
 Carbon from fossil fuels used to be deep underground. Bring it to the surface and it's now in our ecosystem. The trees will grow and absorb carbon, so it works short term, but in the long run they will die and rot or burn and release that carbon. Even if used as lumber that will only delay the rotting or burning. Unless you cut down the trees and stuff them back into the oil hole deep underground never to be seen again then its not really carbon neutral. It's better than doing nothing, but reducing the carbon use in the first place is the real solution.
  • 1 1
 Which is the unsolvable problem.

Even if you bury the trees, they're not as dense as the coal we dug up in the first places, and won't be for millions(?) of years.

Planting trees is pretty much all we have but.
  • 12 0
 That is not all true really. If you don't cut the trees down and let them die from age; mushrooms, plants and animals will break them down to soil. And the soil will hold most of the carbon in the ground as long as you don't clearcut the area so that plants and other speccies dies (which unfortunately happens all the time here in Sweden). In deforested areas you will do a great thing to plant new trees to start absorb carbon, but also restore the ecosystems and getting water back in dry areas. But yeah, reducing our carbon use should still be a huge priority!
  • 5 0
 The only true carbon sinks are big trees. Mangroves don't cut it for me. Not enough biomass. Yeah they are ecologically significant but to be a carbon sink there must be biomass.

Bottom line is planting trees will never be the answer. We need to stop deforestation ASAP and let massive amounts of deforested farmland go through the succession process back to a natural system. No human planted system will ever achieve the biomass of a natural forest system.

It cracks me up that governments all over the world can lock down people "to save lives" based on science when the science of what is going on with deforestation and loss of diversity has been observable for decades and we do nothing. Call it conspiracy theory or whatever you want - but you are lied to and will continue to be lied to.

I 100% guarantee that 10X more people have died as a result of climate change than Covid - but that stuff never really gets reported. It's the stuff like lack of food, adequate water supply, etc. Food sources become less healthy and weakened immune systems and poor health result and the deaths are directly linked to the health of the ecosystem.
  • 5 0
 Impressive. It could be interesting to know what surface is necessary to plant 1'000'000 trees. Any idea here?
  • 5 0
 Probably areas set aside for commercial logging. Which will probably be harvested again after a rotation. Also worth noting that when a plantation is re-planted the trees that survive to maturity is a lesser number than planted. This isn't a bad thing, carbon is still captured by harvested trees. Its a win for sponsors as well as forestry.
  • 4 0
 5500 trees per acre of forest. So roughly 200acres... which is a good start... But that's why they say 1.3 million trees, sounds much more impressive than 200 acres reforested. Which is really very little, but they still deserve a lot of credit because planting trees is a win win for everyone.
  • 4 0
 I’ve personally planted about 300,000 in a previous gig. That was about 1,000 acres (you don’t re-plant at typical forest density).
  • 3 1
 @JDFF: yup. The carbon capture happens in the tree growing. Because the majority of the co2 absorption in our oceans I wish we would focus on that. Small steps I guess
  • 1 0
 I'm no expert but I estimate it takes at least one acre.
  • 2 0
 Endura makes no BS riding gear. Most of their kit I have been using for 5+ seasons and it still rides and washes like brand new. I finally replaced my MT500 jacket with a new one this year after 9 seasons on it. You can't find quality like that anywhere else.
  • 3 0
 They have always made my favorite wet and cool weather riding gear bar none. I think they just raised their own bar. Good job!
  • 6 1
 They just got a new customer
  • 6 1
 but all their packaging is still non recyclable
  • 1 2
 oooooooooooooooooooo
  • 2 0
 When you move to plant more trees in there in Scotland, which is great, maaaybe stay out of the Flow Country eh?

99percentinvisible.org/episode/for-the-love-of-peat
  • 3 0
 Did they pay for some carbon offsetting company or did they build the program themselves. Carbon offset companies are quite shady and are just profiting from this trend
  • 1 0
 Love endure its so durable. I keep getting disappointed by other brands. Riding in all weather in the Scottish highlands certainly puts the stuff to the test. I wish they made more stuff for kids. I'd really like MT500 burner pants for my wee boy!
  • 1 0
 Nicely designed gear, but why oh why can’t they spend the extra few pence on decent cotton for the stitching of the products, or decent zips on their overshoes, had 5 pairs of overshoes under warranty because the zips fall apart, the 6th pair I’m replacing the zips as fed up with them only lasting a few months.
  • 1 0
 The nature doesn't need the help of tree planters, woods can grow by themself, just leave the nature itself. 1.3 mio. planted trees doesn't mean that they all grow to a real tree. Just marketing
  • 2 0
 I have a pair of their shorts I got from a friend, they are my favourite pair. This reaffirms it
  • 1 0
 Looks like I know what my next helmet brand will be. I was actually considering their Full face helmet but the visor was fixed. I hope they change this on the next one.
  • 1 0
 I have their MT500 full face and the visor can be removed, is the issue that it can't be adjusted?
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: Yes, I believe you cant adjust the visor.
  • 1 0
 @mountguitars: yeah nah you can't. to be fair it does have a remarkable amount of visibility but I can see how that would be a turn off. I wouldn't have bought it if I hadn't won it Razz
  • 1 0
 @T4THH: One of the checkboxes when I was shopping for a new helmet is that it would allow me to take off my goggles and let it sit on my helmet's forehead so it meant I would have to push back the visor out of the way. I ended up getting an IXS FF Trigger last fall. Sadly, the sizing on the Trigger is awful.
  • 2 0
 Strange 1st sentence. Starts off as 1st person but then swings 3rd. We/their
  • 1 0
 SYMMETREE....really cool , small outdoor clothing company out of Oregon. They plant like 6-8 trees around the world for every purchase.
  • 2 0
 I hope they are being planted in a way that allows trails to be built through the forest
  • 1 0
 Judging by all the comments, we shouldn't do anything since we don't have a magic bullet for pollution/climate change.

Good work, team!
  • 1 0
 Climate changes because climate changes.
  • 3 1
 I guess I like endura now...if I could just afford their stuff
  • 1 0
 They’re normally one of the better value brands, although some of the MT500 stuff seems to be increasing in price quickly...
  • 2 1
 I realize I cant be negative nor annoy anyone or ruin his - her days ....damn it .... well played Endura.
  • 1 0
 What, no issues with Endura's teeth?
  • 1 0
 Its a no Brainer we need more trees since south,central America had been cutting their Forrests down
  • 2 0
 Keep at it Endura, good policies like this win loyalty.
  • 1 0
 I love Endura gear, now I have another reason to appreciate the brand, good on them!
  • 1 0
 Endura if you're reading this I would buy goods and services to support this, job well done.
  • 2 1
 They themselves don't plant any trees. They pay some other company to plant the trees.
  • 1 0
 Probably at slave wages.
  • 2 0
 If only it were that simple...
  • 2 1
 New marketing for telling the people why their products must be that expensive.
  • 1 0
 Except they're not, relatively speaking.
  • 2 1
 So cool, I wonder if this is part of the Mr.Beast project trees thing.
  • 1 0
 Damn, I knew I forgot to do something last year
  • 1 0
 Thats a lot of freakn trees!
  • 3 2
 Can they come to California and cut down trees in our over grown forest ??
  • 2 1
 Don't worry about that, lack on any reasonable planned logging will ensure that they'll burn shortly.
  • 1 0
 How can one get involved in this project?
  • 1 0
 Time to buy me a new pair of shorts!!! marketing works!!!
  • 1 0
 that doesn't mean 1 million trees survived ..
  • 1 0
 what kind of trees tho?
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