Endura MT500 Pack - Review

Mar 29, 2017
by Paul Aston  
Endura MT500 Pack



Endura is synonymous with hard wearing and well thought out products, born and bred to battle the tough conditions that are found year-round in Scotland. This 15 litre 'enduro bag' is from their long-standing MT500 lineup, which is their tag for MTB products that face the heaviest demands. There is plenty of storage space, a Koroyd back protector, and straps and loops to tie up all of your enduro attire.

One size fits all and weighs in at 1220g for the complete pack including the Hydrapak bladder system. Yours for $164.99 USD / £139.99 (£119.99 excluding bladder).
Endura MT500 Pack Details
• CE 1621-2 Level 2 Koroyd back protector
• Mesh-covered, 3D foam back panel
• Lightweight, perforated foam shoulder strap
• Easy access, waterproof, zipped pocket
• Removable tool roll
• Splash-proof base
• Quick-release pad carry straps
• Carry system for helmets
• 15-litre capacity
• Weight: 1220g inc. back protector, bladder and tool pouch
• Price: $164.99 USD / £139.99
endurasport.com


Endura MT500 Pack
Endura MT500 Pack


Construction

The main construction of the pack is from rip-stop polyester, with a large portion of the back being mesh covered foam. For its medium 15 liter size, the MT500 packs in many features: there's a removable roll/pouch to keep your tools together, a fully waterproof pocket to keep your phone and money dry, hip pockets on the waist belt, and an elasticated helmet carrier and loops for knee/elbow pads. The base of the pack is splashproof, for riding through muddy puddles and putting the bag on wet ground during mid-ride breaks.

Back protection is supplied in the form of a Koroyd EOP 1.0 honeycomb protector, a material more commonly spotted on Smith's helmets. This lightweight (205 grams) board meets CE Level 2 protection which is the higher level, it is also stiff and should provide good protection if you decide to bend your back over a pointy rock or try to insert sharp objects like shock pumps you are carrying into your spine during a crash.

The 3-litre Hydrapak bladder is BPA and PVC free, which I assume is a good thing, though this doesn't stop your water from tasting like rubber. The bladder hose can be routed along either shoulder over pre-shaped, mesh covered foam straps. The only colorway is bright yellow with some reflective accents to keep you visible in the winter months.


Endura MT500 Pack
The Koroyd back protector is lightweight at 205 grams and stiff, it receives the higher CE Level 2 protection rating.


Performance

Overall the MT500 ticks all the boxes: lightweight, protective, a three-litre bladder, plenty of storage. A pack that should easily cover 90% of anybody's rides.

The MT500 is more suited to bigger humans; the bag is just over 50 centimeters tall and fit me (185cm) well. An extreme amount of adjustment can be found in the shoulder and waist straps to fit the larger lady or gentleman. For my muscle-free skinny frame, I found the straps too long, and even with elastic retainers they often ended up flailing around in the wind – where are the scissors?

Thanks to the large surface area in contact with my back, the pack would hardly move during riding, although it is tall and did hit me in the back of the head a few times on drops. Stability isn't quite on par with EVOC and their large elasticated waist straps, but it's not far away. Ventilation works well on the shoulder straps, and the foam pads against your back keep most of the pack away from your body for good air flow.


Endura MT500 Pack
Proven in Scotland's finest summers, the fully waterproof pocket will keep your phone and wallet dry.
Endura MT500 Pack
The metal closures are simple to use and aren't affected if covered in mud.


The bag is non-complicated and access to all pockets is easy, though some of the straps cross over the zips to the main compartments. The metal closures are easy to open and close, even when covered in mud, and they never detached themselves in use. The tool roll helps with organization but I would like to see a few more pockets in the main section for stashing various things.

After a few months of solid use, the MT500 is showing no signs of wear or tear, and thankfully the yellow rip-stop material doesn't hold onto muddy stains.



Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesIf you need to go full enduro, including a certified back protector to get past the start marshals, the MT500 checks all the boxes. Overall, a superb bag that rivals the best options out there. Paul Aston

67 Comments

  • + 19
 Jeez cant wait to ride my Enduro 29er with the Endura MT5000, my enduro shorts, my enduro knee pads, and my enduro thong. Boy I love enduro and everything named enduro.... Back pack actually looks hella sick though
  • + 102
 rider, you need to chill.
  • + 40
 Pretty sure Endura have been around for a long time before the term Enduro became popularised in MTB. I believe the name is derived from the performance of the product, rather than it's application in an intended discipline. I had a pair of their shorts, and yeah, they were very durable.
  • + 31
 I think you've not realised who Endura are and how long they have been around pal.
  • + 22
 @excavator666: so they endured?
  • - 6
flag chillrider199 (Mar 29, 2017 at 9:39) (Below Threshold)
 @excavator666: Oh, this is my first time hearing of them. They seem solid.
  • - 3
 @nickkk: Haha not possible.
  • + 0
 Never go full enduro
  • + 3
 @manchvegas: Indeed. They endured years of MTB and Bike Messengering. But I split the arse out of them one day when squatting in the gym. They'd probably still be going if it wasn't for that.
  • + 0
 @chillrider199 this just made my day hahaha
  • + 3
 @lee-vps-savage: Comically, the url says 'enduro-mt500'
  • + 5
 Been around since 1993 way before the term enduro. Great brand with a big factory just 10 miles along the road from me in Livingston, Scotland. Enduro thong is a grand idea though. Need to have a word with them.
  • + 1
 You forgot to put your enduro specific goggles over your enduro specific open face helmet
  • + 2
 Dont forget to check your enduro linkage bearings!
  • + 1
 @Cranky-Biker:

Im sick of hearing this comment on PB. Although im glad that my life isnt that boring that a shitey comment read on PB makes my day complete.
  • + 2
 @simeon10: Thats why you go endura, it's not quite enduro and has been around a lot longer.
  • + 2
 @StraightLineJoe: someone seems to have had a bad day Smile
  • + 1
 @Cranky-Biker: that's rich coming from someone named "cranky biker" hahaha
  • + 11
 Big fan of the brand. Got a pair a Hummbies shorts in Scotland that are about 7 years old, use them a lot and still look awesome. All brands of clothes should be like Endura: Quality first, all the rest second.
  • + 10
 agreed. $164 might seem like a lot but you'll only have to spend it once with Endura. Their stuff lasts
  • + 3
 Agreed, all my riding gear is endura. I love the hummvees. I know I can count the quality and fit. Wish they made nicer jerseys but my pants, shorts and jacket will be endura
  • + 10
 If you wore that and have Hope/Superstar hubs, people might think you are pretending to be an angry wasp.
  • + 1
 Better yet, if this pack glows in the dark and you ride at night on the street you can scare away all the roadies!
  • + 4
 I use a Decathlon B-Twin back protector pack I picked up in France a couple of years ago, works very well but I'm yet to see a back protector pack of this style that uses the novel feature of a chest camera mount on the central clasp/harness clip that means I can have a stable pack AND chesty style mount POV cam position..without the need for a separate cam harness. The B Twin pack has this ability but I've not seen it on the bigger brand names, seems like they're missing a trick imo. Looks like a great product though from Endura.
  • + 1
 Sure. It's just cost prohibitive for them. This feature would push the price of their awesome backpacks for at least another 100 euros/dollars/sterling (you choose).

How much did you pay for your backpack?
  • + 2
 @jollyXroger: about 40 euros.. RRP was under 70euros.
  • + 1
 @nickkk: haha yeah decathlon is cheap. But you can't argue with a 10 year warranty on a bag that cost £2.50!

Their bikes are fantastic value too.
  • + 3
 I am hit and miss with Endura;

Bib shorts, DH shorts, DH rain trousers and waterproof jacket have proved totally indestructible after years of (ab)use and crashes. Soft shell jacket, jersey and just gloves disintegrated in a few months.
  • + 3
 I own this bag for almost a year. The external pockets are perfect for a phone and a pressure gauge. The interesting thing is that when riding you do not notice the back protector. I am 1.78 and the shoulder straps are perfect. Not once I have had any issues of stability while descending. It stays in place. The small wallet is very useful, because I have stored all necessary things and I take it with me also while riding my road bike. Last year Endura did not offer a hydration bag, so I use my camelbac hydration bag. It is an excellent choice I have made. One year later there is NO sigh of aging! The colors stay vivid even under the sun of Athens.
  • - 4
flag mollow (Mar 29, 2017 at 13:39) (Below Threshold)
 A pressure gauge lmao are you kidding me?
  • + 2
 @mollow: Small changes in pressure can have a pretty big impact on ride quality, flat/rim protection, etc. If I lose pressure on-trail for any reason, I like to be able to get it right when adding air.
+1 pressure gauge carry (Topeak SmartGauge).
  • - 1
 @mollow: I laughed at that as well. People act like they're riding an epic every weekend and bring every tool with them possible.
  • + 1
 @mtbracken:

I don't know I just make sure it's good before I start riding and never had that problem... I feel like too many people believe this f*cking crap that gear changes everything how about you just ride the damn trail while I pass by flying down with only one pedal axle... It's getting ridiculous last weekend I hear a guy telling his mate he HAS to stop because he forgot a click on his LSC... I almost died
  • + 1
 @mollow: Hah to the LSC adjuster! re: tire pressure, I'm talking about flats or significant burps (rare these days) or punctures that take a bit to seal. If it's a short ride, I'm not going to fret over a few PSI, but if I have hours left out there, I like to be precise. Also, I'm often on a hardtail with carbon rims where I don't want to get bounced around at too high or blow up a rim if too low. If I'm on the full squish with alu rims, I'm not so picky.
  • + 2
 @mollow: +1 for laughing at that!! I'm burning through all kinds of money trying to find things to get more stuff off my back, out of pockets and back at home!
  • + 2
 @mtbracken:
Hah I know I slipped out of subject. Your carbon rims explanation actually makes sense since I only have alu rims on my bikes.
That must be the reason I can't feel the difference that much!

Cheers
  • + 3
 @mollow: I just give em a squeeze! Yep good to go. I can just picture it now, " guys hang on I lost a psi " hahaha...
  • + 2
 @mtbracken: dear friend I ride 15 km of Tarmac (and another 15 km to go home) to reach the local trails. So I use 50 psi in my tubeless 2,35 tyre in order to have less rolling resistance. This way I avoid using my road bike as much as possible to maintain my endurance level. In addition I do not trust my fingers to measure the pressure I need when reaching the trails.
  • + 5
 If you need to go full enduro....that statement never stops being funny....
  • + 1
 Ive got the smaller Singletrack version of this, still has space for a back protector ( I use a generic d30 one)

Its a great pack, very lightweight, stable, great size, well vented, hip pockets, has lasted over a year (of shitty weather and racing) and still looks like new, the tool roll is cool!
  • + 1
 Is this pack different somehow from the one that has been around for a while? I've seen some other reviews from a year-plus back and just couldn't tell if any changes had been made.
  • + 0
 lol probably tastes like rubber because BPA was a damn good plasticizer, and it's inferior replacements impart more taste (and have similar qualities where, if you inject shit tons of the pure chemical into a rat, show endocrine disrupting behavior.)
  • + 2
 Nothing beats old newspapers stuffed into your socks and backpack for protection. Pro Tip : Use glossy, it has a lower coefficient of friction.
  • + 1
 Unless this pack will give me a reach around I have no interest in backpacks. Bottles and stashed SWAT tools are my desire. Maybe a Source Fanny pack.
  • + 4
 I just got the source and love it. Definitely recommend
  • + 7
 HAHAHA... Fanny Big Grin
  • + 2
 @sampolicky: ya I really like my source pack as well. Only thing I struggle with is wearing the shoulder straps it comes with. They make me feel like borat at the beach.
  • + 1
 Reach around, lol
  • + 2
 Apologies, I'm drunk and was watching the inbetweeners
  • + 1
 The phone pocket isn't waterproof btw. Mine leaks and killed my iphone on one particularly wet ride.
  • + 1
 Got to admit my camelbak is shit compared to this. I can't even squeeze a set of car keys in them!
  • + 1
 metal closures is a good touch... sooner or later i always end up smashing those closures, by stepping them
  • + 1
 Can't believe it, climbs like an XC pack and comes down like a DH back protector
  • + 1
 is there a cheap back protector insert that i can just stuff inside my osprey bag, behind my bladder?
  • + 1
 You can the koroyd back protector insert on its own: koroyd.com/product/koroyd-eop-1-0. Not cheap, but less than buying a new pack.
  • + 1
 Great kit, have had their shorts for years & they have survived multiple DH stacks. They come out better than me!
  • + 1
 Looks pretty nice, particularly with better back protection than the evoc.
  • + 1
 Glad to know that Endura have got my back
  • + 1
 So there is replies on my "dash". How do you reply back
  • + 2
 I hate WalMart too
  • - 3
 The definition of Endura is to fast and often lead to death. Not to have everything while going fast lol.
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