ENVE M60 Forty Wheels - Review

Oct 8, 2014
by Mike Levy  
ENVE M60 Forty review test

ENVE debuted their new M Series lineup of wheels earlier this year, with the range consisting of four options that are all designed to suit the varying needs of different riders. The M60 Forty wheelset reviewed here is a step in a more all around direction than their cross-country race inspired M50 Fifty wheels, and ENVE's naming convention implies how they are intended to be used: 60% down and 40% up. In other words, the M60 Forty wheelset is your do-it-all option that, at 1,495 grams for the 29er rims laced to DT Swiss' 240 Center Lock hubs, is still feathery enough to not hold back even the most serious of cross-country racers out there. The wispy weight figure doesn't mean that the M60s sport an old school, anorexic rim shape, though, as their 23mm internal width is wider than a lot of contemporary rims on the market, and their 32mm height and 29mm external width certainly have them looking like they're ready for battle. ENVE says that a bare M60 rim weighs 397 grams in 29er form, or 347 grams for the 27.5'' version, and that manufacturing the rims and assembling the wheels at their Ogden, Utah, facility gives them maximum control over the $2718 USD finished product that comes with the assurance of a five year warranty and a lifetime crash replacement policy.


M60 Forty wheelset

• Intended use: XC/ trail / enduro
• Rim: 397 grams (29''), 347 grams (27.5'')
• Rim width: 23mm internal, 29mm external
• Diameter: 29'', 27.5''
• Hookless rim bead
• Handmade in Ogden, Utah
• Hubs: DT Swiss 240
• Spokes: 28, 32 (tested)
• Weight: 1,495 grams (29er w/ DT Swiss 240)
• MSRP $2718 USD


U.S. Made Carbon Fiber Rim

The big talking point with the M60 wheelset is obviously ENVE's handmade carbon rims that are constructed at their factory in the United States, and while them being handmade isn't really anything to brag about (carbon rims, frames and other bits are laid up by hand, after all), the fact that they're manufactured at their own factory plays a big role in the $999 USD retail price for each rim. That approach does give them quite a lot of control over the finished product, as it not only allows them to have better quality control than they would if they went the overseas route, but also the ability to make quick changes to the carbon layup on a rim for either production or prototype units. This is highlighted by rumors that ENVE was supplying the Santa Cruz Syndicate team with a radical downhill rim to be used with equally radical and very custom tubular tires. No word on if we'll see anything of the such in the near future, but, if true, it underlines what ENVE is both capable of and willing to do. In the same vein, ENVE actually produces four very different carbon rims that, while looking similar to each other, are actually quite unique.

ENVE M60 Forty review test
  All of ENVE's M Series rims feature a hookless bead design and internal nipples, both of which are claimed to make for a stronger finished product.


The M60 rim is 23mm wide internally, which is 2mm wider than the lighter and more cross-country oriented M50, and 2mm skinnier than the enduro focused M70. ''Rim width is determined by pairing each rim model with the predominant tire widths used for the defined ride application,'' ENVE explains. ''By optimizing the rim and tire interface, handling predictability and traction are improved.'' It isn't just the dimensions that set each model of rim apart, though, as they also each sport a unique carbon layup compared to the others, with the idea being to tune both the amount of vertical compliance and lateral rigidity to how each rim is intended to be used. Impact resistance also comes into play, and the downhill oriented M90s have a different makeup compared to the M60s that won't likely see the same sort of abuse.

ENVE
  How do you make your carbon wheelset even more trick? Custom decals, obviously.


Giving the rim a closer look reveals two things: one, there's no hook shape to the rim bead. And two, there doesn't appear to be any nipples. There are nipples, of course, but they're located inside the rim rather where you'd usually spot them. ENVE explained that going with an internal nipple design "produces a more consistent build, and a stronger structure. This process yields a superior build quality and virtually eliminates the need to true the wheel assuming the builder does a thorough and quality build." It also means that you can't perform a quick wheel truing, however, as you'll have to pull the tire and rim tape off in order to access the socket heads of the nipples. The rim's nipple holes have been designed with this in mind, and ENVE has actually molded each hole in place rather than drilling them through after the fact. The hookless design is also said to allow for a rim that is easier to manufacture consistently to the exact same size, as well as make for a stronger finished product due to the sidewall being quite thick throughout its entire height rather than having to have a hook shape.

ENVE M60 Forty review test
  DT Swiss' 240 hubs are at the center of the M60 wheelset on my bike, but you can also choose from their 180 hubs with ceramic bearings or Chris King's U.S. made hubs.


The M60 wheelset is clearly a premium item, so it's not a surprise that the two hub options to choose from are equally high-end: either Chris King ($2750 USD), DT Swiss 240s, or the ceramic bearing equipped 180s ($3298 USD, M50, 60, 70 only) if you prefer Swiss over American. Those who want to go with Center Lock rotors have that option if they choose the 240s, and all are available with either 28 or 32 bladed spokes.






On The Trail

The M60s likely saw more tires mounted to them than any other wheelset I've had under me thanks to both changing conditions and me having a number of different rubber options to review. This includes a set of Schwalbe's Hans Dampf and Nobby Nic tires, a single Magic Mary up front, a set of Specialized's Purgatorys, and some XR4s from Bontrager, all of which felt like they fit just a touch tighter than on most other rims. It wasn't to the point of me losing my temper and throwing things, but I will admit to reaching for a set of plastic tire levers when it came time to install brand new rubber. I'd personally much prefer a slightly tight fit that gives me confidence that I won't pull a bead off mid-corner than a loose fitting interface, but that's me, so I'm okay with the snug connection. I also used the supplied tubeless rim tape from ENVE, which appears to just be Gorilla Tape from your local hardware store but in the correct width so you don't need to trim it down, as well as the long tubeless valve stems that are included. We've come a long way from the early days of tubeless tires that saw us making trips to the compressor with a spray bottle full of soapy water and safety glasses on, and all of the tires sealed up and seated with basically zero issues while using only a floor pump, which might be a big deal for anyone who's had to clean Stan's sealant off of everything within twenty feet of where they were standing.

The DT Swiss hubs at the center of my M60 test wheels sport Shimano's splined Center Lock rotor system but the XTR Trail brakes on my bike feature standard six-hole rotors, which means that I had to employ the Center Lock adapters that come with the wheels. These couldn't be any simpler: just slide the adapter down onto the splines, fit the rotors onto the six posts, and then tighten down the lock ring. I've literally had more trouble pouring myself a bowl of cereal than installing the rotors and Center Lock adapters onto the DT Swiss hubs, although they did give me some trouble down the road...

PNW
  The M60s saw everything from full-on cross-country racing, to shuttles on some of the rockiest, hairiest terrain in B.C., not to mention endless miles of primo singletrack right out our back door.


Big deal, the tires and rotors go on fine. It's how they feel on they perform on the trail that really counts, right? Of course it is, and while a lot of wheels can feel somewhat invisible so long as they tick off all of the requirements that we ask for these days, the M60s certainly standout as being noticeably different under me, and I mean that in both positive and negative ways. Let's hit on what I like about them first, though.

These things are light, especially when you factor in their 23mm internal width, and because of that they feel pretty damn sporty on the climbs and out of corners, especially when you compare them to a heavier (and admittedly much less expensive) aluminum rimmed wheelset. It's not like you're going to be a gear higher everywhere on your ride or crush your local pro's KOM times, but they certainly do feel peppy all around. Just for reference sake, SRAM's carbon Roam 60s sport a skinnier 21mm internal width and a heavier 1,650 gram total weight, while Mavic's aluminum Crossmax SLs are even skinnier at 19mm but with a 1,530 gram weight (but don't require rim tape). Neither of those options are too shabby for their intentions by any means, but they make the M60s, with their 23mm internal width and 1,496 gram weight, look pretty appealing if you're a numbers guy. The relatively low weight doesn't mean that the M60s feel like they're going to fold over every time you hold it open through a corner or happen to land a touch more sideways than how you took off, with just the opposite being the case - these things are supremely stiff. They're so flex-free that they made my already torsionally rigid bike feel like it had somewhere between zero and zilch millimeters of deflection, which clearly is one of the reasons that they feel so snappy and alive.

And what about any reliability issues? Nothing to report on this front, although the rear wheel did drop enough spoke tension over the first few months to have them pinging and popping under heavy pedalling loads, which would have been a quickly solved issue if it wasn't for the fact that I had to remove my freshly tubeless'd tire in order to access the internally located nipples. This is a royal pain in the ass, although I do appreciate the use of bladed spokes that allow me to grab ahold of each one during the operation in order to prevent spoke wind-up. The rims are certainly looking well used these days, with the large white ENVE decals peeling and scraped off in small spots, but the carbon itself shows no signs of buying the farm. I've seen ENVE rims crack in the past, just like I've seen a broken example of pretty much every other rim out there, but at $999 USD per rim, I feel like the ENVEs should be pretty much indestructible. Nothing is unbreakable, of course, but the M60 rims have brushed off everything I've thrown them at.
bigquotesThe relatively low weight doesn't mean that the M60s feel like they're going to fold over every time you hold it open through a corner or happen to land a touch more sideways than how you took off, with just the opposite being the case - these things are supremely stiff.


The vertical, non-hooked rim bead proved to me that traditional hooked rims do absolutely nothing to keep the tire on, with zero burping to report after months and months of use. The 23mm internal width no doubt helps matters on this front, especially with wider tires like the Hans Dampf and the super aggressive Magic Marry, and I couldn't even get them to release any pressure or sealant when run as low as 18 PSI. I pulled the front tire right off the bead of a competitor's slightly skinnier aluminum rim at 20 PSI while on the face of a jump just before swapping over to the M60s, a moment that led to a rather interesting flight pattern and ''landing'', but the ENVEs had my confidence back in short order and I never even had a hint of trouble.


Issues

There's a lot to like about the M60s, but their price tag and U.S. made origins doesn't mean perfection, however, as I have a few issues to grumble about. Lets get right to my main criticism: these wheels are stiff and unforgiving. I'm well aware that many riders complain about wimpy wheels that feel like they're going to taco under them, especially those who don't shy away from an extra slice of cake or sign up for the Clydesdale class when they race, but the M60s feel like they could be almost a bit too far in the other direction. That's my observation after doing back-to-back tests on the same trails, riding the same bike, and with the same tires inflated to the same pressure on two different sets of aluminum rimmed wheelsets, and while many would say that you can't have a stiff enough set of wheels, handlebar, frame or whatever else, that's a complete delusion in my books. This is especially true when you're talking about a short-travel bike, with the ENVE wheelset feeling a touch harsher on my cross-country rig than other, more traditional options. This was most noticeable when the bike was either leaned over through a choppy corner, or when crossing rough, off-camber sections of trail, and I'd liken it to feeling as if there was an extra few PSI in my tires than what I'd ideally want. It's also best not to forget that your spare tube will either need to have a longer than normal valve stem or be supplemented by a valve extender - it'd be a shame to be way out there when you realize that you can't fix your flat.

The M60s saw some pretty rowdy terrain, and while the rims themselves came through with flying colours, the rear wheel did lose a bunch of spoke tension after several months of charging on them. That in itself isn't really a big issue, but I don't feel like I should have to take my tires off when the time does come to true or add tension to them, especially because pretty much all the tires that I fit to the M60s felt to be a touch tighter on them than some other rims. The internal nipples make for a clean look, I'll give ENVE that, but I much rather be able to tension and true them at a moment's notice, especially if it's required during a road trip.

DT Swiss' hubs have always been a favourite of mine, which is why I was so bummed to find out that their Center Lock rotor adapters do a better job of annoying the hell out of me than doing their actual job. Firstly, the lock rings want to back off, even when torqued correctly and with a touch of Loctite applied to the threads, which is obviously far from ideal. No, they never
backed way off, but they did loosen up enough that I'd make sure to check them once or twice a week, which isn't acceptable. Even more irritating, though, is how the adapter's fit onto the splined mount is sloppy enough that the entire assembly, rotor included, shifts slightly when you grab a handful of brake. This is undoubtedly connected to the lock rings backing off, but it would occur regardless of if I just tightened them up, and felt sort of like a loose headset on the trail. I'd rather go with the six-hole DT Swiss 240 hub option from ENVE and buy new rotors than deal with these cheesy adapters, and I suspect most of you would feel the same after dealing with them.





Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesI've always avoided saying if I felt a product was worth its asking price or not, and while this may seem like a bit of a copout, I'd prefer to let you decide if you want to spend your hard earned money on it after reading my thoughts on how it performed. After all, one man's budget, needs, and wants don't dictate another's. I'm going to take the same approach here with the M60s and say that while they're clearly pricey at $2718 USD for the set with DT Swiss 240 hubs, it's obviously up to you to decide if you want to drop that sort of coin. The ENVE rims are very nice, they weigh very little, and they perform very well, but the wheelset as a whole - which is how I have to judge them - let me down thanks to the funky DT Swiss Center Lock adapters that never stayed tight and shifted on the hub splines, as well as the hidden nipples that make maintenance more of a hassle than it should be. That said, the rims themselves have stood up well, with no wounds after a period of time that has lead to some dings and dents on aluminum hoops in the past. If you can look past the foibles you'll end up with a wheelset that's lighter, stiffer, and in some cases faster than most other options. If not, there's plenty of less expensive wheelsets to choose from.- Mike Levy


www.enve.com

Must Read This Week

270 Comments

  • 170 21
 Before anyone starts... Yes, they're expensive, we know. Get over it.
  • 55 10
 And yes they are not 26"
  • 23 6
 is it a crack there?
  • 15 30
flag tjet (Oct 8, 2014 at 3:02) (Below Threshold)
 I just bought a set of SLR s and I thought they were expensive, I guess I'm super lucky for only paying a 1,000 for them. This is getting ridiculous...
  • 36 23
 Neg prop if you want but after they had that whole shattering issue i would never buy enve rims. Especially with a price like that
  • 68 14
 FlowMaster, so if a company will constantly tweak things to improve their quality, offer a 5-year warranty against manufacturer's defects (which let's face it, if a product is truly made in a defective way, said defect would present itself within that time frame), and a life-time crash replacement policy you will NEVER buy their product? Nice to know that if company had a bad batch of product you will not give them the chance to improve and thus write them off forever.
  • 49 37
 We dont need to get over it when these wheels are a compete and utter rip off!! Just because these bloody things are made from carbon doesnt mean they can justify the price tag. Carbon fibre is not a rare and magical subsatnce its now as common as the dirt on your shoe so charging people this much is a total joke. £500 will buy you a great set of wheels by Hope that'll probably last a hell of a lot longer than these and you won't cry when you bend one. Even if i was a multi millionaire i would not buy these at all, such a waste of money.
  • 10 3
 I like the fact that they have a 5 year warranty against any possible defects, but replacing a rim is little compensation when you knock all your teeth out if it shatters.... They are a nice rim, expensive but nice. Its personal choice but I just couldnt spend that on wheels......
  • 19 8
 Hey Matt- you don't bend carbon rims.
  • 23 7
 3500 after tax and not UST....not getting over that.....ever
  • 4 1
 halo chaos them wheels are sick
  • 7 6
 @TheOriginalTwoTone ya you dont bend carbon rims, you just shatter them because carbon does not show stress, it just breaks
  • 16 10
 Yeah, it will shatter in a time frame that would've taco'd ten aluminum rims.
  • 11 3
 UST is just an old standard, nobody uses it anymore. Most companies have switched to a hookless bead. UST was also designed to not use sealant
  • 10 2
 @Flow I've seen a bunch of pictures of crack carbon rims where the rider didn't even know until they got home.
Tire held air and the rim held up.

It's not all the doom and gloom you all want to paint it.
  • 2 1
 I wish i could say that all this should make a solid set of alum rims cheeper, but my guess is not.... too bad.
  • 12 2
 Its a question of value here. All these wheels are, are lighter. They're not stronger, they're not easy to maintain, there are too many compromises here. Why should truing a wheel be a 45min. procedure? Would really suck if you had to true a wheel between stages. Why would I pay this sort of money when I could get the same performance from a set of Crossmax XL's or Stans laced up to some Chris Kings for 1/3 the cost, and triple the reliability?
  • 3 12
flag TheFireSermon (Oct 8, 2014 at 7:21) (Below Threshold)
 Trendy people's wheel set who don't care about money nor reliability. Plus Pinkbike, test these XC rims on some rocks, not all the smooth trails, where I live there are miles and miles of rocks.
  • 2 10
flag makripper (Oct 8, 2014 at 7:51) (Below Threshold)
 Thats expensive.
  • 7 9
 @ka-brap,

While they may cover their defect in workmanship and replace the wheels, what about them picking up any other costs? Damage to the bike, which is not expensive in most cases, but what about possible broken bones? Are they going to cover my medical expenses (not even bringing pain and suffering into this debate) for a product failure that they clearly accept as being their defect? I have to concur with @FlowMasterO in the fact that I would rather keep my face out of the dirt and reduce the possible risk of injury from a product that made it to the market place with a manufacturing flaw, which is why I still run aluminum rims.
  • 2 2
 what he said
  • 9 8
 They are waaaaaaay stronger. That's the point. You guys that say they aren't, have no first hand experience with them. Levy is known to be biased against them.
  • 3 2
 But they are not worth £2000 (say it slowly.. Twoooo Thoooouuusand Pooouunnnds) No flipping way!! Enve must think the people who buys these are pissed......and they're right of people do buy them!!
  • 6 2
 oops. I meant FXXXXKKKKing expensive.
  • 12 1
 $2 per gram.....seems legit
  • 2 5
 lol, @digthehills, logical statements are down-voted here on Pinkbike.
  • 5 7
 Go away carbon wheels .... you make no sense.
  • 9 5
 These wheels are absolutely insane when it comes to reliability and rigidity. Are they expensive? Yes. But the price comes with the quality of craftsmanship to back it up. you've gotta pay top dollar for top products...
  • 4 10
flag peanutbuter (Oct 8, 2014 at 12:49) (Below Threshold)
 hahahaha you said enves are reliable you silly fool
  • 1 1
 So a set of Hope Hoops at under £500 are not reliable??
  • 4 3
 @meesterover how can you even ride a bike? Please show me a single product that covers any of that? AL rims and wheels still fail, yet you're riding one. How can you manage without fearing all the possibilities of a rim failure?
  • 5 1
 @slowdownU they are lighter and stronger. I'd suggest you ride a set of carbon rims. While I'm the first to admit can't afford Enve, I have a wheel set with Derby 32h carbon rims and they are both lighter and much stiffer than my FlowEX 36h wheels I had.
I have a set of Light-Bicycle rims on the way, Save a little over 1/2 lb in the rims alone over FlowEx.
  • 3 0
 My comment was slightly in jest ... however, these make sense for very few. I'd love to try some, but it's hard to imagine myself getting excited to spend this much on wheels if I had it. I'd rather buy another frame and start building an additional bike. There are some great aluminum rims on the market and great hubs too... I just don't need carbon rims in my life.
  • 5 0
 Oh yeah. Just to let ENVE know that Superstar do a great set of Carbon AM Wheels that are £600 and have been independently tested for strength at a university in the UK and they found they were stronger than Flow rims. They also come with a lifetime crash replacement deal and free trueing......Yes ENVE £600!!!!
  • 3 0
 Twotone, when I get high-end wheels, they will likely be Crossmax XL's because they are pretty bombproof, I don't need to spend an hour to tighten a spoke, and are only around 250grams more. Also, I will not spend $3k for wheels because I am not a twat, or a factory sponsored racer with a mechanic to handle my lite work.
  • 2 0
 This is what I'm getting:

Light Bicycle with DT Swiss 240s Straight Pull hubs and DT Competition Straight Pull spokes
Procore (200 grams ea.)
2.25 Schwalbe Hans Dampfs (680 grams ea.)
  • 1 0
 I've had amazing luck with both of my LB wheel sets. My 29rs came in just under 1500g and are still true after 1k miles under my 220+ lbs riding weight. My 26rs were still true after a year of hard riding and have a new home because I sold the bike. I have a full spec writeup in my picture folders.
  • 2 0
 CORRECTION

Light Bicycle with DT Swiss 350 Straight Pull hubs (6-hole Disc brake IS, 264g RW with XD 11) and DT Competition Straight Pull spokes w/ Brass Nipples
Procore (200 grams ea.)
2.25 Schwalbe Hans Dampfs (680 grams ea.)
  • 2 0
 Yet in bulk, standard modulus carbon is going for a little as 10$ per lb now. Unless it is ultra high modulus, in which it's a lot more expensive, but very much restricted to Aerospace manufacturers only, or Specialized...if you believe what they tell you:-)
  • 1 0
 I have a set of Roval Control Carbon 29s and they seem pretty solid and they were $1100 with a lifetime warranty. 1580g.
  • 61 1
 It's actually 60% DOWN and 40% UP.
I wonder how this is possible though, uphills always feel sooo much longer than downhills Wink
  • 12 3
 Imagine how light the DH rim would be if it was reversed. Ride up walk down.
  • 51 9
 In general there is more and more evidence that, even price aside, carbon is not as jolly magic material for MTB frames and components. as they painted it for us 5 years ago. In the beginning they were making tough carbon stuff with lots of strength margin (2009 2.8kg Blur LT2c, 2011 V10c 3.6kg ) Then some aluminium frames got close in weight terms (2012 Giant Reign 2.7kg) and they cut off the margins (blur TRc 2.2kg, Trek session 9.9 2.7kg) and sht started to crack. Now it's time for carbon rims to face the evolution of use of aluminium (LB xc rim 350g vs Pacenti TL28 at 380g). Tge dawn of carbon, renaissance if aluminium I sense. All you people who were calling us sceptics as luddites and telling us to ride cantilevers - are you chanting for 275 now? When will you acknowledge the limitations of technology in improving simple machines that bikes are? Your dream of F1 comexity of bicycle design is only a dream. Is it so bad that as Mike said in his Laid Out article that we may not see anything more in MTB tech? Go hit the weights you number oriented, pseudo science geeks, this is where progress is: you sit in it, it is your body.
  • 9 0
 Wait (weight?!) Vittoria is coming vith somethinkg "new": graphene!
If you wanna have fun, read that: www.velovert.com/information/9171/exit-geax-vittoria-du-pneu-a-la-roue
If you don't speak french then you're lucky cause that means you can't read velovert.com Wink
The best part of it being that producing 1m2 of graphene would cost about 600 billion € (yes they say that...). So either a wheel will retail for about several million €, or you need very very little of graphene to revolutionize the carbon, or.... it's like homeophaty: it's all in your head.
  • 10 0
 People get to caught up on numbers. I've got a carbon bike because i love they way they dampen vibration, yet i couldn't care less about how much it weighs(3 year old bombproof 14kg mojo hd build). Its not about what frame has the best numbers, its about what suits you.
  • 3 0
 Props for the Mojo... Same boat as you, just other side of the ditch.
  • 5 5
 first tine I agree with you waki
  • 13 4
 Sorry to clarify I meant, hit the weights on the gym...
  • 13 7
 Actually, it's the complete opposite. After riding a set of carbon wheels, there is no going back to aluminum. Carbon is far superior with wheelsets when built correctly. They last longer, corner better and don't come out of true. Feel more compliant, yet are stiffer laterally. Carbon is no magical material with frames, however it's a huge upgrade with wheels.
  • 6 4
 I cannot confirm that dulsuspensiondave, at least not in case of amateur on a 26er. On a 29er yea, you get something, on small wheels, you can easily get away with Pacenti TL28, EX471 or Flow EX. The dramatic differences in weights and rolling resistances depending on tyre/tube choice will always outweigh eventual weight gains on a small rim.
  • 8 6
 Carbon is superior and stronger with wheels? Lets see a set of carbons roll down a racecourse on just the rim, like with Gwyn and Cedrics video.
  • 5 0
 I'd certainly welcome some shorter sidewall tires to go with the new crop of wide rims: there's a lot of room for tires to go on a diet & perform similarly or better than current ones, provided they're mounted to rims that provide adequate support. The rubber is always the heaviest component in a wheelset, folks.
  • 8 0
 I don't get all this hating on carbon. I flat-spotted a 500g aluminium within a month of getting my Stumpy FSR 29er, from a small landing to flat. Then I bought some 400g Chinese carbon rims which I have caned for the next 14 months. I admit I babied them for the first few weeks, but since then they have been abused like no other rims I've ever owned. They been landed badly countless times, they've hit numerous dodgy lines through rock gardens and they have endured the occasional OTB. I have not had to true them once. Yes, the weight saving is nice, but the real benefit of carbon is they are STRONGER than aluminium alloy rims.
  • 4 2
 Mbl77 - a few of my friends smashed several Chinese carbon rims riding far from DH racing speeds. They do destroy aluminum rims too off course. It is worth noting though that one of them raced whole dh season on one pair of dt ex500s. I haven't destroy mine LB rims yet and I don't expect to do so as I havent managed to destroy Any alu rim in last 6 years or more. My version of reality is that carbon rims which come at weights competitive latest alu rims, that is 350-400g are lighter and stiffer, but i would not call them stronger
  • 6 5
 Waki- wheel size makes no difference. These ENVE's are stronger, stiffer, and lighter than any others with the same intended use. All season racing them without needing a truing stand. I destroy wheels too. Any good bike industry employee will agree that a good set of carbon wheels is the best upgrade on a bike. The price is insane, that I will agree with.
  • 3 1
 Dave - it matters. 150-200g rotational weight increase on a 29er is easily distinguishable and gets evidently tiring on longer climbs on bigger wheels. I bought a 29er straight after I used to ride XC on 1kg tyres, 150g tubes and 700g rims. I thought to myself, if I could rock that on si gle ring, then for 29er I'll go with cheap 600g rims and 700g nobby nics. 29er climbed worse and accelerated worse. I just felt the physics telling me: I'll climb well but only if you keep on mashing those pedals. Then I rode a borrowed 29er with carbon rims and 700g tyres and it was much better, increase in stiffness was easily percievable too as, what I call "29er cornering lag" was not present. First carbon rims weighed 450g for AM, that was at times when 550g alu rims still were narrow, had high sidewalls and were made of cheese alloys. Modern alu rim like XM401 or WTB Kom comes close to weight of carbon due to shape optimization, skipping eyelets and use of better alloys. Carbon rims got lighter meanwhile reaching borders of getting brittle, when there is not enough material thickness to keep them from shattering or cracking. DH carbon rims are still strong as 500g us easily acceptable weight in that department. I will never buy carbon bike again, but if I buy 29er I may consider carbon rims.
  • 2 1
 Waki- yes carbon rims on a 29r are almost a necessity. The point is that strength, stiffness, and reliability are the reasons to buy a top quality carbon set, no matter what the wheel size.
  • 3 9
flag madmon (Oct 8, 2014 at 12:02) (Below Threshold)
 are people still discussing a 29er on a mtn. bike site? save it for the XC forums
  • 3 0
 Waki, the problem with your logic is that technology evolves and allows manufacturers to lighter weight products while retaining enough strength. That's why alu bikes weight got closer to the carbons models, but carbon manufacturing evolves as well so they can make them lighter.

But I fully agree with you carbon is no wonder material. There is no way in hell a set of enve wheels is worth it, no matter how nice they ride. 1000$ just for the rim! No offence to anyone, but you need to be insane/stupid to buy that.
  • 1 0
 @lanka

But people HAVE been reporting more problems as carbon rims have gotten lighter, especially with the M series ENVE. It's like anything else: the first production models were overbuilt, then they got it down to a more normal weight, & now they're trying to make them so light the lose durability, both as a product differentiation tactic, & for those users who can live with replacing a rim every once in a while if it means they can shave weight.

Heck, they made some road brake levers back in the day that were so light that people were bending them just using the brakes, but they were probably lighter than anything you might see today.
  • 2 0
 My logic is that development is not linear. Carbon is not a step ahead from aluminium but another branch that grows and evolves, just as 29ers, fat bikes or air sprung suspension. In that way aluminium got light enough to challenge carbon (performance/price), the only thing to do was to make carbon A cheaper B even lighter. Option A makes quality worse, option B pushes the material to the edge of getting brittle even if weight to stiffness is still superior. Basicaly if you get walls of a carbon element too thin, it will crack under hits. So while aluminim evolved and as a result got more expensive (ZTR, WTB KOM or Pacenti are fkn expensive) while carbon seems to stagnate. Many people here on PB see "innovation" in bike industry as very linear process and they are happy to equal dropper posts to 275 wheels or axle resize as legitimate as evolution of disc brakes which are currently beyond anything we thought we can hope for 10 years ago. As to ENVE - similar to Chris King or thomson - these are added value, luxurious items with buyers status written all over them. Nobody really questions the sense of having a Ferrari or McLaren which after all are damn useless cars. I would never buy Enve or CK (ot DT240 hubs) even second hand, but It does not stop me from drooling when I see them
  • 4 0
 Fair enough, and I agree with you development of mtb technology is definitely not a linear process, I started riding on a full rigid with cantilever a well. What I meant is that just like they managed to improve alu wheels using new alloys, designs and manufacturing process, I'm sure they can use new resins and layup process to make carbon wheels both stronger and lighter. There will be some hits and misses along the way, but like Mike said, at 999$ a rim, they need to be both featherweight and indestructible.

As to bling parts, you nailed it. Nobody needs it, but everybody wants it. We wouldn't be on this website reading reviews otherwise...
  • 3 0
 Ya know there ARE better alloys to roll rims from, but they also cost a lot more... carbon is proving the best option for the properties and physics of wheels. Of course not every wheel maker executes the material well.
  • 22 8
 Hm. Intended use: 60% up and 40% down... So I can ride 600 feet up and then 400 feet down (for example). What about the last 200 feet? Is there a sherpa who will carry my bike downwards the last 200 feet included in the price? Or do I have to ride backwards? I don´t get it...
  • 6 2
 Might be talking about time, not distance, and since you go slower up hills than down hills then it makes perfect sense...
  • 16 3
 no it means that it is meant to go downhill better than uphill.
m60 : strength to weight ratio = 6:4
m70 : strength to weight ratio = 7:3
m90 : strength to weight ratio = 9:1

basically the first number indicates the primary use of the wheel. the bigger that number, the more aimed it is at downhill.
  • 17 3
 I think you might have missed the joke...
  • 12 4
 I was not really sure if he was joking or not , I don't really understand german humor too well... mjktool das war sehr lustig Wink
  • 4 1
 @HutchJR: does that mean M50 Fifty: strength to weight ratio = 5:5 = 1:1? What does "strength-to-weight ratio" even mean?

TL;DR: not much as presented, and the ENVE naming scheme has little to do with it.

"Strength-to-weight ratio" is a bit of a misleading term; the only unitless ratio you could get out of it is (force applied to some arbitrary location at failure): (weight of the rim). But where is this force applied? What if we only consider a very tiny section of the rim; surely the force at failure will remain the same, while the "strength-to-weight ratio" can be arbitrarily increased by considering smaller and smaller rim sections. Hence, you can't rattle off unitless ratios for different ENVE rims and expect them to mean anything.

Instead, consider the "specific strength" of a material, a.k.a. (force per unit area at failure)/(density). This is typically what people refer to with "strength-to-weight ratio", but you need to consider units. For reference, concrete has a specific strength of 5.22 kN*m/kg, paper ranges from ~35 kN*m/kg to ~180 kN*m/kg, carbon-epoxy composite has 785 kN*m/kg, and pure carbon fiber has 2457 kN*m/kg. Note that 1 kN*m/kg = 1 kPa/(kg/m^3). [1, 2, 3]

So, does a strength-to-weight ratio of 1:1 mean a specific strength of 1 kN*m/kg? Such a rim would crumple/explode as soon as you looked at it. 1000 kN*m/kg? That's more like it. Does that mean that a 9:1 strength-to-weight ratio is equivalent to a specific strength of 9000 kN*m/kg? If so, why not make all the rims out of this wonder-material?

Sources:
1. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Specific_strength#Examples
2. www.engineeringtoolbox.com/engineering-materials-properties-d_1225.html (some unit conversions needed)
3. personalpages.manchester.ac.uk/staff/william.sampson/pdf/SpecificContactAreaFinal.pdf (regarding paper; see table on p. 6)
  • 3 0
 im just giving an example there toddball. I was not saying that in a literate scientific way; I was referring to the fact that the higher the main number, the stronger it is. its like saying :
m90 : meant for DH, but you can still ride it up a hill but don't expect amazing climbing.
m70 : very good at dh but not too heavy either for getting to the top of your trail
m60 : you could do DH with it , but don't overdo it. cycle to the top of your trail.
m50 : best of both worlds , you can still ride whatever trails you want, just don't do anything you would do on the m90 or m70. very good at climbing.

im not a scientist but I think this makes a lot more sense to most of us Smile
  • 2 0
 I realize that now, but I got a little carried away tried to figure out the maximum pressure an ENVE rim could take, and realized halfway through my comment that I didn't know exactly how big a rim was. Oops.
  • 16 2
 Whether expensive or cheap, it seems there are better options out there. From my point of view, I don't mind the extra weight that bombproof and wide aluminum rims have. And if you want carbon and light, the Rovals seem to be pretty sweet, and you can true them without ripping your tire off.
  • 8 6
 There is no aluminum rim that withstand more than these for their intended use. The Rovals aren't near strong as the Enves. The Reynolds/I9 combo is pretty sweet.
  • 1 1
 My Rovals are stupid light and have given me no truing issues except a mal-machined hub which they replaced with a new wheel and a set of tires for my troubles. Couldn't be happier with 'em
  • 3 1
 Pretty sure my buddy just busted an M70 rim on an Oakridge trail. Then the following weekend my buddy smashed his wide carbon rim. Probably stick w/ i9's aluminum rim.
  • 3 0
 I destroyed an I9 trail, then an enduro rim within 3 rides on xc trails (tsali, then cave run). Enve AM's are still tru after racing enduro on them all season. My buddy broke his roval's on the first ride out.
  • 4 0
 Sure, Dave, but the M70s cracked on pinkbike when dropping "a small stepdown" that shouldn't have done anything, let alone ruin a rim, and cracked another one on a g-out that shouldn't have wrecked that rim. So I guess there's plenty of anecdotal evidence that all rims suck. If people wanna blow cash on shiny things, then more power to them, but it's hard to believe these are the "best rims in the world" when they seem to crack, and you can't tighten a spoke while you're on a ride.
  • 2 1
 What is this "tightening a spoke on a ride" thing you speak of? I have ENVE's and never have needed to touch them with a spoke wrench. Haha. But for real, it really sucks that the tire and rim strip have to come off to tighten spokes. That's ridiculous.
  • 2 0
 $1800 for the Roval Control SL 29's and they weigh 1370 grams...I ride them hard and land sideways off big jumps/drops all the time and haven't had to true them in a year of use. Best bang for the buck available!
  • 31 14
 Everybody, think about how many lives you could save with that money ....
  • 23 2
 You're a traitor to this community. I love it.
  • 21 22
 Says the Guy with the Kona Operator Full DH rig on his profile pic. Sell your bike and save some lives. i will be here hugging trees with my carbon rims.
  • 1 1
 I sold it a year ago ! Enduro's better ... Haha what s the point I had SR Mtx33 rims on the kona just something like 30-35 times less expensive than here ! Love
  • 13 0
 I don't have trouble dropping inappropriate sums of money on bike porn, but for this asking price I would be super annoyed to have to take off my tire in order to tension the spokes and/or true the wheel. With other bling-amazing-wow options out there (for less money) this is a bit of a deal breaker for me...
  • 1 0
 $1900 for Stan's Valors makes these wheels a really hard sell in my opinion. they don't have the captive market they used to, they need to adapt or die.
  • 4 0
 Diffrent strokes.. I don't mind at least being home alone on a friday night playing with my nipples.
  • 5 1
 I think you are missing the point, you just do not have to true the wheel that often (ie almost to the point of "at all"). 100 days in the bike park last summer and I checked the spokes....when I was changing the tyres. I have broken one spoke, that got hit by a rock, since that "re-build" the wheel has stayed true with even spoke tension.
For info I am a 210 lbs rider, my season is 100 + days of six hour days, and yes as a lot of it is teaching, it is not all charging but there are still a lot of miles, hits and jumps in that riding time and there is at least one day per week I get to ride the good stuff.

Second season on the same set of wheels about to finish and that adds another 90 ish days (rode a bit more trail in my spare time) to the wheels and the only problem I have had this season is failed bead on the tyre ie not the fault of the wheelset but a very rare QC failure on otherwise very good tyres.
On average most of my peers are going though at least two rims in that time frame with the assocaiated hassle and cost of a wheel re-build each time as well as the down time from riding whilst they wait for the shop to do the rebuild.

Do I have a handful of replacement spokes, internal nipples and my own internal nipple driver.. of course I do.
After disc brakes (Shimano), sticky rubber, carbon bars and dropper posts they are the single greatest improvement to ride quality in the last 25 years.
That said there are some amazing alum wheelsets that will deliver almost the same performance, without the truing 'hassle' for one third of the price. I also cannot think of one premium wheelset that does not have its own quirk: Mavic = hub tension, Chris King = bearing pre-load, Hadley = bearing pre-load and propriatary tools, Shimano = centre lock.
  • 2 0
 amrskipro, while I am very much impressed with these wheels (unlike many of the members here) I don't think Enve thought about it enough from the end consumer's POV. They for sure nailed many important structural R&D points, but for about $3,000 this wheelset should deliver on all of their points AND be easy to use. If the wheelset was half the price, I wouldn't make such a deal of it but for the price of an entire bike, this wheelset should in all respects be damn near perfect. Sorry, but not being easy to tension/true is a big miss for me, despite your positive experience with them.
  • 3 0
 there are enough roadies who cannot and will not wrench on their rides all the while dropping coin constantly to sustain enve or any other carbon product for centuries to come.
  • 1 0
 well I guess you're right @fullbug, if they want, they could drop out of MTB, or only produce rims on special order. I'm sure they're doing fine, especially with their previous cachet, but the availability of as good products from Stan's, SRAM, & Roval, at better pricing, combined with the increase in problems that people are reporting with these new M series rims, & I think they're in for a rude awakening at a a $2700 price point.
  • 1 0
 I just had to do that a few weeks ago. I had to remove the tire, tape, and sealant. I had to buy new tape and sealant, plus a special spoke wrench. It was quite the ordeal just to fix my rear tire rubbing the chainstay! They do go up hills easier, though. I feel my 26AM were a huge improvement on ride quality and enjoyment, but not enough to pay what they're asking. If I hadn't gotten special treatment, I would be rolling on Derby rims.

I just put a Ripley 29 on layaway and I think the derby rims would lace up nicely on the DT Swiss 240 hubs (mine are six bolt disc mount). If only someone wanted 26" Enve rims I could practically pay for the new bike!!!
  • 1 0
 other than these m series aren't all their sales rims anyway and everybody laces em up the way they want? sorry, i dont know anything about what i cant afford! haha
  • 1 0
 a lot of people who can afford these wheels do not true their own wheels. they can easily afford to have a shop true them and I'm sure they have a spare bike too so they don't miss any rides.
  • 1 0
 Well, when I was there they were building wheelsets like mad. There was no way for me to know what was being shipped out.
  • 11 1
 I'll give it to you that the hidden nipples are not ideal, but it should be clear that Enve wheels
really do need to be trued far less than other wheels. I've been riding AM 29s for over a year and they haven't needed truing yet.

Also it's odd that one of the biggest complaints came from using the wrong rotors for the hubs. I've always seen the centerlock adapter as being an "I guess if you really have to" sort of option. If it were my review, I would've been sure to try them with some centerlock rotors.

Lastly, at first the lack of flex in my enve wheels was a turnoff. But once I got used to it (after half a ride) the instant response and feedback became my favorite thing about the wheels. I know it's just an opinion and not the exact same rim, but I don't think they're too stiff or harsh at all.
  • 1 0
 There's plenty of other centerlock adapters that actually clamp down on the splines that work fine. If you spend this much on a wheelset, wouldn't you expect all the parts to work correctly?

He said his wheel went out of true. so obviously what is true of your AM wheels might not be true of these, which are a less sturdy rim. Especially in the context of wider reports about these M series wheels not being nearly as reliable as past ENVE wheels. Lots of people reporting problems with these wheels, across the series.
  • 12 3
 Budget options:
1. Buy a complete, quality AM dig for less money. Ride with envy for carbon wheelset.
2. Buy wheelset, imagine you get to ride them. Who the hell needs a bike anyways?
3. Sell your house,down grade to shitty car, and buy both.
4. Anyone need a kidney?? I'm taking offers!

Screw it, I'm going for #3.
  • 2 0
 Although, with regards to number 2 (fnar), i doubt that those who would buy these are having to make a choice between wheels or a full bike Wink They probably have carbon chains, brake fluid and protein bars too...
  • 8 1
 Wait a second...internal nipples on a tubeless rim? Who's the genius who thought that was a good idea? Oh shit my wheel's out of true, let me just rip my tire off and make a huge mess of my sealant, then ruin my rim strip and have to waste more money re-sealing everything to get it running again.
  • 2 7
flag aljoburr (Oct 8, 2014 at 11:47) (Below Threshold)
 You should never really need to true a carbon wheel if it is built right unless you get something caught in your spokes & break some
Then your screwed anyway
  • 6 4
 That is an utter bullshit response. All wheels need to be trued. If you don't true your wheel you can seriously damage your rim, because the spokes won't be tensioned enough to bear load correctly under stress.
  • 4 0
 internal nipples...pretty much the only thing you need to know about these wheels so that you never buy them IMO (besides the price) - at least in my book...im not taking tires off to true a wheel. and trail side repair...youve got to be kidding me
  • 4 0
 Seriously, what a giant fail in that regard. Couldn't agree more Seraph.
  • 1 3
 If you knew how these nipples were designed so that they do not slacken off then you would know that I was talking about
Carbon wheels DO not need to be trued they just need correct spoke tension & will run true
Get your facts right seraph
  • 2 0
 ^ did you even read the write up? several times it was mentioned that more tensioned needed to be added to the wheels. this means truing the wheel. therefore, the carbon wheels DO NEED to be trued...
  • 8 1
 The best part of this review is that you could tell he wanted to say they aren't worth it, but enve paid pinkbike to review the rims so he wouldn't say it. Thanks for implying without actually implying.
  • 2 1
 Thats not what I read at all. He can't judge your situation.
How can any reviewer (that doesn't have to pay for their kit) tell a rider that $2000 rims are "worth it". A student and a CEO will have a different idea of "worth it".

A guide or coach at Whistler may be able to justify them because he spends 8 hours a day on his bike, even though he earns shitty money.

Accusing Pinkbike of taking money because they didn't judge YOUR personal situation is pretty screwed up. (and yes, I think the internal nipples are there to look good at the expense of function)
  • 1 1
 You don't get reviews on pinkbike for free. It doesn't work that way. It's not an accusation, it's just the way it is. Otherwise we would have much more objective conclusions in our reviews rather than "it works good, it's good, draw your own conclusion". Also, if you're riding a bike 8 hours a day every day, you are going to want to be able to true your rims without taking everything apart. The target demographic for enve rims is the biker that bikes less than they show off their bike/income. Otherwise you'd just buy derby rims and not look like a wank or spend a relative fortune on an inferior product that is known to have issues with durability.
  • 1 0
 That said, if you wanna show off your income, by all means, this is the wheelset for you. There is no better choice than enve rims with chris king hubs. You will look like a baller.
  • 8 2
 I think nipples should generally be hidden. If you need to play with them sometimes that's fine, and normal, but best not done on the trail anyway. You people who want all your nipples exposed for easy access are the ones with the problem.
  • 6 0
 I totally disagree. I think both sexes have earned the legal right to have exposed nipples, (in Canada anyway). I support equal rights for women especially.
  • 9 0
 $2718.00 - Should be wearing Balaclavas
  • 6 3
 id rather buy a bicycle for 2700$ than a wheelset. but then again i work for my money.
  • 5 5
 After having both a $2700 frame and a $2700 wheelset, the wheelset has more performance per dollar. Oh, and I work for my money just like most people do.
  • 8 0
 "I work for my money"

Love this comment. I have always tried to work less and make more, so it amuses me when people wear this as a badge of honor. Well I'm off for a ride. Have fun at work!
  • 3 6
 Hahaha. So funny to see people negative prop something that is known as common sense in the bike industry.
  • 2 1
 "the wheelset has more performance per dollar" are you trolling here? That is utter bullshit. I can buy a wheelset for 250 dollars and it will run just dandy as long as a true it occasionally. A $2700 dollar wheelset will do the same, they will just be lighter and stronger (in some ways). Now compare a 250 dollar frame to a 2700 dollar one...
  • 2 1
 No, it's fact. Your shitty $250 wheelset will add nothing but an anxiety attack when things get rough. Get the $1600 aluminum frame and a set of ENVE's, is what I'm saying. Wtf is a $250 frame anyways? An 08' mongoose without a shock?
  • 2 0
 "Wtf is a $250 frame anyways? An 08' mongoose without a shock?" This is exactly the point..........
" the wheelset has more performance per dollar."
"Your shitty $250 wheelset will add nothing but an anxiety attack" Outlaws hold up really well, not sure what you are talking about.
  • 1 0
 Are you really comparing outlaws to enve's? Are you insane?
  • 2 0
 Holy shit dude, focus. You said "the wheelset has more performance per dollar." Which is completely incorrect. I made a nice easy comparison: "I can buy a wheelset for 250 dollars and it will run just dandy as long as a true it occasionally. A $2700 dollar wheelset will do the same, they will just be lighter and stronger (in some ways). Now compare a 250 dollar frame to a 2700 dollar one..." Which you agreed with me on "Wtf is a $250 frame anyways? An 08' mongoose without a shock?"
  • 1 0
 mo money mo problems
  • 9 1
 Phew, ordered mine last week on chris kings, can't wait!
  • 5 3
 yeah the chris kings are better than the 240s... as I found out sadly...
  • 2 0
 I have the 240's and they have been great for two years without problems, and I like that my freehub is really quiet. My son has a 240 rear hub and it's super loud. I don't know if it's an optional freehub, or different grease, etc
  • 1 0
 yeah mine are really quiet too! the thing I don't like though is that they get clogged up with mud and dust during a ride making them run with a lot of resistance which does not happen with my Easton havocs...
  • 4 0
 I would never bitch and moan about the cost of bike parts since I like many of you am an enabler of the bike industry's penchant for injecting their prices with steroids. But for that much scratch this wheelset needs to be the best thing going and they don't seem to be. Thanks Mike for the honest review.
  • 5 2
 So happy that Mike pointed out that "too much stiffness takes the feeling out"! That's exactly what I feel with these wheels (well, with the old ENVE AM). If you charge down a descent riding like you stole it, they're fine and work well. But back off a bit and go down at 90% speed, and they'll be too stiff, and unforgiving, to the point they remove confidence.

Same goes for the internal nipple. I love the honesty of Mike saying they are a huge pain in the ass.

Well, I sincerely regret I spent so much money on the ENVE AM. Going to sell them and buy a custom EX471+DT240 wheelset, for 1/3 of the price.
  • 2 0
 My experience owning many sets of carbon and Al wheels is that the stiffness isn't as much of an issue as is the internal width of the wheel. Biggest improvement since going full squish is the wide wheel, period.
  • 3 0
 The shifting of the rotor on the spline is probably connected to the toleranced and some clearance between the splines of the hub and the rotor. I'td be possible to make a tightly fitting pair, but the instalation would be a bit of a pain. Also you don't normally go in reverse and brake, you usually only brake in one direction, so the rotors snug up in one direction and more or less stay that way.
  • 4 0
 I like how it never occurred to him to just put on a centerlock rotor.
  • 1 0
 I highly doubt it never occurred I'm sure there was a reason for using the adapter and such. No need to imply that someone is so short sighted to to see something like that.
  • 3 0
 Question, I know he says they have a crash replacement - but what are the terms? I'm assuming the replacement rim isn't free, but at $999 US retail, what discount do you receive (even at 50% off that would be pricey!)? And do they just give you the rim, or do you have to send the old one in and then they do the rebuild - in which case what's the total cost, including shipping, etc. Just curious.
  • 2 0
 Great question #2
  • 7 1
 I've cracked a set of Enves and I took it to a dealer and they shipped the wheels to Enve and they build the new rim using hub and spokes if able. They only charged me for the labor. No questions asked how I cracked the rim.
  • 1 0
 msmtime... just googled enve crash replacement. Sounds like they have warranty coverage for defects, where they'll repair at their cost; but their crash replacement clearly states 50% off msrp to the original purchaser with receipt, plus shipping ... so sure sounds like $500 to replace that rim?. Nice that msmtime got lucky, but not sure I'd count on that coverage consistently.
  • 1 1
 They did charge me 500 bucks for " labor. "
It was the older AM rim that I broke, and they upgraded to the 60/40 that I have now. They're pretty rad
  • 3 0
 Have to say I'm surprised that it is the 60forty being reviewed on Pinkbike (I rather suspected the review would indicate they were too xc'ish - and why bring a knife to a gunfight?). I expected it would be the 70thirty which I'm seeing more commonly on AM bikes (seen a bunch of them, never the 60forty on the trail). Or is this review a sign that you don't need anything more than the 60forty - ie. if Mike couldn't wreck these or get them to flex, maybe the 70thirty is just overkill and unnecessary extra weight? Wonder when Mike's thoughts on that are?
  • 3 0
 Great question #1
  • 5 1
 We actually have a set of the 70s and 90s on test as well, but the 60s are what I've put the most time on so far. Also, given the dimensions of the 60s, I think that they suit how a lot of us ride and the tires that we use. Review on the 90s coming up in the future.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy First, great review. I find most of your reviews to be pretty much bang on, even if you have to read between the lines once in a while. I have a couple quick questions about your review. You mention that the 60's might be a little too stiff. Do you think this is related solely to the wheel set or partially to the shorter travel bike? What bike (or travel) were the wheels tested on? Could you make any comparisons of the Enve 60's to say a Stans Flow EX wheel set? Or maybe even the Ibis wheels that you rode for the HD3 review? Thanks in advance.

Mike
  • 2 0
 Industry Nine 27.5 Trail Wheelset

28mm outer/23.4mm inner width

1540 grams

$1195

I weigh 210lbs and have ridden the 26" version of this wheelset hard for over a year. I have never had to true them. They freakin rip corners and accelerate like a mofo! Don't waste your money on hype and status stickers.
  • 1 0
 Yes but carbon
  • 1 0
 Really? I broke one, then an enduro. All in 3 xc rides. Curious about the Reynolds as I love I9 hubs.
  • 2 0
 "We've come a long way from the early days of tubeless tires that saw us making trips to the compressor with a spray bottle full of soapy water and safety glasses on"

...we have? Damn, not around here we haven't.

My brain cannot get around how a hookless rim profile can retain a beaded tire. But I don't understand lots of things.
  • 2 0
 Yeah... particularly on those crazy wide new wheels from Ibis... 41mm external width & hookless bead? how the hell is this BETTER at keep wheels from burping, as most manufacturers are now claiming?

I guess I'll just trust the engineers. Cause it makes no sense to me.
  • 2 0
 Enve seems to have adopted the Red Bull advertising strategy: Put your name EVERYWHERE, give away ton of product- then watch throngs of people line up like its the next iphone because they like CG or want to channel Ratboy. So far, its working.

For $1000, you are also paying for a stunningly aggressive marketing strategy.
  • 2 0
 CG used Mavic wheels
  • 2 0
 Touché.
  • 2 0
 Do we know what is the profit margin per rim sold for that company? In this day an age I still don't know why people get hung up on the "made in" thing.
Well established bike and component manufacturers produce fantastic products in Asia without having to compromise in good quality control.
I don't know how old ENVE is in company terms but I am wondering where is the innovation or the product advantage.
I may be wrong here but all I see is carbon rim with "Apple-esque" design and pretty decals.
One thing I would love to see more is type of product guarantee ENVE has. If their costumer service is just as good I may be convinced by them.
  • 4 2
 I own a set of their AM Wheels from last year before they revamped their lineup...

I bought them used. And they are absolutely bomber. I regularly run them at downhill parks. Regularly smash them into rocks. And generally neglect them.

To all the people crying about price... do you cry every time someone drives by in a Porsche. Can you make the same argument that they are overpriced vehicles that only cater to people with too much money to spend?

There's a reason why they're the BEST carbon wheels on the market:

Handmade in the U. S. of A. 5 year warranty. Lifetime crash replacement.

Get over it, or get a better job.
  • 4 1
 It's funny, I always thought that Porsche's cars were actually decently priced among other cars of similar specs. They were the cheaper, reliable, trusted (but less exciting) option as opposed to a Lambo or Ferrari for example... However, it has been a while since I really paid much attention to cars.
  • 2 0
 "which might be a big deal for anyone who's had to clean Stan's sealant off of everything within twenty feet of where they were standing"

I blew a tire off of a tubeless rim in a small apartment bedroom that was "converted" to a shop. There was Stans on all four walls, the clothing in the open closet behind me, and the ceiling fan. To make matters worse, this was while experimenting with glitter to help plug all the little cactus holes you get when riding in west Texas. Yes... Glitter EVERYWHERE.
  • 4 0
 Hidden nipples!?!? No way! For that money I want those nipples erect and highly visible, with people walking past, glancing and nudging each other.
  • 2 0
 Enve wheels are actually cheap as hell after you count how many fake dollars our governments are adding to the money supply. That said I cant say anyone should buy them unless their income is pegged to the money supply like bankers.
  • 2 0
 I've been riding 26,29 and 27.5 wheel size trail bikes with Carbon rims for several years now, Both Easton and Enve wheels. And have raced xc and enduro on both. They have made a significant change to the performance of the bigger sized hoops in regards to flex.
They last amazingly well. I recently bought a new carbon Nomad 27.5 that wasn't specked with carbon rims, but the WTB trail wheel set, they suuuuck, always out of true, flex like crazy, burp tire bead regularly, and really difficult to seat tire when installing. Can't wait to get back on a carbon wheel set.
They really do make a difference.
Check out the Chinese versions built up with Hope hubs for $825pr, I have several friends that are using them, and their stoked.
  • 2 0
 These wheels are a clear example of trying to reinvent the wheel and coming up with the wheel.
If you earn enough money to afford these you most likely realise that life is not about status symbols.
Ztr rims just work and are great for not getting punctures or running tubeless. Yes they will fail. But you can get spares with ease and lace them yourself without breaking the bank. You won't be worried about scratching your very expensive wheel (or them cracking), you will just get out and enjoy riding.
No need for these today, tomorrow or anytime in the future.
  • 4 0
 The article has it the wrong way round. It's 60% down. Just like the M90 is 90% down.
  • 4 0
 Is anyone really riding their DH bikes up hill 10% of the time?
  • 14 0
 yeah, up the lip of jumps
  • 2 0
 Yes up the hill to B-Line, Schleyer, Fantastic and Crank-It up. The worst part of my day. Every day!! ;-)
  • 1 0
 My WTB KOM 29er rims are only 50 grams heavier than these rims for the same width, but cost 10 times less. Sure these are nice, but unless you are basically pro-level rider or rich, I can't imagine why you would bother with the extra expense. The gains just seem so minimal.

www.wtb.com/products/kom
  • 2 0
 If you look into real world experiences, the KOM's have had major denting issues with certain riders on the terrain that they're marketed for. I did a lot of research into Stans vs WTB KOM vs AC vs WTB frequency vs DT vs light-bicycle, etc, etc and loved the idea of the UST profile KOM and their price. In the end, there were too much negative feedback to warrant giving them a try.
  • 1 0
 My real world experience has been quite positive so far (200+lb without gear, lots of cased jumps), but I wouldn't expect them to be as good as the Enve rims, or decent carbon rims for that matter. Just not 10 times worse. Derby rims seem to get pretty positive feedback and a measly $350/rim. Guess my point is that it doesn't seem like Enve is offing way more value for way more dollars.
  • 1 0
 I was one of those guys denting the shit out of them! I now ride Enve wheels. I rode I9 torch enduro they were great I just had issues with a few rear spokes loosing tension, otherwise they are very stiff like Enve's and took lots of abuse!
  • 2 0
 For the weight, the KOMs are almost too good to be true as a proper enduro rim, but for general trail XC under a 200+ lb dude I'm very happy.
  • 1 0
 Good review. I don't find I need levers to install or remove the same tires the writer installed though. I have 240 6 bolt hubs with 32 spokes for my hard tail because I wanted something wider and tougher than I had. I noticed that the wheels felt snappier right away and I do get a harsher thunk when I bottom out. I can run low 20's psi for most stuff but say Tunnel Vision at Whistler wants a bit more air for all them roots. My rear needs a true job though. I think the rear was built a touch put. We'll see when my wrench gets to me and test tension. I have always felt that good wheels are one of the most important components.
  • 3 0
 hmmm... $2700 to save a 1/2 pound..

My new bike (complete bike with wheels) cost 2750...

Thats just a lot of money for some wheels..
  • 1 0
 Sorry, one more question for Mike - what 60forty version was tested here (27.5 or 29)??? Also, what bike were you riding them on? i.e. I'd attribute different weight to this review if these were 29'ers slapped on a hard tail (doubt it), vs 27.5 on a 6 inch enduro/am rig (I'm guessing?).
  • 2 0
 "wah wah wah... they cost too much... meh"

here cry babies: www.ibiscycles.com/wheels

actually... that's a pretty sick price for a full carbon wheelset. And I'd LOVE to try a 41mm wide wheel.
  • 2 1
 no sense buying a 27.5" carbon wheel set as it will be obsolete or outdated by the cycling industry within 3 years. Once they perfect the 650B like they did the 264life they will tell us to sell them and buy ....THE NEW STANDARD" so save your cash and buy up all the 26" bikes the idiots are dumping.
  • 3 0
 Bought a barely used set of 2013 Reynolds AM 26" carbon rims (with DT swill hubs) for $400 and haven't looked back. The seller was moving up to 27.5!
  • 2 1
 26 4 life
  • 2 1
 I had a pair of enve wheels 2 years ago and did sell it (not M series).
why?
Because i don't like.
At first, yes indeed i like it.
But, EVERYTIME i cracked it, i must say "Let's stop this and let's sell this wheels"

Lifetime warranty? Yes.
But, let's face it here dude.
When are you gonna ride your bike when you must replace your wheels everytime you ride?

Still happy and satisfied with my Flow EX.
  • 1 0
 I have both the M70, M60, M50 and an older set of XC Enve wheels. I use them for both work and spare time riding and they are definitely the strongest wheels compared to their weight, that I have ever ridden. In the beginning I really didn't liked the internal spoke nipple design, but I almost never have to adjust the spoke tension compared to other wheels, that I have used in the past.
  • 1 0
 I made a wheelset out of two Light-bicycle 35mm wide rims (650b), laced on a hope pro 2 evo front hub and a DT 350 classic pull rear hub.
This make a very stiff wheelset that's is rather light (400g rims) and not expensive compared to this one. It's also really easy to maintain.
Rear hub : 225$ on eBay (shipped)
Front hub : 92$ on chainreaction.com
Spokes : DT champion 60$ for both wheels
Rims : 175 $ each (No, they're not made in North America... I know. But with usa carbon material (Toray)
Build: a friend who is a good wheelbuilder laced them for me, for 70$ total.
So it's about a 800$ wheelset and I like it very much.
  • 1 0
 Mine arrived over the w.e on king hubs. Just did back to back runs today on my tallboy ltc with these against my roval control carbons, both butcher front purgatory rear, my usual route of 13km, grade 3 and 4 up, 4 and 5 down. I always loved my rovals (basically a dt240 internal) found them pleanty light and nippy, compliant enough on the rough but good lateral stiffness in the corners. Paid $1750nz for them about a year ago and they've been faultless.

The m60s on kings are roughly 40g more than the rovals, im going to say all of that and maybe more is in the hub itself. There was certainly no obvious feeling of any weight penalty. The ride however the m60s really shine! I never found my rovals flexy but the stiffness on the enves is next level, which really comes to the fore in the rough stuff, the classic carbon 'stiffer but more compliant' magic, really inspires more speed on rougher lines, drops and in corners. I usually run 28psi on the rovals tubeless, and went the same on the m60 but will drop afew psi as they are just that damn stiff!

First time on king hubs and love them, very impressed with the freehub feel and pick up.

Are they worth 2x as much as the rovals? I got mine on a long term interest free deal so for 2 less coffees a week hell yes there worth every penny! That said, they do ride in a certain style and feel, i wouldn't put them on my short travel bike, the rovals are certainly more fit for that purposes (there an xc style rim after all), but for a 5-6" travel bike getting ridden hard, the m60s are an awesome choice if you're willing to splash out.
  • 1 0
 Oh, and fitting the tires was easy as u like!
  • 1 0
 I hope this review gets through. I just bought a HV m60 27.5 set at with DT swiss 240 at TOP dollar. They are light but not as light as advertised (only 80 grams heavier though). They are very expensive wheels so you expect perfection. When you install the valve and rotate the wheels they will fall to the heaviest point (the valve). This is pretty trivial, but not high price perfection. Some of the flat bladed spokes are twisted like licorice at the rim end. Probably doesn't matter, but are these going to be the first spokes that break? The person who built the wheels writes one of their their names (first or last?) on the pack that comes with the rims. If they break what does this matter? Installing a hard rubber tyre (maxxis ardent) on the front rim was hard. It made the tyre lever scrape inner tape they supplied to cover the poke holes and tore up the decals badly.

These are all trivial issues, but for 2870 USD I expected a perfectly balanced rim, flat spokes that all looked perfect and tyre installation for hard rubber on the front just as easy as it was for maxxis 3c soft rubber on the back (my Stan's have always been a breeze). THAT SAID, I have not ridden the wheels yet. They may yet prove to be an incredible ride and unbreakable as the price suggests. It's just a really bad start.
  • 1 0
 I hope this review gets through. I just bought a HV m60 27.5 set at with DT swiss 240 at TOP dollar. They are light but not as light as advertised (only 80 grams heavier though). They are very expensive wheels so you expect perfection. When you install the valve and rotate the wheels they will fall to the heaviest point (the valve). This is pretty trivial, but not high price perfection. Some of the flat bladed spokes are twisted like licorice at the rim end. Probably doesn't matter, but are these going to be the first spokes that break? The person who built the wheels writes one of their their names (first or last?) on the pack that comes with the rims. If they break what does this matter? Installing a hard rubber tyre (maxxis ardent) on the front rim was hard. It made the tyre lever scrape inner tape they supplied to cover the poke holes and tore up the decals badly.

These are all trivial issues, but for 2870 USD I expected a perfectly balanced rim, flat spokes that all looked perfect and tyre installation for hard rubber on the front just as easy as it was for maxxis 3c soft rubber on the back (my Stan's have always been a breeze). THAT SAID, I have not ridden the wheels yet. They may yet prove to be an incredible ride and unbreakable as the price suggests. It's just a really bad start.
  • 1 0
 I hope this review gets through. I just bought a HV m60 27.5 set at with DT swiss 240 at TOP dollar. They are light but not as light as advertised (only 80 grams heavier though). They are very expensive wheels so you expect perfection. When you install the valve and rotate the wheels they will fall to the heaviest point (the valve). This is pretty trivial, but not high price perfection. Some of the flat bladed spokes are twisted like licorice at the rim end. Probably doesn't matter, but are these going to be the first spokes that break? The person who built the wheels writes one of their their names (first or last?) on the pack that comes with the rims. If they break what does this matter? Installing a hard rubber tyre (maxxis ardent) on the front rim was hard. It made the tyre lever scrape inner tape they supplied to cover the poke holes and tore up the decals badly.

These are all trivial issues, but for 2870 USD I expected a perfectly balanced rim, flat spokes that all looked perfect and tyre installation for hard rubber on the front just as easy as it was for maxxis 3c soft rubber on the back (my Stan's have always been a breeze). THAT SAID, I have not ridden the wheels yet. They may yet prove to be an incredible ride and unbreakable as the price suggests. It's just a really bad start.
  • 6 2
 once again, no, thank you. i'll stick to my 2100 gramms and 300$ wheelset
  • 9 7
 I'll stick with my sun Ringle mtx's you can't beat 320 bucks for my wheelset and I bet they will last year's longer than these cheese dick carbon rims
  • 9 3
 You are really confused if you believe that.
  • 3 1
 4 years dh on mtx. No issues. 350$. Enve faulty right out of box and built in design flaws...
  • 3 0
 Bent a mtx in 2 dh rides laced to hopes. Raced the whole season on Enve AM's without even needing a truing stand.
  • 2 0
 Show me pics of that wrecked mtx rim bud only way that's happening is if you have a faulty lace job
  • 3 0
 Is that a crack on the inside of the rim? In the pick of the rim on the left - next to the spoke hole...
  • 1 0
 Nah, it looks like a residual piece of the black Enve rim tape. You can see another piece a little below it.
  • 6 0
 Definitely not a crack. I've gone over the rims with a fine tooth comb and there's zero damage to them.
  • 2 0
 No, that's the way the rims look brand new. Enve does as little as possible cosmetically to their rims. What you are seeing is the parting line between the two halves of the mold. I used to work there making the molds. Their bars, post, stems etc are all sanded and painted though.
  • 3 0
 check out derby rims. I love them. 35mm internal diameter, bombproof and plush at $350
  • 1 0
 I just put a set of the DH layup 29er Derbys on my bike. They are incredibly stiff. Glad I didn't go with stiffer spokes. I can ride these wheels so much harder than my Flows, which winced every time I rode them. They have that peculiar carbon vibration damping quality but they are mega stiff.
  • 2 0
 But the real question is... what do the rims sound like when you are banging them with a stick on Heckler's Rock at Crankworx!?
  • 1 0
 Lmao
  • 1 1
 It amazes me how many negative haters there are commenting against Enves. Have you tried them yourself? Because i know for a fact that they are the best rim/wheelset on the market.. ive been running them on my DH bike (Chris King hubs) for over a year now and im more than impressed. I rode South Africa World Champs and the 2 remaining World Cup races in 2013, also a NZ provincial DH series and also the NZ National series on the same wheelset and not one have i flatted, broken spokes, detroyed my wheel, or had them wobbling. I managed to eventually crack one of the rims but i still rode on it and it stayed perfectly straight and when i got it sorted for warranty Enve had it replaced and built back up in no time. I would rather spend more $ on a wheelset that last than having to keep forking out for new rims every 2nd race. Just remember you only get what you pay for!
  • 3 1
 Just go and buy yourself some HOPE tech enduro's and with the money you save, you could go and buy yourself a few beers ;-)
  • 5 1
 over priced
  • 3 0
 I'll stick to my mavics thanks.
  • 2 0
 I actually have a set of these with Chris king hubs and they are holding up very well, the only pain is fitting tyres.
  • 3 2
 Wasn't going to buy them because i saw the price. Then i saw they do custom colours and i was like yeeeeeeewwwww.
  • 3 2
 Why have I never seen green enves it seems the logical choice? I guess if you own them your not green with envy anymore.
  • 1 0
 Sweet ride.
  • 1 0
 Sadly it's not mine.
  • 6 8
 Wheels too stiff? That's what suspension is for, choose a decent tyre size and the correct pressure to match up with the trail and your shock settings and no one should need any wheel flex to help them out. You don't see F1 guys asking for wheel flex.
  • 4 1
 In all two wheeled motor sports (and MTB as well), when you lean in the corner, your suspension becomes lateral flex. Your bike is leaned over 60deg, bump is applying a vertical force, thus your fork and shock are nearly useless. Frame and wheel flex play a big role. Now, my Bronson Carbon + ENVE wheel is on the border of "too stiff" if not pushed hard enough.

I have good days when I push hard. The bike feels right. I have bad days when I'm tired or not feel confident (and working stress plays a role here), I go slower, the bike feels too stiff and reduces confidence further.
  • 5 0
 You also don't see F1 drivers running super low profile tyres. Wonder why that is...
  • 2 0
 Go ride a set of 36 spoke rims and tell us that wheels can't be too stiff. Wheels that are too stiff can throw really throw you off. You need stiffness as well as compliance. Like most things in life, it's all about balance. To me it sounds like you don't know what you're talking about!
  • 1 0
 I think stiffness is also a personal preference just like most things on a bike's setup. Most people will say my bike is under sprung and over damped, but that's how I like it. Wouldn't you agree that balance is different from person to person?
  • 1 0
 I'm a printer so Pantone colour is the norm to me.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/11501733

What colour should I choose?
  • 3 0
 Inverted nipples?
  • 1 0
 aka innies Wink
  • 2 0
 you had me at $2750 USD...
  • 1 0
 There is not a CRACK in the rim internal next to the valve hole in picture #2?????
  • 3 0
 No, there is zero damage to the rims. You're seeing the residue from the rip tape.
  • 1 0
 I stopped reading after I saw the price ... and rushed to order them (not).
  • 1 0
 Any chance we can get the print/wording that is under the pictures to be formatted to work on the mobile browser?
  • 1 0
 Give them to Kelly Mcgarry so he can take a crack at them (no punt intended). Smile
  • 1 0
 We need a Carbon VA Aluminum shootout please! I bet a set of Reynolds AM Carbon would win the shootout.
  • 1 0
 I can buy an alloy made in the USA T275 with that kind of price and ride it. I can't ride with just the 2 wheels.
  • 1 0
 Mike, when are we going to get the reviews about all those interesting tires you mentioned?
  • 1 1
 he was trying to be nice but he was really saying you're truly an idiot to spend the amount on a wheel set unless you're racing on them
  • 1 0
 Is American labor that much better? Still if your proud to buy American made stuff. Go for it!
  • 1 0
 the only thing i really like about these wheels is the decals look SUPER cool when you're rolling really fast.
  • 6 5
 People will have such enve when I rim these bad boys with some rubber
  • 8 6
 Go home no 26
  • 6 1
 M70 thirty and m90 ten come in 26
  • 5 0
 There's a review of the M90s in 26'' in the works.
  • 4 4
 Sorry but DT swiss hubs are not anywhere close to the quality of Chris King hubs.
  • 5 4
 Yes, it's true. The DTs will last significantly longer.
  • 5 4
 LOL- I saw a DT Swiss rear hub on a brand new $10,000 S-works enduro blow up after half a season of riding. Chris King hubs are simply better in every way. But to each their own, if you think DTs are better, good for you.
  • 2 0
 They are both great hubs, each has their strong points. I've never had trouble with either, owned multiple sets of each.
  • 2 1
 And a DT Swiss 240 was on a Rampage winning bike a few years ago. Can you say the same thing about King?
  • 2 0
 Any half decent hub can last through a couple runs at Rampage, especially the top tier hubs like Hope, DT Swiss, King, Hadley, Saint. Doesn't mean anything to the average consumer.
  • 1 3
 There are also zero King hubs being run in the XCO, CX, Road or anything other than DH circuits. 8 of the top 10 WC XCO racers were on DT hubs this past year. But, I suppose that means nothing. The guys on S-Works Enduros are definitely much harder than guys that get paid to race for a living...
  • 2 0
 I'll take DT over anything else. So simple to maintain, easy to swap to different formats, and altogether bombproof.
  • 1 0
 Buy a Roval wheelset for $500 put ENVE sticker kit on it, problem solved!
  • 2 1
 Made in USA. Grate. 2K not so grate.
  • 1 0
 I agree that Made in the USA is great. But people in the USA make a great deal more money than people of the great nation of China, so there will always be a premium for great USA and Canada made products. I really like ENVE wheels now that I have them. I have a great time on the trail with them
  • 1 0
 Why didn't you get Centerlock rotors?
  • 3 0
 Because I wanted to try the adapters that are supplied with the wheels. I've had no issues with Center Lock rotors on Shimano hubs, but haven't read anything about how a set of DT Swiss' adapters work. Not so well, as it turns out.
  • 1 0
 Did you try Centerlock rotors or Shimano lock ring? Would be good to know if the issue is the adapter, the hub or the lock ring.
Are Freeza rotors worth it?
I love carbon rims - I've beat the hell out of mine with zero issues. Easy to build, nice and stiff, light for the width (29mm internal).
  • 1 0
 Good review Mike and seems like you raise some good questions. I do wonder if it really wasn't two reviews; one of the Enve Rims and the other of the DT adaptor for center lock rotors? Do you think the giant pain in the ass the adaptor ended up being, jaded you on the rims? Hard to feel positive about something when it is so frustrating from a maintenance standpoint (Don't get me started on my MT8 Brakes...)
  • 1 0
 23 IRD? Why are companies still doing this?
  • 1 0
 Spank Oozy Trail295. #theone
  • 1 0
 Just curious what the test sled was Mike? Your Element?
  • 1 0
 No 26"? Not getting my $!
  • 1 0
 I'll stick with my EX729s and Hopes Big Grin
  • 2 4
 I love enve!........ Not. check this S**T out if you want to see just how "tuff" enve is /Users/jeffeaton/Desktop/p2pb11476006.jpg
  • 3 3
 photo did not load but check out the pic in broken parts on my photo album if you would like to see
  • 2 3
 Sorry photo did not load but check out the broken parts section in my pics and you will see....
  • 1 0
 That was some carnage, hope you're alright. How did the wheels hold up?
  • 3 0
 I took them off before I did this. And happy I did it would have been really expensive, haven't done any 40ft plus with them and I don't plan on trying due to the headset and bars failing on one of our 40`s. Bummer their stuff was running well until I wanted to go big :-(..
  • 1 0
 Bloody Hell!
I guess ENVE does not have comparative results on 40ft drops for those components. Did you get replacements from the company? Also would you consider using ENVE components after that experience?
  • 1 0
 They are being sent back as we msg, I will let you know what they say about the replacement. Currently I am purchasing Thompson Titanium bars with a Thompson DM stem. I would use both enve stem and bars for racing but never again for big freeride hits.
  • 2 1
 I wonder how many times (and how hard) you crashed prior to this failure?

ALL carbon parts need to be inspected for damage after crashes. Is it silly that carbon parts may have to taken out of service way sooner than aluminum? Yes. But that's the price you pay for running them. Regardless of brand.

I find it hard to believe that you were able to break both the stem and handle bars by landing any size jump cleanly. And without prior damage, unnoticed most likely.
  • 1 0
 Thank you for your concern about this incident, about twice before I had crashed on them going about 12mph each time and have owned them for about 6 months. I clean, remove and check almost every part of my bike every time after I ride, then grease and reassemble. This type of thing should not happen on such a hit. Also I landed just fine thank you! :-)
  • 2 1
 Dude, you don't sell them out on pinkbike then put in a warranty claim. You really think that they aren't checking these comments out? Glad you're OK, but not a good way of handling things.
  • 2 1
 Yeah... this is just highly suspect all around.

You claim to not only have received two flawed components (highly unlikely), and you also claim you didn't crash hard enough to damage them prior to this event. But then you managed to break both components (in the same spot no less) that have been proven to sustain forces much larger than those that would have occurred in your "smoothly" executed landing.

Something's off here...
  • 2 0
 Like I said I would use them for racing but not big hit freeride, because their products are great for that usage for me and had a blast on them its just unfortunate this happened. No selling out for me I know what im saying, I went through it.
  • 1 0
 Thats what I expected them to be able to do be more sustainable I was wrong with parts checked after every ride, I guess I expected too much.:-(
  • 1 0
 Sram Roam 60
  • 1 0
 stans
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.040449
Mobile Version of Website