E*thirteen Tire Plasma – Review

May 17, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  
e thirteen Tire Plasma

bigquotesWe've used our share of mediocre sealants, messy, smelly slop that left us yearning for the halcyon days of tubes. So when it came time to formulate our own sealant, we knew what to avoid.e*thirteen


E*thirteen says that they tried them all and were so disappointed with the current crop of tubeless tire sealants that they decided to formulate their own. It's called Tire Plasma, and it looks and smells a lot like Stan's. According to e*thirteen, the stuff is made from a specially formulated acrylic polymer emulsion, which is water soluble and, reportedly, much kinder to people, tires and rims than other leading brands.

Water based acrylic polymer emulsions include a large family of products, like paint, art supplies, industrial sealing products and tubeless tire sealant - which is probably why Tire Plasma smells (and looks) very much like most other tubeless tire sealants. The devil is in the details. Whether it's finely ground Unicorn Kashmir or simply sawdust, nobody's tellin' - so we are left to imagine the secret ingredients inside e*thirteen's sealing potion. Tire Plasma is sold in one-liter bottles for $17.95, in the single-serving (one MTB tire) 120ml packet reviewed here for $4.95, and in a ten-pack of single-serving containers for $39.50. e*thirteen
Tire Plasma


Riding Impressions

Well, there's a lot to like about Tire Plasma, The single-serving package is going to be emptied into one tire by most users, but if you are the gravel-grinding type, the package is resealable, so you can save some for a second tire. Other than that, e*thirteen's tubeless sealant seems like any other in every way. To discover whether it was better than regular Stan's, I poked holes in identical 2.3-inch tires at 26psi with a four-millimeter Allen wrench (e*thirteen's literature states that it will seal holes up to 4mm). Well, OK then - Tire Plasma had the hole sealed in three revolutions, but so did Stan's. I'll give the decision to e*thirteen, though, because there was slightly more dribble from the Stan's tire. Tire Plasma, like Stan's, doesn't produce the thick, rubbery film that Orange brand sealant leaves (and the occasional congealed wad on the bottom when the tire is left standing too long). While some riders believe that lots of gack inside their tires is a good thing, I prefer that my tire sealant remains liquid until it finds a puncture, which, so far, seems to be the case with e*thirteen's formula.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Southwest guarantees at lest one puncture per ride. Tire Plasma has kept my tires firm and sealed for a number of weeks without turning the insides into a high school science experiment. Good stuff from a brand that seems to go the extra distance when they develop new products. RC





131 Comments

  • + 113
 "which is probably why Tire Plasma smells (and looks) very much like most other tubeless tire sealants"

Yes, but how does it taste?
  • + 60
 asking the real questions
  • + 65
 Is E*Thirteen canadian? It's milk in a bag instead of a bottle!
  • + 60
 We got milk in all sorts of containers up here.
  • - 5
flag Zay (May 17, 2017 at 6:42) (Below Threshold)
 That's a new one. Milk in a bag? Seriously?
  • + 30
 @JesseE: You have my attention. Tell me more.
  • + 4
 I got your milk right here...
  • + 5
 @lightningskull: That makes me uncomfortable.
  • + 6
 @JesseE: In elementary school back in the mid 90's the school I went to went from cardboard containers to plastic pouches, think Caprisun. Needless to say they were not adapted for long, easy to double stab which was a neat trick, exploded on stabbing, plus they were easy to sneak out and even more fun to hurl a people.....
  • + 15
 @Rucker10: We've got 3 Litre Jugs (about a gallon), but we've also got the three litre-sized bag option too, if for some reason you'd like to complicate your fridge with a bunch of floppy bags and a jug to hold the open bag up right. After that it's pretty much boxes down the line, but you can find 1 and 2 litre jugs at some stores, and even glass bottles if you're after higher end milk. Whole word of milk vessel possibilities, really.
  • + 2
 @JesseE: They're actually 3.8L, i.e. gallons.
  • + 8
 @JesseE: I'm more of a jug kinda guy. The bigger the better really. Sounds like Canada wouldn't disappoint.
  • + 23
 @Rucker10: Nice full jugs up here, you can really get your hands around'em.
  • + 5
 @Zay: yah... its a stupid ontario thing.
  • + 2
 @JesseE: Glass bottles FTW.
  • + 0
 @gonecoastal: only the good stuff!
  • + 0
 milk tastes better out of glass bottles though.
  • + 2
 They still sell it in bags??? Haven't seen(or noticed) them since I was a kid
  • - 1
 @Zay: Ontario. It's way better, will change your life. I wish BC would adopt the standard.
  • + 2
 @JesseE: Avalon Dairy Chocolate Milk
  • + 0
 @Zay: A new one? That has got to be the single most Canadian thing next to a full denim outfit. (not hating on either.... I got married in Canada)
  • + 1
 @keillor: Please tell me youre joking. Ontario, not adopting bc's ways, part of the reason its may and feels like July.
  • + 1
 @Kenfire24: Yes, but did you get married in denim? Then I'd believe you really love Canada
  • + 0
 This topic literally took over 5 forums for a week can we please not do this again Cry
  • + 0
 @NotDannyHart: ...not do what again...talk about Fun Bags? Not gonna happen...we're dudes.
  • + 18
 Everyone is talking about the prices of Stans vs E13 vs Truckerco, but nobody has posted a price per ML or OZ for each. So here they are from ebay (or direct from TheHive)

Stans - $28 for 32oz (free shipping)
TruckerCo - $20 for 34oz (free shipping)
E13 Tire Plasma - $18 for 34oz (+$9 for shipping)

For individual 120ml bottles:
Stans doesn't have 120ml bottles, and the 2oz (60ml) is $5 which you'd need two of. So $10 for 120ml.
TruckerCo - $4.91 for 120ml (free shipping)
E13 Tire Plasma - $5
  • + 3
 Or Orange Seal Endurance in the 32 oz size, $31.99.
  • + 1
 Given how the bike industry is always looking to charge more for things I just assumed the bottle would be as big as the $15 bottle of Stan's, not the $30 bottle. I'll definitely be getting this stuff next time.

...infact I just bought a bottle of Stan's from Amazon and havent used it yet, if Im still in my return window Im returning it and grabbing some E13.
  • + 1
 @aharris: Just pay attention to shipping costs. If you're paying for E13 Tire Plasma plus a few extra bucks for shipping ($18+9=$27), you might as well get the Truckco stuff.
  • + 1
 you can get it at Jenson, no reason to pay 9 bucks shipping
  • + 4
 I bought 2 34 oz bottles at Jensons and a tire. Free shipping when u spend over $50.
  • + 21
 I tried the truckerco once as it was a sale with some pads I bought. Wish I has left it in the bottle. When I removed the tire like 3 months later it was a solid 3 demensional being I was unable to identify. I removed it from the tire and the dog barked at it for 10 minutes.
  • + 9
 @USMC: A+ on the descriptive writing.
  • + 1
 yes but with the stans you use less sealant !
  • + 22
 So it does everything that Stans does in a bag. Sweet
  • + 33
 For 1/2 the price.
  • + 20
 If it smells like Stan's, feels like Stan´s, works like Stan´s... then I guess we now know what that "secret ingredient" is.

Beer
  • + 42
 @smoranc: You mean the secret ingredient isn't love?
  • + 22
 @RWM5772: I don't like love in my sealant. But I tolerate it.
  • + 2
 I'm not so sure about this love in my Stans anymore.....DNA test anyone?
  • + 5
 Check out Truckerco, their sealant does everything Stans does, but in a bottle that costs like 1/5 of what Stans does.
  • + 21
 their formulation reminds me of an mtbr forum on diy sealants: I recommend adding donkey jazz and fruit fiber, but I have no idea where you'll get fruit fiber from.
  • + 0
 I've used both extensively, Stan's is some good stuff but when it dries your tire turns into an exorcism location. Tire plasma just gets into a really sticky mm thick layer on the underside of the tread. Combine that with the ludicrous price of a whole liter and it's irresistible. Only had 1 bad flat with it, and that was a rim-denting pinch flat that shot through the sidewall.
  • + 1
 Pepper. If it can plug a coolant leak in a Cat with tires bigger than your car then it can block a puncture in MTB tire. True story. Please dont call me Sgt. Pepper either.
  • + 0
 It actually works though compared to stans. E13 tire plasma has been the best sealant I ever used, and actually seals a puncture fast and holds it off long enough to end a race run, or finish a ride in most cases. Usually I stop and put in a dynaplug, and dont have to add in air. Stans always let out mot of the air if I catch it fast enough before plus, and always have to pump it up. Never had any luck with stans, except a quicker indicator Im losing air as it also sprays sealant all over me and my bike/fork.

This tire plasma is sticky , but that is why it actually works.
  • + 5
 @maxyedor: The Truckerco sealant works really well with a great price. Their brake pads are where the real deal is.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: have you tried that?
  • + 1
 @BigballmcCall: Sadly they don't make pads for my brakes, hoping they start to soon. Great smallish company with killer customer service, the kind of company I don't mind spending my money with.
  • + 1
 @maxyedor: TRP? Got a set of those on one bike and XT's on the other.
  • + 8
 I like being able to inject the sealant through the valve (rather than dumping it into the tire before you put it on the rim, which is a recipe for a potential mess). Orange, Bontrager, et al, come in containers that you can inject into the valve - but I suppose, you can buy a syringe or something. Not a huge deal - but I'm pretty lazy.
  • + 4
 trucker co sells syringes cheap with surgical tube... pretty cheap.
  • + 3
 Because of the ground up chunks of "secret ingredient" in the E13 sealant you can not fill a tire this way, I tried, It clogs up in the valve stem which will also creates a mess.
  • + 3
 @mt208ss:

The sealant is doing an admirable job for me, but my tires fit reeeeeally tight on my rims. Being able to top off the sealant with a quick shot through the core was a huge plus with Stans. I don't know that I'd buy more of the e13 for this reason.
  • + 3
 I use a cheap marinade injector syringe (without the needle), much wider opening than normal syringes. It just barely fits in the valve stem.
  • + 4
 Just buy the small Stans bottle and reuse for years.
  • + 2
 I stole my ex's hair dye mixing bottle, works perfect! You should be able to find them for dirt cheap at any dollar store, or beauty supply. Even a mustard squeeze bottle would work.
  • + 8
 Stan's has left me cursing from not sealing the smallest of holes looking like a porn set with all the white fluid spraying everywhere. Orange seal works every time for me. Sure if your bike sits for weeks on end you can have dry orange sludge, but I'll take that over a Stan's coral ball rolling in my tire.
  • + 3
 never had a hole this big, but wouldn't it help to release the air and then spin the wheel a bit and pump it up afterwards again? only to give the fluid a chance to settle...
  • + 3
 I agree. I switched to Orange Seal a few years ago and what a world of difference. It seals bigger holes/ cuts, and lasts twice as long. I just bought the 'endurance' mix and we'll see how much longer it lasts. -only wish you could buy it in 1 gallon or 5 gallon containers.
  • + 1
 OG Stans never let me down when it was fresh but when aged it was useless. I decided to pick up a big bottle of Orange seal to try. It was definitely better at sealing up leaky sidewalls/beads but had similar performance to stans when it came to punctures. When I finished off that bottle I picked up a bottle of Stans Race which has been working very well so far. It even didn't cure inside my tires over the winter months. I'll be sticking with the Race sealant for now...
  • + 6
 Rc - you mention that it has remained liquid so far - how long have you been trying the e13 secret sauce?
  • + 3
 I recently read a MAXXIS fine print that amonia based sealants like Stans will weaken the sidewalls of their skinwall Minions and void warranty.

It most likely means it also will weaken any regular EXO casing they offer.

a food for thought. ...

I am happy with my STANS & ground BlackPepper combo at the moment.
  • + 10
 Stans has been amonia free and rim friendly for quite some time now.
  • + 3
 @Fattylocks: good to know.. I was not aware of this..
  • + 5
 @denomerdano Wait....there's skinwall Minions???!?!?!??! When did this happen? I write Maxxis four times a year asking
for that!
  • + 7
 @chezotron: they have been around for atleast 6-7 months now.
  • + 2
 @Fattylocks: A quick blurb from stans website: "I heard there is ammonia in your sealant and it is bad for my tire and or rim?

Any trace amount of ammonia in Stan’s sealant will evaporate soon after it is injected into the tire. We have found no damaging effects from our sealant even after years of use. Although tape may not be necessary to seal your rim, you may add one layer to protect un-anodized or scratched areas of your rim from oxidation due to moisture in the sealant."

So trace amounts or no, there is ammonia, and it doesn't mention that a change has been made from their original formula. They also state that they haven't found damage, and to that point I must say they haven't looked far enough. As a mechanic in a shop I've seen stans sealant eat through a shimano ultegra road wheel. It wouldn't void MAXXIS warranties if it was completely benign. I've found Orange seal to be the safest sealant corrosion wise, but it is annoying when it dries and leaves the rubbery layer.
  • + 1
 Stans Race smells like cat piss to me.
  • + 6
 Hi @denomerdano, we appreciate the shoutout here but that is not true. Our Tubeless-Ready tires feature a rubber that has been tested to maintain performance using liquid sealant through the life of the tire, in addition to tubeless-ready beads and bead cushions for rim security.

You might be thinking about our skinwall 26x2.50 Minion DHF DH-Casing, wire bead, 2-ply tire (part number TB74269000). This is not a TR tire and would void the warranty if you set it up tubeless. Our skinwall 27.5x2.30 Minion DHF tires are available in a TR construction that carries a full warranty when used with any sealant on the market.

The use of sealant in any of our standard casing, EXO, DoubleDown, or Tubeless-Ready Downhill tires will not degrade the rubber or void the warranty. Please feel free to PM us if you have any question about whether you can run your tire tubeless.
  • + 1
 @Maxxis: Really good to get to the source of this info.
I thought the fineprint was rather strange too but It was on a German webstore for DHF EXO Casing Skinwall. Happy to hear Stans will do no damage.

So what is the exact difference between a TR EXO and EXO casing , say a HighRoller 2?
Is it a bead difference or sidewalls differ aswell?
Cheers
  • + 1
 @Maxxis: Hopefully there are plans for skinwall Aggressors, DHRs and High Rollers???
  • + 2
 @denomerdano: The EXO layer is a sidewall insert designed for abrasion protection, it does not affect the tubeless compatibility of the tire. TR tires use a slightly different rubber compound that resists deterioration when used with liquid sealants along with a tighter fitting bead and a bead cushion that work together to provide a secure fit against the rim.
  • + 1
 @chezotron: Not at the moment but we cant wait for the 2.50WT Aggressors and High Roller IIs to land in a few weeks!
  • + 2
 For quite a while I've been considering to convert to tubeless and I still haven't done it. Some downsides have been solved in the mean time. Like needing a compressor to install a tire, this isn't that necessary anymore. Another thing that put me off was the risk of getting my valve gunked up or ending up with a unbalanced tire because the sealant clogged up in one point. Of course there is the advantage of getting more grip due to running lower pressures (without risking a pinch flat) and the fact that the sealant seals punctures on the fly. Then again I've been running latex tubes for the past decade or so (these green tubes) and their larger flexibility (compared to conventional butyl tubes) allows them to deform rather than puncture when poked. I run about 1.25 and 1.5bar front and rear respectively (I don't measure accurately enough to talk in terms of psi) so I guess that's low enough. Hard cornering doesn't cause it to burp (obviously), just to cause the rim and bead to briefly separate and clip some grass. Of course it doesn't seal when I do puncture. But then again I can always pop in a spare tube and patch the other tube when back home. I understand people in the past used to just dispose of punctured tubes but really, why? Patching is easy! So what do you do when the sealant doesn't seal your tire? Put in a tube, that's what I hear. So you need to take out your meticulously installed valve (I read installation is a delicate job) and put a tube in. Where does the sealant go, dispose it next to the trail? Really, what are the enviromental effects? If the liquid is supposed to dry up in an airtight film, it would probably be harmful if dumped on the soil, wouldn't it? And finally from what I read in reviews here, installing a tubeless tire is still more effort than installing a tire with tube.

So yeah, I do understand that some early disadvantages (like needing a compressor for installation) have been resolved. I also accept that some advantages of tubeless over butyl tubes also to a minor extend count for tubeless over latex tubes. But the other issues I mentioned here. Are these valid?
  • + 4
 I went tubeless years ago. My first flat in years was on a demo bike running tubes. Tubeless is more of a hassle and it is messy, but overall I can't go back to tubes. And you get better at installation real quick.
  • + 1
 I have been running tubeless since 2003. Once setup, it is dead nuts reliable, except adding sealant when it dries out. The sole exception is a huge puncture, which I have only had on my downhill bike. Even then, I have been able to get them to hold enough air to take the fire road down and then plug/patch them. That said, I don't run weight weenie tires.
  • + 3
 The valves do gunk up a bit, but you can remove the core and do a bit of cleaning. Yes, I have tipped fluid out trailsiide because of a sidewall tear that wouldn't seal, but I can only think of that happening twice in ten years. Because my Stans only lasts three or so months, I don't recommend tubeless unless you ride lots (effort and resources versus kilometres ridden). Valve installation isn't too hard, just hold the base that is inside the rim so it doesn't twist when you tighten the nut on the stem. My rear tyres only last about six months and that's XC riding. When I rode gnarlier terrain a tyre would last only as long as the Stans inside it. I do repair tubes and I do care about reducing my environmental footprint. I just looked at the Stans MSDS and the product is about one third natural rubber latex, one third propylene glycol (you can put it in dog food but not cat food), and one third water. Little or no harm done trailside.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: Thanks a lot for clearing that up! Unless I'm injured, very busy or just away from home (without the bike) I ride about four times a week. That would probably keep it from gunking up. But of course if I'm going to swap tyres for different conditions I'll need to clean it out anyway.

One more question about larger cuts in the sidewall. When running tubes, I can usually just glue a patch to the inside to keep the tube in the tyre. Or I'd use whatever reasonably stiff I can find (like a leaf or money bill) and slip it between tube and tire. How would you safe yourself when that happens when running tubeless and it doesn't seal? If you don't close the cut your emergency tube is going to poke through and explode. But if it is all wet inside, a patch is not going to stick. Does the trick with the leaf or bill work here, or would it slip out of place? I envision this sealant as some sticky but slippery liquid that doesn't match my conventional methods of trailside repair.

I can definitely see the advantages but some downsides are still there. Especially as the performance of latex tubes (which I run) is right there between tubeless and conventional butyl tubes. And of course I happily sit at the tail end of technological progress. But from what I read, this progress (including that of tyre inserts) is still too quick. Once it levels off, that may be the time to bite. That could well be two or three years from now. But yeah, I 'm definitely considering it.

Funny these subjects about tyres. Depending on who I'm responding to, I'll have to write tyre or tire.
  • + 2
 @vinay: in Australia our bills / notes are polymer / plastic, so they work really well as 'boots' for wrapping around a tube for cut sidewalls. Mind you, whether you run tubeless or not a big cut in a sidewall will always need a tube and a boot around it. Smaller cuts and holes can be fixed by poking a tiny piece of cotton cloth into the hole and the Stans seals and dries out. I got that tip from some PBers from Arizona.
  • + 5
 Orange works great in the southwest and also through the valve stem with no problems at all....easy
  • + 5
 So E*Thirteen took a page out of Canadian milk delivery systems book?
  • + 1
 How about developing some sort of super tough light weight reinforcement for tires like using the graphene that Viittoria added to their rubber compound, that will protect tires from punctures so we don't have to keep adding crap to our tires?

"Graphene, a material consisting of a single layer of carbon atoms, has been touted as the strongest material known to exist, 200 times stronger than steel, lighter than paper, and with extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties."
  • + 2
 Glitter works best insteas of black pepper or fruit fibre .. js
I also mix stans race with normal stans half and half with glitter is the way to go . I dont have any glitter tho thats just a wc team secret Wink
  • + 1
 Ive been wondering about mixing the race with the standard Stans, The race is meant to have a shorter life, does mixing them extend this?
  • + 2
 I've just tried a product called goop, it hasn't worked too well. Put it in Maxxis tyres with Stans valves and gorilla rim tape and they lose nearly all pressure over night, now waiting for delivery of Stans.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham did you compare this to the new Stans Race Sealant or the original? I find the Stans Race to be much better than the original but is really expensive so wanted to know.
  • + 4
 Props for using minimal plastic!
  • + 1
 That's pretty cheap if it works the same. I tried my own variations over the years using latex water glitter slime and anti freeze. Which all worked well but never really saved me money hence now I just go with stans
  • + 1
 Just curous. What is the environmental impact of this new acryl polymer based sealant, compared to the conventional latex based ones?
  • + 3
 I just cum in my tires.
  • + 10
 Fair enough! Although if you are ejaculating an Acrylic Polymer Solution I'd suggest you get to a doctor!!
  • + 1
 I wonder if e*thirteen will produce some sort of double plasma version to compete with Stans new race sealant.
  • + 1
 I would only use Stans Race sealant specifically for an endurance XC event like a 50 or 100 miler. That stuff clogs tubeless valves really bad, making it impossible to add or subtract psi after application.
  • + 3
 @lccomz: Ive been using the race formula for a few months now. i just dont add it through the valve. i break the bead down and pour it in. My valves are working well still. just an idea. it seems like the larger flecks would clog easier
  • + 2
 @lccomz: Other than the price I really haven't experienced any negatives of the Stans Race Sealant so far. I'm the idiot who hits local trails with basically no spares or tools though, so the extra security is worth it to me.
  • + 3
 @Iccomz. It says it right on the race sealant bottle. "Must be poured directly into tire. Cannot be injected thru any valve. Not compatible with tubulars and inner tubes. Will plug any valve or injector."
  • + 3
 @Nicksand5: Yea i dont even bother injecting through the valve and ive never had an issues
  • + 1
 @whattheheel:
I've never inject sealant through the valve. I always un-seat the bead.
  • - 3
 @lccomz: You're doing it wrong then. Easiest is to seat the bead first without sealant, then deflate and inject the sealant through the valve after removing the core.
  • + 3
 @seraph: DAMN! Your reading comprehension is crap.

From the post 3 above yours:

" It says it right on the race sealant bottle. "Must be poured directly into tire. Cannot be injected thru any valve. Not compatible with tubulars and inner tubes. Will plug any valve or injector."
  • + 1
 @saskparkrider: agreed, that's what I was saying about either one.
  • + 1
 @seraph: you sound like a very experienced professional bicycle mechanic.
  • + 1
 @whattheheel: how dare you read the directions.
  • + 1
 @carym: I know. Kids these days.
  • + 1
 You could also just clean out your valve with a toothpick, post-injection. Or Q-tip etc.
  • + 2
 Stans race plugged my valve and I never inject through the valve (lucky me had a spare tube with a removable valve core to swap in at the trail head)

Still worth the added protection and I will just change out valve cores every so often
  • + 1
 Orange Seal has Latex and it can be pealed off the inside when changing tires or adding when it's dry
  • + 2
 Isn't that a bad sign if it's dry? I tried orange seal and went back to Stan's. Stan's just seems to work and is way less nasty when it comes to cleanup.
  • + 5
 @leftCoastBurn: Don't all the sealants dry up? They have to otherwise they wouldn't be able to plug any holes. Orange Seal can be pealed off in big strips; still a pain to do but better than snot balls
  • + 1
 @matadorCE: yeah I thought he meant drying up inside a sealed tire. In my experience Stan's stays liquid for a really long time. You are right about being able to peel of the orange seal in strips though
  • + 1
 This is the only stuff I've used and bought the big jug. All good.
  • + 2
 Metric?
  • + 2
 BOOST compatibile
  • + 1
 Not available for 26" tires.
  • + 3
 You can buy the 27.5" version, cut 1.5" out of the middle and glue the free ends together. If that doesn't work, I've heard you can also tie them together. I've also been thinking of riveting the sealant but I'm a bit afraid of puncturing it. After all, if you've got a hole in the sealant, does it still work?

The table also states you could use either 100ml or 110ml, depending on your tire width.
  • + 1
 cool but I've never had trouble with stand race sealant
  • + 1
 plenty of non mtb specific stuff out there that could be tested
  • + 1
 Come on pinkbike, wheres the recipe for homemade stans?
  • + 0
 From my experience 60ml is enough to seal a 29x2.35 tire
  • + 1
 I use 3 oz usually. Same size as the small Stan's containers.
  • + 0
 still running tubes!
  • - 1
 If it ain't broke, don't fix it. Love me some Stan's.
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