e*thirteen TRS+ Cassette - Review

Jun 22, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  
e thirteen trs cassette review


The popularity of 1x drivetrains continues to increase, as does the number of aftermarket options available for riders looking for an even greater gear range than their stock setup. There are enough numbers associated with all of this to make your head spin, but when it comes to e*thirteen's new 11-speed TRS+ cassette, the important numbers to remember are that it has a 9-44 tooth spread, which equates to a 489% range, weigh in at 333 grams, and retails for $309.

TRS+ Cassette Details
• 11-speeds (9-42 tooth 10-speed version available)
• Aluminum and cro-moly cogs
• Cog sizes: 9-10-12-14-17-20-24-28-32-38-44
• Weight (actual): 333 grams
• MSRP: $309 USD
www.bythehive.com / @ethirteen-components
The cassette's three largest cogs are machined from aluminum, and the eight smaller cogs are steel for increased durability. That eight cog cluster can be further broken down into two more parts, one with five cogs and one with three. This allows riders to replace sections of the cassette as they wear, rather than needing to buy a whole cassette; the 32-44 tooth alloy cluster retails for $104, and the 9-14 tooth steel cluster is $39.95.


Crunching Numbers

Remember when I mentioned that there are enough numbers to make your head spin? Well, get ready for some dizziness, because it's time to dive in and see how the TRS+'s 489% range compares to some of its competition, at least on paper.

The first, and flashiest, contender is SRAM's recently announced Eagle 12-speed drivetrain. That setup gives riders a 500% range thanks to its 10-50 tooth cassette, but it requires a new cassette, chain, shifter, and derailleur, all to the tune of roughly $800.

Next comes OneUp's Shark cassette and derailleur upgrade, which results in an 11-50 tooth cassette with a 455% range. That kit costs $125, in addition to the price of a Shimano cassette. OneUp also has a driver body available that allows for that 11-speed Shimano cassette to be expanded even further, resulting in a 10-50 tooth cassette with a 500% range.

Shimano has an 11-46 tooth cassette on the way, but with a claimed weight of 450 grams it's a quarter pound heavier than the e*thirteen TRS+.

And what about the original 11-speed drivetrain that ignited all of this wide-range madness? SRAM's XG1180 cassette has a 10-42 tooth spread, giving it a 420% range, and it's priced within a few dollars of the TRS+. Now that that's out of the way, let's take a look at what it takes to actually install the TRS+ cassette.
SRAM Eagle
SRAM's Eagle drivetrain has 12-speeds and a 500% range, but it isn't cheap.

OneUp
OneUp's Shark upgrade can convert a Shimano drivetrain to one with a 10-50 tooth range.


e thirteen trs cassette review
The three pieces of the TRS+ cassette ready for installation.
e thirteen trs cassette review
e*thirteen's bottom bracket tool is used to secure the largest three cogs, and then a chain whip is used to lock the eight cog cluster into place.

Installation

The TRS+ cassette installs on an XD driver body, but there are a couple extra steps required for installation compared to a 'regular' cassette. The carrier that holds the three largest cogs goes on first, and is held in place with a lockring that requires a tool from e*thirteen to tighten it down to the recommended 25 Nm. That tool (the same one used to install their bottom brackets) is included with the cassette.

Once the first portion of the cassette is installed, the next step is to line up the indicator mark on the 24-tooth cog with the 'unlock' symbol printed on the 32-tooth cog. This will allow the second carrier, the one with the remaining eight cogs to slip into place, and it's then locked into position with a chain whip. Removing the cassette is a reverse of those steps, but it does require two chain whips in order to unlock the cassette.

Don't have two chain whips? If you keep your wheel installed, and shift the chain into one of the three largest cogs, you can then get a chain whip on the smaller cogs and push down on a pedal with one hand and down on the chain whip with the other to unlock and eventually remove the cassette.


e thirteen trs cassette review
The diminutive 9-tooth cog held up to months of use, including plenty of wet, muddy rides.
e thirteen trs cassette review
The cassette can be further disassembled, allowing for sections to be replaced individually as they wear.

Performance

For the duration of the test period I ran the TRS+ cassette with a SRAM GX rear derailleur, and a PC-X1 chain. Out in the trail, in the middle cogs the performance was on par with the SRAM XG-1180 cassette whose spot it replaced, with quick and accurate up and down shifts. It was in the largest cogs (the easiest gears) where the shifting lagged a bit, and I was never able to get the shift down from the 44 to the 38 tooth cog to be as quick as I would have liked. The upshift speed was reasonable, but there was a noticeable lag when dropping off those top two cogs. I checked the cable tension, the derailleur's limit screws and B-tension, as well as the derailleur hanger alignment, and everything was as it should be. Swapping back to a SRAM cassette resolved the slow shifting in those easier gears, confirming that the blame for the sluggishness lay with the cassette. The tooth profiles and shift ramp shaping don't look drastically different than a SRAM cassette, but there's enough difference to affect the shifting speed.

What about that tiny 9-tooth cog? It's survived without any signs of excessive wear despite plenty of wet weather riding, although I will say that it didn't really see a massive amount of use. That's due to the terrain I typically ride – there simply aren't that many wide-open, flat out sections of trail where I'd have enough speed to warrant pedaling in that hard of a gear. Even when spinning out a few road miles on the way to the trailhead I usually found myself using the 10- or 12-tooth cogs.

The cassette's 44-tooth cog saw much more usage, and I certainly appreciated it when faced with the steep logging roads that are the key to accessing the gems hidden in the forest near my house. I ended up staying with a 32-tooth ring up front due to the fact that I was more interested in having an easier climbing gear rather than increasing my top end speed; swapping to a 34-tooth chainring would have maintained the same climbing gear ratio as I'd had with a 10-42 tooth cassette, but increased the speed needed to spin out. Alternatively, I could have gone down to a 30-tooth chainring, thus gaining an even easier climbing gear and more ground clearance, while still maintaining a similar top-end speed to what I'd had previously, thanks to the 9-tooth cog,

On the whole, the cassette has held up well to the miles that have been put on. It did develop an intermittent creak after a string of muddy rides, but pulling it apart to clean and re-grease the section where the two carriers slide together resolved this. The fact that portions of the cassette can be replaced individually is a nice feature, one that means you'll only need to part ways with a fraction of the cost of an entire cassette if you wear out the 44-tooth cog trying to see how much vertical you can rack up in a season.




Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe TRS+ cassette weighs only a few grams more than a SRAM XG-1180 cassette, and has almost the same MSRP, but possesses a gearing range of 489% vs. the XG-1180's 420% range. On paper those numbers are attractive, but out in the field the cassette's shifting performance wasn't as flawless as I would have liked, which makes the TRS+ a less compelling option. Of course, different derailleur and chain choices may affect the results, but with the test setup I used the SRAM cassette's shifting was quicker and smoother.

Personally, I'd rather have perfect shifting rather than a greater gear range, but there may be some riders who are willing accept slower downshifts in order to broaden their cassette spread, whether that's to make it up steeper climbs or to avoid spinning out on high speed descents.
- Mike Kazimer



Visit the high-res gallery for more images from this review.





154 Comments

  • + 27
 I run this cassette and have not noticed any issues with shifting or shifting speed in any direction. I am using it with an XT 11 speed derailleur. The 9 tooth cog is great as I can use a 32t and never spin it out while racing, and in return I get a really easy gear to push on long steep transfers as I needed to use a 36T on a standard 11-42, making long climbs a little more tiring. That can make a huge difference on saved energy race day.
  • + 8
 I'm also using a Shimano derailleur (With a Goat Link) and the shifting is flawless throughout the whole cassette.
  • + 10
 I am using this cassette with an XT mid cage derailleur (YBN chain) as well and have not noticed the shifting issues mentioned. My setup makes me perfectly happy. Also, I really wonder why he wouldn't have gone to a 30t chainring, given what he said. It would have kept him more in the mid range of the cassette that he said performed well and allowed him to utilize that 9t cog.
  • + 5
 I've been using this with XX1 everything else, and don't notice any degradation in shifting performance. However, after a ride that alternated between sticky mud/clay and sand, the cassette developed the same creak mentioned by the author. Taking it apart and re-greasing the interface between components would quiet it down for a few rides, but it would always come back. Finally had to put some electrical tape on the interface surfaces, hasn't creaked since.
  • + 13
 @ninjatarian: I kinda had the same thought: if you don't need all the range of a cassette, but you're testing it for something like this, start getting creative with the testing to push the product. Throw a 28t on there for a while to force yourself to use the 9t more often(especially since it's kinda one of the big question marks on this product that people are going to want to hear about.) Throw a 34 or 36 on there next, force that largest cog to do work. beat on that cassette in a way most people won't.

It also showed me another thing I've been noticing for a while, though: we're starting to get into ranges on 1x systems that aren't upgrades, but tools for specialized use. @JKSR is using this whole range, but he's hitting the 9t because he's racing(& actually, he's saying he never spins it out, so unless he comments more, we don't know how much he's actually using it.) But my point is, that's a specific use that's more extreme than most riders are seeing.

I'm starting to think that right around 420%, maybe just a tad more, really is the sweet spot for 1x systems, & that most people don't really need the 489% this provides. Stuff like this, eagle, etc, are more like DH blocks: specialized tools for racers, & not something you "must" have to keep up with modern tech.
  • + 1
 I am using a sram gx rear and pcx1 chain and have had 0 issues with slow shifting. it does get creaky with lots of dirt in it so i clean mine about every week or 2.
  • + 3
 It's still $309 USD vs. a Shimano XT M8000 1x11 cassette($67 in CRC), plus a OneUp 45T($90) = $157 USD and you get a 11-45 range. Paired with a 34T chainring is a perfect setup for anything and almost half the price. Gearing is flawless with XT+OneUp as well.
  • + 2
 @groghunter Agreed on the sweet spot. This e*13 cassette is also available in 10 speed, 9-42, 467% range. That brings the cassette & component cost down. In retrospect that's a near perfect setup that I should have gone with. 10 speed Shimano is ace.
  • + 2
 Thanks to everyone chiming in that they're NOT having issues. Often a review like this can do real damage. I don't doubt the reviewers experience, but it's good to hear from others. Anyway, even if there is a little lag in the top gears, I'll take that for the range provided and the ability to replace only the cogs I want. I'm not racing, so it sounds awesome for me.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: On high speed stuff I don't spin out with a 32 up front, the same places I would spin out with a 36T front 11T rear. 32-9 is taller, I haven't experimented with a 30T front yet as I don't own one, but its on my list. I need to be going quite fast to use that tall of a gear, Im talking Enduro races when screaming down a super fast section, or fireroad/ski run ope section, the 32-9 gives me the ability to go faster, I am loving it, and the 10t is usually enough in most situations with the 32 up front.
  • + 1
 doubled
  • + 1
 @JKSR: So would you agree that if you weren't racing, you wouldn't really be upset if you spun out on those sections?

Are you thinking about the 30t because you think you think you need a taller climbing gear than 32x44? Having a 32x42 for myself, I can't really imagine a taller gear than what I have being useful, though my big bike is definitely more DH than trail (Devinci Spartan.)
  • + 1
 @groghunter: For racing, yes, a 30T front for the super easy gears for transfers, and with the 9T I don't think I would have an issues spinning out on high speed sections. For years I just ran 36T front and an 11-36 cassette. Its not a problem, but the easier gear for climbs certainly saves a lot of energy at races. I don't need a lower gear for climbing, but with a 9T, I could go to a 30 and not lose top end. As it stands, the 32-44 is super easy, but over a long transfer, it is welcomed.
  • - 6
flag thenotoriousmic (Jun 24, 2016 at 18:59) (Below Threshold)
 As if someone actually spent £300 on a cassette. You're all what's wrong with mountain biking these days.
  • + 4
 @thenotoriousmic: £225.81 actually. $309 usd.
  • + 2
 @groghunter: 420% is always the sweet spot.
  • + 3
 @mateo5: But XT + OneUp weights like 500 grams.
  • + 20
 And here I am riding a 11-34 Sram 9 speed cassette with a Type 1 Sram X7 and a 34 tooth RF N/W ring.
Still end up grinning at the bottom of the trail from ear to ear. Would like a wider range though, but hike it if it's too steep uphill and shred it down.
Blah!
  • + 8
 That's the point. You say hike it if it is too steep . . . . Well why not ride it instead using your wide range. Makes perfect sense.
  • - 5
flag SeaJay (Jun 23, 2016 at 11:58) (Below Threshold)
 I don't understand people who want to pedal just for the sake of staying on the bike when I'm beating you up the hill walking and pushing my bike....
  • + 3
 @SeaJay: Because that's actually riding a bike versus walking up hill. That's probably why. If you are more concerned with being quicker when walking uphill compared to someone riding their bike still, then you sound like an awful person from a perspective based purely on your comment.
  • + 2
 @SeaJay: I'm beating you both when I hike past with my bike over my shoulders.

Big Grin
  • + 1
 I'm with you. I just replaced my 11-34 with a 12-36 yesterday so it still works with everything I have.
When I have the $$$ I am hoping to upgrade to 11-42.
  • + 1
 @SeaJay: there's no shame in walking up, and it's better for you too.
  • + 9
 I don't get it with those pizza size rear cassettes. 15 years ago people where riding the same mountains with a 8sp 11-28t cassette and a 24 granny ring. And now they tell you you need a 10-50 or something cassette with a 30/32T to get up that same mountain? Go figure.... and then those super small end cogs 9T or 10T. I ride mountainbikes for more then 20 years now and in all those years i now that almost nobody use those small cogs. Only when you spin out on a tarmac downhill with 60Kmph. So those 500% range claims. That's nice marketing bullshit but in the real world nobody uses that range.
  • + 27
 Depends where you live in, i regularly use all the gears on my 2x10. These giant cassettes are needed for some people if they want to ditch the front mech.. For me it's too expensive though, and I really don't have the "problems" of a front derailleur (well some weight saved is always nice, but oh well)
  • - 4
flag chancey (Jun 23, 2016 at 2:54) (Below Threshold)
 Im with you sinterklaas, who wants to run one of those huge rear cassettes?
  • + 9
 @chancey: According to Sram? EVERYBODY!
  • + 35
 People like you just don't get it. Back then most mountain bikes were using a triple ring drive train. So if you swap to a single chain ring upfront you do lose some of the gearing ratios. simple as that. Also, different trails offer up different terrain and situations. If you're so happy with your drive train config ride on but seriously there's a real reason, a valid reason why rear cassettes are going the direction they are going.
  • + 1
 @daweil: exactly
  • + 23
 Use that range all the time and so glad the front derailleur is gonzo.
  • + 2
 I would love to see some scientific thought on the value of the higher chainring tooth count and actual power output or cadence or something like that. Not industry fluff, but your leg is this long X your approximate power capabilities divided by the number ratio in the rear cassette intergered by the number of teeth in the chain ring ?

im sure some mechanically inclined person could explain actual WORKLOAD with varying chain ring size and cassette set ups. ie, comparing a 26 11-32 setup with a 32 11-42 and actual physiological benefits of a larger front ring.... i think this makes sense Wink
  • + 4
 I have gone from 2x to 3x, then back to 2x, and now 1x. I don't have a massive 50 on the back, but I have absolutely no problem with them. Who cares if they're large?! As long as they work. I'm running a One-up 44 in the back and 30 up front. It took a few rides to get my fitness up, but I love the quieter ride and not dropping a chain is absolute gold.
  • + 3
 @rrolly: well the main reason I don't *think* I'd want a massive rear cog is because the derailleur cage has to grow to take up all that range on a single chainring... at least with a 2x your lowest gears are all on a smaller front cog, so you don't need nearly as much extra chain length in there. I blow up enough hangers as it is, I'd prefer not to put the lower pulley even closer to the ground. The cage on that Eagle RD looked massive.

But this could be a baseless, worry, idk. For me the praxis 11-42 10 speed has been more than enough range, and it runs with the same mid-cage RD I was using on 2x10. I don't see myself going any bigger than that.
  • + 5
 Spoken like someone that lives in an area with no real mountains to climb. I still see people with old 7speed bikes walking hills that are too steep for their gearing, back then pushing bikes up a hill was a common sight but now its really rare thanks to bigger gears.
  • + 6
 Let's be honest though, people who now ride 1x, would you rather go back to 3x? Hell f*cking no, 1x is the business. Front derailleurs should go straight in the garbage can.
  • + 6
 It's ok to be confused and grumpy about change. But just accept it has benefits. A lot of things 15 years ago riders did and rode do are just not the same today at all. So why draw the line at gearing as a point to say 'no more progression please'. I'm willing to be you do not ride on a 15-20 year old bike . . .
  • + 1
 I love it when internet peeps tell me I'm doing it wrong. My friends come visit and always wish they had a smaller chainring for around here. To each their own.
  • + 1
 I run a 1x10 with 11-40cassette and 34t front with 27.5 wheels. I spin out quite frequently. cant wait for 46t front chain rings to make a comeback.
  • + 5
 In my humble yet sincere opinion... It doesn't fkng matter where you ride on what in what style, your muscle structure matters! God damn it! Good Lord knows, I was guilty of saying you should ride this and that. But now I have seen the light! Saying you should run this and that gearing is bollocks. You won't make marathon runner a sprinter, You won't make strong man winner into a rock climber. Training can alter genetics and way of upbringing slightly. But if you started MTBing after getting 16, you are a product of your dads sperm and what he made you do over those years. Pick a cadence and be a dick about it, suits you right.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: it's just an odd mindset. fat bikes are bad. 29ers are bad. Boost is bad (ok bad example, Boost IS bad). who needs a dropper post? Everything's too expensive. Plus sized bikes/tires are for losers.
We are lucky to live at this moment and be riders. Bikes are better than they've ever been. Trails are better than they've ever been. We should all be stoked.
  • + 2
 @bkm303: I've never broke a derailleur on a climb, and none of the guys I ride with have either. That's the only time your derailleur is hanging out there. The rest of the time it's snugged up like your chestnuts in a pair of Sax.
  • + 1
 @rrolly: yeah but even when it's not fully extended that cage is still hanging lower. I broke a lot more derailleurs and hangers back when I still had a triple and a long cage RD on my bike. Granted, that was back before "shadow" derailleurs and all that... maybe modern ones are more out of the way. Still, I don't love the idea of a long cage RD.
  • + 2
 I guess I must not live in the real world then. Funny, I though Los Alamos was in the real world... I have the 9-42 version of the TRS and I use all of the gears. When I'm on pavement, I pretty much never use the granny cog, but I definitely use the 9 tooth cog. When I'm in the dirt I pretty much never use the 9 tooth, but on really steep punchy climbs I use the granny cog. I guess if your bike only rides to the trail in the back of a pickup truck or car you don't need that range, but I like to ride from my back door to wherever the pavement ends, then just keep riding. Just because YOU don't have a use for something like the TRS doesn't mean that no one else does, but hey, whatever. I don't see why people bother with dropper posts, but they do.
  • + 1
 @RunsWithScissors: what's pavement?
  • + 2
 @rrolly: It's that stuff other people drive cars onSmile
  • + 2
 That is a really weird thing to say about the small cogs, especially if you ride mountainbikes for more than 20 years as you say. Let's speak of higher gears. For over 20 years my highest gear was 44 chainring with a 11t cog. Before that I had a 46t-12t, and after that I switched to a 10-42 cassette with a single 34t ring. Chainrings have been continually decreasing. From 46t to 44 to 42 to 40 or even 38 and now with the single rings even going below 30. So if you are from those times you know how it was. There was a lot of fire road riding, so heavier gears were indispensable. I took a long time to move to single ring because I didn't want to give up the 11-44 (4x) gear. I max that out even going uphill, to pedal at 60 km/h you would need an enormous ring. The great appeal of Eagle for me is that I could use a 40t chainring and finally get that 4x ratio back. Or a 38t ring with a 9t cog. You're maxing that out at 30 kmh already. But to each his own, some people ride heavier others prefer a higher cadence and others neither Smile
  • + 8
 I am interested why Shimano doesn't use their capreo 9t cassette and hub, I remembered Specialized used it on Demo a few years ago(9~21t 7speed, with dt240 hub). XX1 eagle's 10~50t means 500%, so what will shimano do next? 11~55t? or 60t?WTF! Come on shimano, we need 9t cassette.
  • + 9
 They should build a saint or zee 6-7 speed DH group around the capreo freehub body.
  • + 1
 yup. its always been strange to me that shimano never used their capreo idea in the mtb world. specialized/dt swiss/sram used it for their monster energy team (www.pinkbike.com/news/DT-Swiss-7-Speed-Downhill-Hub-First-Look-sea-otter-2011.html), canfield made a version of the rear hub for mtb, and now e13 is having a go. but the company that first designed the idea and the freehub interface used it for small wheel folding/commuter bikes...go figure.
  • + 1
 > What will Shimano do next?

Drivetrain-wise Shimano has been following SRAM's footsteps for the past few years.
  • + 4
 @madisob: except Shimano will make a front derailleur and triple crank for it...
  • + 8
 I'm stoked on this cassette... shifts just fast as my sram did and don't have the creak issues he mentioned. Coming off of an injury and being a bit out of shape, it sure has been nice having the extra range as well. Goes good with a beer at the top of a long climb!
  • + 7
 Range is more important than smooth shifting to me. Personal preference. I have one and really like it. I would be considered a bigger strong rider and the extra gear range made me drop the double because my riding is in the mountains. The shifting is not as good as shimano or sram cassettes but pretty close. I run an XTR 9000 long cage derailleur and shifter with an xtr chain. Front ring is 30 for the long climbs and 32 for most everything else. If you have ridden as long as I have - you know what bad shifting is - we are truly pampered now a days. This cassette does not have bad shifting. Bluntly to me its better than any current other option for those of us that hate SRAM shifter ergonomics.
  • + 6
 I agree about the range @dldewar that's why I am so optimistic about EX-1 where you have 8 speed wide range cassette with better chainline, eliminating the issue of chain being dropper when back pedalling on top gears. Hopefully they will release EXX1 or something with a light cassette, because right now EX1 weighs a ton. And yea, we are damn spoiled these days, I had my share on all derailleurs from SIS in 1998 through Alivio in 2003 to XTR 9000 now.
  • + 5
 Ive been running this the 44-9 e13 on my Following for 4 months with Sram X01 rear mech, XX1 shifter, 32T Blackspire front ring and KMC chain. It runs as smoothly as the Sram XX1 cassette it's replaced. I didnt need to adjust the mech, just fitted and it worked and after 4 months or 2-3 rides a week theres little or know

I agree with previous comments that its the 9t that really makes the difference giving a much longer gear and allowing me to leave the 32 on the front all the time.

From my experience this is a great bit of kit and gives close to the range of gearing that you get from the new 12 speed without having to change the rest of your components Smile
  • + 1
 Great stuff, teknorob. Also thinking about putting one on my following. Great to hear your feedback….
  • + 5
 Try the last years of friction shifters 1986-7 before Shimano SIS & Suntour Accushift(overshift). 28,38,48t front rings & 14-26t screw on freewheels. Twisted chains, broken rear axles, impossible to cure chain suck.

You kids don't know how good you've got it awesome choices these days.
  • + 1
 You can still buy them at rivendell. Grant Petersen and some other retrogrouches sveres by them.
  • + 4
 I really like this. Replacing sections of the cassette makes more sense especially since the climbing cogs get used the most. Just a bummer with the performance. My cousin likes his, though.

I also know I'm beating a dead horse but how can one turn down a $70usd XT 11-42? Getting the proper shimano drive body(which most likely has new bearings) and cassette would be cheaper than the competitor's cassette offering(talking XO1).
  • + 1
 Only pass it by to get it from the German sites for 50 euros... Wink
  • + 2
 $73.95 New. Backcountry.
  • + 3
 @SteveDekker: pricepoint literally has it for $59.95!
  • + 2
 @joalst: For the 11-40, the 11-42 is $64.97 + shipping so about the same. Killer deal. I'm impressed the xt crankarms are like 95 bucks too. Best stuff out there for the price I think.
  • + 7
 I was just expexting to read about the feeling of pedaling that 9t. supposed to be weird squared and bad for the chain?
  • + 1
 I second that thought!
  • + 2
 Also, no mention if the jumps between cogs are too big. Thats one of my concerns. If I can't quite find the right gear for certain climbs, that extra range isn't going to be as helpful.
  • + 4
 I've been using this cassette for a while now and the shifting has been absolutely butter. Never had any issues, and haven't had to make a single adjustment. I'm guessing that's the GX derailleur causing those problems? With XX1 it's absolutely flawless.
  • + 3
 It's a real bummer it doesn't live up to SRAM cassettes, I liked the extra-expanded 11 speed concept when this first came out. I just can't see myself sacrificing the performance and taking the risk of creaking for a wider gear range.
  • + 5
 I'm 60% more certain that I don't give a crap.

Maybe they'll put out a green version of the XG-1180... that would be tight.
  • + 2
 The One up option can be installed on cheaper cassettes, keeping your investment low.
  • + 1
 I recently purchased this cassette and observe same issues that Mike describes in the review - lagging shifting, dropping chain when back-pedalling and a creaking noise now after these 2 months of rain here in Alps. Must say that my derailleur also needs a replacement but I doubt it will solve all the issues (defo not the creak). I should had stayed with SRAM 10-42 tooth cassette and reduced the chainring to 32-tooth. That would be a better solution I reckon.
  • + 6
 I just want something that doesnt drop 2-3 gears when back pedaling! And maybe a nice light 9-38ish 10speed..
  • - 1
 Dropping gears when backpedaling is the nature of the beast with single ring drivetrains, really.
  • + 5
 I just wish it wasn't habitual for me to back pedal a few times to mentally prep for stuff. Other wise it is pretty much a non issue.
  • + 2
 I have several months use on mine, running it with an xx1 der, xx1 shifter and xx1 chain. I don't have any lag on either end of the cassette shifting up or down and it shifts every bit as well if not better than thr full xo1 on my other bike. I would recommend this cassette to anyone.
  • + 4
 arent most linkage designs set up for use with 34-36t rings? if you use one of these and move to a smaller front ring, you risk messing up your suspension performance
  • + 1
 most bikes in the last few years were designed around 32t, actually, due to it being the most common size to pair with a wide range cassette.
  • + 2
 Ride a 2*11 setup and I have a 620% gear range.
I routinely use the whole range on weekend rides.
And for the record we're doing 6-8 hour rides every weekend, you're not allowed to say "get stronger" until you come to Washington and climb what I climb.

FD for life !
  • + 3
 I love this cassette. Shifts flawless! I have a muttly 10s arrangement: 10s XTR shifter, 11s xtr mech, 9-42 TRS+ cassette, 34t ring. Plenty of spread; and I dont get dusted, I do the dusting.
  • + 1
 This review kind of confirms what I find i true for myself. That I don't need that much range so why would I go with a thinner weaker more expensive chain and cassette and more double shifts thrown in to compensate for the overly close ratios Think I'll stick we 10spd
  • + 4
 It takes what to install it? Two chain whips and their proprietary bb tool? Shifting below par? $300. I don't see the point.
  • + 1
 I've been riding mine now for some time and I, too, have not noticed ANY hesitation in down or upshifting on the big cogs. This is 'thee' best investment I have made in some time. The range I now have access to is perfect. The design, installation, look, and weight of this piece of gear is spot on. I run mine with SRAM X01 and it is absolutely great.
  • + 1
 I run this cassette with XTR derailleur and a KMC chain and I have more silent drive train than with the XTR cassette. Compared to xx1 I got a little faster down shift which has take 0.65 sek of my favorite Strata segment ????
  • + 1
 where are these hills that people ride up?
my lowest gear is a 1:1 and has been for over 15 years and ive never found a hill I cant climb,
I normally don't go any lower 2:1, I used to single speed before I got bored of spinning out.
  • + 1
 If sections are available (WHERE????), is it possible to only buy both steel sections and creat an 8-speed DH cassette with 9-28 range (thus beating Sram's X01 DH 7-speed), or is it impossible? Do the steel sections mount onto the aluminum section? Frown
  • + 1
 I have a 10 speed with a wolf tooth 42 tooth cog. It is quick to shift onto the big cog but slow as heck to shift off of the big cog. Honestly though it is not a big deal. When you are shifting off of the 42 tooth it is typically after a bit of a grind and you don't really need to instantly be hammering it anyway. Usually when I want to quickly drop gears I am already in like the 24 tooth anyway.
  • + 1
 I've owned the 11-spd variant since they received their first shipment in a while back.
Firstly, when I swapped it for my existing X01 cassette I immediately noticed that it was lighter than the SRAM.
I did not weigh it because I didn't really care, but it was at least lighter to the point where I could tell simply by handling both cassettes.
Secondly, I'm running the same 30t that I was running with the X01 cassette(OE on the bike-29" Enduro), and use both the 44t and 9t on every ride.
I believe I'm spinning out at about 35mph with this gearing, thus(obviously) any faster and I'm just trying to make the smallest hole in the wind I can.
Lastly, I'm gonna assume the writer of this article didn't have his shifter and/or derailleur adjusted properly, 'cuz my shifting is every bit as good as it was with the X01 cassette it replaced. FWIW, I'm using all X01 components, but quickly perusing some of the comments on here, it looks like I'm not the only one who's experienced flawless operation with my E13 cassette.
[Reply]
  • + 1
 Perhaps i'm missing something, but where do we get 420%, 489%, 500% ??? over what ? what is the baseline... i can only guess (cos i ain't that bright) that 500% relates to 5x the spread of ratios, but compared to what ? It is a long time since i was at school, but i seem to remember being taught that 100% was the whole, and that 1% represented 1/100 of the whole ? If some bright spark can put me right, at least i will be able to sleep again.......
And on the subject in hand, 1 x 11 XT M-8000 11-42, OneUp 45t expander and oval 34t chainring.... it goes up, it comes down..... chain stays on, looks a bit trick.......... job done !
  • + 3
 44/9 = 489%. Although it actually doesnt make much sense as a percentage. But i guess marketing likes big numbers.
  • + 1
 I find the percentages pretty confusing and meaningless. I just use the upper and lower tooth count to work out what's what - the smaller the no of teeth the higher the top end, etc. A simple difference in teeth between top and bottom would mean more to me I think...
  • + 3
 @slimboyjim: The problem with that approach is that the difference you mention is an inaccurate way to compare cassettes. For example, If you rode with a 10-42t in the back and, say, a 32t chainring and then decided to get a (hypothetical) 11-43t cassette, you would be unable to replicate your top and low ends. A 10*32 is approx. the same as an 11*35. However, to keep your lowest gear ratio you would have to use a 33t chainring. In other words, a 10-42t cassette allows you to have a higher high and a lower low than an 11-43t one, despite the differences in teeth between their largest and smallest sprockets both being 32.
  • + 0
 @santoman: Just to clarify I wasn't advocating getting rid of the upper and lower range numbers, as they are the most important fact as you say! It would just mean more to me if they said Eagle was 10-50, which is a 40 tooth difference, whilst the e-13 cassette is 9-44, a 35 tooth difference. It just makes more sense in my head to differentiate the two, rather than 489% and 500% ranges...
  • + 0
 I guess it means that lowest ratio has 500% (5X) more teeth than the highest one and vice versa (50t ÷ 10t = 5 i.e. 500%, or 10/50 = 1/5 i.e. 1/500%)
  • + 3
 @slimboyjim: I was just trying to point out that, depending on the sizes of the smaller and larger sprockets involved, it could very well be that a cassette with a smaller teeth difference would provide a wider range.For instance a 9-46 cassette would have a 511% range (larger than Eagle) but a 37 teeth difference (smaller than Eagle).
  • + 1
 @santoman: good point - I'd not considered that!
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: so a 100-135 cassette is also a 35 tooth difference, but quite useless on a bike. That's why the ratios (%) are more important.
  • + 1
 As long as the price won't go down, I'm not in the market for a wide range cassette when you can get almost the same result with an XT 11-42 for less than 100 CAD -- especially when it is a wearing part that will need to be replaced.
  • + 1
 Loving mine! Especially the fact that with the increased range i dont have to climb in 1st gear all the time, and the chainline is so much better and efficient when you are in 2nd or 3rd gear.
  • + 2
 The cassette pieces are only replaceable if e13 actually has the parts in stock. The parts aren't in stock and no price is listed.
  • + 1
 bythehive.com/collections/drivetrain/products/trs-cassette-parts?variant=11282325825 - Steel parts are in stock. Alloy parts will be back in stock next week. They are also available and in stock from a number of different US distributors - QBP, BTI, Hawley.
  • + 1
 @ckcost: thanks. I went to buy a new cassette yesterday and couldn't confirm how much replacement parts would be because the website doesn't list the price when they are out of stock. Those other distributors don't show up when searching. So I gave up and got another sram cassette instead. Maybe next time I can get e13.
  • + 0
 @dfiler: liar
  • - 1
 @dfiler: The google is your friend: bythehive.com/pages/contact-us
  • + 0
 No need. I've already got a replacement cassette on the way. Not really looking to need to contact someone to figure out availability or pricing anyway. Next time around i'll take another look. Typically they last a year so by this time next year i might be rocking a TRS+.
  • + 1
 xt 11-34 cassette, zee derailuer with a cable spacer, sram x9 shifter, 30t narrow wide... everyone saying a 9 speed isnt enough "range" dont ride with single speed psychos enough...
  • + 0
 This seems like an attractive option to me as both my MTB's are running 28t front rings (28t x 10-42 on a Stache 7 and 28t x 11-36 on a Carbine 26) I don't mind a little spin out on road downhills when going home to have a great gear range off road. The 9t would be the top end gravy there but not all that necessary for me as I've never needed more gear on trails.
  • + 2
 these cassettes get any bigger, next thing we know theres a Plus-size and one that needs an electric motor just to start it !
  • + 3
 All this proves is that the multi front ring setup, is more efficient, just not as sexy as 1x.
  • + 2
 Still rockin the 9 speed XG 999 and managed to covert a x9 type 2 to work with it, loving every minute of it.
  • + 1
 Good honest review! I'm on the Sram cassette right now but might switch it out for this to get an even better gear range. This is very tempting!!!!
  • + 1
 I don't get it — $309USD for a 9-44 when you can get a Shimano XT M8000 11-42 for $80USD. It's almost 4x more expensive for ever-so-slightly more range?
  • + 1
 That's not a slight difference, it's massive. 489% vs 382%
  • + 1
 When is their 7 speed DH cassette with a 9t cog coming out? There was an article about it a few months ago, but still no mention of it on their website.
  • + 1
 soon. very very soon I hear.
  • + 2
 You guys lost me at 309 dollars. I bought the 42t e13 rear gear and that only lasted half a season.
  • + 3
 These aluminum top rings wear out too quick.
  • + 1
 True but you can replace just the aluminum part.....$100 US
  • + 1
 have one of these cassette's in 10 spd (299grams) for sale, brand new fitted once £150 posted

pm me
  • - 1
 When will the madness end?

Instead of making the most unreliable part on a mountain bike more unreliable why don't we just get rid of the most unreliable part on a mountain bike? Because of a half pound or so.
  • + 16
 Tires are the most unreliable part on a bike.
  • + 16
 Would a specialized demo with a gearbox satisfy your thirst?
  • + 2
 Tires are more unreliable but that is a problem without an easy solution. There is an easy solution to derailleurs but we are weight weenies and traditionalists.
  • + 3
 Here we go again with the gearboxes.
  • + 5
 @Protour: I don't see having to buy a new bike as an easy solution.
  • + 3
 @jasdo: I'm pretty sure that honour goes to the Rockshox Reverb.
  • + 0
 @SubMarined: Funny because I've actually warrantied a reverb in the last year, but I've killed about 4 tires too.
  • + 3
 @Protour: I don't think gearboxes are an easy solution either. I get what you're saying; what other off-road vehicle has its transmission open to the elements, unsprung, and hanging off the rear wheel? However, gearboxes that have to use meshing gears can't shift under load and aren't as efficient as a chain system. Until some brilliant engineer can solve the efficiency problem and riders learn to back off on the power during shifts gearboxes aren't going anywhere.
  • + 1
 @Protour: Okay so you are going to convience a xc racer to add a pound of weight to their bike when the current system is not horrible???
  • + 2
 @protour Sram came out with a gearbox to replace a derailleur back around 2009. It was called the Hammerschmidt, and after about two years, nobody bought them anymore.
  • + 0
 @m-t-g:

That was a two speed system to compliment the unreliable rear derailleurs I am speaking of. As long as we have rear derailleurs a mountain bike drivetrain cannot be considered reliable. Nobody can debate that effectively.
  • + 1
 @Protour: I have only snapped 1 rear mech in 15 years of regular riding, that was due to a stick getting caught in the drivechain. Apart from that 99.9% of the time when I push the trigger on my handlebar my mech changes gear. I consider that to be reliable.
  • + 1
 @metaam: I've generally has good luck with them but had x9 derailleurs blow out on me this year after a Zee blew up last year. Both for no apparent reason, honestly just riding along and one happened on a climb.

That fact that a stick took out your drivetrain only highlights how unreliable and poorly designed traditional mountain bike drivetrains are. Virtually all the broken chains in DH racing are the result of the failed derailleurs system. BMX racers rarely have issues with their 1 speed drivetrain.

This isn't even a debate, it's an indictment of the failure of both Shimano and SRAM, and these retarded extended cogs only make the crap more unreliable.
  • + 1
 @Protour: Fair enough, maybe I have just been lucky, I've had more problems over the years with brake sets suffering from premature wear and tear than mechs, I guess we all make our judgements based on our own experience. Out of interest have you ever ridden a gearbox bike? I haven't even ever seen one in the flesh so I can't comment on their pros and cons.
  • + 1
 @metaam: I haven't but look forward to it. Hopefully Zeroed keeps improving the idea.
  • + 0
 1x10 34t - 11-40t cheap as you like and man up when it gets steep i'd rather spend my money elsewhere like on unnecessary bling for my dh bike or beer for that matter
  • + 1
 Thanks Mike! Think I'll pass.
  • + 2
 too much
  • + 1
 expecting
  • + 1
 9 Love
  • + 0
 next will be as big as your rotor.
  • - 1
 www.jensonusa.com/Shimano-M770-XT-9-Speed-Cassette

That and 2 rings on the front

75% the cost
  • + 12
 Right, so then you have no clutch, a front derailleur, and a front shifter. If you don't want to pay for better stuff, then just don't...
  • + 5
 @p0g0: I run a 1x 9spd
No clutch and it works just fine with a wolftooth.
  • + 1
 @bubbrubb: fine if you have no hills
  • + 1
 @p0g0: I do just fine without spending 75 % more .
  • + 0
 Finally, a review I can get my teeth into
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