e*thirteen TRS Race Carbon Wheels - Review

Mar 7, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  
E13 TRS carbon race wheels review


As the name implies, e*thirteen's TRS Race Carbon wheelset was designed with enduro racing in mind, specifically, the punishing conditions found on the Enduro World Series circuit, where competitors are required to use the same wheels for the entire race weekend. A damaged rim can dash any hopes of a spot on the podium, which is why e*thirteen spent two years experimenting with different designs before settling on a hookless rim with a 27mm internal width, which should provide plenty of support for tires 2.3” and wider.

TRS Race Carbon Details

• Size: 27.5" (29" option available)
• Intended use: all-mountain, enduro race
• Internal width: 27mm
• Rim material: carbon fiber
• 28 triple butted spokes
• Weight:1773 grams; Front: 822 grams, Rear: 951 grams (with tape and valve stems)
• MSRP: $1698 USD
www.bythehive.com
With rim tape and tubeless valve stems installed, the TRS Race Carbon wheels weigh in at 1773 grams, and retail for $1698 USD. There's also a 29” version of the TRS Race Carbon wheels, and both sizes are available for either 12x142mm or Boost 12x148 hubs. There's a two-year warranty against manufacturer's defects, and $299 will get you a complete new front or rear wheel in the event it's damaged in a crash.


E13 TRS carbon race wheels review
e*thirteen's hubs use a carbon tube that's bonded to tall aluminum flanges.
E13 TRS carbon race wheels review
The hookless carbon rim has an internal width of 27mm and comes pre-taped for easy tubeless setup.


Construction

It's no secret that wide rims are back, a resurgence spurred on by the realization that the extra width makes it possible to run lower air pressures without worrying about burping or ripping a tubeless tire off the rim. The TRS Race's internal rim width of 27mm isn't the widest on the market, but it also allows riders to run a wider range of tire widths; once internal rim dimensions reach 35mm or so certain tread profiles can becoming overly square and create odd handling on the trail.

The carbon fiber rims use a hookless sidewall profile, a design that's become an increasingly common feature. In addition to being easier to manufacture, a hookless rim provides greater impact resistance, since the carbon's thickness remains consistent from the rim bed to the outer edge of the rim. 28 triple-butted spokes are laced to e*thirteen's distinctive hubs, which use a carbon shell that's bonded to tall aluminum flanges. Those tall flanges allow for the use of shorter spokes, and improve the angle between the spokes and rim, which in theory should create a stiffer wheel. Three double-toothed pawls ratchet against the rear hub shell's 60 teeth, creating a quick 6 degrees between engagement points.

E13 TRS carbon race wheels review
60 teeth give a quick 6 degrees between engagement points
E13 TRS carbon race wheels review
The driver body uses three double-toothed pawls.


Performance

Tire installation with the TRS Race wheels was completely hassle-free – the tires fit snugly on the rims, but not tight enough to require any straining or cursing to get them in place, and a few pumps with a floor pump was all it took to get everything seated and sealed.

A large part of the test period was spent aboard e*thirteen's new tires that were specifically created with wide rims in mind. A full review is in the works, but so far results have been extremely promising, especially in wet conditions. There's also the fact that the tires' sidewall graphics line up with the stickers on the wheels, a small detail, but one that makes for an eye-catching setup.
E13 TRS carbon race wheels review
e*thirteen's new tires have sidewall graphics to match their rims.

Given my continued mixed results with carbon rim durability, I was curious to see if the TRS Race wheelset could they hold up to a winter's worth of thrashing on steep, technical trails. The answer? A resounding 'yes'. The on-trail feel is excellent – there's plenty of lateral stiffness, but without any of the wooden-feeling harshness that plagues some of the other high-end offerings out there. Mounted up with 2.3" tires they provided an incredibly smooth ride, taking the edge of the high-frequency trail chatter that can lead to tired hands and forearms. I didn't hold back during my time on these wheels either, pushing them through piles of roots, slapping them into corners, plummeting off drops, and I still haven't had to touch them with a truing wrench.

When the time does come to true them, there's no need to remove the tire to get to the spokes, something that anyone who has had to dismantle a tubeless setup just to get to one nipple will appreciate. The hub engagement was quick and positive, and other than one odd 'pop' that occurred on a steep uphill, they haven't emitted any more strange noises, just the moderately loud 'click-click-click' of the pawls ratcheting body while coasting. The bearings are still spinning smoothly, and are free of any side-to-side play. I did notice a little extra drag from the seal that sits behind the freehub body after my first handful of rides, but applying a light oil around the seal's perimeter fixed this and I didn't have any further issues.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThere are more options than ever when it comes to carbon wheels, but they're not all created equal. The TRS Race Carbon wheels are deserving of a spot near the head of the pack, striking an ideal balance between stiffness, weight, and on-trail feel. They're light enough to race on the weekend, and durable enough to use the other five days of the week. - Mike Kazimer



Visit the high-res gallery for more images.




139 Comments

  • + 176
 the matching sidewall graphics makes me extremely satisfied
  • + 41
 Satisfies OCDs
  • + 31
 You will forever be an E*thirteen customer because of this feature. Talk about good marketing.
  • + 11
 i purposely dont match them up on my bikes .
  • + 11
 @driftmonster just to annoy OCD types? Lol
  • + 23
 The screen print and stickers add weight . So if the sticker is at the 12 o'clock position and the screen print is in the same spot the wheel will be off balance . So I put them opposite of each other for counter balance
  • + 8
 Didn't see that one coming. But if you really cared that much about weight would you run these in the first place?
  • + 0
 Yup, completely unrequired, but very cool looking
  • + 16
 If your worried about sticker weight I can see you staring at that valve stem in desperation.
  • + 18
 He just spaced out 4 valve stems evenly around the rim.
  • + 4
 I need more pictures of that wheel+tire combo please!!! Maybe mounted on a bike with both wheels aligned Smile
  • + 2
 I think every self respecting bike mechanic lines the logos up. It's a good idea by the MKTing department.
  • + 3
 Anti-OCD is also OCD!
  • + 42
 1773g/$1698...NOPE!!!!..Fail
  • + 40
 It's 75$ cheaper then expected?
  • + 44
 Aluminum weight at a carbon price Wink
  • + 9
 But remember it comes with the tubeless set up already installed so that adds weight, hence the 1773g
  • + 17
 It's not all about the weight. Carbon rims are stronger and stiffer than aluminium which, according to the first paragraph was the design brief.
  • + 14
 Hard to beat light bicycle in this calculation. And a mystery to me why anyone would go down any other path.
  • + 20
 Specialized Carbon Fatties are wider, lighter, and cheaper at $1,150. The rear hub uses DT Swiss 350 internals with 54t ratchet free hub, which is about the same engagement. These e*thirteen seem overpriced, narrow, and heavy.
  • + 16
 These are way stiffer and when you have to spend another $1,150 because you destroyed the cheap Specialized carbon wheels, you'll be even more bummed out.
  • + 27
 OR use those dt 350 hubs which are cheap but GREAT quality, then get some nice, beautiful, tested and proven, pro favorite, EX471's from DT swiss, save about 1k from the e 13 build, about the same weight, only 2mm thinner internally, and just an overall better wheel. Plus Alu will make you grow hair on your chest
  • + 2
 @littlejoker probably no more bummed out than when your E13 hubs repeatedly fall apart, because they are junk Smile
  • + 7
 Been running their hubs for a few years, no issues if you know how to properly maintain your bike. You can find small issues with any hub on the market, these have been super reliable and the bearings are great.
  • + 2
 or save even more cash and throw a pair of these on at 1663g and £600
www.superstarcomponents.com/en/am-carbon-wheelset.htm
  • + 2
 @HobNob I second that. My mate's hubs were recently turned into spaghetti. Have to mention that E Thirteen just sent him a new hub without any questions. No picture evidence or anything of the likes needed. Wish they would sort the hubs since the rims seem spot on.
  • + 7
 I just bought a new wheelset and did the whole "what rim and hub combination?" thing. I started out at sets around the 1000 mark and in the end the best combination for weight, strength and performance set me back 400 quid (pro4's on easton arc30's).

The simple truth is i just dont know how anybody can justify spending this much money on wheels when you can get a top quality set of hubs laced to a top quality rim, at a similar weight and by all accounts strength at nearly a third of the price. but obviously its yo money and yo choice
  • - 4
flag bekahn (Mar 8, 2016 at 5:46) (Below Threshold)
 Not only are the roval wheels better from the get go (wider, lighter, cheaper, superior hubs), specialized warranty is excellent. You can break any rim or have any hub malfunction. DT hubs are so simple to work on, and specialized will have your back if there is an issue. In my mind, roval are always to the way to go.
  • + 3
 But they are Specialized. I will never support that company.
  • + 1
 Specialized dropped the price on the old 30mm ID fatties. The new 38mm ID are still $1500.

They are still specing the 30mm rims on all of their 6fattie bikes.
  • + 5
 Some data from my Roval experience: The rear wheel of my Roval Fattie Alloys lasted exactly 16 months and 1500 miles before the tension has become so off that it needs to be rebuilt. Thin road spokes contribute greatly to this. There are 2 minor "dings" in them which I take responsibility for but I don't do big jumps though I ride through rock-gardens (you know mountain biking). The poor tolerances of the XD Driver result in a wheel that creaks under full loads. I thought it was just me then we bought my wife a Stumpjumper and the nipples (he he) on her Roval 29'ers disintegrated after just a few months. They covered the rebuild...but with brass.

I know the Carbons have a better hub and a carbon rim but I would never purchase another Roval product as a result of these issues. My Specialized LBS doesn't even recommend I rebuild the wheel as stock due to the hub failures they've been seeing.

The next wheel-set will weigh roughly the same as the ones above, will cost $700 and will be as follows: DT 350 hub, new DT XM481 rims (30mm internal) with TBD DT spokes. If you ride aggressively Rims are a disposable item and I can't imagine buying another factory built set let alone a $500-$700 rim.
  • + 2
 There is only one thing that carbon rims fear more than rocks: Ex471 rims Big Grin
  • + 2
 @ryan83 I feel you on the spokes. Half the reason I build my own wheels these days is because every factory wheelset either uses something like an DT Alpine that you can't trust on MTB unless you're a featherweight, or they go all the way to DT Champion level to cut costs. DT Competition is the way to go for most riders, & yet, getting a factory wheelset using a simple double-butted spoke is like pulling teeth.
  • + 1
 Dessert spoons make em sweat
  • + 10
 @polymathic, the Specialized Roval wheels have a retail price of $1500 - they're currently on sale for $1150, but it's not an apples to apples comparison to mention a sale price vs. a retail price. I do agree that they're an excellent option - my experience on the Roval Fatties was overwhelmingly positive, but don't forget they have a 240 lb weight limit, and a lower spoke count in the front, which may deter some riders. As far as a 27mm inner rim width being 'narrow', I'd have to disagree with you there. That number may not be radically pushing the limits, but this also isn't a 27+ rim we're talking about here.
  • + 3
 @groghunter - I think you mean DT Rev, not DT Alpine... Alpine are are beefy spokes for tandems.
  • + 5
 I don't think I can find any issue with a 350 hub. And if I find one, I take my wheel off AND WITHOUT TOOLS can inspect the hub, grease it, adjust it (requires tools) put it back together and ride again. 350's are great hubs, pretty bomb proof. The only problem is: not the highest engagement, but unless you're into XC it isn't a problem. Then there is the weight, it'd meh, also its not loud, for you weirdos who like riding with chainsaw hubs
  • + 1
 @Alias530 that or the Aero, but you're right, I did use the wrong spoke name. comes from the fact I buy Wheelsmith 90% of the time, because they usually beat DT on price.
  • + 1
 @sewer-rat kind of hard for an American to get those..
  • + 1
 @therealtylerdurden

Don't sweat it. They're shite.
  • + 1
 @gabriel -mission9 Wotsupwirum?
  • + 2
 Poor tolerance hubs means bearings don't last long. Cheap chinese rims no better than light bicycle, if even that good. dodgy wheelbuilds. And thats if you are lucky enough to get a set that actually come specced as advertised.
  • + 1
 Ah ok.just curious as I've often looked at them and then decided against a purchase.did you personally have a crap experience with them?
  • + 2
 I used to work in a bike shop. I have had many crap experiences with many superstar products. Also once mentioned one of these crap experiences to someone who worked at superstar (when a wheelset arrived not specced as advertised) and basically got told to go f*ck myself. Who knows, maybe they are better than they used to be, but in my head, superstar buy some cheap chinese shite, paint it pretty colours, then sell it for 5 times what its worth. And it still comes out cheap, which ought to tell you something....
  • + 2
 Understood.ive had bits and bobs off them,chainring,guides etc and seemed a little crude,but perfectly workable.evo hubs also run pretty well if you swiap the bearings out for ceramics.i think what put me off the carbon wheels is the price,as crazy as that sounds as I've got older and wiser,I'm thinking under the ethos "buy cheap buy twice". These mainstream makers rims are more costly for a reason,quality costs.
  • + 1
 The DT 350's come standard with an 18t ratchet. The SL's have 54 teeth. The 54t upgrade for almost all DT hubs is about $95.
  • + 1
 That's is the same wheelset I am looking to have built. How do you like them?
  • + 8
 I disagree these wheels are heavy. They could be lighter (and less expensive), but they are not heavy. Per DT Swiss spokes calculator - a wheelset with Derby 27.5 rims (granted 35mm internal width) and either DT 350 or Hope hubs, Supercomp spokes and brass nipples . . . would be 1790 - 1800g. Built yourself, this would cost ~$1200 - $1400.
Just one data point. For sure you can go less expensive (Light Bicycle rims), or lighter (Am Classic hubs, Revolution spokes).

I use 29mm internal width rims and on some tires (Muddy Mary) the profile is too square which I don't like - slower rolling and very edgy behavior looses grip if leaned over too far.

@ Mike Kazimer - what are the details behind "quad butted spokes"?
  • + 7
 I will take the previous carbon trs+ for $699 set, with the awesome graphics in 26" please.
26" still rules in my 5'7" world.
Hey Midgets got to have fun too MOFOS!
  • + 6
 6'2 here and proud to be shredding 26" on both my mtbs. It just doesn't make sense to replace your wheels, fork and frame just to gain less than 0,5% in lap times on Strava. Changing your tyre pressure makes more difference than that.


29ers do make sense though for certain situations.
  • + 8
 Only 1700usd....what a deal!!
  • + 31
 What is that nowadays? $3003.97 CDN?
  • + 15
 It's ridiculous isn't it. If I told my dad you can spend a thousand pounds on a pair of wheels, not including tyres or cassette... I'm going to do it to see what he says actually!
  • + 22
 Wear your dh armor when you do it.
  • + 20
 @jaame: If you're as old as your profile says you are, you'll have to explain to him what a wheel is first
  • + 2
 Better still, call him on his phone to tell him
  • + 3
 He hasn't got a phone. I'll have to call my mum and ask to speak to him.
  • - 8
flag davidsimons (Mar 8, 2016 at 4:58) (Below Threshold)
 OK @jaame, enjoy those £1,000 carbon wheels when your Dad pops for them. I pray to god they don't break first ride out...
  • + 10
 Wow there are still people out there who think carbon is a weak material? They must have been living under a rock the last decade Smile
  • + 2
 Ribbett....ribbett..
  • + 1
 It's gribbett, not ribbett.
  • + 2
 @squinyfox never been gribbett..go and have a word with yourself.
  • + 1
 Seriously?! My primary school teacher has got a lot to answer for then..
  • + 5
 "... the tires fit snugly on the rims, but not tight enough to require any straining or cursing to get them in place, ..."

Next time I hear someone cursing I know what it is for. "Having trouble fitting your rubber, mate?"
  • + 6
 Oh that tire label matchy matchy action. If they didn't line up perfectly it would upset my extremely odd OCD. Nope.
  • + 3
 Does anyone else think mountain biking has become to much of a fashion show, what with color coded grips, cables, rim logos? And, as for all the 'clothing lines'
  • + 0
 For sure DavidSimons! I always take all the stickers off my bikes and prefer black or raw parts over all these glow-in-the-dark-parrots you see everywhere nowadays. It seems like there's a competition going on between cycling companies who can put the most non-matching bright colors on one bike.
  • + 2
 davidsimons, yeah, fuck making things look good.
  • + 1
 @davidsimons Purple ano from the the early 90's would like a word about MTB having "become" a fashion show. We've always wanted our bikes to look cool, it's just that we can actually get things in color, that we couldn't in the 90s. Hell, I remember how neat everyone thought it was when you started being able to get drivetrain components in black...
  • + 1
 @davidsimons
So much agreement.
  • + 4
 No 26? That's a shame, another manufacturer I won't be supporting in the future. Not everyone is in the 650, 27.5, 29er hype machine!
  • + 5
 These are sick but I miss the old rim decals
  • + 1
 Labeling is characteristic, vacuum tire design in this series of products have very to the popularity of application, the overall average comments, give prize place is the retail price of $1698 USD, is the world's manufacturing center base factory price about five times (such as www.icarbonwheels.com/p/18.shtml and www.carbonwheelfactory.com/cheap-carbon-wheels_sp, many top carbon fiber bicycle wheel manufacturers have foreign quotation, you can compare.
  • + 4
 heavy carbon for the win, don't like super light carbon. Just no 26" so I'm out.
  • + 1
 these companies with carbon products need to start standing behind their products, unless you can offer quality lasting warranty i see no point in investing in a product that, on current trends, breaks more than metals and alloys.
  • + 4
 I think the price is fair. My i9 alloy wheels weren't far from it...
  • + 1
 Mavic 74 something something rims dt Swiss competition spikes and hope evo 2 15mm hubs. £350 crc. Ok they are 26" but best bike investment ever and are alu. 1770!? More than my mondy is worth! Pfffft.
  • + 3
 They are all over priced for some plastic wheels and a three pawl set up is old and out dated.
  • + 0
 Oh boy, carbon rims (breakable) with E*thirteen warranty support (non-existent). But wait, there's more...they're charging an arm and a leg for them on top of it! What a deal!!
  • + 1
 Wow... heavy, expensive, AND kind of narrow narrow. Fail.

Roval Fattie SL, 1,530g, 30mm wide (internal), and $1,150 is par for the course.
  • + 0
 Just got me Basset racing Indy car rims for my toy Cobra. 350 $ for a set of really wide wheels. 4 superwide Mickey Thompson tires 900 $. Maintaining a supercar is cheaper than biking. Dam - I do both....
  • + 1
 Tall flanges on a 3 cross wheel has negligible effect on spoke length, it simply creates more of an angle the spokes take from flange to rim.
  • + 2
 And that is a main advantage of tall flanges. In order to create a laterally stiffer wheel, it is a "simple" alternative to the larger flange distance of wider hubs. By "simple" I mean something that doesn't require a new standard Smile . There are other cases where a wider hub makes sense (like getting a proper chainline when you run very wide tyres) but I don't think wheel stiffness is necessarily one of them.
  • + 2
 Will the rear hub have the reliability of a potato? And by that I mean a really rubbish potato.
  • + 25
 To be fair, if you judge a potato purely as a potato, it should be pretty reliable. If you're trying to use one as a rear hub, I can see why you might be having problems...
  • + 1
 in all seriousness, i feel like i have heard reports of reliability being a problem on e*thirteen stuff. is this still true?
  • - 1
 Well the 2014/2015 TRS+ wheels were absolutely terrible. They may have sorted the issues out now but Ill never buy wheels from them again. Most UK buyers of the early Capra's have some torrid tales to tell about them.Stick to manufacturing chainguides please e13.
  • + 1
 I would buy Mavic enduro crossmax instead. They are about the same weight and years have proven how sturdy they are. The french have the upper hand????.
  • + 2
 The non race Carbons TRS+ are $699 per set, and are for AM, enduro. Looks better, to me, as well.
  • + 4
 so much envy..
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer how does this compare to am classic carbonator? Any opinion? Thanks.
  • + 3
 A dollar for every gram.
  • + 1
 My thought exactly
  • + 1
 Glad that's not the case on my 16kg bike
  • + 2
 How about we fix that link to bythehive.com
  • + 1
 Skin rashes, the struggle is real
  • + 3
 Light Bicycle ftw!
  • + 3
 No 26? Bullshit.
  • + 4
 get used to it...realistically 559 is dead.
  • + 8
 It only dies if u let it.
  • - 6
flag immacaroni (Mar 7, 2016 at 21:44) (Below Threshold)
 559 is soulless....
  • + 4
 Haha nice one .
  • + 2
 f*ckin ginger wheels man.....they have no traction, no soul, and they dont roll for shit. If you have 26" wheels you cant be as fast as the worlds fastest racers. come on man! jump on the band wagon wheels!
  • + 9
 26" still rules in my 5'7" world.
Hey Midgets got to have fun too MOFOS!
  • + 9
 fuck im drunk. excuse my rants
  • + 3
 thats what she said!
  • + 6
 The result of BikeRadars test are that 27" is slower than 26". Some other people in the industry say 27" is faster than 26", but none of them have proved the difference is more than 0,5% (most claims are even less than that).

Thereby, if you're not a pro racer aiming to get on that podium at the World Cup races you ride, but you're just a dude who rides for his passion for bikes and not to win, you must be really stupid to buy a new wheel set, new tyres, new fork and new frame, just for that less than 0,5% advantage. That is a very expensive joke for nearly no gains. Individual things that will make more difference on your lap times are: tyre pressure, tyre choice, geometry, stiffness, suspension settings, tyre width, brake power for last moment braking, etc.

Yes, I call it 650b 27". Why? Because it's not the middle size that the industry claims it to be and that the name makes it sound like. It is exactly 25mm / 1" bigger than 26", and nearly 2" smaller than 29". Thereby 27" is the accurate term that shows how big the wheel actually is, without all the marketing BS around it.

PS: I understand it if people go 27.5" if they buy a new complete, since there's hardly any choice of 26" completes anymore. But to spend thousands of euros purely to switch to that new wheel size doesn't make any sense.

Also 26" will never die: it will become niche. Street-, skatepark-, dirt jump- and slopestyle bikes need the short chain stays that 26" has to offer, as well as smaller wheels are easier to throw around. This is why 26" will stay the standard with freestyle and freeride mountainbiking.
  • + 0
 I am going back to 24" on my PT bike. 2-4 for life.
  • + 0
 GET OFF MY DAMN LAWN!
  • + 1
 This design buys me a lot. But not the price.
  • - 1
 Can we stop reviewing 1500+$ wheelsets? At that price point they'd better perform exactly as the specs suggest. Most of us can't justify them anyway.
  • + 1
 About twice what they ought to cost.
  • + 2
 Based on your thorough research of the subject? I guess you could design, build and sell carbon wheels from scratch, for less?

When you consider they're $1000 less than a pair of Enve wheels, that seems pretty reasonable for a high-quality carbon wheelset.
I'm not gonna buy em, as I don't have a problem with my current wheels/alloy wheels in general. If I was in the market for a proper high-end set though, these would be top of my list.
  • + 4
 Alloy weight deserves alloy prices. They're nothing exceptional, you can get better quality for less money right now. Comparing them to the most overpriced product in mountain biking in Enve doesn't change that reality. They're a waste of money at their current price.
  • + 3
 It's not all about weight though, is it? Carbon brings an incredible stiffness (*blushes*) that alloy rims just can't match. If that's high on your priority list, then these represent pretty decent value. The fact is they're significantly less expensive than all of their competitors, and will carry a pretty decent guarantee, with e*13 being one of the best in the industry for no-questions-asked replacement.

I'm curious how you've arrived at the conclusion that all this stuff is "overpriced" though. Expensive, yes, but overpriced... perhaps not. Do you have any idea of the R&D and production costs involved in creating this kind of product? It's crazy high. I don't know how many pairs of these wheels they'll have to sell before they start making any money on em, but I bet it's in the thousands (if not tens of thousands)

Top end stuff is always expensive. Always has been, and always will be. It's not in everyone's price-range (including my own) but there's no reason to be pissy about it. Ferraris are expensive, and most people can't afford them either... Clearly there's a market for this stuff though, and plenty of people see the value in it, otherwise they wouldn't bother making any!
  • + 1
 Nowhere did I say "all this stuff" is overpriced... I just said these wheels are overpriced. You can get better wheels, cheaper. It's that simple. These are not competitively priced, they're overpriced because people like you blindly buy the hype of the brand and throw money at it. I've seen lighter carbon wheels of equal or better quality for $1000-1200... you can come in even below that if you want to sacrifice weight and get wheels of similar weight to these instead of lighter. But, because ethirteen, people think "omg,so worth it". Sorry buddy, I'll gladly spend money but I won't waste it.
  • - 1
 @speedfreek

RD surely costs a fortune.
But only having spent that on RD does not by default mean the resulted product is great.
In my experience e13 wheelsets are not worth 30% of the asking price.
I have the TRS plus alu enduro version. The hubs are a piece of poor design and manufacturing.
The rear is heavy as hell. Sealing is poor. Rear develops play very easy, and I cannot get rid of the play entirely.
Front hub drags very much. Rear hub is very very loud.
No issues however with the rims. But a wheelset is to be judged as a whole.
e13 wheels do simply not bring the quality or reliability of other similarly priced sets.
Yes I agree customer service may be good (had some parts replaced for free), but I would any day, for less money, have a set running on DT hubs+any strong alu rim.
  • + 3
 R&D? What R&D? Making a carbon wheel isn't exactly a new science anymore. They got an off the shelf carbon wheel from China. They also took the path of least resistance, going extra heavy with a carbon wheel to achieve stiffness. Lots of R&D there to achieve the same weight as aluminum, with a slight increase in stiffness. Theres a reason why the high-end carbon wheels cost what they do. If you're going to go carbon, you need to pay to get something decent.
  • + 0
 @SlodownU

Wow, you are way off the mark.

Find me the Chinese catalogue which shows the wheel that E13 have allegedly taken "off the shelf" and I will eat my hat.

Fwiw, I've had e13 wheels before (trs alloy) which were ace, and I would gladly buy from them again.
  • + 0
 @speedfreek

We get it, you're an ethirteen fanboy... move on. Waste your money if you want but discerning consumers are smart enough to not be sold on labels alone.
  • + 0
 Porky! Enter the age of the 30+ pounds mountain bike! And they call it progress.
  • + 0
 No has mentioned 28 spoke build. I just don't see that as worth the big bucks. Build is too light for the average rider.
  • - 1
 Roval Traverse SL 650b are on sale for $1,150.00 and they have DT Swiss internals.
Lighter too.
  • + 1
 Where?
  • + 0
 specialized.com
  • + 6
 @pcloadletter: that's exactly the problem
  • + 0
 Wait this one out. Carbon is pricey, but this is mind-boggling cost.
  • - 1
 so yeah, follow the link to www.bythehive.com and learn all about skin rashes n shit.....
  • + 1
 Bee stings are serious business... The link should work now.
  • - 2
 When you can buy a new motorbike for the price of a wheelset its getting a bit crazy
  • + 12
 Show me this moto. I bet it's shite
  • + 5
 My little suzuki learner bike was $1500 new. No doubt it wasn't flash but it was reliable came with 2 wheels handle bars an (engine) suspension tyres breaks etc etc etc and Suzuki could put that all together for less than the cost of 2 hoops some spokes and 2 hubs and I sold it for 1300 after a year and a half.
  • + 2
 @multialxndr For quite some time, bicycles and bike parts have been majorly over-priced. Don't get me wrong, I'm a really big bike guy, but when my dad's motocross bike costed him less than a DH bike, there's a serious issue. A motorcycle will take you places that a bike will never go, and it will go there at mind- boggling speeds versus something that you have to pedal. I might get neg propped for this comment, but it's true.
  • + 0
 pillar spokes?
  • - 3
 Make them 21mm internal and I'd consider it. There's not many options for us non-wide rim converts.
  • + 4
 i was perfectly happy with 21mm rims until i rode some 27's and stopped tearing tyres off the rim, as well as getting better grip. it's not just hype
  • + 1
 I've currently got a set of 25mm wheels and another set of 21mm and I find the 21s to have more grip as it spreads the tyre tread apart more. The knobs on the wide rims just seem to skip over the ground instead of digging in. I also have to run the same psi on both sets which surprised me after reading the hype.
  • + 2
 The fact is, your tyre profile hardly changes at all going from 21mm internal to 27mm. I know, I know, its the biggest thing in the industry right now, but I like to be informed, so I did some experimenting.

I got the two most different width rims I could lay my hands on. One 19mm internal, one 30mm. I fitted the biggest tyre I could lay my hands on to both (a 2.5" Schwalbe Muddy Mary I had kicking about in the garage) I used the same tyre on both rims to rule out manufacturing deviations, and both times pumped it up to as near as dammit 40psi. Total difference in width at the widest point on the tyre? about 2mm wider on the bigger rim. This confused the crap out of me until I worked it out. the circumference of a circle is 3.14 x the diameter. Add 6mm to the circumference, and according to my maths you add 1.9mm to the diameter. This backed up my measuring almost perfectly. So there you go. Rim width has basically no effect on tyre profile unless you go for something crazy like 40mm internal.

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