e*thirteen's TRS Race 9-46 Tooth Cassette Now Available

Dec 7, 2016
by Mike Kazimer  
e thirteen TRSr cassette

e*thirteen's TRS Race 11-speed cassette, which we first spotted at this year's Eurobike trade show, is now in full production and available for purchase. The follow up act to their 9-44 tooth TRS+ cassette, the TRSr boasts a massive 511% gear range thanks to its 9-46 tooth spread. For comparison, SRAM's 12-speed Eagle drivetrain has a 500% range, and Shimano's 11-speed 11-46 cassette creates a 418% range.

There's no shortage of drivetrain expansion accessories these days, but the TRSr is certainly an intriguing option, especially since it works with existing 11-speed drivetrain components - there's no derailleur modification necessary to get it up and running.
TRS Race Cassette Details:

• 11 speed, 9-46 tooth spread
• 511% gear range
• Tooth count: 9-10-12-14-17-20-24-28-33-39-46
• XD driver body required
• Weight: 307 grams (actual)
• MSRP: $349 USD
• Contact: • www.bythehive.com / @ethirteen-components



e thirteen TRSr cassette
The TRSr cassette is comprised of eight steel cogs and three aluminum ones.
e thirteen TRSr cassette
The aluminum cogs are held onto an XD driver by a lock ring, and the cluster of steel cogs is rotated and locked into place with a chain whip.


Even with its extra-wide range, the cassette still weighs in at only 307 grams, which is lighter than both Shimano and SRAM's highest end offerings. The cassette uses a two piece design - the eight smaller cogs are constructed from steel, and the largest three are aluminum. Each piece is available separately, allowing riders to avoid shelling out the cassette's entire $349 asking price when they need to replace either their climbing or descending gears.

We're only just started to put in the miles on the TRSr - stay tuned for our final verdict once we use and abuse it over the course of a wet and muddy winter.



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171 Comments

  • + 62
 Upgraded my drivetrain to XT a couple of years back (cranks, bb, cassette, derailleurs, shifters) for roughly $430. There's no way in hell I'd drop damn near $400 on a cassette alone! Simply outrageous.
  • + 15
 Yep, that's a lot of money. Wonder why it should cost so much?
  • + 31
 @john260164: Unfortunately, it's because they know there are people out there who will pay that much.
  • + 19
 Can I please pay $380 for something that gets covered in crap and wears out in a year?

I think I will stick with a £60 Sunrace 10 speed cassette and push up the really big hills, or freewheel down when I run out of gears.
  • + 41
 or even better stick with the single speed set up I have just put on my bike and eat more tins of "HARDEN THE F**K UP"
  • + 15
 If you compare it to switching to an Eagle drivetrain it makes sense or even replacing a higher level sram 11spd cassette. Otherwise I agree, it's pricey, def. not for the budget crowd...
  • + 6
 thats what i always ask about sports cars! why are they $100k+ when theyre made of the same stuff that cheap cars are made of. its ridiculous=/
  • + 7
 $380 is too much for a wear and tear part,what is wrong with this industry.
  • - 5
flag Kramz (Dec 7, 2016 at 7:33) (Below Threshold)
 @fartymarty: As a teen, the more I biked, the less dependant I was on gears. If a hill was too steep, you couldn't ride up it with or without them, acceleration wise on flat ground gears actually are a hindrance up to a certain speed due to the lag caused by overspinning+shifting tons. So essentially I found it (and ironically) easier not to have them. If you were doing long distance treks over normal hills they're ideal, or up winding ascents, but in many cases, where I live, and the riding I was doing, they were more cumbersome than helpful.
  • + 3
 @fantaman: they are way.more expensive because they are cuted from a block of aluminium and steel. Instead of just doint the cogs and stamping them, probably theu have the same margin% that they have on a normal cassette, but costs way more to produce.

Having said that, i would never spend that much on one, only if i wont the loterry
  • + 7
 You have to pay to play. If you don't mind not playing then sure, don't pay.
  • + 17
 @LRod1018: ordered!! It's worth whatever people are willing to pay and I'm damn willing to pay!! This is going to be an awesome upgrade.
  • - 5
flag Smallbright (Dec 7, 2016 at 9:29) (Below Threshold)
 Shove it up your seat post e*thirteen, that price is ridiculous.
  • + 3
 @fartymarty: A year lol. I'm getting less than six months per XT cassette and there's nothing to suggest this, Sunrace or SRAM options will do any better.
  • + 19
 @alexsin: if you're only getting six months out of a cassette you're either putting a thousand miles a month or you're doing something wrong
  • + 1
 --- Looks at price... closes page.
  • + 4
 @captainspaulding: Agreed. My X1 cassette is toast, and SRAM cassettes are $$$. At least with the E-13 one can replace segments of the cassette rather than toss the whole thing away.

I could buy an XT cassette, but then need to buy a new driver, and the cassette would have less range and be heavier anyway.

Sometimes MTB is just a kick in the nuts.
  • + 2
 @jaydubmah: Yeah, being able to replace what's worn out instead of replacing the whole cassette certainly softens the blow of having to buy an expensive new cassette every year or so, it's more of an investment that will save you money in the future vs buying another planned obsolescence part. having the 9/10T is pretty nice also, gives you that much more range. It doesn't personally make sense for me at the moment, but I def see the benefits.
  • + 4
 @fartymarty: Got my Sunrace 11-42.....Really good for the money and reliable and in 3 parts! and it's got RED on it so it must me good
  • + 3
 @alexsin: How many miles you ride? I have had the same XT cassette for three years and I don't see anything wrong with it.
  • + 2
 @HK-Mazur: you probably get better wear riding your bike in Mesa Arizona than some bloke in Great Britain or the portion of nor cal i live in that is trying to replicate it
  • + 3
 @jaydubmah: Spend a little bit more for the XO1 cassette up front and you can replace just the big ring. I'm assuming that's the part that wore out since it's the only aluminum cog and it has the most torque and side-load on it. I went with the Wolftooth 44T cog and it's shifting great (the little bit of extra gear for steep climbs is nice too). www.wolftoothcomponents.com/collections/cassette-cogs/products/gcx-44t-cog-for-sram-xx1-x01-cassette.

This looks like a good option for a similar price though too. I wonder how much the replacement big cogs are?
  • + 1
 @codypup: True. Cassettes, chains, and brake pads last forever in the desert as long as you wipe them down and lube them (not the brake pads). Tires last a lot longer in your loamy conditions though. We burn through tires like mad in the rocky desert.
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: love you haha #singlespeedforlife
  • + 2
 The price is due to Economy of scale. (A proportionate saving in costs gained by an increased level of production.)

e-13 is a smaller company with a smaller overall sales revenue. It simply cannot compete at the moment with giants like Shimano and SRAM. Even though SRAM does have their own expensive ass cassettes.

I for one would love to have this cassette. The 500+% range and the added weight reduction is a plus in my book.

I run a 36T Chainring up front so I could definitely use the extra high end increase in speed with the 9 tooth cog.

Plus black cassettes are cool Smile
  • + 1
 Ahahahha! Industry is going strong with their PERCENTAGE numbers, just like camera makers with their megapixels.

511% agree with the comments.
... and so glad I still ride 9sp and SS - cost me like 11.82% of what these crazy people are asking for.

Wink
  • + 6
 @kovaldesign: Ride whatever gears you want. Pay whatever price you want.

What you may think is not worth it many others will see value in.
  • + 1
 @Pastafarion: I had my first ride on single speed again today in a few years (20 miles in London traffic). Am loving the simplicity of it and not having to think, just pedal. My right thumb is still trying to phantom shift though.
  • + 2
 @LiquidSpin: wise words.
  • + 2
 I completely understand the price complaint, the entire drivetrain on all my bikes is XT of one generation of another BUT my newest bike is full M8000 with the exception of the 9-44 version of this same cassette. I was going to do a Sunrace cassette but the hubset I wanted to order only had the XD driver version in stock. Since I am highly allergic to SRAM (working in a shop for years does this to some people) I opened my wallet further for this to avoid having to soil my build with SRAM.

The shifting is incredible with a Shimano chain, better than the 11-40 (with Wolf-Tooth 45T expander kit) M8000 cassette I have on another bike. It has been sloppy here in the northeast and with about 400 miles on it I am very impressed with the wear as I was a little concerned with the aluminum cogs. I also haven't experienced creaking yet but I also haven't been washing my bikes as much as I used to. With a 32t up front the range is great and the 9-tooth allows for a smaller front ring while avoiding spinout versus the Shimano 11t minimum. This certainly makes 12-speed seem a little unnecessary.

Again, I understand the issue with the price but if you want a big 1X gear spread without going 12-speed and think shaving 150-300 grams versus another setup option is worth the coin than I would recommend this cassette.
  • - 1
 who only replaces a portion of a cassette? All the gears are bedded in to that chain. New gears won't like the old chain and a new chain won't like the old gears you leave in. Your chain will skip and your knees won't like you.
  • + 18
 I read tooth cunt.. I thought it's the Tooth Fairy slutty cousin...
  • + 9
 Can anyone plz clarify for me: are Shimano/ SRAM/ 3rd party cassettes all interchangeable with a shimano mech and shifter? I'm a shimano guy but looking at new wheels and may go the XD driver route as it seems a little more future proof than the good old shimano freehub. If I can use my shimano gear and throw a SRAM (or eventually a TRS or another third party) cassette on there I may be tempted by an XD hub.
  • + 10
 Yes, I have that on two of my bikes - XTR shifter and derailleur, and XG-1195 cassette. Works flawlessly. The spacing between the SRAM and Shimano 11s cassette is the same.
  • - 1
 I think it depends on the size of your current cassette and generation of derailleur. If you have a standard size cassette and try and replace it with a wide range cassette you may find the derailleur struggles - I think the OneUp kit had a replacement derailleur cage to accommodate their wide range cassette? I'm not saying it can't be done as it can - just be cautious you don't go too big!

However, looking at similar sized cassettes then there is no reason why you can't mix and match. I don't know why you think Sram is more future proof though - it's hardly like Shimano are going anywhere and, by the time you've paid for a new freehub you could be looking at spending an extra £50 for no reason.

Oh, and finally I too have long been a Shimano guy and REALLY wanted Sram for the bike I built up recently, but I could get a full M8000 groupset with brakes for around £400. Sram cost a lot more for a similar level. It was a no brainer in the end, but you should look at costs. Shimano is cheap but high quality. You can get cheap Sram stuff but it is a little higher in cost which mounts up over time. There is a reason Shimano won the value product award here the other day!
  • + 11
 Yeah definitely compatible, but one isn't more "future-proof" than the other. It's mountain biking - nothing is future-proof.
Changing a fundamental fitment standard is the easiest way to force new sales. Nothing is safe!
  • + 3
 @SwintOrSlude: cheers dude, exactly the user feedback I was after. I should have been clear I'm talking solely about 11spd drivetrains here. And by future proof I really just meant that there is a lot more that the third party manufacturers can do with the XD than the shimano freehub. I'm not interested in putting a dinner plate on my rear wheel but the option of smaller cogs does appeal and obviously 11t is as low as you can go with the Shimano.
  • + 2
 @ThomDawson: I also prefer Shimano, particularly in the XT flavor. (though I buck up for the XTR shifter) However, if you want the bigger rear cogs for big mountains, save your money on the XT cassette, keep the standard free hub driver and get yourself a SunRace cassette. Well, do what you like, but I tried it and much prefer the gear spread of the SunRace over the XT. Shifts flawlessly all the way up to 46t.
  • + 0
 @IllestT: He was taking about hubs when he was talking about future proofing.
  • + 3
 @barrysbikes: errr yeah, so was I
  • + 2
 I ride regularly with a guy running a XX1 cassette and XTR shifter and rear mech because he prefers the shift feel of Shimano, but wants the lightest setup possible (benefits of XD interface cassette). Seems to work just fine.
  • + 2
 Good to know, as my SRAM NX mech is failing after less than 70 miles I've been thinking about getting an 11spd XT mech and shifter so good to know It will go straight on.

Not a SRAM fan, I've had no issues with any Shimano product in stark contrast with my SRAM experience where everything works great to start with but soon fails :-(
  • + 3
 I see you already have several helpful replies, but I'll add my experience as well. I've been running the 9-44 version of this cassette with a Shimano XT derailleur and XTR shifter for about 6 months with no issues so far. Aside from adjustments due to break in and cable stretch, it hasn't missed a shift.
  • + 1
 Yes. I run a Sram X01 with XT 11 speed and it works great. I'm thinking about buying this for more range, but $$$.
  • + 1
 @thomdawson

I have an 11 speed xt setup with a sram x1 casette. Also use a sram GX setup with a shimano xt 11s casette.

They're both interchangeable
  • + 2
 @jwjones807: similar to the setup I'm planning on, thanks dude.
  • + 11
 400 dollars.... That's a whole lot of nope.
  • + 11
 400 dollars.... That's a whole lot of dope.
  • + 6
 I feel this is getting silly, do we really need our rear mechs dragging on the ground because people are to incompetent to set up a front mech? The new side shift front mechs are awesome, way rather run that with a steel cassette that'll last more then one season.

These new "modern" drive trains seem like they would be shot after a season
  • + 51
 Now you see the reason why they came up with bigger wheels... So you don't have to drag your rear mech on the ground.
  • + 1
 @karoliusz: ah I get it now, thought the bigger wheels where to make up for the fox front suspension with its great flex and ctd that felt like it was always trying to kill you
  • + 1
 @karoliusz: so I what I think when I see Eagle on a 27.5" wheel
  • + 5
 I'm running XT shifters + an XTR FD with a Race Face Respond crankset (9spd) , never get chainsuck and it shifts great every time. Nothing wrong with a front mech if you set it up right + know how to shift properly (which means not shifting under two tons of load) .
  • + 0
 @boostin: i agree with you in a way that if I needed the range of the Eagle, I'd stick to two ring setup, using my finger as the derailleur...
  • + 6
 Or maybe just grow some legs. A week back on the old one by ten 11-36 and climbing times dropped like a butter side down slice of toast.
  • + 1
 @boostin I agree I run 1x11 on my enduro and 2x10 with side shift FD on my 27,5+ hardtail. I thought I will upgrade it to 1x but the front shift is butter smooth and quick. I have 515% range for "free" and see no reason to upgrade.
  • + 3
 @bosnianrider: yeah it's funny, people say shimano is behind still making front mechs, but I think they are so far ahead, people don't know it yet!
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: never go full Enduro waki
  • + 7
 @Mike Kazimer: is 287g PB's actual, measured weight, or the manuf. claim? I ask since the old E13 9-44s were 320g, so it would be surprising if they managed to both go bigger & save weight.
  • + 3
 @mikekazimer I also want to know please
  • + 4
 @Veloscente, @Travel66: The actual weight is 307 grams (I've updated the article to reflect this). So, not as light as the claimed 287 grams, but it is lighter than their 9-44 cassette, which was 333 grams on our scale. Thanks for catching that.
  • + 19
 @mikekazimer: Does every single manufacturer use the same f*cked up scale?
  • + 5
 @DJ-24: Manufacturers weigh things in special rooms where the pull of gravity is smaller.
  • + 2
 @jaydubmah: Seemingly.
  • + 2
 I bet they excluded the lock ring.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Responsive & on point. Thanks!
  • + 5
 If you have an existing SRAM 1x11 setup but don't have the $$$ to pony up for a full Eagle upgrade, then this cassette would actually be an economical solution to getting into the magic 500% gear range club.

I have an X1 and this looks to be a great replacement for when my cogs need to be replaced.
  • + 5
 For comparison, a SRAM X1 cassette retails at $277 MSRP. The XX1 11-speed cassette is $374 MSRP.

Add in the fact that you also don't need to change your chainring just to get enough gears on the descents, e*thirteen's TRS Race 9-46 Tooth Cassette is clearly a viable replacement/upgrade.

No need to buy a new shifter, derailleur, and chain, but still get a 511% gear range? Sign me up.
  • + 3
 FALSE ADVERTISING!!! Ethirteen claims only in its articles that: "Each piece is available separately, allowing riders to avoid shelling out the cassette's entire asking price" This idea of not having to purchase the entire cassette is the reason i bought mine. But wait! After part of my TRS plus 9 - 44 tooth cassette wore out, I called ethireen to order the steel cassette portion: first 4 cogs. The first 8 cogs are actually screwed together in two pieces. So altogether there are 3 pieces to the cassette. But the price of the first 4 cogs was $260.00. And ethirteen told me they very much do not recommend repacing cogs sections because the other cogs are likely worn out. Ok, i get it but why advertise it? And they don't even really stock these replacement parts. Basically, ethirteen told me to buy the whole cassette again and they strongly recommended not to replace any of the three pieces. Ethirteen needs to stop with this false advertising.
  • + 9
 That's odd - the first four cogs for the 9-44 cassette are currently listed on their website for $39.95, and it even looks like they're in stock.
  • - 3
 @mikekazimer:

yeah...but call them! the price is very different!
  • - 2
 @mikekazimer:

actually what i meant to say was not the first 4 cogs that are very expensive but the second 4 cogs. these two pieces screw together. Ethireen also says that aligning these two cogs by screwing them together is something ehtirteen recommends doing at their factory. And the second sections of cogs is most important because that is usually where the chain line which gets the most wear.
  • + 7
 I'll just stick with my 2x10. Cheap, works and lots of range.
  • + 6
 Those are huge gaps between gears. They should call this cassette "Madonna."
  • + 2
 Hmm, I like that nickname but I'm not sure why.....
  • + 2
 I think people need to look at this as more of a alternative to going to eagle rather than as a simple way to upgrade their drivetrain. This is more inclined for people who want to get in the 500% club, not people who are looking for a quick drivetrain upgrade IMO.
  • + 6
 $380!!!??? Come on, Shimano's 11-46 is maybe $80.
  • + 9
 Which weights a ton, looks like a nightmare and has less range than SRAM 10-42t. Their recent quality is questionable as well. It costs a lot, but it looks like a great alternative for someone considering Eagle.
  • + 7
 @pooceq: I'll take more weight and "questionable quality" as I can still buy almost 5 of them for the same price! People need to give their head a shake on these prices!
  • + 1
 @pooceq: Weighs a ton??? Can you state numbers please?
  • + 1
 @Rider656: 446 grams for xt cassette
  • + 1
 It's nice to see a more affordable option than say SRAM's Eagle. The price of this is steep but this is E*13's top of the line race cassette... they have slightly less expensive versions. I have to assume this one is aimed at those who race or live on a dentists income. Plus if you're paying full retail for bike parts you're not looking around hard enough. Go to active junky.com then click on their link to jenson and you'll end up with 10%-15% off. It'll be nice to see the review and how it holds up to extended use vs. it's price.
  • + 1
 yep another 10 speed xt cassete user here (and some sram as well) can never justify this crazy cost on one extra gear.....if I gave a s#it about 1x11 I would be having a fit over the range a 3 x 10 setup would give me not spending insane money for the sake of a bail out gear. mountainbike marketing is despicable they will tell you absolutely anything is a must have item that will improve your riding and for what.....if your a racer then sure but for the rest of us this is just mental.....I have nice pats on my bikes and spend good money but when you have to work hard for the money I cant be bothered to spend tis kind of money on a cassete that I will replace each year.
  • + 6
 Sunrace 11-46
  • + 1
 I just buy my co-workers "worn out" xt cassettes when he "needs" to replace them... 20 bucks or a few beers usually is all it costs. They haven't been terrible, i must say.
There is a lot of waste on the consumer side of this industry, and people sometimes just dont get what the "wear-life" of components actually are. They'll pass them off as "used up" almost immediately, or at least after the first few races.
That being said.... now, if i can only get him to switch to these black beauties!!!! Bwaaaaahahaha!!!
  • + 4
 We get it. You love your nine speed drivetrain. We don't care.
  • + 1
 If jenson or backcountry had them, they would be ~279 with current %20 off full price item coupon.

Still probably a couple weeks away from other suppliers having them.
  • + 1
 Year 2216... E-14 new cassette 4-104t! Hurrah! Now we can pedal without actual moving! We have been waiting for this since 2016....)))))
  • - 1
 it would be great if the negative whining Pinkbike users kept there comments to themselves. if your not going to use said item; just move on. no need to bellyache....

I'm have been running one of the 10s cassettes since they came out. Nearly no wear, shifts like a dream, and light. on my second chain with this cassette. Will buy another when this wears out. I feel its worth it. ONLY draw back I can point out: can not use KMC sl dlc chains with it; only sram or shimano
  • + 2
 "I feel its worth it."

Remember that you're not allowed to make that decision for yourself...
  • + 1
 Why KMC chain cannot be used ?
  • + 0
 Bigger gear ratios don't add inches to your dick. A nine tooth cog is useless, has poor yield and will wear out quickyl. A 11-46 cassette is more logic, you get a better scaling.
  • + 5
 I understand why smaller tooth cogs would wear quicker under the same use, but I don't think it will wear out quickly because you'll hardly ever be in the 9T cog, and even when you are, you're probably not putting much torque on it since you're almost certainly going downhill.
  • - 1
 If this thing was $100, or even $150, it would be selling like hot cakes. But it's not. Major mistake on E-13s part. I wonder what profit percentage they make off selling just one of these things. No way it costs $400 to produce a few metal cogs.
  • + 2
 nice simile but I'm not sure hot cakes sell any better than cold ones. Agree $100, or £80 would be reasonable
  • + 1
 I've been reading that a 10 tooth cassete ring has 10% more friction with the chain than a 11 tooth. How much more friction will have a 9 tooth?
  • + 2
 30%?... Is this a trick question?
  • + 2
 yeah just curiosity. I like this cassete.
  • + 4
 It's not friction, it's vibration, sometimes referred to as the polygon effect. As the number of teeth decrease, it gets more rough. I was pretty skeptical about this, as it is generally not recommended to use less than 11t in a chain drive system, according to Machinery's Handbook.
However, I've ridden the e13 9-44 cassette, and have spun that 9t down the road back to town after a big ride, specifically paying attention for excessive vibration. It's not an issue, and the extra range is certainly nice. I think these small cogs work on mountain bikes because you're not using it 100% of the time, but when you do, the extra range is worth the hard-to-detect extra vibration.

TL;DR It is not recommended to run machinery on a chain drive with a cog less than 11t, but it works on mountain bikes because the application is different than what the text books are referring to.
  • + 1
 @m-t-g: it's also friction. the Machinery Handbook is a reference (I have it here on my desk), but the details are more involved. for friction, the smaller cog moves the chain links more, bending them more, which increases the amount of time the plates rub, and increasing friction by a small amount.
  • + 1
 @atrokz: I was shure it was friction.
  • + 2
 @mudmandhbrazil: it's both. nptel.ac.in/courses/116102012/32

Just stating that friction and wear does in fact increase when the chain is wrapped more.

From link:
"For space consideration or for very low speeds, sprocket with less number of teeth may be used, by sacrificing the life expectancy of the chain."

9T is a no-no in chain drive design.
  • + 2
 @atrokz:

This is the most important concern about this product. Nobody seems to care because of lack of knowledge about this.
  • + 2
 @atrokz: Ah, good catch. I apparently missed that last time I read that section, but it makes sense. Even with that knowledge, I would recommend trying the 9t before dismissing it. It ultimately doesn't get used very often, but when you're at 10 all the way across the board and looking for that extra push over the cliff, where do you go? You go to the 9t.
  • + 1
 well my main question was how much more friction will have a 9 tooth cog. I didn't say I don't like it or I like it. just wanted to know if some super bike technician expert from PB comments had that number of the friction in the 9 tooth cog just that. If someone want to say that there is no fiction or the friction will not make the rider loose power or anything else it's OK we live in a democratic world.
  • + 1
 @m-t-g: for sure, in this application, the torque is low and the speed is also low in that gear, so it isn't as big an issue as on a constant drive assembly.
  • - 1
 with all these ever increasing cassette ratios it feels like the bike industry is supplying us with an answer to a question we never asked!

even with my weak and feeble legs I can get up 99% of the hills with a simple 1x10 with just a 40t expander cog.
If you really need a 50t (bail out cog) maybe you should look at an e-bike!
  • + 5
 It allows you to run a larger front sprocket.
  • + 2
 Or maybe you live somewhere with real hills.
  • - 1
 @preston67: We have real hills here in PA
  • + 2
 @barrysbikes: Wales has real hills as well, Also it has mountains!
  • + 1
 @Harverto: "Also it has mountains!"

Only in a technical sense: the reality is that we have a VERY liberal definition of "mountain" in the UK.
  • + 2
 @KeithReeder: In the US anything over 300meters is classed as a mountain, where in the UK anything over 600 meters is classed as a mountain!

I'm just happy that I have hill's Mountains or what ever you want to call them close to my home and I get to play on them often!
  • + 0
 @Harverto: I live 4 hours drive from wales but I absolutely love visiting north wales (or anywhere in wales). The first climb of the penmachno trail or all of the total climbs on the coed y brenin beast black trail are not simple but ive managed them with a 1 x 10 setup. if you need a 50 tooth cog you likely have slightly weaker legs or could use a little more fitness training simple as because guess what your not a bunch of mountain riding pioneers. people have climbed everything before without these huge bail out gears with 1 x 10 setups. That said if you enjoy using them that's fine too but please don't suggest that real hills/mountains can only be ridden with them.
  • + 1
 @rabidmonkfish: Mate rewind!
Have a look at my original comment where I say "with all these ever increasing cassette ratios it feels like the bike industry is supplying us with an answer to a question we never asked!

even with my weak and feeble legs I can get up 99% of the hills with a simple 1x10 with just a 40t expander cog.
If you really need a 50t (bail out cog) maybe you should look at an e-bike!"

Not once do I suggest that we need a 50t cassette!
  • + 2
 @Harverto: i know thats why i was agreeing with you. sorry i guess i could have made that clearer Smile
  • + 1
 @rabidmonkfish: No worries bro!
  • + 1
 @rabidmonkfish: I do suggest that. Maybe your trails are not that technical despite the elevation gain.
  • + 2
 @preston67: Said the man who's never been to Wales!
You do know there are other country's right?
  • + 1
 @preston67: how do you figure that? am I not riding technical terrain because I don't have a super large rear expander cog style gear?.
  • + 3
 Do they make anything like this for 1x10?
  • + 0
 you can buy a kit for a better range if you have a old x10 cassette ...
  • - 1
 Trickstuff, 10-41t 10spd cassette.. is that enough?
  • + 10
 Sunrace
  • + 5
 E13 makes a 10-speed 9-42 cassette.
  • + 4
 @nojzilla: yep, running a sunrace 11-46 with XT M8000 RD. Works well.
  • + 1
 @B20PV: Cat's out of the bag. I think the price is about to go up on SunRace. Unless there's something else I haven't heard of, that 11-46 is the obvious choice in best bang for the buck.
  • + 0
 Leonardi 9-42 ten speed cassette. Shifts fine, still requires xd driver.
  • + 1
 Thanks everyone, until i can actually afford $1k (which is 2/3's of what i paid for my Trance) for a SRAM Eagle setup, looks like i'll just go to 42 on the back!! Thanks for the help!
  • + 1
 I think that the ratios on my 10-42 Sram 11s are almost too tight. I frequently change 2 or more gears at a time so this may be better.
  • + 1
 Ordered!! This is a rare purchase that I'm actually insanely stoked about. Awesome!!
  • + 2
 just get normal XT cassete and one-up or hope BIG cog and thats it ....
  • + 1
 I am curious about why Shimano doesn't promote their Capreo cassettes and hubs to mountain bikes, it is 9t.
  • + 1
 @skylinespeed: We have a 9 speed 9-32 made from a combination of the Capreo and other cassette sprockets.
  • + 2
 Canfield Brothers used to offer a 1x system based on Capreo. Google it.
  • + 1
 Lighter doesn't mean more reliable or durable......shimano XT best bang for the buck
  • + 2
 F#ck... I have just mounted my 9-44 yesterday Frown
  • + 7
 I bet you your 9-44t cassette still works just fine.
  • + 1
 unless you are a serious uphill guy 44 and 30 in front is plenty big enough
  • + 1
 I think it's good to not believe that new stuff is necessarily better than what you already have. It's mostly marketing....like was said before, the industry is forcing sales.
  • + 2
 Nice Idea but for 380 USD, you can get a XT8000 11-46 for much cheaper.
  • + 1
 There's this new system that gives close ratios great range and cheap parts.... a front derailleur
  • + 2
 Those things look sharp enough to cut up trails.
  • + 1
 Guys,I don't know if I'm wrong but 46 x 9=414% cassette range,not 511%.
  • + 2
 Gear box please
  • + 1
 Thinking about trying it and very interested to hear how it does.
  • + 1
 I think I'll stick to my 9-speed, thanks.
  • + 1
 I just got 9 of them
  • + 1
 511% 3
  • - 1
 Yes please...been waiting for this
  • - 3
 Stopped reading at the cost. Cassettes are disposable items. I go through about 2 xt's a year on each bike.
  • + 29
 You're doing it wrong. Or riding insane distances and not changing the chain
  • + 7
 You didnt see the part where its in 3 different chunks. When you have an area that is way more worn out than the others, E 13 will let you buy that one area so you dont have to buy a whole new cassette. Honestly bullshit as to why shimano and sram cant do that.
  • - 3
 @chillrider199: you really think they'll sell each bit individually? My XT (11-36 10spd) cassette is in several bits and I'm pretty sure I can't buy any of them by themselves.
  • + 4
 @Kiwiplague: you can buy individual cassette parts on their website.
  • + 4
 @stumpymidget: XT 10spd cassettes are dirt cheap now...why bother?
  • + 4
 @ReformedRoadie: because 9 tooth sprocket gives a MUCH bigger gear than an 11.
  • + 1
 @Kiwiplague: you can also buy individual parts for xt cassettes from sjs cycles here in the uk.
  • + 1
 @chillrider199:

I tired that. the middle part cost $260.00, which is not advertised on Ethirteen website.
  • + 1
 @stumpymidget: where are you that you need a much bigger gear? Rarely, usually in the winter when riding a little less, I wish I had a 42 instead of a 40 out back, paired with a 32t chainring. I did occasionally spin out the 30t I had previously, which is why I went to 11spd.
Where are you using the 9t cog?
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: it has allowed me to use a 30 tooth ring up front without ever running out of gears, even on the downhill part of my road commute to work, and 30 x 42 will get you up just about anything.
  • + 1
 @stumpymidget: an XT 11-46, with a 32 or 34 is a lot cheaper solution. Maybe it's worth it for your situation, but if I was paying that type of coin for cassettes, I'd be watching chain wear like a hawk...
  • + 1
 @howsyourdad: no im not. I live in a very sandy wet place and it creates a grinding past.
  • + 1
 @ilovedust: dude I ride over 1500miles a year in florida (it doesn't get much sandier than this) and might go through a cassette every 2 years
  • + 1
 Four-wheel bike, is it?
  • + 1
 @stumpymidget: ...Which answers a question nobody asked...
  • + 1
 @KeithReeder: erm, ReformedRoadie asked where i used the 9 tooth.

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