Everything We Know So Far About the New Canyon Sender

Jan 24, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  

Canyon have had a busy winter having signed two of the most marketable riders in mountain biking, launched the Collective and mislaid all their vowels. On top of that, it looks like they have been beavering away designing a new downhill bike too.

The Sender platform was first released in 2016 and downhill has changed a lot in the four years since then. The current Sender platform is in desperate need for an update as it only runs 27.5" wheels and still uses Imperial standards on its shocks. It was possible to bodge 29" wheels into the old Sender if you put the chainstays into their longest setting, as Magnus Manson was doing last year, but as we've seen from other brands, a bodge job is not going to be as fast as a platform designed around bigger wheels.

Magnus Manson's Sender in its longest setting to accommodate 29 inch wheels. Photo: Dan Griffiths


However, Canyon looks to be updating the Sender platform for 2020 and we've now seen a combination of spy shots and social media posts that make it look completely different to the current platform. Here's what we know so far.

A Linkage Update

Magnus Manson's current generation Sender. Photo: Dan Griffiths
A screenshot from Tahnee's Instagram of the new bike.

The old Canyon Sender was designed around the MX Link, inspired by, you guessed it, the kind of linkages you see on motocross bikes. The linkage was designed to offer three separate stages of suspension - a supple, coil-like first stage, a supportive middle and a progressive, bottomless finish. It looks like the MX Link, or at least something similar, is still in use on the picture of Tahnee's bike above but the shock is now mounted more horizontally and is now connected to the downtube, not the toptube.

We’ve always admired the Sender’s MX system that uses 2 separate sets of links with different jobs. The main links connect the front triangle to the rear axle and control acceleration and deceleration responses like anti-squat and anti-rise, whereas the second set of links drive the shock and can be modified without affecting the anti-squat and anti-rise figures. This allows them to create a super tunable bike that can be adapted for riders as diverse as Tahnee Seagrave, Troy Brosnan and Mark Wallace. It probably also explains how they were able to bodge in the 29inch wheels for so long without needing to re-invent the bike.

Photo by Dan Hearn
If you can make anything out from that diagram you have better eyes than us! Photo: Dan Hearn

It’s a cool system and it’s pretty different to anything else out there. The closest we’ve seen is the new Demo however this uses concentric pivots so it isn’t quite as tunable.

We’re purely speculating here but we believe the shock has been moved to the downtube so they can take some material out of the top tube area and let the bulkier downtube deal with the loads. It should also save a bit of weight and slightly lower the bike’s centre of gravity.

A New Front End

Photo by Dan Hearn
The new headtube area of the new Sender. Photo: Dan Hearn

With the shock now changing position, it makes sense that Canyon would take the opportunity to re-work any niggles that might not have been quite right on the old model. We've had the clearest pictures of the front end of the new bike and it's very obvious that it's going to be a bit different than before. From the wind tunnel pictures, we can see that there's a slightly different head tube shape and that the cable routing hardware has all changed too.

A snap sent in by eagle-eyed Pinkbike reader @sam_belcher02 that shows most of the new front triangle. You can also see some aluminium links around the new linkage.

29 Inch Wheels

Photo by Dan Hearn
Tahnee tucking over the top of a 29-inch wheel and the telltale Fox 49 fork. Photo: Dan Hearn

Full 29er or mullet setups are now the norm in downhill racing so it makes sense that Canyon will be designing the new Sender around bigger wheels. Every picture we've seen of the new Sender has it fitted with a Fox 49 fork, hinting that it's at least a mullet set up. The side-on photo above seems to hint at a mixed wheel bike as the rear tyre definitely looks lower than the front tyre but it also has a much slimmer tread and it could just be a camera perspective trick. It's also possible that it could be set up to run both combinations thanks to some adjustable geometry.

What else could be included?

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Remember Eurobike 2016? We don't blame you if you don't as it was an eMTB dominated affair, but there was one bit of downhill tech that definitely grabbed our attention - Canyon's DisConnect system. Coming the year after Gwin's chainless win, this was a system that allowed the drivetrain to be disconnected from within the hub in order to completely free the bike's suspension from chain-induced forces. Doing so eliminates the pedal kickback you see in the above video but also means the rider pedalling will not turn the wheel, so it would have to be toggled on and off during a race run.

At the time Canyon said they were working with Fabien Barel to refine the system but nothing has come of it since. With Fab looking very involved with the recent wind tunnel tests and the team clearly hunting marginal gains, we wouldn't be surprised if we saw this concept resurface in some form on the new bike.

Anything Else?

We’ve spoken to Canyon and they’re staying tight-lipped on any details for now. It won’t be long before the race season now though and it will be much harder for them to hide the details between the tapes. We’ll update this piece with any extra info when we get it.


149 Comments

  • 48 8
 I've always wondered whether a freecoaster hub design could be good for Dh? A simple half back pedal disengages the freehub and stops the pedal kickback when the suspension moves but you don't have to press a button to engage it again, you just pedal forwards and it locks back in.

Sure a half pedal back isn't ideal on a rough course and the lack of engagement points would take some getting used to but there's no buttons to remember to press, no cables and a fool proof way to fit and work on any bike.
  • 5 1
 Interesting idea! Would try it out if had a freecoaster handy & a high pivot DH bike, think someone should try it out though!
Wonder why cable actuated freecoasters do not exist anymore?
  • 16 2
 IMHO, any disengagement system (other than the one Gee uses) isn't reliable enough for racing
  • 9 1
 @hamncheez: are you talking about him using an spacer in place of one of the cogs so the chain doesn't engage?
  • 26 2
 bah, gwin simply gets rid of the chain...
  • 2 0
 @mau416: correct
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez: Yea such a simple solution to the problem.
  • 7 1
 @mau416: no, a freecoaster is a BMX hub where the actual mechanism inside the hub disengages with a half back pedal (that's how flatland bikes can go forwards and backwards without the cranks spinning). There's a few different ways to make it happen and you can dial in how sensitive they are. Pedalling forwards engages the mechanism again and then the ratchet.

The spacer in the cassette is another option but you're reducing the number of gears plus you still have to remember to physically change back to normal, a freecoaster hub doesn't need anything to be pressed to bring back the engagements.
  • 2 12
flag hamncheez (Jan 24, 2020 at 8:13) (Below Threshold)
 @aliclarkson: ya, but why add more complexity and unsprung weight to a race bike. If that fails on bmx, no one cares. If it fails in your race run and you're not Gwin or Neko, you've got problems. Also, during sprints, top DH riders like Gee and Gwin are putting down as many watts as track riders. I don't know how well a bmx freecoaster designed for 20" wheels would hold up to that.
  • 8 1
 @hamncheez: Like I said, It was just something I wondered about. Still seems less complicated than a system with cables and levers. The extra weight wouldn't be ideal but more efficient suspension could be worth it? There's some newer freecoaster designs that seem stronger these days.

It's worth an experiment I think.
  • 11 0
 @aliclarkson: how dare you suggest something here without at least a prototype in place or a pending patent.
  • 3 1
 A freecoaster wouldn't work because you need the engagement to be instantaneous when you pedal out of a corner, and that's the only situation where pedaling is important on a dh race (besides the start gate, but the freecoaster doesn't have any disadvantages in that situation because you can pre-engage it).
  • 3 0
 @aliclarkson: i9 make one, Reece Wallace had one on his Glory last year.
  • 1 7
flag JimLad (Jan 24, 2020 at 10:55) (Below Threshold)
 Pretty sure gees spacer won’t let you shift back to the block , as there are no shift ramps to move the chain
  • 1 0
 @JimLad: then how does he use it?
  • 4 0
 @JimLad: That can't possibly be the case. Every DH track requires pedaling at some point, especially near the bottom. There is no way he'd permanently disengage his chain mid run.
  • 2 0
 @Clarkeh: i also got my hands on one to try and is what made me think of using it on a dh bike
  • 1 5
flag JimLad (Jan 24, 2020 at 12:56) (Below Threshold)
 @hamncheez: you can shift down to the spacer, but then you're stuck with it until the bottom. There are no teeth right, so how is the chain going to move back onto another cog? Unless shifting two or three clicks would be enough to catch the teeth of the next cog over, that might work
  • 2 0
 There's no buttons to remember to push but there's certainly a half backpedal to remember to perform which is a lot more to manage than flipping a simple switch and not catching a pedal.
  • 4 1
 It wouldn’t work. If you’ve ever ridden a freecoaster you’d notice there’s a lot of dead space before it engages. It would feel like you’d snapped your chain every time you went to sprint also they’r notoriously unreliable. Also I’m not sure it would work at all with rear suspension. The swing arm might just make it engage and disengage constantly.
  • 1 3
 @JimLad: I’d imagine you’d have to shift up a few gears at once and brute force it. If you just shifted up one it wouldn’t shift.
  • 5 3
 HES NOT TALKING ABOUT A #%@$ SPACER
  • 2 0
 Things to think about, most freecoasters have adjustable slack options. Let’s take the profile z coaster (I had one on my last dj build) I initially set it up with a quarter crank in mind and wound up hating it. You guessed it the slack to engage it was just the worst. However with the adjustable cam ring I brought that in to an 1/8 crank. That was bearable.

Side note, I’m not sure how it stacks up to the beat down of a WC DH course. I know some of the stair gaps I’ve hit wouldn’t even come close but I didn’t manage to break it in two years of indoor parks, skateparks and the streets.
  • 1 0
 Freehub with 20’ like dt 18 ratchet, eliminates issues with suspension
  • 2 0
 @Hardtailhooligan: you’d need quite a bit of slack or it would just constantly engage and disengage as the swing arm moved. It’s a shit idea anyway but if you really wanted a freehub on a downhill bike you’d need a different design with faster engagement than anything bmx currently uses.
  • 3 0
 @JimLad: It shifts just fine without any issues.You just need to choose right diameter for the spacer and it´s like slightly slower normal shift.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: Not that easy to make sure the chain snaps on the third pedal stroke?
  • 1 0
 @baca262: Hahah that run inspired a little bit, as I rode the whole 2019 whistler season chain less after my derailleur hanger broke off my 2013 Canyon Torque. I might say it was a choice but in reality it was Canyon's inability to support the biggest mountain biking market in the world -- The Pacific North West.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: True I hadn’t thought of it like that. If you couldn’t guess by my screen name I stick with hard tails lol. I have been considering getting something short travel full but I can’t justify it. I’ve handled some pretty tech terrain on all my past hard tails, but in Ohio we don’t have the most elevation and even our most technical trails probably don’t compare to what comes to mind for someone from say BC or anywhere with mountains lol
  • 1 0
 @JimLad: Works just fine, the ramps on the gear you're changing to are the ones that assist in shifting not so much the gear you're on. Would also work with regular non-ramped gears. Guys were doing at least 15yrs ago in freeride/street/DJ. Nothing new, just a different use.
  • 2 0
 I’ve been riding a freecoaster since 2005; you don’t need to do any backward pedalling to disengage the hub, the forward rotation of the wheel will disengage it. Moreover, you can tailor the ‘slack’ (degree of disengagement) based on the degree of pedal kick-back each specific linkage system inputs. For example, as seen in the video there is appx. 1/8 turn system input by the linkage, so you would adjust your hub for 1/8 engagement.

Of course, this system will also eliminate any ‘pedal support’ / anti-squat which might have been designed into the system to begin with. I’m no engineer, but I assume certain linkage designs will lend themselves more to a free coaster than others.

Also, many comments discuss ‘instant engagement’ requirements and the ‘feeling of a broken chain’. This is not accurate and I question whether you’ve ever ridden a freecoaster and if so, what the slack was set-to.
  • 1 1
 @cwatt: well if you tried to sprint out of a corner with a disengaged freecoaster you’d have no pedal pressure for a 1/4 turn before it engaged again. Hence feeling like you’ve broken your chain. Not totally accurate but the best way I could think of describing it. Ether way it’s a terrible idea and it’s never going to take off, so who cares?
  • 32 2
 Full review coming tomorrow.
  • 40 0
 Nah, tomorrow is weekend. They said no full review tomorrow. Give them a break. Full review on Monday.
  • 84 9
 Your mom's coming tomorrow.
  • 7 44
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 24, 2020 at 4:35) (Below Threshold)
 @BenPea: you post yet another social media atrocity!
  • 31 2
 @WAKIdesigns: The pot calling the kettle black
  • 39 0
 @WAKIdesigns: yours too
  • 5 0
 @BenPea: haha always room for yo mama jokes. Well played.
  • 7 17
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 24, 2020 at 7:22) (Below Threshold)
 @BenPea: you know I love you hot lips
  • 6 1
 @WAKIdesigns: you won't find me at the bottom of the sar-chasm, you crazy f*ck!
  • 6 1
 @BenPea: gonna need a full review
  • 11 1
 @gumbytex: this is a family site and I really want to avoid going all in on the idea of a field test featuring shiny Poles and badly smashed rear triangles.
  • 2 0
 R.I.P. Ti-Springs.com
  • 8 3
 The last time I did a yo momma joke, the guy who I said it to's mother had actually died of an aneurysm the year before. I have never felt like such an absolute cunt before or since. Of course I apologised profusely and he was all right about it, because I didn't know it had happened. But I still can't bring myself to do them anymore. True story!
  • 7 1
 @jaame: horrific, but you know what? Anyone still doing the "full review tomorrow" joke can get f*cked, orphan or not.
  • 10 2
 @jaame:
Them: my mom is dead you a*shole!
ME: Yeah, dead tired!!
Everyone: Much high fives and huzzahs....
haha
  • 2 0
 @cky78: you’re dead funny
  • 1 0
 @jaame: Seriously though, that would have been pretty shitty situation for you. Lesser than the guy whose mom was dead, but still shitty.
  • 1 0
 @cky78: What made it worse was that his mother was his best friend. She had him when she was 15 years old and his dad was married to another woman. He always looked after them financially but not as a proper father. One day at the breakfast table, his mum who was like, 40 years old at the time and fit as a fiddle, literally just dropped dead. Truly horrific by the sound of it.
  • 3 6
 @jaame: what in the fk... thumbs up for being a naturalist in the face of an obvious non targeted joke. BenPea was impressive with firing up the giggles, you are impressive with shutting it down. You just pulled the plug using a Saturn 5 rocket. Whooooosh!
  • 1 0
 @jaame: been there! See you in hell
  • 30 8
 Desperately in need of an update?
Not really, the geometry is still fully relevant as is the suspension kinematics.
Desperately trying to shove 29ers down our throats more like.
  • 25 8
 As a former 29er resister, totally disagree. They're responding to demand of racers and data. I still roll on 27.5's, but the old wagon wheels are trash argument isn't relevant anymore. Unless, of course, you're talking about the snack. Those things have gotten way too small and taste like cardboard.
  • 11 5
 More like giving the client what he asks for. A lot of people actually want to buy 29ers. Nobody tries to shove something down someones throat.
  • 4 2
 @rrolly: Well this bike should be mixed wheel size if they are actually listening to racer data. pretty sure half the field was on mixed wheels by the end of the season after bailing on full 29. only the tall riders have stayed on full 29.
  • 21 2
 "The current Sender platform is in desperate need for an update as it only runs 27.5" wheels and still uses Imperial standards on its shocks."

"Desperate"? You can still get 27.5" wheels and tires at all performance levels (unlike when stores just stopped carrying high performance 26" tires) and no one is going to stop making imperial shocks in the near term (I think Fox and maybe RS actually committed to continuing to make imperial stuff). I'm surprised it's not getting shit on for being "only" Boost 148 and not Super Duper Awesome Boost 158.99 and having a pressfit/threaded/plug&pray/USB3.7-Turbo bottom bracket.

And of course, no way Troy Brosnan could still be Mr. Consistency with that "desperately" old tech. Wait, what? He was? Well, shit.
  • 4 12
flag hamncheez (Jan 24, 2020 at 8:08) (Below Threshold)
 when your sponsored racers are asking for 29ers, I would consider that desperate
  • 9 2
 @hamncheez: you do know brosnan rode the 29 and went back to the 27.5 right?
  • 3 0
 @andydhteam: are you saying that a frame designed for 27.5 doesn't handle well with 29 inch wheels? Better not prototype dedicated 29 frame then!
  • 1 2
 @hamncheez: nahh I didn't show me were I said that.
  • 1 0
 @andydhteam: " you do know brosnan rode the 29 and went back to the 27.5"
  • 13 2
 Eventually the inevitable will happen, engineers and designers will be forced to conform to one design, one that looks like every other race bike that was manifested by racing data.
  • 7 1
 Yeah eventually all bikes will look 99% the same. Once manufacturers accept that there is only one ' best' design.
  • 19 1
 Sounds like a session?!
  • 8 1
 Translation: Looks like a Session.
  • 9 2
 Of course. Just like in MX.
  • 7 5
 Nice idea, but marketing bull shit will all ways be there, It is the American way!
  • 1 2
 The fact that most bikes share the same suspension design as a Session, if your statement were true, all bikes will be sessions.
  • 2 0
 Consumers influence this too. If a bike looks too different they don't buy it.........and engineers and designers can't take the PB beating online. Wink
  • 5 0
 I do not think it will happen, a lot of brands have suspension designs they say is best. but what we see more and more, is that they modify their systems to have a very similar operation. going even so far to abandon their trademark beliefs. for instance the new propain tyee is basically a nomad/megatower depending on which wheelsize you look at. It lost all "no kickback is best" philosophy. banshee has done the same -coming from the other direction (to a degree).operation wise the sb165 and the new enduro are also pretty close ( with the big S completely throwing the low antisquat out of the window).

with the best systems on the market, 4 bar and shortlink, you can do a huge variety of layouts but i feel we have reached a point where they all are designed to do the same.
  • 2 1
 FSR bikes
  • 6 0
 There is no best bike/suspension/tyre/rim/brake etc. There are systems that are bad, but pretty much any quality frame or component these days is perfect for some kind of rider.

The argument about what bike is best is as pointless as an argument about what shoe size is best.

Conclusion: Bikes will always have significant diffrences.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: so true, I could've gotten a good deal on a Marin Wolfridge but damn it's ugly AF
  • 3 1
 @PaulBoettig: The best shoe size is 11.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Did Specialized abandon the low anti-squat approach (with the new enduro) to prioritise peddling over suspension action? I have a 2017 enduro that is great going downhill but rather wallowly on the way back up.
  • 2 0
 @EckNZ: probably, higher antisquat means less movement while pedaling, but also more kickback and locking out the suspension to a degree. The trend on endurobikes is going over 100%, while pretty much only rocky is staying at 70-80%.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: I suspected as much. I had a Norco sight from a few years ago that pedaled brilliantly yet still felt plush enough on the way down. I think it had over 100% anti-squat, so I'm pretty happy with the current trend.
  • 1 0
 @boydasilva: Nice, thats my size Wink
  • 12 0
 Nobody made a vowel joke in the comments so far, so I'm going with the new DsCnnct feature to be on the next iteration of the SNDR.
  • 4 1
 TRY BRSNN MRK WLLC MGNS MNSN SNDR
  • 5 0
 @TyroneM: Y lft t Thnn Sgrv y sxst Cndn!
  • 5 1
 Yeah, this would be impossible without 29" wheels: www.youtube.com/watch?v=HIPbRNE3Opk

Oh, wait...

It's great to see a continued push for performance and all, but let's be a bit less dramatic about it. "Desperate?" Hardly.
  • 7 5
 Was there ever such a thing as "imperial shock mount" as mentioned in the article? I get that they (SRAM?) introduced the metric shock mount but I thought it was only a marketing term. After all, my 2007 Cannondale Prophet takes a 200x50mm shock, sounds as metric as can be. Deviations are irrelevant as length and stroke depend on preload (which compresses the top out bumper). Saying pre-metric shocks are imperial is like saying pre "Forward Geometry" bikes were optimized for rolling fakie.
  • 22 1
 Your shock is actually 8 inches and 757575757 microinches x 2.000001 inches of stroke. Hence the total collapse of the empire.
  • 3 0
 I think it is the imperial shock travel vs metric shock travel:
1,5 inch - 38mm
2 inch - 51mm
2,25 inch - 57mm
2,5 inch - 63mm
2,75 inch - 70mm
  • 1 2
 Was just an excuse to change things, was just the bush size that changed from 1/2" to 12mm or something like that
  • 7 6
 I hope you realize that Sram or Shimano don’t come up with new standards for the hell of it. It is always due to a bike mfg coming up with a new frame/bike that requires new tech. They just make the parts to fit the bikes not the other way around. I know according to the internetz I’m wrong, but it’s the actual truth.
  • 6 1
 It was introduced by rockshox to allow for more bushing overlap in the sealhead of their shocks to increase reliability. Mos manufacturers have simply adapted their current imperial shocks to suite the new metric standard (a 9.5x3.0" shock can be changed to 230x65 by way of an 11mm internal spacer). Typically the measurements for imperial shocks were based on inches and converted to mm. So your 200x50 shock is actually 7.875x2.0" and then rounded to the nearest nice number
  • 1 2
 @cjkj1999: 7.875" rounded to the nearest nice number? You mean to say that the shock length is accurate to a tenth of a millimeter, that wasn't just 7.87" or 7.88"? Then on the other hand they rounded 2.0" off to 50mm instead of to 51mm? So a 190mm length shock is actually 7.480"? I don't think this reasoning will hold in court Wink .
  • 6 1
 @sunringlerider: I can't accept a single thing you say as truth. Your rims were the worst I ever rode in my life.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: yes, until Rock Shox introduced metric shock sizing, all shocks were measured in inches and often converted to a metric number. Your old shock is technically a 7.875x2.0, converted to metric its a 200x51 though many people mistakenly called it 200x50mm as the round numbers sounded right. The new metric sizing bumps everything in 5mm increments and shocks are longer overall respective of travel to provide more bushing overlap.
  • 2 1
 @rrolly: dude that’s harsh. Fun fact they were made in my home town until Hayes/merger/sale. Hence the name. 20+ years ago they were huge on the local grom scene in my hood.
  • 2 0
 @aljoburr: Nope, bushing/eyelet size stayed the same. In fact, metric also specified nice hardware widths in 5mm increments.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: Taking about out side diameter of the bush, but width has changed too, so that about older frame mounts that now do not fit?
  • 1 0
 @just6979: So are they still making spacers in 22mm 3/4" as that was the main width, before metric, sure that is not most popular size now!
I know you can buy wider ones & machine a little bit off them which is what I usually do
But your cant really think their is not any difference?
  • 1 0
 @aljoburr: The hardware/spacer widths were already all over the place. Metric narrowed them down to 5mm increments, because that just makes sense. You don't need to machine anything, all the sizes are still pretty well available (unless maybe you have a slightly old Cane Creek or a pretty old RS or Fox).

"But your cant really think their is not any difference?" I didn't say there was no difference. I said the "normal" bushing diameter & width (15mm W x 12.5mm ID - 15mm OD, I think) didn't change for metric.
  • 7 1
 OMG.... 27.5 wheels!!! And Imperial Shocks!!!! Hide the children!!!
  • 2 0
 More children understand metric system, just hide the i phones before they get implanted under their skin!
  • 9 7
 "The current Sender platform is in desperate need for an update as it only runs 27.5" wheels..."

Is this seriously stated? NEEDED? 29" wheels are good for some things and some people, but they are not this magnificent technological breakthrough. It's all down to the rider. Tired of this marketing. Let's tell people that their 27.5 (and 26) bikes are outdated and garbage. You aren't running 29? Careful, your bike might implode.

Here's a wacky idea...design engineers and companies alike, pull your heads out of your arse and design a bike that can run all 3 wheel sizes and let the consumer, the customer, decide what they want to run. You should be catering to the people that pay your bills and feed your families, not forcing people to ride what you think is best.
  • 2 0
 I think this is was airdrop bikes try to accomplish with their slacker project Smile love that brand
  • 1 0
 Just curious ... on her IG account Tahnee talks about how silent the new bike is. Are they using Onyx or some other sprag clutch now?

I converted to these a few months ago (and LOVE THEM) and have been wondering why they haven't been more widely adopted in DH. There's a weight penalty (which means little in DH) but the loss of drag is noticeable, especially on high speed run outs, etc. Given most of these riders will do anything for half second, certainly seems worth consideration.
  • 3 0
 I always wondered if the little protection guard on the rear was called the Sender Fender? :
  • 1 0
 Can’t thy just make the pivot at the bb and there will be no kickback? Kickback is created from the chainstays getting longer throughout the travel. I may be wrong but that seems like it would be too simple
  • 1 0
 Looks like a demo. But in all seriousness, the original sender and the new demo have nearly the same linkage, just with the link lengths tweaked a little bit.
  • 1 0
 I've seen the prototype at la bresse last Summer. Wish I had taken a photo, all I can say is it had the shock mounted to the downtube and 29" wheels
  • 1 0
 hmmm i wonder who "we" is. is "we" we al,l or we except the one staffmember whos been riding it for a month ?
  • 3 1
 Doesnt Knolly control pedaling and shock forces independently also?
  • 1 1
 Yes. The Sender is pretty much the Knolly design but flipped behind the seat tube. The new Demo is pretty much the Sender design but lower in the frame. Of course, a single design can be executed completely differently by different bikes, so that doesn't mean they are going to ride anywhere near the same.
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: Knolly's design does separate the axle path (thus pedal forces) from the shock curve, but it's very different that the Sender and new Enduro (and the motocross design they're based off). The former all use a pulling force to "straighten" a pair of links that push on the shock. Knolly's FourByFour is basically horst link on top of a horst link.
  • 1 0
 Did Tahnee blow it? or was this leak planned? Can't wait for canyon to come to Canada.
  • 1 0
 FYI- Magnus is on a Norco Aurum now and Mark Wallace is still rolling 27.5 on his Sender.
  • 1 0
 Hmm, all i wanted was for it to be available in the states in all black last year. i guess complete redesign works too...
  • 1 0
 bro, i looked for this enduro rig 2x before while purchasing. no dice. canyon, to me, is never there but always enticing.
  • 1 0
 I hope this bike continues to live up to its name!
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Porsche
  • 16 0
 We all know that Porsches have linkage forks
  • 1 0
 Looks like MX link is gone bye bye
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Ravine
  • 1 0
 Well, it’s not a session.
  • 1 0
 Adjustable chainstay length. That is a good new innovation.
  • 1 0
 What's the "mislaid all their vowels" joke mean?
  • 1 0
 Cllctv
  • 1 0
 It will look similar to a Demo now!
  • 1 0
 Canyon = 30% reduction in price for a 100% reduction in customer service
  • 1 1
 Canyon, pls take my money!
  • 1 2
 Maybe the fresh Sender won’t be the ugliest dh bike on the market. Maybe.
  • 1 0
 Personally thought the current Sender was the nicest looking DH bike on the market...
  • 1 1
 ehh looks like a session. lol
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Demo
  • 1 2
 All this teasing, and click bait nonsense, who fucking cares, DH bikes are last decades news.
  • 2 2
 Looks like an Intense...
  • 21 0
 yep, both have two wheels
  • 7 1
 Rude. Pretty much the most insulting thing you could say about a bike.
  • 2 0
 @MikeyMT: I don't really like them either, but I thought the general consensus was that they were pretty good?
  • 1 0
 @nhp890: I think you’re right. Personally haven’t been a fan since the 951. Now that was a sexy bike.
  • 3 0
 @MikeyMT: I remember drooling over M6s and 951s some 10 years ago. Also I think most people aren't aware, but Intense was way ahead of the industry with the downhill 29er, the 2951. I remember reading about it around 2009 I think?
  • 8 11
 The only thing I know about that bike is that I want one. Ok I also know this will lower the price of the previous one. I want the previous one more then.
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't that raise the price of the previous one?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Nah I think it'll lower the previous one.
  • 3 1
 All I see in photos as difference in between old and new frame is shock mount in main triangle. New one has shock mounted to down tube compared to older model having it '' suspended'' in between top tube and seat post tube leaning towards nothing. Probably that was weak point as in case of bottoming out shock was forcing forward towards nothing to resist and absorb impact. Its all theory but possible.
  • 1 0
 You won`t have enough time before la Muerte to ride all the toys you want Waki
  • 1 0
 Agree.. I've been secretly observing prices for some time now because now I need a dedicated park bike, of course, and Canyon is pretty tough to beat
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: You can be open about your price observing habit. It's okay. PB comments section is a safe place. . .
  • 2 0
 @rrolly: oh i know it is! I always felt safe here. It's my own bedroom where I don't feel safe speaking about it
  • 1 1
 Looks Like a Megatower

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