Fabric Scoop Radius Seat - Review

Oct 20, 2014
by Mike Levy  
Fabric's lineup includes a number of different saddles that each feature a unique shape to suit specific body types. That in itself isn't really news worthy given that many brands offer the same sort of thing, but Fabric's range also includes the radical looking Hex-air with individual air pockets that make up its relatively wide 155m width, as well as the 3D printed, titanium ALM model that's come about through a collaboration with Airbus. There's also the slimmer and lighter weight 134mm wide Line seat, and, finally, the 142mm wide Scoop shown here that Fabric says ''suits an average sized body.'' MSRP is $79.99 USD for the 256 gram, nylon base, steel railed Elite model that's reviewed below. www.fabric.cc

Fabric seat review test

Fabric touts a simple design and construction method, and the finished product is anything but flashy.



Choosing a seat isn't nearly as simple as it used to be, but there's now a much better chance that you'll end up on something that works well for you. My decision making didn't end when I picked the 142mm Scoop, as it's available in three different profiles: a Flat top for ''an efficient supportive platform for an aerodynamic, stretched position,'' a Shallow model that Fabric says ''suits a performance orientated position that demands comfort and flexibility,'' and finally the Radius version that's ''aimed at a more upright riding position, its shape offers maximum support and comfort.'' I knew that I'd be fitting it my Rocky Mountain Element, a pure cross-country race bike that you'd usually see the spec'd with the Flat model, but also that I run a short 50mm stem on the bike that sees me sitting more upright than I would with a traditional cockpit. I went with the more rounded shape of the Radius for this reason.

Fabric seat review test

The Radius version of the Scoop sports a rounded profile and a forgiving, well padded nose.



The Scoop consists of three separate elements - the microfibre top that Fabric says is both waterproof and easy to clean, the base that's either carbon fiber (on the Scoop Ultimate) or nylon depending on the model, and either carbon, titanium, or steel rails. This three element construction is different compared to a more traditional cover that's sometimes stapled over foam and then attached to the base, and Fabric's modus operandi is to go a different route that results in a simpler, cleaner seat.

Fabric seat review test

The simple looking nylon base doesn't feature any reliefs or cutaways.




Pinkbike's Take

bigquotesI know that I prefer a more rounded profile to a seat, so I ended up on the 'Radius' version of the Scoop that sports exactly that kind of shape, which was a good decision. It felt like home to my behind pretty quickly, and while I wouldn't say that it was as quite as comfortable as the less traditional Tioga Spyder Stratum that it shared time with under my ass, the Scoop rates way up there on my list of seats that I could sit on for hours on end. And that's exactly what I did, and one of the last rides on it before writing this review was a 94km mountain monster ride with over 10,000ft of climbing and eight hours of saddle time. If it was going to be a pain in the ass, it would have been then, but, other than some general tenderness that you'd expect after such a day, it was a pretty uneventful epic for my undercarriage. That's obviously a very, very good thing.

I can go on and on about how the Scoop's shape seemed tailor made for my behind, but the bottom line is that you should give it a sit at your shop before throwing down any cash for it. Comfort aside, the seat's reliability has been stunning. And I'm not just talking about the lack of bent rails or zero creaking from the shell and rail interface, but also the microfibre cover and how it literally looks as good as the day I put the Scoop on my bike. Sure, I always end up putting a load of miles on different bikes and some other seats, so the wear rate isn't as harsh as if it had been in non-stop use since spring, but I've had it under me for thousands of miles since April. The result is that it appears to only have about fifty miles on it after all that. Even the Fabric logo on the nose of the seat has resisted fading, and there's not even the slightest hint of the cover wanting to separate from the shell. It certainly seems like Fabric's simple-is-better approach has resulted in a very reliable saddle. So there you have it, a comfortable seat, at least for me, that's available in three different shapes to fit a gamut of asses, and it's mega reliable to boot. I'm a fan.
- Mike Levy



45 Comments

  • 41 3
 What more could you ass-k for?
  • 30 0
 to sit on a dolphin.
  • 6 11
flag FlowMasterO (Oct 21, 2014 at 3:37) (Below Threshold)
 With a price like that its the buyer who gets the butt end of the deal
  • 1 0
 Sitting on a dolphin aye? I must admit it has some doplhin-esque esthetics. Although I would compare it more to a cyndaquil...

That cell saddle looks interessting, hope they review that too.
  • 1 0
 Bottom line, that seat kicks ass, kindly.
  • 1 0
 Lovevit
  • 8 1
 I'm confused,surely that's a Charge Scoop saddle,or am I missing something.
  • 17 0
 Fabric was set up by the guys who run charge. Charge are now only making frames and complete bikes and fabric will be making the other parts like saddles and grips. Basically this saddle is the same as the charge scoop.
  • 3 0
 Cheers for the info,interesting.
  • 9 0
 Pretty sure it's so that other companies will spec their saddles OEM.
  • 1 0
 Makes sense I spose.
  • 1 0
 Fabric is an offshoot of Charge, but offers saddles in different profiles too. The Scoop radius is the same curvature as the original scoop - however the Shallow and Flat profiles are completely new and unique, as are the Cell, Line and ALM saddles

Fabric also offers higher spec (nylon / carbon bases - carbon rail and full carbon options)
  • 1 0
 Is it also so that they can Charge(bazing!) more? Cause I sure as hell didn't pay $80 for my steel railed scoop, & could have paid even less if I hadn't bought it at the LBS.
  • 2 0
 Been running Charge Scoops since they were first released and they have been extremely comfy for 5-6 hour rides on a HT and FS, piece of piss to clean and could be had for as little as £25. Certainly comfier than a Gobi, bel air and a couple of others I've had.
  • 1 0
 any issues with the plastic catching on your legs when you go behind the seat? my only complaint so far, though it may have been due to the angle i had it at. haven't had a chance to try it since I changed it.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter - Same issue here. It would have been good to have a 135mm option also. The normal Spoon was a bit too wide for me but my real gripe was getting my shorts caught. Not an issue with a WTB Rocket.
  • 5 1
 Just to know weather this saddle could also work for us we would certainly need a 3D model of Mike Levy's ass Big Grin
  • 4 0
 I don't want one of those, sorry if I hurt your feelings Mike.
  • 5 1
 oh, whether.... obviously
  • 2 1
 I've got one of these (Charge branded) on my trail hardtail, and it's just as comfortable as this review suggests. It's very flexy though, and while that can be helpful in taking the edge off trail chatter, it feels pretty disconcerting when you're railing a berm and it starts to squirm underneath you. Almost feels as if your back end is kicking out.
  • 17 0
 Railing a berm while sitting down?
  • 1 0
 Try it sometime. Feels good man.
  • 1 0
 I think it was Nico Vouillez who used to sit and pedal through berms, some fast french downhill rider did it, in any case.
  • 1 0
 After riding on countless so called "Ergo" saddles. I have learned a couple of things about my tastes. If it looks right , it feels right in general. After riding MTB's for 30+ years. I always go back to Steve Potts original WTB SST saddle. This saddle sort of reminds of that shape. But I doubt it would make me stop buying up a supply of WTB SST Teams in Ti rail. Saddles are one of those things that tech can't fix. Either it fits your ass or it doesn't.
  • 1 0
 I picked one of these up after exploding my trusty Gobi XM in an unfortunate event with a tree... Its no Gobi that's for sure.. but its not a bad compromise at the price point.
  • 1 1
 If they make a Carbon shell with Ti rails Spoon then i may be interested. Got the Spoon on my Fixie and its as comfortable as my Specialized Henge which was triple the price! Thats Ti and Carbon and its dreadfully light!
  • 3 1
 ".....the base that's either carbon fiber (the scoop ultimate) or nylon depending on the model,and either carbon, steel or ti rails."
  • 5 1
 "I don't read, I only look at pictures"
  • 2 0
 I think he refers to Charge Spoon
  • 2 0
 If you read my comment, i stated Spoon, not Scoop, and as far as im aware, they do not make a Spoon yet!
  • 1 0
 Im sure they do because it was only a name change. Still the same saddles. Oh and they'll custom make a saddle for you as well. Boom!
  • 1 0
 Yeah, its a wise move to change the name as so many people change their saddles for the Charge Spoon, so stocking it OEM is a good idea...

The custom saddles look sick! I was tempted to do one for my fixed gear, but had to try keep costs down at the time of building :'(
  • 1 0
 Best saddle ever made is the railed SDG Bel Air. I can spend all day in it no problem.
  • 2 0
 Gotta be the first new thing not to say Enduro on it for 12 Months surely?
  • 2 0
 every ass has it's own saddle...
  • 3 4
 It doesn't look like it would be uneventful on the undercarriage.................comfortably numb comes to mind when I look at this saddle.
  • 1 0
 I have one Charge scoop and it's awesome!
  • 1 0
 Can ew put sugar in yous t wid it butt??
  • 1 1
 "gamut of asses" ftw
  • 1 3
 We already have charge spoon - why do we need this?
  • 4 0
 This is the newer faster better version - Fabric are the same people as Charge.
  • 1 0
 Newer faster you say..................in that case I need one.
  • 1 0
 well i don't really like the spoon. im quite picky about saddles and the more choice the better!
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