Fair Bicycle Releases Offset Saddle Clamp For RockShox Reverb Seat Posts

Aug 4, 2021
by Matt Beer  


Have you ever wished for a steeper seat angle, but weren't able to slide your seat far enough forward to achieve this? Fair Bicycle has come up with a solution - the Drop Best Reverb Offset Saddle Clamp. The two-man European team behind this brand, Marco Giarrana and Valetin Wendel, are multi-discipline mountain bikers who have a heavy belief in eco-friendly and fair trade business practices.

Right now, the clamps are only offered for Rock Shox Reverbs, but I would expect the idea to spark enough interest that Fair Bicycle will soon branch out to other brands of posts. The 27mm offset clamp can change the virtual seat tube angle by 2º and allows for independent adjustment of the saddle position and angle.

In the positive offset position, the Drop Best will bring a steeper, new school seat tube angle to older bikes that might suffer from being too relaxed. If you've had the chance to jump on a bike with modern geometry, you know that a steeper seat tube angle makes for a much more comfortable climbing position. That can aid in keeping the front wheel on the ground on tricky climbs, too.

Positive offset
Negative offset

Fair Bicycle says that the negative offset could help strike a balance for some new bikes with extremely steep STAs. Extra large frames with seat tube angles of 77º or steeper can make the seated position much shorter in comparison to the reach measurement or standing position. What this means is Fair Bicycles' Drop Best could help tall riders find more room while pedalling seated.

The clamps are machined in Switzerland from 7075 aluminum and use 12.9 and 10.9 grade USA made bolts. The system has been independently tested in Germany to meet ISO MTB standards. The stock Reverb rail clamps and hardware weighs 74 grams, while the Drop Best comes in at at 125 grams. This may be substantial in terms of percentages, but I would bet that improving your seated position takes precedence over a few grams.

The Drop Best will retail online only at fairbicycle.com for $118 USD / €99 / £85.





209 Comments

  • 175 4
 It's made to offset the sag of reverb
  • 4 0
 Sign me up for 2! :-P
  • 18 12
 Do a bleed but put the reverb oil in the fridge for several hours to overnight first. I saw this trick on Butter Suspension youtube and it worked. So far been good for 600-800 miles.
  • 35 0
 @MattyBoyR6: I love this even if it's fake and intended to contaminate my fridge for someone's sadistic pleasure.
  • 37 2
 @MattyBoyR6:
Reverb sag has nothing to do with the line bleed.
  • 12 1
 @MattyBoyR6: Just my experience here but the sag has nothing to do with the bleed...Although you are right that the fridge trick is perfect to achieve a proper amount of fluid. The bleed is for the trigger only.
  • 67 1
 @MattyBoyR6: Or you can just get a proper cable actuated dropper post and never have to worry about bleeding lines or sagging.
  • 1 0
 @Alexnor78: can you get rid of the sag?
  • 4 0
 @MattyBoyR6: If you subject the oil to some cold temperature training prior to bleeding does it work better when it's freezing?
  • 2 0
 Is it April Fools Day already?
  • 9 0
 We actually thought of sending a bleed kit with every DROP BEST.
Just kidding. Although there were a lot of bad Reverbs, the current C1s seem to do well. And we actually have very good support from SRAM here in Switzerland on Reverbs (read: low cost, closing both eyes, because they know).
  • 1 0
 @littleskull99: With newer versions you can by using the vent valve. www.youtube.com/watch?v=v68G5IMGSjk. Otherwise it is a rebuild from my understanding.
  • 7 1
 @MattyBoyR6: I bought a reverb once. After the sagging issue, I took it to SRAM at Sea otter to get is serviced for $125 and then sold it for $100 without using it again. I couldn't re-sell a sagging post without guilt. After service, because I didn't know if the sagging issue still existed, I could sell it and not feel guilty. Maybe I should have just thrown it away instead of losing $25 and my time.
  • 3 0
 @abzillah: That's what a shop told me SRAM do with those sent back to them. Not even they want to take one apart (not that nobody does, you just need to really want to).
  • 3 0
 @littleskull99: Yep. Buy another dropper.
  • 10 0
 @MattyBoyR6: or just buy a Bike Yoke dropper.
  • 5 2
 @abzillah: Hate to mention it, but... you lost $125, not $25.
  • 2 0
 @abzillah: I gave it to a friend of mine who claimed that he can service it. Couldn't thake his money. I gave him even my bleeding kit and a bottle full of fluid
  • 3 1
 @Almazing:

Not true. I've had my PNW rainer sag on me. Cable actuated air cartridge droppers can also fail and sag, though they are much easier to work on to be fair.
  • 4 1
 My wife I have had five different brands of droppers over the past few years… a reverb, an x-fusion, a one-up, a pnw and a specialized.. guess what they all fail eventually and need servicing..

Perhaps more people claim reverbs fail, because they are by far the most specced on bikes????
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: did he fix it?
  • 2 1
 @Almazing: Sagging can be present in most droppers. Mechanical actuation has nothing to do with a saggy post. The function of the most dropper posts and their lack of sag still relies on oil which is free of air and a charged IFP. Most cheap mechanically actuated posts use a cartridge very similar to what holds the trunk of your car open which is not serviceable. There is a lot of ignorance on this thread... lol
  • 61 6
 Wow, I love how it cantilevers your entire body-weight _AND_ all the clamping force off of a single M5 bolt.

I am morbidly curious as to whether it'll snap the bolt, or pull out the post head first?
  • 6 3
 while it might stress the bolt, I imagine on slack actual STA bikes it will reduce the load on the bushings.
  • 6 1
 @enki If you think about where your weight will normally be on the saddle, I don't actually think this will put a significant moment on the clamp/ post head. However, if you have a long saddle, sliding up onto the nose during a climb could be a bad idea. I don't think Reverbs have had issues with post heads failing, but have you seen what the old Bike Yoke Revives did?

As @hamncheez said, at least this will help reduce the load on the bushings.
  • 4 1
 You might have a point, nominal clamp load for a 12.9 grade M5 is 2320lbs. That might sound like a lot staticly, but it really isn't in that much for dynamic loads. Actually now that I think about it those dynamic loads are being transferred thru the taint, so it does in fact sound like a lot. that'd be 10g (for a 230lb rider), which isn't that much for pedals/bars, but for the seat... ouch!

Edit, actually given the leverage (particularly in the negative offset), it'd be a lot lower than 10g to overcome the clamp load.
  • 1 1
 www.shutterstock.com/video/clip-16890709-slow-motion-opening-beer-bottle-opener

Yeah, I've seen some post heads come loose in my day.
Could be a problem.
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: ... 10g is a lot. That's basically hitting the ground while sitting on the seat. It'll take a lot to snap that thing.
  • 50 0
 That's correct, the leverage is quite high. But this has been tested both in the lab, at one of Germany's leading test labs in a worst case scenario, offset to the front and load applied on a point way forward on the saddle. It passed even after the full fatigue test done before. The bolts are M6 12.9 grade. Also, we have cased hard, in the real world, many, many times, wearing full lower protection. Landing on the saddle nose. With all kinds of saddle rails, steel, ti, carbon...We haven't broken a saddle or post yet. Of course something is going to happen, it's called mountainbiking after all. But we think we have done everything we can to make the product work in most scenarios. Thanks for contributing guys!
  • 6 3
 @FAIRbicycle: If you've never broken a saddle, then you've never cased as hard I have. Smile
  • 3 0
 @blcpdx: I broke a carbon-rail Phenom Pro in my driveway. I am not a large dude (6' 185 lbs). I suppose it could have been defective. I also broke two Syncros seatpost heads back in the day when I weighed 120lbs so maybe it's just me Smile

I'm not really sure why we're talking about weight on the front of the saddle when it comes to catastrophic failure. Surely weight on the rear, especially in the negative offset position, is the worst case scenario?
  • 1 0
 I'm 90kg kitted up, an I've broken Bolts on regular seat posts. Gotta admit it's a concern. I did think about something like this, like running a lay back seat post backwards.
  • 3 0
 @nojzilla: on my Dune I did assemble the clamping parts of a Brand X Ascend dropper back to front and set the seat fully forward. I think it gave an extra 10mm or so.
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle: Exactly, I'd say you're more likely to bend/pop your seat rails out of your seat (done it with WTB Volt Pro), before your brackets break. The plastic seat bosses/rails are the weak point. This was exacerbated in my case with the seat being so far forward on the rails. If it could be clamped in the middle of the rail range with your bracket it'd be a much stronger interface!
  • 2 0
 @blcpdx: Huck to flat Smile I have bent a seatpost by a good 20°, casing on an old Giant ATX DH back in the days. It hurt.
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle: have you ever seen that photo of the Glory that was bottomed so hard the whole frame bent together?
  • 5 0
 The load isn’t on the bolt. The bolt provides a clamping force, and the dynamic load is held by the friction of the adapter against the seatmast head.

This is the same reason car lug bolts don’t snap even though they are massively undersized to hold the forces of your car: they clamp the wheel to the hub/rotor, and the shear force provided by that friction interface is over an order of magnitude higher than the shear strength of the bolts.

If you put ball bearings between this adapter and the seat mast (or between your car’s wheel and rotor), you’d have threaded fastener failure almost immediately.
  • 5 1
 @Auto-XFil: hey get your facts & logic out of here no one wants them
  • 1 0
 @jaame: No! Do you have it? Was that at the old red bull site in Jindabayne? Those drops were to FLAT if I remember right (waaay before the Glory was around though?)
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle:
Pinkbike Forum: “DH/4x - the weight game” page 3123

It won’t let me copy the link for some reason.
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle: What do you think about that? Massive guy, massive case, or both? Looks like it bottomed out HARD to me.
  • 42 0
 What I learned today: The double of 74 grams is 125.
  • 16 1
 Finally! I've been looking for something like this for years. I don't have a reverb, and I doubt they'll make for my Giant Contact SL dropper, but I'd be very happy to purchase a One Up dropper for more drop plus this clamp to move my seat forward. New post plus clamp accessory is way cheaper than a whole new frame to achieve a comfortable seated position.
  • 6 0
 Take a look at 9 point8 droppers, they built this feature into the dropper.
  • 7 0
 Thanks for the feedback!
That was exactly one of our thoughts. Also a way to keep riding a bike for longer = good for the environment.
  • 1 0
 Hey zacjob, you can gain a few mm by flipping the lower rail cradle back to front on the giant posts. In case that's enough.
  • 1 0
 I don't have a Reverb either, and the price would scare me away if I did, but maybe in the future this can be developed for more common posts, like Trans-X for example.
  • 1 0
 @bbqmike: I'm not sold on 9.8's dropper reliability anymore than I am Reverb. They had a lot of problems with brakes slipping and general reliability issues. I wish 9.8 would just fit a cartridge with Igus bushings ala OneUp, Giant, TransX, PNW Components, etc.
  • 16 0
 Let’s see a PB article where they take a one size too large, ‘outdated’ bike from 2018 and mod it out with this, an angle set and offset bushings to see how close they can get it to today’s modern geometry.
  • 1 0
 Exactly what I did minus the seatpost…as of yet Big Grin But the 1.5degrees on the HT steepen the seat quite a bit already
  • 1 0
 Totally agree, it ransformed a gt sanction I had especially giving it a 64 deg head angle
  • 1 0
 The sticking point is the "one size too large". That means you need to buy a bike anyway, because you can't apply it to your existing one.
Using a forward seat offset and an angleset will really squeeze the seated position into something resembling grandmas citybike.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: Some of us have been silly enough to size up having been a bit below the recommendation for the size. But I agree. The reach definitley got smaller already from the angleset, I also realize I dont even slam the seat all to the front these days, I might give that a try first. Living in Amsterdam I love my Omafiets so it suits me well, yet lots of the riding here is rather on the flat side so a super straight seattube is a bit out of place anyways and the 74.5 I am sporting now are quiete comfortable.
  • 1 0
 That sounds more like an NSMB article to me. Those folks like to tinker, and already have some articles about rehabbing older bikes to keep them on the trails longer.
  • 2 1
 @Ttimer: Due to the supply chain issues in National Board Dental Examination test packages I’m limited to shopping for a new bike on the PB buy and sell.
  • 1 0
 @Sterling-C: Sorry, meant to up vote.
  • 12 1
 I've been begging for something like this. This the first option for forward offset dropper post with at least 170mm of travel. I hate the reverb platform so I'm hoping they release one for one-up soon! I'd buy 2 immediately.
  • 2 2
 have you tried the c1? mine works flawelessly after a year with one bleed
  • 8 0
 We are looking into that. Will keep everyone posted. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 @DERPOWaterpig: Unless it came on your bike and you had no reason not to give it a shot, I can not understand why anyone would give rockshox a chance in the dropper post world anymore.

YEARS of the same problem over and over. Every time my friend gets a new Bronson my mind is blown that SantaCruz still specs their high end bikes with that piece of garbage.
  • 1 0
 @landonpate: Thats crazy, because I have one on my custom built Trek Remedy and it couldn't work more smooth! Maybe I'll just give it some more time and see what happens
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle: one up please. My Mondraker is brilliant to ride, but seat is too far back when seated even slammed forward, this would help.
  • 12 2
 My bike was fine until someone told me it want fine, now my dropper isn't fine either.. But my bike and dropper were fine a few years ago, U best just ride my not right stuff and have fun instead of worrying about everything.
  • 4 6
 Funny what marketing can do to your brain. Yes steep STA are now preferred, but people did just fine riding slacker STA's a few years ago. I'd keep riding my "outdated" bike until I'm ready to upgrade rather than buying little niche items to make minuscule improvements to my current rig. There's always gonna be something else new that comes out that you'll convince yourself you'll need next.

I do envy the people that upgrade every year but in reality there is no need for it. But if you can afford it, why not. I do laugh at the people I see driving beaters with their $6k plus bikes hitched on the back. Priorities I guess!
  • 5 1
 You're right. You never argue with the rider on the crapiest bike on the hill schooling everyone. Thanks for reminding us.
  • 2 2
 @FAIRbicycle: I bet there's many people on the crappiest bikes that can outschool and outride the dads on their 2022 top spec'd bike who take the green trails down and hike their bikes up the fire roads.
  • 2 0
 @stumphumper92: Why do just fine when you can do better? I had a 2015 Giant Reign that did just fine, but had such a stupidly slack STA that pedalled like a busted armchair. I ended up solding it, tired of squashing my undercarriage leaning against the saddle every half-decent climb.
  • 1 0
 *selling*
  • 1 0
 @stumphumper92: one day you too will be old and slow, may you also be blessed with a family and money for nice toys Smile
  • 6 0
 I recently bought a bike with more modern geo, and I've been wondering if the "better for climbing" aspects have a negative impact on riding on the flat? I'm finding it hard to get a comfortable seated riding position on the flat without a lot of pressure on my hands. The distance from saddle to handlebar is similar to my old bike, but the steeper ST angle is changing my weight balance. I'm considering a riser bar, which might move my center of gravity back away from my hands, but is that going to negate the supposed benefits of my bike when climbing/descending?
  • 5 0
 Most definitely. Road bike STA is around 74° for a reason.
  • 4 0
 Try raising your bars by 5mm at a time with headset spacers to see if that helps. I find modern geo likes a bit taller stack than the older stuff. Luckily it's a free and easy experiment (if you've got some room on your steerer tube).
  • 8 2
 *Cough cough* marketing bullshit.
  • 1 4
 on anything that is slightly up, your seat should be dropped slightly and you should be riding not pedaling..... other wise you are correct more pressure on the hands for sure.
  • 1 0
 @JustinVP: Thanks, but I'm already topped out on spacers. I'm riding an XL, and even with all the spacers under the handlebar it's still lower than the seat height
  • 1 2
 @MaplePanda: yeah, UCI rules.
  • 2 0
 @MuddyBrit: I had a similar issue, I ride an XL 2020 Capra and I should probably be on a large...but with COVID bike shortage I couldnt pass up the deal I got on a basically brand new bike. The reach was causing a lot of pressure on my wrists and hands while climbing and in flats. So, I have shortened the stem to 30mm, added 50mm Spank Vibrocore risers, and added a 5mm spacer. Solved my issue.
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: you sir, have a very progressive road bike. between 72 and 73 (but smaller frames have indead steeper STA)
  • 1 0
 @scitrainer: Thanks for sharing. Did you notice any downsides from having a higher bar? 50mm plus 5mm spacer is a big step up
  • 1 0
 @TDMAN: I ride size 52, so that’s probably why. Geo chart says 74° STA.
  • 1 0
 @MaplePanda: With set back post as well. This steep seat tube angle does place a riders weight ahead of the rear contact patch so looping out is less likely. To me though steep seat tube angles encourage a more upright position which is less efficient in terms of making watts.
  • 2 0
 @MuddyBrit: It has actually helped me with jumping and staying more centered on downhills.

I felt too forward previously...but it may be different for you and your bike geo.
  • 9 0
 This would be awesome for my trek slash
  • 3 0
 Yeah, we personally suffere(d) from these slack seattubes on brands like Trek. Actually I personally have had issues with that way back to the GT STS days (sick bikes, don't get me wrong). Where strangely it was claimed that the slack seattube angle would be better for descending?? Never understood that Smile
  • 1 1
 @FAIRbicycle: the idea behind is actually quite good, it pushes the saddle forward and out of the road, it also lets you have a lower and more forward CG frame.
People are just trying to use bikes like the slash as a trail bike
  • 8 0
 flashy website for having a single adapter. Hopefully a sign of good things to come as they roll out more parts!
  • 4 0
 You are onto something there. Watch this space Smile
If all goes well, we do our (drop) best.
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle: Will this work with the AXS Reverb?
  • 1 0
 @SwampThAAng: No, that would be another project. If SRAM brings a GX level Reverb AXS we will get under pressure Smile
  • 6 0
 I reached out to a few seat post manufacturers last year on this idea. I was trying to finangle a steeper STA on my bike at the time. Glad someone made a product. Now do the oneup , and x-fusion !
  • 1 1
 I posted this a few years back on the OneUp thread on MTBR. The OneUp corporate account happily answered every other question posted there - except mine asking for a forward offset head. Was weird.
  • 1 0
 @Linc: They responded to me basically saying that it would cause too much stress due to the offset. No doubt the posts are not originally designed for that type of offset load within whatever margin of safety that have set
  • 3 0
 Will this cause a sideload/splay on the bushings and make lowering the seat more difficult due to increased friction? Are the stock seat clamp bolt ears designed to handle this kind of load? Will it void the warranty (e.g. if the ear snaps off my reverb, am I SOL)?
  • 1 0
 This should reduce the load that the bushings have to carry, so there should be less friction (try lowering your dropper by sitting on the back of the saddle, then on the nose). The post head is definitely the concern here. I'd probably run a stubby saddle to prevent myself from loading too far forward on the nose.
  • 2 0
 Hey, thanks for the thought. During testing we have not noticed any more sideplay or increased friction developing on the Reverbs. Regarding the stock post ears, please see our response to enki above.
We don't know, but pretty sure warranty is void when running a DROP BEST. But that will be the case with many accessories (think your steerer tube gets a crack and you have been running a SWAT style tool in it. Not sure what a fork manufacturer would say.
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle: Not so sure about the SWAT. Heck, people successfully warranty OneUp-tapped steerers all the time.
  • 3 0
 I think it's a great idea could even get over the €100 price tag because it's made in Europe. But €19 shipping within Europe for a tiny item is really excessive. Hopefully, they find a distributor with reasonable shipping before copies show up on Aliexpress.
  • 5 0
 Thanks briain It is very hard to ship competitively out of Switzerland. Remember though that in the EU, USA and Canada we ship guaranteed free of sales tax and custom fees. Don't think many others do that. Also, we hoped a bunch of riders would order together and split the 20 bucks.
  • 3 0
 How about brands stop lying about the seat angles and just make them steeper........ don't understand whats resistance, my thought is they just don't like the look. Stuck on the headtube and seat tube looking the same. So dumb

I had people telling me my bike look funny "clown bike" was the words I was told in 2015 with a 78STA. They rode it and had a different idea later
  • 1 0
 But if it looks fast it rides fast, no Big Grin ?
  • 2 0
 Seat tube is slack but starts forwards of the bottom bracket because short chainstays makes 29" wheels colide with the seat tube.

You can't have it all, there is no space for it.
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: This. It's impossible to have steep 'actual' seat angles with 29" wheels with realistic chainstay lengths and proper wheelpaths.

It's almost funny watching frame manufacturers try to 'sell' stupid long chainstays on enduro bikes as a performance enhancing 'decision'. Just admit that you prioritised uphill pedaling position and that meant you had no choice but to run a 450mm chainstay and be done with it.
  • 3 0
 “ Extra large frames with seat tube angles of 77º or steeper can make the seated position much shorter in comparison to the reach measurement or standing position”

FINALLY. People are understanding that too steep of STA + too long of a reach = uncomfortable pedaling position on modern XL bikes. We need to increase the stack height when we increase reach and STA too much. Otherwise us tall folk look like hunchbacks pedaling up hills.
  • 4 0
 Definitely a good addition for us geo modders especially given offset bushings and increasing axle to crown of forks work to slacken out the seat tube angle
  • 6 1
 Am I the only short leg/long torso freak left who slams their saddle all the way back?
  • 1 0
 No, you are not. You can flip a DROP BEST backwards if your bike/body requires that. And run the saddle rails in a normal position. Thanks for inserting that point of view!
  • 1 0
 I'm a short leg / long torso freak and generally push my saddles forward. Are you on a particularly progressive bike?
  • 5 0
 ONE-UP next please! Probably the most sold aftermarket post out there. Most of us thing Reverbs are pure trash.
  • 1 0
 Sooo many mails and requests for OneUp...thanks!
  • 2 0
 I own a 2019 slash... One of the biggest "offenders" for modern STAs, and I can't even run my seat slammed forward on it or I get knee pain (unless i raise the dropper way, way up). There's a limit to this depending on your anatomy.
  • 2 0
 Problem is reach and seat angle need to be adjusted in tandem. Longer reach and steeper seat angle or shorter reach and slacker angle. If you only adjust one you’ll end up with an effective top tube that’s too long or short.
  • 1 0
 Yes. Exactly. I think people are missing this in the comments.
  • 2 0
 One feature I just noticed: It looks like this clamp separates the tilting adjustments from the seat clamping screws. Having the same screws used for both functions is one of the reasons I dislike the Reverb and stick with the 9point8 droppers. Maybe I'll have to get this clamp and a Reverb after all.
  • 2 0
 Another million dollar idea would be to make a saddle where the back of the rails extends slightly behind the seat so that you can push the saddle super far forward. Wouldn't require a special seatpost at all, but it would probably look super weird.
  • 7 1
 Any pre 2020 Santa Cruz
  • 5 0
 Is it just me, but does make the bike look fugly.
  • 1 0
 Please read our answer to loam33. We understand your point!
  • 5 0
 Just throw on a pair of clip-ons and you're on your way to Kona!
  • 1 0
 That's funny, made me laugh hard Smile Who would have thought that we, the cool MTBer take over tech from those riding with sleeveless shirts, arm warmers, chamois and compression socks?
  • 1 0
 All my seats are slammed forward. If im sitting im generally climbing… so with a dropper its out of the way anyways. Climbing is so much more efficient and i dont need to slide forward sitting my taint as much on the front of the seat other than super steeps
  • 2 0
 If you bike is old enough to have a shitty slack seat angle, it’s also old enough to not have enough reach. Stop the band aids and get a new frame. You’ll be happier in the long run.
  • 1 0
 Great idea and it's nice to see that Kona Process as an example.
I do wonder slightly if optimal use of this product will be limited to bikes which have slack SAs (which is a common thing) and are also quite long already?
So a well designed bike from a few years ago might have a too-slack SA by current standards, but the reach would be in proportion with that - and this product might lead to the bike feeling too short?
Does that make sense?
  • 1 0
 This could be good for people that are getting a hand me down and don’t really fit on the bike in the first place,
For for those people with injuries (like a low back) that’s still want to ride and not be hunched over as much like road riders, and
For those casing that hard, hopefully you remember to drop your post before sending it (or bring your DH bike next time)

The ability to customize is a good thing
Thanks for R&D and for building it. Hopefully few more post options will spawn from this.
  • 1 0
 This is a cool idea, but I wonder if the offset will result in the rider unevenly loading the seals on compression of the post. Might not be noticeable at first, but I’d be interested to see a long term test and whether or not it leads to reduced seal life. My guess is reverbs that use this wear out faster.
  • 4 0
 9point8 has had this for awhile now
  • 4 10
flag bigbrett (Aug 4, 2021 at 9:52) (Below Threshold)
 Too bad their droppers suck Frown
  • 2 0
 @bigbrett: how so? I had an issue with a deal on one after a couple months. Got it fixed and now I’m on season 5 and ride pretty much every single day! I think they are phenomenal
  • 1 1
 @stormracing: I went through three that had major reliability issues before I ditched it. two of them had an issue where an internal mechanism began scoring the stanchion after a few weeks of riding. They wouldn’t warranty the first one, treated it like maintenance, then finally warrantied the second when the same thing happened. Plus it required a lot of lubrication (like once a week) to feel good. Ditched it after that. Maybe they are better now, but that was a pretty bad experience.
  • 2 0
 we know, thanks! also we think great posts from 9.8
@bigbrett: had good experiences with them so far
  • 1 0
 I love 9point8 but their 'forehead' option only works on their fall-line-R posts, which max out at 150mm. I've been asking them to make one for their normal fall-line posts, which goes up to 200mm, but it hasn't been a priority for them. I was getting set to design my own. Maybe this will light a fire under them...
  • 1 0
 @lixxfe: I also emailed them a year back making the same request haha.
  • 1 0
 @unusual-bread: Let's keep at it, and direct them to this threadSmile !
  • 5 1
 Interesting, I always wanted my feet to be behind me when I pedal.
  • 1 0
 That’s what I’m thinking. Gonna have a lot of ruined knees in 5 years.
  • 1 1
 wait, I need help with this....so one of the reported crowing achievements of the steeper seat tube angle is that it took the mass of taller riders (and shorter alike) and moved it forward so they were not hanging so far over the back tire thereby reducing front tire lift during climbs...and now we are told that they need to create an offset to negate that advantage...huh.
  • 1 0
 This lets you create a steeper seat angle to get the advantages you just talked about... not sure the confusion here lol it just so happens it can be put on backwards if for some odd reason you want to slacken out the seat angle as well.
  • 4 1
 bye bye warranty ....not that it means much
  • 8 0
 just like any other modification, keep the original piece and switch it back if you have to warranty. Super simple.
  • 1 0
 used to sell these in our shop back in the day Smile
it's funny because Maverick dug out the dropper idea and made it big again around 2007?
  • 3 3
 27mm is absolutely massive, your seated reach would have to be like 2 or 3 sizes too long to begin with for that to work, no?
How about something more reasonable, like a 12mm offset?
  • 3 1
 By the looks of you can still slide the saddle forwards and backwards in the rails, so with this bringing the 'centre' forward 27mm, you could then slide the saddle backwards to achieve your 12mm. Obviously it's less useful if you're not currently at the extreme end the saddle rails.
  • 3 1
 Hey Dirk Scott says exactly what we would. We went for 27mm because it works for many scenarios. You can still slide the saddle forwards and backwards like in any other clamp. Keep in mind that simply offering two different offesets would generate a lot of cost from our side. You have to make quite a big batch to even get to a reasonable cost and then still have testing expenses, sample expenses...Thanks for your input!
  • 1 0
 Someone needs to make some more of the lookalike rock shox stickers that said bullsh1t from back in the day, Little ones to go over the logo on the back of returds!
  • 1 0
 Great Idea... i have my old Jekyll setup with the saddle slammed as far forward as it can go, its definitely made it easier to climb on.. i like this better.
  • 2 0
 people should ride more, and think less / worry about this thing of "Geometry"
  • 3 0
 Seems fair
  • 3 2
 Not a bad idea but a whole brand X or other copy post is only about £50 more, not exactly keenly priced.
  • 5 0
 Thanks. We understand the crazy seeming price points for a complete dropper and just a saddle clamp. Yet this is the very best price we can do for our high fair trade and eco/circular standards. It would seem kind of nonsense not to pursue your idea just because you cannot compete with big Asian factories? I have been in CNC shops in Asia where stuff like a 50 quid dropper is made. I would not want to work there.
  • 3 0
 @FAIRbicycle: Fair comment - I run a small CNC shop on the UK so know the costs well and I imagine they will be higher where you are based.

We really do have to do better though if we want to compete and re-shore manufacturing as the whole world won’t understand (or don’t care) about shop conditions, just that product works and it’s cheap.

I also know personally of a few shops in Taiwan that are as clean and well setup as any I have seen in the UK, better than many even, and prices are still good.

Good luck with it, it’s a hard position to try and convince the customer a price is worth paying because of the place of manufacture.
  • 6 0
 @justanotherusername: : Cool! So you really understand Smile Totally agree not everyone will understand or care about where their goods come from/how they are made. We just think, and hope, there is a (growing) bunch of people who do, because you should.
Re-shoring: We see this happening for even more complex machining here. Companies are getting ready with automation for small batches too, bringing the difference down to salary cost, basically. However, we want to source from places where workers have insurance, paid vacation. I have seen top notch shops in Taiwan too (quality, efficiency, know how definitely!), but the wages, vacation, environmental standards are too low. Being ex-machinists ourselves our rough guideline is: source from where you would happily work yourself.
  • 3 1
 looks like a direct ticket to snap city
  • 2 0
 please see our reply to enki above. thx!
  • 4 3
 Yes, make our bikes look more ugly so we can be a part of the steep sta cool kids, sweet!
  • 4 0
 Hey loam
I understand. It is an uncommon look. I was a hardliner too in many cases. For way too long I was die hard to run max. a 34T cassette. Because those 42Ts looked like a tourists bike IMO. Now I happily run a 52T cassette and even think that looks totally cool. Not sure why. Can it be because all our heroes do too? I am not 100% sure on that.
While a bike with DROP BEST looks uncommon, I do think you can start to like it visually too, once you appreciate the functional advantage. If you are on a bike/position that needs adjusting.
  • 1 3
 I see failures.. Internals too much side load on shaft,develope more play and or bend or wear faster..not too mention the clamp and foece it sees and the offset mounting.. Good idea on a stationary post,on a dropper not so much... Hope it works fine, it's a good answer to some issues for several riders
  • 1 0
 please see our answer to enki above thx!
  • 2 0
 I can already hear the creaking
  • 1 0
 Dang, 2 model years too late. Would have been epic for my old evil...luckily. most '21+ bikes(worth buying) =77° min
  • 1 0
 All jokes aside, I think this is a really good idea. 9point8 did it with the fall line r, but not the regular fall line.
  • 1 0
 If you have to use your saddle like this, I think you should buy a new frame that is designed for you.
  • 1 0
 Not sure I would want to try anything that has a slight chance to make the seals of an reverb wear out even faster.
  • 1 0
 What about an universal adapter, which can be run with every fixed seatpost on the market?
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the idea! We were thinking about that too. But with fixed posts the adapter would soon be more expensive than the post itself. Still interesting, what's your thought?
  • 1 0
 @FAIRbicycle: It would be however less expensive than buying a new frame. E.g.: geometry wise, my bike is 95% ok, except from the overly slack STA. To solve this, I run a homemade thingy, which adds 5-6 degrees to the STA. It would be nice to find such a thing on the market, properly engineered and certified. Cheers
  • 3 1
 Shown: How to fix a Kona
  • 3 0
 Or Evil from three years or older.
  • 3 1
 Now do One Up
  • 1 0
 Please now make it for the 100 droppers in existence Smile
  • 2 1
 I thought this was the best thing ever... then I saw the price.
  • 1 0
 Looks only a mother could love.
  • 1 0
 Lots of smegma on that seatpost.
  • 1 0
 Reverb no thank you PNW yes please
  • 1 0
 That OG kona process is DOPE
  • 1 0
 Thanks! It's my personal bike. I spent a lot of time and money hunting it down from Kona. In large and that grey/black. Why? It's sick Smile
  • 1 0
 I have a 2016 134 and I approve this message. Take my money!
  • 1 0
 Bikeyoke version would be awesome @FAIRbicycle
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the input! Definitely on the map, but they're all not that easy to do Smile
  • 6 6
 People still use non-AXS Reverbs?
  • 21 1
 People still use Reverbs?
  • 6 2
 @hamncheez: I have AXS drivetrains on 2 bikes. money isn't the issue keeping me from running the dropper.....it's the vow I swore to never put anything with the word reverb on my own bike, after working in a shop for a year. lol. *ptsd triggered*
  • 1 0
 KS LEV please!
  • 2 3
 Does this come with a handle bar reach extender also?!!! I love "band-aids" for make design more better.
  • 3 0
 Just get you a 100mm stem and you are all set. LOL
  • 1 1
 bushing bushing babaiiiii
  • 1 3
 Ain't no one gonna comment on how this just changes the offset and doesn't actually do anything to "steepen" the STA? Increasing the offset compromises the lower positions.
  • 2 0
 It changes the 'actual seat tube angle', by putting the centre of the saddle further forward over the bb. The 'actual seat tube angle' is a straight line from the bb to the centre of the saddle
  • 1 3
 Why invest in returds? Just get a pnw or 1up post for a price that is reasonable and should really be the norm for all knucklehead businesses to recognize and materialize!
  • 2 1
 Buy a one up.
  • 1 0
 Love this!
  • 1 0
 Good idea!
  • 1 2
 Or, buy a bike that fits properly from Day 1.
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