Field Test: 12 Bikes Hucked to Flat in Gratuitous Slow Motion

Dec 27, 2018
by Brian Park  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

12 Bikes Hucked to Flat in Gratuitous Slow Motion

Literally just what the title says.



Hucks by Adam Price, photography by Trevor Lyden


Merry Christmas! After a few weeks testing 12 new bikes on some of the world's best trails in Whistler, BC, we brought Adam Price AKA The Privateer up from the office to have a little fun hucking them all to flat. For science.

Well, broscience anyway.

In order of appearance: Santa Cruz Bronson, Yeti SB150, Specialized Stumpjumper 29, Kona Process 153 CR 29, Cannondale Habit, Giant Trance 29, GT Sensor, Yeti SB130, Pivot Firebird 29, Scott Ransom, Devinci Spartan 29.

2018 Pinkbike Field Test
Giant Trance
Cannondale Habit
Cannondale Habit
GT Sensor

Yeti SB130
Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper 29 review test Photo by Trevor Lyden
Specialized Stumpjumper 29
Trek Remedy 9.9 Photo by Trevor Lyden
Trek Remedy

Kona Process
Kona Process CR 29
Santa Cruz Bronson
Yeti SB150

Pivot Firebird 29
Devinci Spartan 29
Scott Ranson


This was the last Field Test video for the year, and we hope you enjoyed the tests as much as we enjoyed making them. We'll be releasing more video reviews soon, so stay tuned!


Watch all the Field Test videos here.


306 Comments

  • + 123
 Thanks for this wonderful Xmas gift!
  • + 30
 Yes, but very curious how that Message linkage fork would behave...
  • + 13
 Dude, Adam was hucking to flat? The Privateer is a legend....
  • + 4
 @Thustlewhumber: Does hucking to flat mean hucking to a flat landing or hucking to a flat tire? Noob question?
  • + 41
 @Danntana78: neither. It's actually referring to the music playing in the background. usually when the tunes are a little flat, it lets morale drop, which means it's a little more difficult to get as sendy. more flat tunes = more respect.
  • + 4
 Should've been flagged nsfw though
  • + 17
 Great video! Actually the first video I've watched right through for a long time. Amazing how watching riding gods shralping and spinning just doesn't do it for me anymore. Most of these videos look the same. This was pure gold though. More outside the box videos please PB!
  • + 9
 @kpickrell: agreed. The front suspension appears quite crude and basic compared with the rear in these slo-mo's.
  • + 5
 @tremeer023: Yeah I wonder when the Fox 38 is coming out. Clearly we need it!
  • + 2
 @Danntana78: Flat landing, as opposed to a more favorable downward sloping landing.
  • + 9
 @tremeer023: no doubt. Some SERIOUS flex in some of those front ends, wow...
  • + 103
 I'd like to see some old stinky delux or specialized enduro on there at the end just for a comparison from old bike to new bike flex.
  • + 99
 A good reminder we are just noodles riding slightly stiffer noodles.
  • + 63
 Oh, this groundbreaking experiment will help current and future generations of Pinkbike engineers understand and discuss the phenomenon of flex. It is for us what Hubble is to astronomers. Adam is Chuck Yeager to us. We salute you.
  • + 5
 Yes, I’m infinitely smarter as a rider from viewing this. I also appreciated the broad spectrum of manufacturers vs using multiple from the same, that also happen to have ad spend for the platform.
  • + 15
 @cgeuns: I read some comments about these videos proving Fox 36 to be flexier than Lyrik and sustained brain damage from repetitive, non volountary face palm reflex
  • + 49
 *Huck Yeager
  • + 6
 I think they should do the test over and make two categories 27.5 and 29........just to eliminate the bias
  • - 8
flag WAKIdesigns (Dec 25, 2018 at 15:08) (Below Threshold)
 @nofear259: Huck Eager
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Huck-a-billy hoedown.

"For those about to be Hucked, we salute you!"
  • + 30
 Being an (armchair) engineer, I've been saying for a while that dual crown 'enduro' forks need to come back and it's not hard to see why creaking CSU's are so common. Bring back the SID XL and Junior T ha ha.
  • + 39
 MRP Bartlett!
  • + 6
 @sspiff: Nice! That needs more exposure :cough: Pinkbike :cough: .
  • + 3
 @sspiff: They also let you order almost any colour too.
  • + 3
 @sspiff: I just stumbled upon the Bartlett yesterday, and I'm super curious!
  • + 4
 @sspiff: would be very interesting to see the MRP (and of course the SID XL) compared to all these SC Forks.
  • + 2
 Had the e150 fork on my ’08 Enduro. Really liked it even though it was a bit underdamped. Super-stiff.
  • + 7
 If you put a stiff, DC fork on a trail bike all the forces causing that flex are going to go into the headtube and the frame instead. Trail bikes aren't overbuilt like a DH bike is.
  • + 3
 I'm not talking about trail bikes as such though. More 'Enduro' bikes with 160mm+ forks that are turning more and more into DH bikes every day. Might as well beef up the front end a little bit more and put a 'lightweight' dual crown fork on. Having really long 170-180mm single crown forks that tend to creak seems like a half assed solution to me.
  • + 2
 @wallheater: Most solutions are half assed mate, welcome to MTBing. You want actual solutions, buy from people who care about performance, not margins. Hint: they are not multimillion overpriced Taiwan made forks/shocks/enter your part per year kind of manufacturers.
  • + 4
 @rezrov: Wrong...
Scott Ransom actually built to the same standards as the Gambler.. A few people run it with dual crown forks..
And Evil Wreckoning
and YT Capra..
.
.
.
.
  • + 6
 @denomerdano: doesn´t matter if they are designed to the same standards if they were not designed for DC forks they won´t have reinforced area behind headtube which fork is going to hit in case of crash and most likely will seriously damage the frame as a result. Hence why not many manufacturers don´t approve their frames for DC forks in the first placey YT does and they know why.
  • + 2
 Run a 36 ebike chassis for 160, 170 and 180mm bikes. I'm 195lb and it's stiff, predictable and not too much heavier. My placebo tells me the damper performs better too!!!
  • + 1
 been saying this for a while that single crown forks are holding these bikes back. 170mm triple crown lyric please.
  • + 1
 Dual crown forks are also easier to change the offset on, for side by side testing. Just a new crownset. If you want to upgrade to 37mm offset on a Fox single crown... 1) you have to get through Fox sales.. 2) you buy an entire steerer, crown, uppers assembly which costs more than a @#$%! and all you needed was the offset.
  • + 16
 NOT FLEX

Being an acual enigneer, The forks are not flexing they are pivoting on the axle.
When the front tire flattens out on some severe flat landings it stops rotating. the bike continues to carry it's momentum forward . this results in the fork pivoting forward on the axle to stay aligned with the forward moving head tube on the frame . Its because the forks are quite stiff and the tire stops that this occurs.

Youll notice you don't see this pivoting when the landing is such that the front tire keeps rotating at reasonable speed. Only when the tire stops due you get this pivot effect you guys are misreading as flex.

Place your finger on 1:38 and click that over and over. you'lll see what I'm talking about.
  • + 0
 @rezrov: YT and Yeti seem to think otherwise .
  • + 3
 @Mikevdv: Being an actual bike mechanic (heh....) I personally never mentioned flex. I'm referring to the CSU being the weak point in the fork due to there only being one clamping point for the stanchions. All the energy is being fed into that point and the lower headset bearing. Crappy tolerances and under built interfaces mean creaking.

Having said that, anyone who has ever tested a fork for CSU creaking knows that they flex. 2 seconds with teh google even shows this:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRIkdDe6fIM

Also shows how older Chris King headsets used to cut into steerer tubes on long single crown forks due to the headset design and steerer flex. I can't remember ever seeing this issue with a dual crown fork though as the steerer is better supported..
  • + 2
 @rezrov: you should check out the head tube on my Empire MX6 EVO, that’s going nowhere
  • + 0
 @wallheater: couldn’t agree more. There’s even more to it. Bushing overlap is silly, why not incorporate coated internal sliding surfaces inside the lowers and use glide bushings. Maybe there should be more USD forks, with carbon CSUs like RS1 since it is easier to make the whole package stiff in fore/aft plane. Wait... it would make the price sky rocket... maybe one piece CSUs like Öhlins (and Fox in the past) which may bring us to a conclusion that making crown/steerer interface 1cm deeper and bushing overlap bigger would make a lot of difference... again, I can’t blame my Lyrik for any stiffness issues.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: we cannot use sliding bushes because magnesium lowers are too soft to allow this. And everyone is using magnesium lowers.
  • + 5
 @Mikevdv: not flex ha what? Did you watch that video with your back to the screen. Watch again and pay attention this time.
  • + 1
 @Mikevdv: I see what you described, thank you sir!!
  • + 2
 I wonder whether the Cannondale Habit would accept (as in, certified to accept) the old DC Lefty fork. If so, you should safely be able to ride it with any DC fork of the same length. I thought the Fox 40 can easily be shortened. Chances are you can do the same with other DC forks. Or indeed dig out your old Rond (WP) Mid Ego DC USD forks to slap them on your heavily gusseted Dual Slalom bikes. Hucking is cool again Actually I'm pretty sure fork manufacturers are busy developing and marketing their 2021 shorter travel lighter weight DC forks right now.
  • + 3
 sid xl ftw!
  • + 3
 @doe222: And Knolly, the Delirium headtube can take a double crown. 170 out back too, perfect with an MRP bartlett dual crown.
  • + 2
 @kazwei: i had a pair of judy sl dualies and they were awesome
  • + 6
 @Mikevdv: Whaa?!
You are speaking utter nonsense there. Surely "as an engineer" you are aware that if these forks didnt flex at all on landing the forces transferred would be enormous. The fork would shatter or rip the head tube off the frame. There HAS to be flex. But as an engineer I'm sure you know that.
Also, "the wheel stops rotating because the tyre has flattened"?!?! What? What engineering qualifications do you actually have? Asking for a friend....
  • + 2
 I just watched this again to see the FLEXING and it's (sort of....) interesting to see how much the fork flexes when the rear wheel lands first Vs the likes of the Cannondale where Adam lands with the forces directly in line with the fork direction. There will be less energy for the fork to absorb with the Kona landing as the rear of the bike / legs have absorbed more, but as the forces aren't in line with the fork the fork flexes more as it's acting as a lever. Hence some Lyriks look more flexy than others. Flex flex flexy flex blah blah blah Smile
  • + 2
 Too stiff forks will make your ride harsh and take away the speed, also it will overload the damper. Every CSU has it's own life span anyway, it depends on quality and how well research development and field testing were made nothing is eternal specially a joint where tube is inserted in a chunk of metal.
  • + 4
 If you watch at 0.25 speed you can see that some of 'em flex like heck. Probably has to do more with each fork's angle during the compression than its actual stiffness. Presumably there is an optimum (non-zero) amount of fork flex for each type of bike/race/terrain, or else we'd all be lugging around 40mm stanchions right now. Ditto for the frame itself.

PS I am an electrical engineer so I am infinitely qualified to speak on mechanical engineering problems as long as they are presented to me via the internet.
  • + 3
 @gabriel-mission9:

I realize when any load is applied some flex is present . whether it is significant or visibly detectable is what I'm getting at.

what is predominantly VISIBLE in this video is the pivoting of the fork on the front axle.

worst case of this is 1:38 get a good screen and reclick that section a few times. (you can't do this with a touchscreen phone)

The flex (although present) is BARELY visible.
the pivot Is VERY obvious and I believe most people are not making this distinction.

This pivot occurs because the tire stops rotating on landing it becomes difficult to begin rotating as it's basically a square on the ground just after impact as such the fork pivots on the front wheel axle a bit because this is the path of least resistance to stay aligned with the headtube.

Id like to include photo's in my response to clarify further.
But based on your response attacking my qualification it doesn't appear you would be open to discussion or further thought against your initial assumptions. So likely wont be a fruitful discussion.

If you care to take the time slow it down an notice the line between the shock and the head tube barely wavers from straight on impact the tire stops then the fork pivots forward on the axle to stay in line with the headtube.

To your point the blue yeti I find the flex to be visible on that model. but others the visible effect is dominated by a pivot rather than a flex.
  • + 2
 @Mikevdv: I watched the section that you mentioned, and yes the wheel stops turning briefly but just look at the relationship between the lowers and the front of the head tube as the fork goes through it's travel and tell me that the fork isn't flexing. I watched it at 0.25 speed several times.
  • + 2
 @wallheater: pause the video draw lines.... 1 for lowers, 1 for stanchions and 1 for head tube. in the air vs at impact vs 3/4 travel. It's tricky cuz a lot of crap is moving in weird ways you wouldn't expect. (Tire stops bike keeps moving forward)

There is some flex notably between the stanchions and lowers but BARELY perceivable. rotation of the fork around the axle is massive but head tube stanchions and lowers stay in close alignment from the unloaded condition as far as the human eye is concerned

I'm open to being wrong cuz i like learning new things and further questioned my initial statement due to the feedback I had from you guys but on further detailed review, I stand by it....majority of what is being seen is not flex.
  • + 1
 @Mikevdv: All I know... Is that if my Fork or head tube doesn't break on these landings, im good! That and most of my landings are to transition anyways. We're good.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Ok, I get what you are saying, and perhaps you are right to have a pop about the way I took the piss a bit. Sorry.

I still think you are wrong though.
A) There is no way the tyre deformation momentarily stops the wheel. The leverage moments just don't add up. There is a huge amount of inertia driving that wheel forwards, a collapsed tyre with a couple of inches contact patch simply doesn't have the leverage required to stop the wheel.
B) If the fork is rotating around the front axle, without significantly flexing, the back wheel would come off the ground. It doesn't.

I believe what you are seeing is the fork splaying (flexing) forwards on impact, then returning to straight as the load is overcome. The dropouts maybe move a total of 3/4" forward of their normal position, to 1/4" behind, to straight, so the fork does not appear wildly curved at any point, but it is definitely flexing visibly, and the momentary pause in the wheels rotation is an artifact of that, rather than anything caused by the tyre.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: I've not done any math so my comment here is purely qualitative. Indeed I don't know if it adds up.\

A) I don't think it would necessarily be the tyre deformation stopping the wheel. There is a lot of normal force from the ground at that point, so there is also a lot of grip. But it isn't because the wheel would suddenly be "square" which would stop it. Instead because of the head angle, as the fork compresses the wheel also moves rearwards with respect to the front triangle. So as the inertia of the rider is still pointed forwards and down, the inertia of the wheel (and lowers of the fork) is horizontal and at least not so much in the forwards direction. This could cause a CCW moment (from the observer viewpoint). Whether it is flex or pivoting, I've not decided yet. Obviously it is a combination but I've not decided which one is dominant. A way to check this theory would be to do the experiment with a linkage fork like the USE fork or the more recent Weagle fork (forgot the name) which don't move the axle that much rearwards.

B) In a different thread (in the same article) I actually mentioned that the rear suspension seems to stall or the rear wheel even bounces up during the compression phase of the landing. One hypothesis was that it was because the tyre was rebounding whilst the suspension was still compressing. But I can very well imagine the rear end does come up because the bike indeed pivots forwards.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: they’re flexing from the crown. If you’re used to riding triple clamps the flex is super noticeable and 170mm single crown forks.
  • + 2
 I'm fed up with my 36s flexing and binding - luckily Mojo Rising have a new dual crown conversion kit on the horizon, with adjustable offset to boot! That means i can replace my CSU with the dual crowns and stanchions, while keeping my damper/spring and 36 lowers... Triple clamp 36s anyone?
  • + 17
 those poor forks. look at the flex
  • + 14
 Kind of has me terrified of what my bike must be going through being a bigger rider(6'4" 265lbs)
  • + 1
 Flex on the front end of the Kona is really back and forth. Haven't looked at specs but hoping that isn't a Lyrik.
  • + 17
 Flex is good! No flex = snap.
  • + 3
 Just think they have bushings and wiper seals, which will give under load. This is where the majority of it will come from. Nout major!

I’d like to see this slow-mo on a bike with a flex-tail / solid chainstays, without a pivot.
  • - 1
 @cunning-linguist:
me to prove that steel hartails don't do bugger all. its just the material absorbs vibrations and dulls it with shear hefty weight. they are not flexing. then do it we some carbon and ally ones aswell.
  • + 2
 This flex seems pretty irrelevant. Who would notice when absorbing impacts like these? I'd be more interested in how much these forks twist under max braking (without going OTB). As for the forks flexing under impact like this, I wouldn't care.

I'm actually more curious about what happens with the rear suspension. The all seem to kind off stall at 3/4 of the travel and only then go to full travel. Is this what we call "spiking"? Or did Adam land and absorb the impact and then stomp, which pushed the suspension through its final bit of travel?
  • + 2
 @vinay: I think it's a combo of a few things: Adam absorbing the impact, the force transferring to the front, then back to the rear, and also the tires absorbing and then deflecting.
  • + 3
 @vinay: Basically, all of the dampers working at different rates and times. Edit- watching again, it looks like the tire is the biggest factor in this 3/4-travel-to-full pause. The tire is undamped. So, the air is compressed, which then rebounds. You can see the tire compresses, rebounds, and transfers the force back through the linkage. In the momentary pause between that force transfer, the shock stops moving. Pretty cool!
  • + 2
 @vinay: This is most visible with the Kona at 2:18 ish. You can see the tire fully rebounds and lifts back up again- this is when the shock pauses; when the tire is pushed back to the ground by the shock, it is then bottomed out again and transfers through the linkage.
  • + 1
 @vinay: Watch the rear tyre. Usually it compresses a bit, then the sus starts moving. At some point the pressure in the shock overpowers the pressure in the tyre and the tyre is then fully flattened into the floor. I believe this causes the brief "stall" in the suspension you spotted.

May also have something to do with the fact that air springs are f*cking awful. For many reasons. Many many reasons. I'd be interested to see back to back vids, air vs coil.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: Why do you think air springs are awful? Seems like nearly every bike manufacturer specs air springs and there is probably a reason for that. What's the last air spring you have ridden?
  • + 3
 @skills25: Every bike manufacturer specs air springs because:

A) One size fits all, ie they don't have to carry 5 different weight coil springs for every bike they sell. They just sell you a bike and you stick in as much air as required. This saves them lots of money.
B) Air is free. This saves them lots of money.
C) Air is really light. So the total weight of the bike looks better on paper.
D) Air spring volume can be changed, meaning you can build bottom out control into the spring which is cheap and easy, instead of into the damper which is expensive and difficult.

Performance wise though, air loses out to coil every single time.

A) Air changes in temp, changing your spring rate over the course of a ride. A long descent under a heavy rider can turn a bike from a soggy undersprung sofa into a pingy oversprung bastard quite easily.
B) Coil springs are linear meaning your suspension will feel the same no matter where you are in the travel. This is a good thing. If you are concerned about bottom out, set your damping up better.
C) Really rampy air spring setups intended to reduce bottom out, turn your bike into a rock hard undamped pogo stick in deep travel. Your damping settings that you carefully tuned at full extension will be completely overwhelmed once your air spring has gone up from 200psi to well over 1000psi at bottom out. I am irritated daily by the fact that shocks and forks are sold with identical tunes for air and coil springs. The applications are worlds apart.
D) Air springs are sooooooooooooooooooooooo sensitive to maintenance. An air spring that has been ridden hard for a matter of days will perform less well than a freshly serviced one. Coil springs need exactly 0 servicing throught their entire lifespan. Which will likely be longer than that of the bike they are on. Obviously the damper and chassis still need servicing, but so will an air fork/shock.
E) air springs have weird mid stroke issues that are obvious to even the most ham-fisted riders. The more you look into the science of it, the wierder the issues get. The spring rate changes if the piston approaches the rate of pressure wave propagation in the spring are really quite interesting.

Whats the last air spring I rode? Er, I dunno. I work in a high end shop. I ride lots of 2019 bikes regularly. The nicest air spring I ever rode was the one in the Ohlins DH Race fork. It was really really nice. For an air spring.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: I've not ridden many so considered high end forks. Out of the forks I've owned, three of them had coil springs. But it is not fair comparison. The first was my first fork, a RS Judy TT without any damping. Obviously I was constantly smashing it straight through the full 80mm of travel and during longer faster descends, it would resonate causing me to eventually either lose control or in the best case, get off course and lose speed. After another bad crash I decided I needed damping so I got myself an air sprung Marzocchi MXComp so for me that was a huge improvement. Even when I broke one top cap in a crash, I still had the other air spring I could inflate a bit more to help me make it back home (being sprayed with a good amount of oil every bump along the way through the open fork leg). In the mean time I also got a DJ bike with Marzocchi Dirt Jam forks which uses both air and coil springs, so I'll leave that out of the discussion. After four years on the MXComp, I got myself a coil sprung Magura Odur late 2006. The construction was a huge improvement for me, but once again I was blasting through the travel. I increased travel to 100mm, got stiffer springs and increased preload (by means of spacers, pretty simple) to the point that sag was pretty minimal but I was still blowing through the travel. And I was wearing my coil springs out quite quick which is what they call coil binding. That is, the coil springs were deforming plastically. These coil sprung forks did actually have much heavier damping than their air sprung forks, so it wasn't like they were offering them with the same damping. Though I have to admit that (as trends are cyclic) they were at a point that their perception of ideal damping was for it to be supple. Both their 2004 forks (inherited from Rond/WP) as well as their later forks have much heavier damping. Eventually they discontinued their coil sprung forks as at the time, it was really hard to sell coil sprung forks relative to what they cost them to produce. With air sprung forks (including negative air chamber), I indeed have more tuning options to get my forks to perform to my liking. The geometry of my more modern frame now also puts less weight on the forks though, so maybe my older coil sprung forks would now keep up just fine.

TL;DR: At the top end of the market (where you probably are) coil springs are probably the better option. Especially with more damping adjustments. But at the more entry level where I probably find myself at, air springs are probably the way to go these days. Simply because cheap air springs are easier to tune than cheap dampers. I'd say there still is a place for an air spring with coil assist in this market. Make it so that for the lowest design weight, the coil would be sufficient and then make the air chamber so small (using oil or whatever it takes) so that it still ramps up near the end. And heavier riders remove oil and add air to make it work for them too.
  • + 1
 @skills25: Alright, just watched the video again (happened to be on a computer without the required codecs during my previous visit). Indeed the suspension and the tire make it two springs in series performing out of phase. Curious how Adam experiences this but to me it seems the suspension could just as well have rebounded when the rear wheel jumped up. Both because (to me it seems like) it would have felt he'd hit the bottom anyway and to preserve traction. Again, curious how he experiences this. And also how different combinations of suspension and tire would work. What if the suspension were less progressive (as @gabriel-mission9 suggests though of course there can be progression in the linkage too) and what if tire were more progressive (by means of inserts, ProCore etc) to level out the transition from going from smooth air in the tire to the rim hitting the ground. Not saying I'm such an expert claiming what we see here would be such a problem. But if there is only one thing I can take away from this experiment, it is that the suspension and tire work out of phase and the tire is jumping up while you're deep in the travel.
  • + 1
 @gabriel-mission9: I prefer air over coil on many situations as do many of the riders I know.. You can't beat that popiness on booters or the pumping ability... Coils sort of deaden that feel.
  • + 13
 wait a minute isn't that switch infinity faff supposed to move up and down as the suspension goes through its travel cuz it didn't do f all as far as I could tell. Or do you have to be pedalling as you huck to flat?
  • + 37
 No. It's a quantum link. It's not gonna work when you're looking at it. Duh!
  • + 11
 @kpickrell:
should have called it the religious link. Read about it and believe blindly.
I'm just as gulable, I still want a sb130.
  • - 4
flag thenotoriousmic (Dec 25, 2018 at 17:23) (Below Threshold)
 Yeah like most bikes they just add stuff to make it look like it does stuff to sell bikes. Most people don’t even know they’re riding single pivots. Don’t know much about yeti’s as I’m not a fan just generalising.
  • + 3
 @kpickrell: no, it’s a Weeping Angel.
  • + 6
 @markg1150, it’s moving, but probably not as much as you’d expect. You can see what’s happening a little more clearly in this video from when the design was first introduced: www.pinkbike.com/video/371459
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: i'm willing to bet alot of money the SB130 vertical travel is significantly less than original SB5.5 (or w/e the orig was) design. sort of like how VPP lower links have gotten shorter and higher (no longer underneath BB at full ext.).
  • + 1
 Maybe the faff is in your eyes, Have a look again. Before touch down the link is about centred. At bottom-out the link is at the very bottom of the rails. Clearly visible on both the 150 and 130.
  • + 5
 @watermouse:
it does move a microscopic amount yes.
But given this is from full extension to full compression the amount it travels is just ridiculousy tiny. How long are those links compared to how much it actually uses them. So under normal riding conditions with way less travel range being used does it do anything?
maybe it does but this vid doesn't help. I'd need close up vid during normal riding to prove its worth. or back to back testing with one that's had it moving link removed.
kind of for me thinking yeti could have made them single pivots but didn't want to for the snobs.
i still want a sb130 either way.
  • + 1
 It does move quite a bit actually if you really pay attention to it.
  • + 9
 Not Switch Infinity, Switch 4mm.
  • + 1
 It does move ever so slightly so they had to put it there, didn't they? Something would wear out real quick should they have tried to use a static pivot over there. Though indeed just like more and more companies these days, they may start using flexible members too which might allow them to do away with this system.
  • + 12
 The landings are not perfectly equals, some are nose down first and others rear wheel first, thats why the forks flex in different ways. Enjoing it and watched it 1k times anyways, great field test!!
  • + 13
 The rear-wheel-first landings were brutal on the forks - Kona, Specialized. A perfectly level landing looks to be the easiest on equipment.
  • + 7
 How come no slowmo of the remedy Frown
Will wonderful video! Watching some of those frame flexes help me understand all this chatter about stiffing the frame like trek did.

Thx all and happy Xmas
  • + 3
 probably cause the rocker link snapped Wink
  • + 19
 Ahhh damn it, knew someone would notice. We just missed it and I didn’t want to interrupt Chris the video editor’s Christmas.

You can watch the Remedy slow motion here: www.pinkbike.com/news/field-test-trek-remedy-99.html
  • + 3
 GT was in there twice (back to back) to make it 12.
  • + 1
 Thanks mate@brianpark:
  • + 9
 “Some flex is desireable”
-makers of flexy bikes
  • + 8
 "I like to ride bikes with zero flex."
—nobody's butt or wrists
  • + 1
 Yeah I hate the flex in my tyres. Such rubbish, eh mate?
  • + 5
 This is the perfect culmination to the right sort of bike journalism we need. A fine thing. Especially since it allows each member of the PB Commentariat to see and reinterpret the data exactly how their own preferences demand!!
  • + 4
 This test only tells me it´s better to land slightly on the front wheel instead of the back wheel to keep the momentum going forward instead of downwards. Would be more interesting to see the same bike landing differently...
  • + 3
 Question. Is there any correlation between the the bikes and the flatter tires? Because the specialize was squished but the tires held their profile well. Vs other bikes that did not. It this because of suspension design or just tire pressure?
  • + 5
 Can we please see the Trust The Message fork tested like this for a comparison? Looking at how the telescopic forks seem to sometimes bind I think they may do better.
  • + 6
 To be honest... That was the only reason, I opened the articles. To see the Bikes squished to the max ^^
  • + 6
 Super cool, but I didn't need to see my 36 flexxing like a pool noodle.. Merry Xmas everyone
  • + 17
 Are you saying you have a flexy 36mm noodle ? Poor guy
  • + 2
 My tuppence worth! Flex is not a bad thing! If it were perfectly stiff it would break itself and you probably. MotoGP discovered this years ago, Yeti have realised this and put some compliance into their rear end as your suspension becomes less effective the more you are leaning over and the frame needs to start absorbing the trail. Next time you go on a flight watch how much the wing flexes, especially in turbulence. I can assure you if they were perfectly stiff they would snap off! The bike industry is still quite behind in some areas and I believe ‘tuning stiffness’ will become the next challenge in perfecting our steeds.
  • + 1
 @sundayrider It simply amazes me how many simply don't understand this! Well said.. The hate the new yetis are getti g over in the forums in regards to this flex is almost over bearing... Meanwhile they are some of the finest riding bikes I've tried this year.
  • + 6
 Stumpjumper 29 loses ????
  • + 0
 It definitely flexed the most out of any bike here. That fork bouncing back and forth looked like shit!
  • + 1
 Saw a lotta flex in main triangle...
  • + 1
 @zephxiii: maybe the swap hole doesn’t help the main triangle.

It doesn’t help that on these tests sometimes both wheels hit the geound first and some land back wheel first.

One this is for sure is the stumpy looks bad...
  • + 7
 What a time to be alive.
  • + 5
 hypnotic! those bikes look like they were in pain during that test
  • + 3
 Gives me new respect for my fork and headtube, dealing with my 220 pound fat-ass landing a lot less elegantly than the PB testers.
  • + 1
 Hello, somewhat new to the scene, curious, maybe you can shed some light....
1) Are the front/? brakes being applied? If so, why, is this the only way to "huck to flat"?
2) If brakes are being applied, would a person normally ride like this? and would this be considered a normal huck and be a normal way of measuring flex?
  • + 1
 after reviewing again,
- would all of these top of the line bikes really "huck to flat" with that small of jump/ramp that he showed he was using?
Looks like the brakes were applied to get them to "huck to flat".

This is why that front tire seems to want to spin the other way in some of the vids upon landing.
Cool to watch, but not sure if this is simulating true riding, ??
Maybe PB can shed some details, like is tire/shock/etc pressures are all equal,etc...
  • + 1
 @bike1212: Flat refers to the landing, not the tires
  • + 1
 Stuff flexes when you land heavily on it. No shit Sherlock. Struggle to see the point in this hucking to flat and filming it obsession. Just makes a whole load of people worry about flex when they never noticed it when actually riding. Guess I'm in the minority with this opinion, given all the sycophantic comments. JP
  • + 3
 My reaction exactely, if it flexes like this on a bottom out on flat ground, imagine what it does when you loose alot of speed through a rough rock garden or hit something that almost throws you over the bar. Still I've never seen a fork crack so good engineering is good I guess!
  • + 10
 I don't come to Pinkbike for information, I come for entertainment. And, for me, "the point in this hucking to flat and filming it" was highly entertaining. Like a sunset that is irrelevant to me yet I'll stop and watch it slowly change colour.

I hope no-one would or wouldn't choose a bike based on this video. I agree with that (extending your point to what I think would be its conclusion).
  • + 1
 Very fun to watch, but, as others had mentioned, seemingly many variables at play... landing bias, tire pressures and Adam's application of brakes on some landings. As such, it's hard to place stock in comparisons across bikes. Regardless, props to Pinkbike and Adam for making the video. Where else would we get super slo-mo full compression of this many enduro bikes?
  • + 1
 A lot of people don't know this but taking the air out of your shock and compressing your suspension by hand can actually reveal exactly where your bike's point of inflection is and where to set your sag.
  • + 1
 Point of inflection, like in calculus, professor?
  • + 2
 Canceled future therapy appointments, watching this instead. Makes me feel better and motivates me to huck more. Thanks @Pinkbike
  • + 2
 Pink Bike had to leave out Transition bikes since they all come with superior Huck To Flat technology and would make everything else look bad by comparison.
  • - 1
 Is that what they call it when their carbon explodes Wink ?
  • + 2
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=CJAwCoE3a00

@7:22 then Lars gets way more in the tank for the @7.35 jump
  • + 2
 What you see is not flex in the forks alone, I think, but the total result of flex in the fork, steering head area and tubes of the frame.
  • + 2
 Apparently someone didn't appreciate Scott's handlebar... Smile
props to the oldschool handlebar on that mini-huck in the intro.
  • + 4
 Nice to see he can land either foot forward lol
  • + 1
 10 regular, 2 goofy (both GT) in the video.
11 regular, 1 goofy (SB130) in the thumbnails.
  • + 1
 Here I was thinking left foot forward was regular, right foot fwd goofy.
  • + 4
 Bronson BB shell practically scraping the ground. ಠ_ಠ
  • + 5
 So many reasons to rewatch all of them land! You just gave me another one.
  • + 1
 Good seeing the chain slap on landing. Its a common problem with bikes that have SRAM derailleurs bending their derailleur hangers over on the trails here. has anyone else seen this?
  • + 4
 Best field test so far, pure science, thanks PB!
  • + 1
 I'm a little surprised how little vertical movement there is on those SB 130 rails. Either they make them way longer than needed for servicing or maybe to make the suspension design gimmick more believable?
  • + 1
 @VFreehd you need to pedal one then..
  • + 4
 The flex on the roof of Levys Mini is also nice.
  • + 3
 Just a simple observation, but it appears that tire pressure is not a consistent factor in these tests.
  • + 1
 In the interest of science why no Lefty? Every single front fork demonstrated significant sticktion. This is exactly what Lefty claims to have solved.
  • + 1
 Because no Lefty was specced on any of the bikes in our Field Test. Would be interesting for sure!
  • + 1
 hmmmm how come no girls are doing drops to flat. is it cause other than being awesome, its also dumb nd gurls r smarter than guiyzzzz. hmmmmmm
  • + 3
 Love how the SB130 sparked at bottom out.
  • + 1
 Where? I watched it a few times after I read this and can see some glinting on the spokes and linkage but I don't see any sparks.
  • + 1
 @KxPop: if you pause on the right frame, the shock sparks.
  • + 3
 holy sh*T it sparked!!! I thought that was a joke, but it sparked.
  • + 1
 It "sparks" again on rebound. Maybe this is static electricity or some sort of weird camera artifact? Nice eye either way.
  • + 2
 No way, that is the sun reflecting off the paint. A spark would be much more orange.
  • + 2
 @Pinkbike: this would be awesome footage for all forks you review. We all Trust you have received the Message.
  • + 2
 I've hated single crown forks forever. Tried Fox 36 n Lyrik. Noodles. D.C. For life.
  • + 1
 @Doomsdave You must be a shuttle rider then.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: no I ride trails all of the time. I was just spouting my stuff acting like a goober. I have a FOX 36 that I use on my 16 UZZI most of the time. I do have a Boxxer that I use too when I do multiple days at Mammoth. I would rather ride full time with a strong SC. I just hate to compromise. If someone would build it, my opinion is that it will do very well. An updated Totem or something in the 38mm range. Just my thoughts.
  • + 1
 The Giant looked like it had the best suspension design based on that video. The bike looked natural, and kept form when taking the hit.
  • + 3
 That Bronson, it’s on the f*kin floor!
  • + 1
 Really makes you question mountain bicycle design, if any of their pedals were in the vertical position, it would be total game over. I wish they would stop trying to incorporate what works on road bicycles, on mountain bikes, look at the difference between a monster truck, and a Formula 1 car.
  • + 2
 Should never have sold my downhill bike for an enduro,this just confirms what I already knew,they are junk for hard riding.
  • + 1
 Do you have a similar video of a DH bike to compare with?
  • + 3
 Man that pivot looks stiff.
  • + 3
 Let's see an Evil with Trust fork do the huck to flat. - EDventure
  • + 2
 Those RockShox’s were flexing super hard. Just increases my commitment to Fox
  • + 3
 Yeti switch infinity pivot BARELY moves lol. what a gimmick.
  • + 8
 Tiny changes make a big difference in suspension geometry. It moves a few mm which is apparently what it needs to do.
  • + 5
 @mm732 Go ride one... Best pedaling platform out there!
  • + 5
 Looks like they could 1/2 or maybe 1/3 the length of those stantions - I wonder why they made them so much longer than necessary.
  • + 10
 @harrybrottman: that way you can see the kashima.
  • + 6
 @spaceofades: no point in buying kashima if you can’t see it!
  • + 1
 @PtDiddy: Its the little things that matter!
  • + 1
 @DrPete: i'm willing to bet alot of money the SB130 vertical travel is significantly less than original SB5.5 (or w/e the orig was) design. sort of like how VPP lower links have gotten shorter and higher (no longer underneath BB at full ext.).
  • + 1
 If your not pedaling, the SI isn't going to react the way it's designed too.
  • + 0
 So, Adam, how do you feel after sending the Hucks all day?

Knees were feeling ok?

Come on, "tell us how you really feel and remember, this is being recorded for prosperity" Big Grin
  • + 1
 Wow - tough crowd, spose you're not into Gladiator or The Princess Bride.....
  • + 1
 My wrists were pretty sore for a few days after this!! Good training though!!
  • + 4
 That DVO flex!!! OMG....
  • + 2
 They looked the worse of all to me
  • + 5
 It looked like the frame was flexing more than the fork! Look at the downtube as it lands!
  • + 1
 Then again I looked and it may be the tubes, Im confused now! ahhahahahhah Still fun to watch!
  • + 1
 Agreed. I think it’s the frame itself. You can actually see his hands oscillating back and forth quite a bit as well, and the movement is hinging from the bottom of the headtube.
  • + 1
 I noticed the same thing but to be fair I think it's the only 34mm fork in the test.
  • + 3
 Makes me never want a kona process
  • + 3
 More flexing than a Mr Universe contest.
  • + 2
 will there be a 29er dh shootout in the near future? I saw paul aston was busy testing some monster trucks lately
  • + 2
 Those poor forks. Now redo the test with air spring pressures how you would actually ride them.
  • + 1
 If those bikes are setup with normal pressure that Adam would ride them at then I need to loose a load of pressure out of my suspension and tyres.
  • + 4
 What makes you think the pressures aren't set up normally. Does your bike NOT bottom out when sent to flat??
  • + 5
 Any tokens in there?

No - no tokens.

So when you say "no tokens" what you really mean is two tokens?

Who the f put those in there?
  • + 2
 Are you saying yours does? I have 180mm front and rear, I might bottom the rear, but never the front.
  • + 0
 @Erotomania: Well I mean I ride a hardtail, but yeah, with my 130mm fork at fighting pressure, it bottoms when I go off a 5-stair.
  • + 1
 @Erotomania: So what you're saying is that the bikes aren't set up exactly the way you like it so they must be wrong? Razz
  • + 2
 @KxPop: No, I’m just saying they set the bikes up to make the footage.
  • + 2
 @Erotomania: that’s my thoughts or he purposely drove them in to the ground on landing for the film. I have always setup suspension so only a cock up bottoms it out. A bottomed our bike it basically full rigid so you don’t want it doing that - as shown with the trek it goes wrong and snaps things if you let it bottom.
  • + 2
 @StevieJB: Yup, leave that last 10% of travel for the unexpected. If you bottom a fork like they are on the trail, you are about to have a bad day.
  • + 3
 Amazed at the chain movements even with the new fangled derailleurs.
  • + 0
 Another interesting thing was the fork, "ramp up"; they all seemed to travel the same speed the whole way through the travel pretty much linearly. If the forks were doing what the manufacturers say they're doing, it definitely wouldn't look like that.
  • + 3
 Much more enjoyable when I played it at 0.25 speed and muted sound.
  • + 4
 @indotrails so you went to a dream inside a dream inside a dream. You’re crazy man.
  • + 2
 @Bigbangus: yo dawg, I heard you like a dream.jpg>
  • + 2
 Based on the test riders stats. I could just Stand On to Flat. The Xmas season is not helping .....
  • + 3
 The Cannondale and the yeti got 0psi in them tyres?
  • + 1
 i don't know what to look for, and can't see the flex. i must be blind. is it in the rear triangle? fork?

merry christmas all.
  • + 4
 Watch the front fork on most of them. It oscillates front and back. All normal! The rear ends would flex side to side, which wouldn't be evident on these tests. No flex = snap, so flex is good! To an extent.
  • + 1
 It's also fun to watch the tyres.
  • + 1
 Awsome - So satisfying. though now I wish for double crown forks for Christmas!
  • + 1
 If that's the slow mo isn't slow enough for you, YouTube has an option in the video settings to slow the whole video down.
  • + 2
 And this is why I never buy used bikes!
  • + 1
 If the bike lands on the rear tire first then the fork looks like it flexes a lot. So not really the bike's fault...
  • + 2
 Thank you pinkbike. I have been waiting for this for weeks.
  • + 1
 Mike Better check into that squealing mini. Will leave you stranded. Water pump or alternator swinging a song of death
  • + 3
 beautiful
  • + 2
 Is it just me or is the Lyric + Spartan the least flexy from end here?
  • + 2
 I now appreciate, more than ever, the strength of wheels.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the inspiration. I made a video of me doing the same on my SC Hightower LT.

youtu.be/0UT2vNQMUy0
  • + 1
 I thought that StumpJumper was for sure gona snap. That flex gave me anxiety
  • + 1
 need more air in your tires !!!
  • + 1
 Right foot forward on all the bikes.... except the Yeti. #favortism
  • + 0
 Yeti, on both of pics there should be foot on front of that ugly frame part Smile
  • + 1
 I would however give the Trust fork a whirl.
  • + 2
 Oh don't you worry.
  • + 1
 Every single one of these looks absolutely painful
  • - 2
 to be honest, it most likely was, I don´t now who came up with this dumb idea when you could get the same result form doing simple drop to flat with 10% of the risk for rider and much more consistent results as it would be way easier to perform every time in the same manner.
  • + 1
 @Mondbiker: if the purpose was for science then your comment is valid. It would simply be a weighted drop test.

However, science had nothing to do with it.
  • + 1
 My sb5 flexed like that and cracked in two places ????‍♂️
  • + 1
 That ransom. That almost 2 stage shock. Seems to be working good.
  • + 1
 that lyric on the Kona looks horrible..
  • + 1
 @pinkbike
Why was the Marin Alpine Trail not in this test?
  • + 1
 I would love to see this done with some DH bikes from a few more feet up
  • + 1
 One of the most fun videos I've seen in a long time.
  • + 1
 Why is he pulling his brakes upon landing?
  • + 2
 I don't think he is (there is still some relative movement between the caliper and the brake disc during the landing phase). That's the tyre knobs biting into the dirt, effectively braking. The important bit is to note the resulting drastic reduction in rolling forward, which is probably riders get pitched forward during landing (last landing in that clip is case in point). Now if you brake, it makes that pitching forward aspect even worse.
  • + 1
 @Kapricorn: in the beginning of the video you can clearly see him pull his brake that’s why I asked 0:17 seconds in. Maybe it’s unintentional. Take a look. Yes it is interesting how much forward momentum is stifled.
  • - 2
 That´s what you do if you don´t want to loop out...Pretty basic stuff. Also helps with lessening impact on the hands because the bike cannot go backwards thus reducing body weight shift forward.
  • + 3
 @Mondbiker: if you're looping out when you land, something is wrong.
  • - 1
 @spaceofades: I´m not, because as ex trials rider I know how to use brakes to prevent it... It´s cool to see this guy knows it too.
  • + 3
 @Mondbiker: i think you weight trials bikes differently, and jump in completely different manners. One thing I can say for sure is that gwin doesn't brake when he lands to avoid looping
  • - 1
 @spaceofades: I´m sure even Gwin can overshoot jumps...All the guys riding big jumps land to back wheel especially when guinea pigging jumps, it´s much safer technique than coming up short and hitting the edge of landing front first...Just watch any vid from FEST series/Rampage/Crankworks or similar and you will see plenty of potential loopouts saved buy simple dab of rear brake, no drama. Of course trials riding is very different to pretty much everything else as the stuff they "ride" is not really ridable lol. You can either clean the jumps or crash, on top level there isn´t even space for strategical dabs (and thanks god for that, much more interesting when everyone has to go for it whereas before they could just play it safe with dabbing in hardest parts of sections when having enough lead in points). But the good thing about trials is it will teach you a lot of useful stuff for any mountain bike discipline.
  • + 2
 @Robbyc1979: Fair point! Perhaps there was very little space after landing? From one view around the 0:21 mark, there doesn't seem to be much room going forward before reaching a bunch of stuff piled up.
  • + 1
 @Kapricorn: I was half thinking it was because he wanted to compress the suspension more so he would bottom out. Which was the point of it. To bottom out. I don’t know. I liked seeing the deflection in the frame and forks. Makes you realize what you put your bikes through.
  • + 2
 @Mondbiker: the only time you would use your rear brake upon landing a jump is if you are landing in an unintentional manual and you feel like you’re going to flip. And that’s it. I don’t even have my finger on my brake when I’m jumping because it’s gets in the way of a flat table. We’re not talking trials here. These are enduro bikes. You don’t know what you’re talking about so before you jump on me for asking a reasonable question why don’t you think about how you don’t know first. I’ve been jumping bikes before you were even born.
  • + 0
 @Robbyc1979: I guess fest series guys or this guy called Semenuk don´t know how to jump either, tough guy lol. Just because you are older doesn´t make your technique any better, plenty riders out there which aren´t even half your age who rode better than you could even wish for. You don´t have finger on the brake is enough to show how good rider you are for me, sorry.
  • + 1
 Great reviews and videos!!! Thanks
  • + 1
 He’s right foot forward on all but the sb130... just sayin..
  • + 0
 The wobble of some of the forks!.... Did he break on touchdown or is this regular movement?
  • + 5
 That is pretty normal, suspension forks flex a lot more than people notice.
  • + 2
 @Fix-the-Spade: yep they are engineered as such.. Boggles me that more people don't realize that!
  • + 1
 That soundtrack though I thought I was watching Lord of the Rings
  • + 1
 You guys are such teases ! You knew we wanted this the most
  • + 1
 Watched the entire video thinking one of the frames would snap.
  • + 1
 The trek snapped its linkage - there was a link to the film of that.
  • + 1
 @StevieJB: What? We definitely didn't break the Remedy.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: Sorry 1st time I watched this www.pinkbike.com/news/field-test-trek-remedy-99.html I thought it snapped at 02:18 as it seemed to compress nicely through travel and then right at the end of travel suddenly move much more quickly, looked like something broke. Doesn't seem as noticeable now watching it again, I think I'm looking at the same film.
  • + 1
 You've finally given the people what they want!
  • + 1
 Would a boost fork flex more than a non-boost?
  • + 2
 Yes, but not in the direction noticeable in this vid.
  • + 0
 Is it just me or did it seem like the bronson was the only rig that looked SAFE
  • + 1
 This is the content we here for
  • + 1
 How are those rims alive??
  • + 1
 Ehhh it's just a lil huck to flat, most rims can handle this without issue as long as the pressure is reasonable.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: I agree...but a few of those images look like rims are hugging the ground! Bronson, SB150 and Firebird in particular
  • + 1
 Two yetis? Lol..
Pivot got my attention..
  • + 1
 THOSE POOR TIRES!
  • + 1
 Glorious! Thank you
  • + 1
 poor bikes
  • + 0
 Cool seeing the flex in the entire bike in some.
  • + 0
 Need an Adam review of the hucks to flat!
  • + 0
 Bronson and Habit did better?
  • + 1
 Epic!
  • + 0
 The GT sure is big and bouncy!
  • - 3
 Can somebody explain to me why this is so appreciated? I'm not sure what the use of full-flat photos is, or why they aren't just posed with unsprung bikes from a perfect profile angle.
  • + 1
 An unsprung bike wouldn’t show the flex or how the bike looks and reacts during a real landing.
  • + 1
 Duh!! Because we moved on from Randy months ago
  • + 2
 Because you can just hear someone say 'hold my beer and watch this' when they thought if this, and that's been the root of every major advance for humanity...
  • + 1
 Flexy Chrismas!
  • + 1
 Flat tire test too
  • + 1
 Thanks Pinkbike.
  • + 0
 why does Norco not on the list ?
  • + 0
 The DVO Sapphire 34 flexed the least, and by a wide margin.
  • + 3
 Don't worry, I made the same comment in the trance 29 field test and got downvoted too for speaking the truth.
  • + 4
 Big fan of DVO, always said it was stiffer up front than the Pike it replaced, now I have a vid to prove it lol
  • + 2
 I wonder how the new Marzfoxy would compare?
  • + 4
 Huh, was about to comment the complete opposite and searched the page if anyone already commented about the flex of the DVO. It was already flexing before the bike hit the ground.
  • + 1
 Looked like the Fox 36 on the Cannondale flexed the least, but I suppose it’s impossible to tell what’s really happening unless all the tests were done using the same frame and same exact huck etc. Makes no sense that one 36 would flex less than another so clearly there are confounding variables.
  • + 3
 @DrPete: Thats more just comes down to how he landed
  • + 1
 @rrsport: Spot on. The Cannondale landed nose heavy, so this would steepen the angle thereby creating less forward-back flex for any fork.
  • + 5
 What video are you looking at? I mean seriously, it flexed very noticeably back and forth like 5 times.
  • + 1
 @rrsport: I love watching the slow motion, I think you are correct a lot has to do with how balanced the landing is, so my idea is to winch the bikes up to 4-5 feet and drop them straight down to even things out, I volunteer Not to be the test dummy.
Merry Xmas and a Happy New Year.

Thanks PB for my Christmas present I kind of know it wasn't going to be the HD4
always next year.
  • + 2
 @DrPete: 34 on the Cannondale, not a 36.
  • + 2
 @pandafoo: ah, my mistake.
  • + 1
 Mesmerising fork flex.
  • + 0
 why is it so relaxing and exciting at the same time watching this??!
  • + 1
 Top PB post of 2018!
  • + 1
 That was great!!!
  • - 2
 I dont get the obsession with these "huck to flat"videos. I get a lot more useful information from "things that bounce thursday".
  • + 1
 It's the mountain bike equivalent of the 'money shot' in porn. It doesn't serve any purpose really, just fun to watch I guess.
  • - 1
 That baked bean colored GT is so ugly.
  • - 1
 The ransom shock area really looks ugly when compressed
  • + 0
 Best gift this year!!!
  • + 0
 Glorious! Thank you
  • - 2
 wheres my knolly podium?
  • + 5
 Probably in your garage?
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