Field Test: 2020 Canyon Lux - A Very Fast Baseline

Jul 30, 2020
by Sarah Moore  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Canyon Lux SLX 9.0 Team



Words by Sarah Moore, photography by Margus Riga



The Canyon Lux was released back in June of 2018, which by our standards usually makes it 'old' news. But since we hadn’t spent much time on it, and it’s got World Cup and World Championship winning pedigree under Mathieu van der Poel and Pauline Ferrand Prevot, we included it in our cross-country Field Test as a baseline. We were also interested to see how race-focused geometry has evolved in the past two years.

With a 70-degree head angle, the Lux has the steepest front-end of all the bikes in this Field Test. The 74.5-degree effective seat-tube angle on our size medium is in line with the other bikes, and the 435mm reach is the same as the Cannondale Scalpel, although the Lux pairs that with a longer 80mm stem. Other key numbers include 435mm chainstays and a 1,126mm wheelbase.

Canyon Lux SLX 9.0 Team Details

• Travel: 100mm rear / 100mm fork
• Carbon frame
• Wheel size: 29"
• Head Angle: 70-degrees
• Seat Tube Angle: 74.5-degrees (effective)
• Reach: 435mm (size M)
• Chainstay length: 435mm
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Weight: 22.5 lb / 10.2 kg (w/ dropper)
• Price: $6,999 USD
www.canyon.com

The Lux uses a flex-pivot suspension design, with the seat stays flexing rather than using bearings, thereby saving a bunch of weight. The Canyon is a bit different than how Cannondale does it on their Scalpel, though, which has a section on the chainstay that flexes like a pivot, not the seat stay. Other details include integrated chain retention, Canyon's Quixle thru-axle that makes it easy to remove the rear wheel without tools, internal cable routing, what Canyon calls their Impact Protection Unit bump stop, and flat-mount disc brakes.

The Lux CF SLX 9.0 Team that we’re testing is available in four sizes, small through extra-large, all of which are available only with 29" wheels, 100mm forks, and 100mm of rear travel.




Canyon Lux Photo by Margus Riga
Canyon Lux Photo by Margus Riga

Climbing

The Canyon Lux's strongest point is climbing. It gets around tight corners like a charm, as you would expect given its geometry. That being said, I never felt like I was truly comfortable while on the Lux. Yes, the seat angle is half a degree steeper than the Supercaliber, but the position didn’t feel as modern or inspiring.

While the quick handling allows you to wind through tight sections easily and make last-minute line choice decisions, the Lux doesn’t have the best traction, so while you might be able to change lines quickly, it doesn’t always translate into cleaning it. It feels to me like the Lux sacrifices a bit of traction for efficiency, and I dabbed more while on it than any other bike. In part, that's because the bike feels like it "rides high" as the suspension doesn’t move a ton, despite sitting at the recommended 25-percent sag.

That being said, on long, smooth climbs and less technical sections, it's incredibly efficient and as if all the watts are going into forward momentum. It also did well (like really, really well) in the Efficiency Test, but that's still to come. In other words, it's a speed machine on smooth ground.


Canyon Lux Photo by Margus Riga

Canyon Lux Photo by Margus Riga
Canyon Lux Photo by Margus Riga

Descending


Relatively speaking, it feels like you’re a long way over the front of the Lux when descending and, while I tried riding with and without the seat down, I was really glad this bike had a dropper post for steeper sections. I think it's telling that, despite being the only bike I rode with a dropper, I didn't set my fastest time on the descent when aboard the Lux. Nothing comes as easy on the downhills as it does on a longer, slacker cross-country bike, but no surprises there. When I was riding the Lux, it just seemed like the edge was closer and I had to be very selective with my line choices.

That feeling was partly due to the geometry, and partly due to the fact that the rear-end just didn’t maintain traction that well. It's very much as if compliance and comfort have been sacrificed in the name of efficiency... Like it's a race bike. It didn't help that I kept accidentally hitting the lockout lever whenever I used the dropper post, either. The Lux is most comparable to the 60mm-travel Trek Supercaliber on the descents, which has almost half as much cushion.

Conditions were quite wet during testing, so the rocks and roots offered far less traction than usual and that didn't help the Lux's cause. But there are plenty of places around the world full of smoother terrain, which is exactly where the Lux will shine.



Timed Testing


Our timed lap for the trail bikes was just shy of 20 minutes long and split into three sections. First, we powered up a smooth section of switchbacks before starting up a more technical, twisty section of trail that tested the bike's slow-speed handling and traction with tired legs. After that, we evaluated how the bikes maintained speed on a short bumpy traverse before the main descent, comprising of a small rock roll before a series of rough, suspension-testing corners and straightaways. Nothing too rowdy, but representative of the terrain the trails these modern cross-country bikes were intended to see.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Sarah Moore: "This was actually the slowest bike in my timed testing, both on the climbs and the full lap. It was 8.4% slower on the complete lap, 9.6% back on the tech climb, and 10.9% back on the entire climb. That being said, it was just 0.3% back on the descent, although I would have expected this bike to win the descent by a landslide since I used the dropper post!"





Canyon Lux Photo by Margus Riga


Pros

+ Ultra efficient feel on smooth, less technical climbs
+ Shimano XTR gear ratios, great shifting under load
+ It has a dropper, even if the setup isn't ideal
+ $2,500 USD less than the closest priced bike
Cons

- Relatively harsh feeling suspension
- Geo holds it back when the terrain is challenging







The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with clothing, protection, and support from Giro. Control tires provided by Schwalbe, and power meters provided by SRM. Filming took place at The Backyard pub in Squamish.




Photos: Margus Riga
Video: Jason Lucas, Cole Nelson, Max Barron



249 Comments

  • 169 1
 Just going to take a moment to shout out @sarahmoore for the great job on this series!
  • 68 1
 Very good work. And very excited to see the increased female presence on the face of PinkBike. Shredding isn't limited to dudes, and PB seems to be embracing that! Awesome
  • 7 0
 I couldn’t agree more. This helps get my GF more interested in your bike reviews! Thank you:-)
  • 3 0
 She is good and she was able to properly pronounce Pauline Ferrand-Prévot's name.

When she is riding uphill she is like riding an E bike !
  • 110 5
 Climbs like a trail bike descends like an xc bike
  • 62 1
 Correction: Climbs like a hardtail, descends like an XC hardtail.
  • 8 2
 "Climbs like a hardtail" would be more inline with Sarah's comments. In the rough stuff a good trail bike climbs better than a hardtail or an average XC bike, at least for my skill level.
  • 2 4
 @jfcarrier: I know I did not ride that many full sus bikes, but I never found any of them to be better at climbing than a hardtail.
  • 3 0
 @pyromaniac: I guess it depends what trails you ride on? As soon as it gets technical it's a pain to climb on a hardtail, between the losing traction, and being forced to stand all the time gets really tiring
  • 1 0
 @pyromaniac: it is a funny one, I'm running a Trek Top Fuel just now and I was doing techy hill climb reps the other day. I usually keep my suspension locked for the climbs, but I have to unlock it as I get more fatigued. Having rear suspension helps a lot if you don't have enough power/tech skills to clear some sections of the climb, the extra grip helps with staying on the bike if you mess up as well.
  • 3 0
 @Paluzas: You should try the techy sections locked and not locked and time them. I have found in the past that even if brute force and pushing hard over the stuff locked feels fast it often isn't actually as fast.

This can be seen in the lap times @sarahmoore is getting. The scalpel was the fastest on the techy climb IIRC or second fastest despite it feeling smooth and less fast. It's similar to why Nino and Kate are now running 2.4" tires and even DH riders are on 29. They feel slower but they time faster.
  • 2 0
 @zede: It's probably that I stand up for climbing most times anyway.
  • 2 0
 @pyromaniac: are you pedaling standing on a 10-20min technical uphill section ?
You gotta give some advices to Nino because even him can't do this
  • 2 0
 @zede: There are no 10-20min technical climbs where I live...I rode a lot of singlespeed a few years ago, so I kind of had to stand up a lot to get up climbs.
  • 2 0
 @zede: Yes, he can. He doesn't need to. Both because he has a suspension, and because he knows when and how to stand vs sit. Saying he can't is just silly.

I race an XC hardtail, and will on occasion ride/race technical trails that require me to be out of the saddle for LONG periods of time. It is more than doable. I also prefer to stand on anything that isn't a fireroad, which is also true when I am on my 170mm bike.

My XC HT climbs better than any bike I have ridden. The Epic FS I used to race climbed fine sitting, but I prefered to stand. So mostly just dead weight on the bike (and my climbing suffered).
  • 99 3
 Sweet 2023 gravel bike.
  • 14 0
 Just needs drop bars, would be a blast!
  • 1 0
 @Lokirides: I think we’ll see a hybrid drop/flat bar within a year.
  • 2 0
 @jclnv: oyster bars already exist...
  • 4 1
 @jclnv: I agree! While I am primarily a trail rider, the most fun I've had on a bike this year has been ripping melow singletrack on a fat tired (2.1) drop bar "gravel" bike. So versatile for making creative routes on every surface and giving trails that had gotten really boring on my trail bike new life.

Very curious what such a hybrid drop bar would look like. I personally would not like multiple brake levers / shifters, but would be interested in some smooth aftermarket dropper post integration (ie NOT purchasing a whole new front brake lever just to add a dropper post to my gravel bike).
  • 4 0
 @jclnv: So, bar ends will make a come back?
  • 3 0
 @jclnv: dropper bars?
  • 2 0
 @toddball: Never seen those before! Exactly what I was thinking.
  • 5 0
 @toddball: Blue Oyster Bars?
  • 1 0
 @Lokirides: wolftooth has your answer
  • 1 0
 @toddball: Dear lord, I shouldn't have googled that
  • 50 2
 This bike isn't $7000 because it's a couple years old. It has always been $7000 and occasionally $6500 on sale. Its Disappointing that we are shocked when a bike cost $7000.
  • 8 0
 Agreed. Also worth noting there is a $3400 carbon version of the Lux. A rare price point for carbon full suspension.
  • 29 0
 I view the Lux as an XC Racer's XC bike. Most of us are trail/enduro bikers looking for an XC bike and well this isn't it.
  • 16 1
 Yup, totally agree.
  • 3 1
 I think the Orbea Oiz is a much better choice than this bike for the type of geometry and suspension it has. Canyon has some great values in road bikes, but the Lux..meh.
  • 3 1
 It’s simply an XC race weapon that also doesn’t bottom out because of the perceived harshness noted in the review. Once controlled it’s super fast and stable even on the descents. There’s a reason it’s won so many World Cup races. It’s not some middle of the road XC bike, it’s a race machine made to go fast. We’ll see how the others fair now that they’ve essentially copied the design at this point. Smile
  • 18 0
 Hmmm, buy this and the Spur for $12,500, or the Cannondale Hi Mod?
  • 21 7
 Or skip the XC race bikes all together and buy two fun bikes (Spur plus a long travel bike?)
  • 5 0
 Waiting for the 2021 model Lux, I bet it will be have updated geometry, it will still be the best bang for the buck. I heard their Neuron is an excellent down country.
  • 1 0
 @mrkkbb: yes, the neuron has won several tests in german mtb-mags.
  • 5 0
 @seidla: Most of their Tests are crap
  • 3 0
 @seidla: German mtb mag typical test:

Is a bike: +5 point
Has a nice color: +1 point
Is a German brand: +3 point
Has fancy German tech: +1 point
  • 14 1
 This is your best video yet. Great job at really covering this bike in a fair way. Sarah and Levy have good chemistry. Put her on the podcast. Kick Park to the curb.

Two questions for Mike and Sarah: 1-gun to your head XTR or XX1 AXS? 2- Which of the 4 race bikes is your favorite on looks alone. I’m a fan of the unique Canyon aesthetic and color schemes.
  • 20 1
 For sure, Sarah's on the podcast every now and then it's always great. She'll be on much more in the future Smile

1 - For me, I'd choose AXS. I love how it's a button touch rather than pushing a lever through an arc a very specific amount to shift. XTR's shifting under load is impressive and helpful, but gimmie the wireless robots!
2 - Based on looks alone, the Supercaliber is gorgeous. I love the clean lines.
  • 13 0
 Glad you liked it!! I think the guys all do a great job on the podcast but coincidentally I will be on it next week! 1- That's a tough one, I love the beepbeepboop futuristic feeling of AXS as well and that oil slick cassette is gorgeous but I think if I had a gun to my head I would point to mechanical XTR... 2- The Cannondale with the bronze drivetrain and logo is really nice to look at, but I'd say the Specialized Epic is my favourite looking bike.
  • 9 1
 But Brian's NPR voice...
  • 13 0
 @TwoNGlenn: lol my shoulder surgery a few years back messed with my voice box a bit, so I'm a little raspier and need to pause sometimes. Sorry. Smile
  • 9 0
 @brianpark: I was just kidding about replacing you. You are awesome
  • 13 0
 @brianpark: Don't you dare apologize to haters in the comment section!
  • 4 0
 @sarahmoore: Speaking of the Epic, will we see it today?
  • 19 4
 super efficient climber until you ride a mountain bike trail
  • 6 3
 Most mountain bikers, even in gnarly places like BC, ride lots and lots of fireroad or smooth climbing track. In terms of time spent, that might even be the largest part of mountain biking. Unless you shuttle, ofc. but we are talking about xc bikes here.
  • 8 1
 70 degree headtube angle is fine for me.......dont need a 65 degree xc bike. how "modern" do we need an xc bike geo to be. Sure if your ripping descents all day look elsewhere but ive ridden lots of steep stuff on 70 and 69 degree head angle bikes and had no issues wheres they felt far more nimble in tight turns. i really dont want this to be the next "evolution" of xc bikes where year after year each model of bike is replaced with a 1 degree slacker model until were all riding 60 degree head angle bikes be it dh or xc.

that said im loving the xc content so thank you so much for these awesome vids.
  • 9 0
 I've got bad news for you.
  • 7 0
 "Yes, the seat angle is half a degree steeper than the Supercaliber, but the position didn’t feel as modern or inspiring."

Isn't it wonderful how sighted bias can totally warp our perception? If only there was a way to conduct blind testing of bikes (and components), it would wreak total havoc on the hyperactive marketing machine that is the bike business.
  • 11 5
 I'm a little confused how focused in on the heatube angle everyone is. I have a 160mm hardtail with 67.5 degrees and i send it on all the local enduro trails just fine O.o. Doesn't steeper just mean less forgiving in the "oh shit" moments?
  • 30 0
 basically I've come to the conclusion it does not matter at all as long as you are smiling. On any bike we just adapt to it over time so all this progression whilst being good for the sport / hobby can detract from what really matters. Riding your 29" wheeled, superboosted, 35mm barred, 520% ranged beast
  • 3 0
 Yeah reach and stack and your stem will affect how much you feel like you're going to OTB as well
  • 3 0
 It's ultimately all about how long your front center is (and trail). Slack HTA is shorthand for long front center, but long reach can be equivalent.
  • 2 1
 Less steep usually means longer wheelbase and better stability on descents; the front axle is also further away from your center of mass to give you the feeling of stability.
  • 2 0
 Good for you, but you would be faster on a true enduro trail on a full suspension. Also if you have a 160mm fork on your hardtail, with sag set at 30% your effective HTA is more like 69 deg.
  • 3 0
 @Geoffire: I couldn't tell you what the HTA on any of my good XC bikes were if I didn't read the geo chart. The ones with the longest reaches have been the best descendents regardless of HTA.
  • 3 0
 HTA is one of a number of measurements that will dictate how a bike performs. That said, I feel it is near the top of the heap for considerations when purchasing a frame. In my experience, a slack HTA provides confidence and stability, buys more cushion during the "oh shit" moments you are referring to, and importantly helps to dictate how comfortably you can weight the front and center your mass between the wheels. When you feel confident weighting the front wheel, you gain a tremendous amount of traction, technical braking performance and cornering ability.
  • 1 0
 @tgent: I just do it cause it's fun + to learn better technique honestly. (also the fire road up is nicer that way) i am building up a new enduro though right now! can't wait for that to be done Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: That makes sense, I'm really trying to weight the front properly for exactly what you were talking about. mtb'ing is the best!
  • 8 0
 @sewer-rat: Biking isn't fun! This is RACE. Only valid questions are: how much does it weigh; and is it aero?
  • 3 0
 @fraserw: slack is more aerobic then lol
  • 2 0
 @fraserw: aero* damn autocorrect
  • 11 3
 Sort of makes you wonder what PFP and MVDP could do on a better bike...
  • 15 0
 I'm sure they're used to the geo and have the skills to exploit it to the fullest, and I'd be surprised if they don't have access to custom shock tunes to improve the traction (should they need it). Given that they're both exceptional CX racers, they'll be well-versed in handling sharper bikes.
  • 18 1
 This is not formula one. The bike doesn't matter nearly as much in competition as some people think. There has never been much correlation between bike test results and race results. Not even in Enduro. It might matter a bit more in DH, but certainly not in XC.
  • 3 8
flag clink83 (Jul 30, 2020 at 11:39) (Below Threshold)
 @Ttimer: I dont think thats true. Why do you see the same couple of bike companies consistently winning WC races and others dont? Geometry and suspension kinimatics do matter in XC. You dont see elite top 10 riders switching to brands that don't a record of winning very often. Giant is the biggest bike maker is the world, why don't see any anthems on WC XCO podiums?
  • 14 0
 @clink83: Egads. In my opinion, every bike being ridden on the WC circuit is capable of taking a win with the right rider under it. Brands win because their marketing departments make a business decision to pay the higher salaries that top riders command, not because their bikes are large difference makers. Only a handful of riders have won WC races in the past few years, so it goes without saying that only a few brands have wins during that time. Look at Kerschbaumer on his Torpado which is just a branded version of a generic catalogue frame. Didn't seem to hold him back from kicking just about everyone's ass for the whole second half of the 2018 season, when his conditioning was in top form.
  • 2 9
flag clink83 (Jul 30, 2020 at 13:28) (Below Threshold)
 @Ginsu2000: www.rootsandrain.com/rider85677/gerhard-kerschbaumer/results
His results are all over the place. If you look at the people who are consistently winning winning year to year, they are usually on a bike that starts with an "S", which are the brand's that really invest in R&D. To be consistent in XC everything has to be dialed, all of the time.
There is a reason that if you go to an XC race it's a sea of Scott bikes.
  • 2 0
 @Ttimer: I'm glad you acknowledged that it matters in DH Smile The right bike there won't put a slow rider on the podium but a poor suspension design can definitely take a rider out of the top 20. There's one rider in particular who's a good example of this but I always get down voted for pointing it out LoL.

XC is all about the rider. MVDP could probably podium on a unicycle.
  • 15 0
 @clink83: You and people like you are exactly the reason why many of the big brands choose to hire the best riders by paying the biggest salaries. Hook line and sinker.

Not saying that Scott doesn't make great XC race bikes. They certainly do. Just saying that riders like Nino and MvdP could win or challenge for the win on any bike on the start line at a WC.
  • 2 5
 @Ginsu2000: No, I have just ridden enough XC bikes to know that some bikes have better geometry and suspension than others. I had an Orbea Oiz an the geometry is noticeably better for racing than the Pivot 429 SL I replaced it with. If I was racing pro or cat 1 races I would do worse on the Pivot than the Orbea. A FS with bad suspension kinematics or a crappy shock tune is going to cost you time. If Ninos bikes weren't fully dialed 100% of the time his opponents would beat him more than they do.
  • 6 0
 @clink83: they are dialed for exact same reason, which is - because the brand decides to invest in RACING, not into frame r&d.. meaning top mechanics, top nutritionists, top physiologists, more custom stuff than competition, more stuff to break and try while training and finding the best setup.. r&d going into the bike frame, that is motivated by winning races, is a very very small part.. there is more work to design bikes to look similar (spark, genius, ransom, gambler) than to build an absolute best suspension platform.. why you see alot of scotts on all your xc races is because 1) some people see nino and want similar bike 2) scott gives good support to even smaller local teams that dont produce any results.. if you have enough members in a club, who race consistently and promise to buy many bikes, you get great discounts.. but thats again a form of investment into race teams, not into bike r&d
  • 6 0
 @clink83: Right...I'm sure Scott would be very happy with Nino's as a representative if he said that he had trouble getting the right setup. In his role as a highly-compensated brand ambassador, it's his job to win races and say that his bike is a big part of the reason why. Nino does seem to be very comfortable with his current setup, but keep in mind that he's gone through a lot of very different setups over the years, all of which he claimed at the time were completely dialed-in and perfect, yet it didn't stop him from experimenting with a lot of markedly different choices. The point is that "100% dialed-in" is actually a moving target, and your constant diatribe of "this is the best / this is how it has to be" is just as unproductive as people who don't race XC claiming that WC riders don't have a clue about how to set up their bikes for optimal performance on a WC track. That's great that you've found some characteristics that work for you. That you are comfortable with it and feel it best suits your riding/racing style are the most important considerations. During 3 decades of racing Pro and Expert (i.e. cat1) I've learned a few things too, and one of those is to keep an open mind. Smile
  • 1 2
 @Ginsu2000: You're looking at it backwards, having successfull racers allows the engineers to put out a better product to consumers. As I said somwhere else, Scott has been using almost the exact same geometry for the Scale for at least 7 years now. How many bike makers can do that? I wouldn't race a Spark or an Epic personally, but its hard not to correlate their winning record with them consistently getting good reviews and being popular with racers. It shouldn't be shocking that if two racers with equal power and skill are racing, the one with the better engineered bike is going to be faster. Do you really think Canyon has the time and money to develop their bikes as well as Specialized, Scott, or Trek? That shouldn't be shocking either.

www.singletracks.com/mtb-gear/the-winningest-world-cup-xc-mountain-bikes-over-the-past-3-seasons

Personally, I'm 6'4 and 210is lbs so I'm never going to be competative in XC, so I dont need bleeding edge super light bikes, and I'm not really that dogmatic, as my fox/RS mixed suspension setup indicates.
  • 2 1
 @friendlyfoe: like who, Brook being stuck on GT, then getting back up to top 10 when he gets a decent bike? Or gwin, crushing it until he gets saddled with an Intense?
  • 2 0
 @spaceofades: the latter. I don't follow DH super close and don't know as much about Brook. Gwin on intense has been a disaster. When he trys to push for that extra bit he crashes. I blame the bike.
  • 1 1
 @GZMS: why is then that most of the pro racers or shop employees in my town who get pro deals or free bikes always on the Scott's? One of the local pros used to be on the giant off-road team and his shop carries giant and Scott...but guess which bikes he is racing? Why did the shop manager who I have raced with sell their Blur and stick to the Scotts when she had both? The idea that people are racing bikes just because Nino rides them doesnt work very well when people who get to ride tons of bikes consistently pick the same bikes. I'm not really a scott fanboy, you would have to ignore the face that Scott has just been making really good bikes for years, road and mtb.
  • 4 0
 @clink83: You make it sound like R&D for bicycles is some kind of large enterprise. Scott's marketing folks, and especially the regional rep in your area, deserve a raise.
  • 1 1
 If you think that an off the shelf single pivot bike isn't heavy influenced by its damper tune and linkage geometry you're fooling yourself. Put a DB inline on your race bike and play around with it. Or ride a lux and a lux back to back, they are almost carbon copies of each other other than HA and the suspension kinematics. I guarantee if the Oiz was in this matchup it would be faster for Sarah on this course due to the digressive leverage ratio.
  • 1 2
 @Ginsu2000: Hell, Why dont you just message @bbcopeland on here or instagram and ask him what kind of testing they do.
  • 1 1
 @clink83: No need. I already know enough engineers at different bike and component manufacturers.
  • 3 0
 @clink83: because they sponsor the best riders perhaps?
  • 3 0
 @clink83: i explained why they pick scott in my point number 2. This because scott does best sponsorship. Because this is scotts way of marketing, to give killer deals to even small local team, so everyone even at local level would be riding scott. I know thats the case at least in my area. Giant is not willing to sponsor a club of 20 people, where only 1 person races professionally, and 19 other work 9-5 jobs and race in C league. Scott is happy to support, and give huge discounts to such teams , so people naturally pick scott as the cheapest option
  • 1 3
 @GZMS: you ignored the people who gets bikes for free and have a choice on which bikes to pick and still choose Scott's. The giant Maistro suspension is light years better than any single pivot, and their builds are dirt cheap. The real reason is that you don't see a ton of people riding their bikes in XC is simply that their geometry is average because they haven't put the investment into making it the best.
  • 1 3
 @Ginsu2000: you provide a lot of opinions but not much to back it up.
  • 2 0
 @clink83:

"clink83 (4 hours ago) Ginsu2000: you provide a lot of opinions but not much to back it up."

Love this. Classic stuff.
  • 3 0
 @clink83: noone can “pick any bike for free”, not even mvdp.. if someone gets scott bikes for free it does not mean they can get any other brand bike for free.. in fact in many cases it means they can either only get scott or scott provides some extra benefits that other brands dont provide.. because scott as a company is willing to give free bikes to people at a grassroots level, where no other manufacturer is willing to support.. they are great bikes anyway, it is just they arent significantly better than canyon , spesh, cannondale, bmc, etc
  • 2 0
 @clink83: "why is then that most of the pro racers or shop employees in my town who get pro deals or free bikes always on the Scott's?"

I was "average" in the Open/Pro class yesterday at a local XCM race.

1st: Epic HT (that rider would probably have won if he just ran the whole race though, barely an exaggeration).
2nd: Epic FS
3rd: Pivot Les
4th: Scott Spark
5th: Surly
6th: 2013 Scott Spark

2-4th were relatively close to each other. Also if interesting note, the HT was the bike that descended fastest in the most technical downhills of those three (2-4 place).

Point 1: the rider makes the bike, the bike doesn't make the rider.
Point 2: "local pro racer" are probably going to ride mostly on what is affordable to them. 1st, loaner bike. 2nd, best friend owns a Spec dealer. 3rd, used. 4th, local shop support.
  • 4 0
 For the lock out levers, you just need to move it over to the right a bit so that the dropper lever isn't over the lockout switch. It's ok if it's over the open position. So in a way, you can do one movement for descents, pull down the dropper lever right down into the open lever of the remote.
  • 3 0
 Yup, you can certainly get it to work-ish, but it's a compromise no matter how it's setup.
  • 1 0
 I moved mine to the right/inside of the brake and it works great. Very intuitive, no compromise at all. When mine was set up as they have it on the test bike, there was some accidental lever pushing.
  • 1 0
 @Rpc1: yes, same here, plenty of accidental pushing. Really bad especially during a race. I wasn't able to move mine to the right of the brake as my brakes are set a bit away from the grips, but enough to not hit the lockout.
  • 2 0
 I use that lever and the annoying issue is the default mode is locked out, with push to unlock. It should be the other way round. Bizarre design choice. I’ve tweaked my identical control set up so I don’t hit the buttons when using the dropper but it’s a compromise...be worse with smaller hands.
  • 1 0
 Cool mechanical lever linking setup :-)
Did the same by mistake and even liked it but unfortunately there is one thing you can't do with that setup: lock the rear AND lower the saddle a bit on very steep and slow ascents to be able to shift even a little more weight to the front (best lowered by fully opening fork) ...
  • 1 0
 I have never, ever, accidentally activated the lockout because of the dropper. I don’t believe that’s the fault of any bike, anywhere.
  • 5 1
 This bike wasn't the fastest on the downs... but it set the equal fastest time.
This bike was super efficient on the climbs... but it was the slowest climber (although it wasn't a gravel road climb).

Some of the logic didnt make sense.

It was slow around the lap though.
  • 1 0
 I think it's a matter of user speed perception. Like a loud motorcycle feeling faster. I also feel slower on flat pedals, but when comparing times with SPDs I'm consistently faster on flats.
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: I feel the same on flats and clips, but am consistently faster on flats also.
The best bikes are those that feel slow when going fast, just means your base fast speed inst taxing the bike at all. That is the best feeling, knowing you are flying but feeling like you are croozing.
This bike was sketchy fast though, probably means her XC experience kicked in and that is what got the fast time. That and a dropper. Which XC racer wouldnt fit a dropper to the other bikes? But would that impact thier performance. These variables are part of the issue with this kind of testing.
I love these tests though.
  • 4 0
 Can’t wait to see the huck-to-flat tests...with so many flexible seat-stays it will be interesting to see...and the Spur review too, even if just for the looks!
  • 4 1
 You're not going to see much on the huck-to-flat tests with respect to the flex stays, even on slo-mo. With short-travel bikes, the amount of flex in the stays is very small, hence why it is a viable application of flex stays.
  • 4 0
 Was going to read the test (as it seemed to have been done in Squamish) only to realize Canadians cannot buy Canyon bikes. So jumped to the comments immediately....
  • 2 0
 I’ve got the base model of this bike and while it won’t appeal to the masses and the geo (lower spec models have a 110mm fork and slightly slacker H.A) make it unrideable to some I really love it. But there are a few mods I’ve made to mine.
First thing, I removed the remote lockout. This bike climbs better with the shock wide open, even on bitumen and the lockout shifter limits what dropper lever you can run. I swapped to a 60mm stem and recently upgraded to the new 120mm Sid.
The internal cable routing is not not the greatest either. I’m guessing they didn’t expect droppers being used on WC XC races. The internal ports are rubber and seem to tweak out no matter how you run the cables through them. Would also like to see a threaded bb on the next generation.
You also have to add shipping to the rrp which doesn’t include the box you need to buy to ship it in.
Loving these XC reviews! Ive been into mtb’s for a while and got to say the new generation of XC bikes are unreal!
  • 2 0
 @sarahmoore in the Efficiency test, I assume the timing is done with suspension fully open and not locked out. Don't think it is mentioned anywhere.
Given the Epic with Brain is basically locked out I am surprised it did not do better.
  • 2 0
 Yes fully open.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: thanks for the info.
Impressive that the Lux is 6 seconds faster than the Brain Epic.
On the other hand that efficiency I suppose also gives the lower grip levels in tech sections.
But for a racer on more smooth tracks / marathon the "old" Lux should be quite impressive. For the DC pinkbike crowd on the other hand it is surely not the right bike.
  • 1 0
 @tr1ckyk1d: I don't know the methodology, but they may have set Brain in it's lowest setting. This is pretty similar to being open. Impressive efficiency from the Lux all the same.
  • 1 0
 @Counsel: I think this deserves some explaining in the Epic review which I sure hope is coming any minute now Smile
So far in the duels I read the Scalpel beat the Epic and timing wise in this shoot out Scalpel is ahead as well.
Just about to pull the trigger on one of them allthough Evo or SE so super interested in all comparisons. Things swing in favor for the Evo though as I prefer slacker HA and less proprietary stuff (AI offset wheels and cranks, BB30 press shit .etc).
Also the Carbon 2 build is soooo poor on the Dale and SE1 above budget.
  • 3 0
 I'm litterly going to bed and now I have to stay up and watch this vid and read the review. Because you know, crazy-ass CX bike... Damn you to Hell PINKBIKE.
  • 2 1
 XC not CX! But based on this review, it sounds like the Lux is closer to a XC bike than a modern XC bike anyways Unrelated, but I think it is cool that you are just going to bed and I just go out of bed and yet we are reading the same article!
  • 2 0
 @neologisticzand:
Opps! It's late and my brain is not fully engaged. Hope you have a nice day.
  • 14 1
 Thanks for staying up past your bedtime for us!
  • 1 0
 Haha exactly what happened to me! grrrr. bed timeeeee...... NOW!
  • 6 4
 So, basically, the bike every amateur xc racer needs(efficient smooth and fire road climber) but no one really wants as it has a lousy(read dated) geo and a harsh suspension feel.
  • 4 0
 @sarahmoore If the other bikes had droppers do you think the gap to the Lux would have been bigger on the downhill?
  • 6 1
 Very likely. But I figured since it had one and none of the others did, I should use it!
  • 2 0
 @sarahmoore: Considering where you were riding and that it felt like the Canyon was trying to kill you I don't think we can fault you for dropping the seat Big Grin
  • 4 2
 Over dramatic wince by Levy when Sarah mentions Canyon doesn’t have a neat chart online to help set up the sag. Cannondale will give you a chart, and it will only cost an extra $5000.
  • 7 0
 I get your point, but this really is basic information that Canyon should have on its site, especially as a direct to consumer brand.
  • 14 1
 Overly dramatic? Nah, I don't think so. But I do think it's unacceptable that a $7,000 bike doesn't have a sticker on it with suggested air pressure settings. I know many riders can figure it out themselves, but it should be a dead-easy no-brainer. You've only got 100mm, so it has to be setup well.
  • 5 5
 @mikelevy: If someone is spending 7000$ on a bike i fully expect them to be setting up suspension pretty specific to themselves (especially for an XC bike). Like you said it has to be setup well and a sticker won't do that for you... so yes defs dramatic Smile
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: the little sag indicators on pivot bikes are pretty neat
  • 25 1
 @monkeybizz: So you're saying it's fine that Cayon has no setup aid sticker on the bike or online or anywhere else? A $7,000 USD bike with no setup guide? Despite them being consumer-direct? It wouldn't be a dealbreaker for me if I wanted the bike, I give you that, BUT EVERY BIKE SHOULD COME with a suspension setup guide so you can get the most out of it.

For $7,000, I want a sticker telling me what pressure to set the shock to.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Just in jest. But a phone call to Canyon took care of it. And I will mention, and you know, that 25% is just a starting point and should be adjusted by rising style, preferences, trails, regardless.
  • 2 2
 @mikelevy: honestly yes, i'm pretty finicky when it comes to my suspension setup so that might be why I don't really care. I just personally think that someone who's spending 7000$ will know about suspension how all the bells and whistles work and will be able to set it up accordingly. The guides are a ballpark of a huge data set that will work well for only the people who fall within it. Even then the margin of error could be +/- 10% or something. Fox has a guide online for a quick google too? Also since it's a fox fork, isn't that kind of sticker fox's responsibility to put it on?
  • 5 0
 C’mon you guys. This would cost them next to nothing to produce, require very little extra effort. There’s no good reason they shouldn’t provide this as basic information to someone who just dropped $7k on their bike.
  • 6 0
 @monkeybizz: Since when does dollars spent equate to riding experience?

Fox has an air pressure guide for their forks that for me I've found to be accurate within 2 psi (and that when I wasn't within 2 psi and 1 click of LSC it was because I needed to remove spacers),

They obviously can't do this with shocks because of different leverage curves. For a bike manufacturer not to have a recommended starting psi for your weight is simply lazy on their part.
  • 1 1
 @friendlyfoe: read: " The guides are a ballpark of a huge data set that will work well for only the people who fall within it."

and: " Fox has a guide online for a quick google too?"
  • 2 1
 @monkeybizz: Just give me one good reason why they shouldn't have this information available as a guideline. Complete the following sentence: Canyon shouldn't include this information because...

... there's no reason to keep their customers who just dropped $7k informed and satisfied with service?

... if they can't figure it out themselves they're not worthy of this bike?

The only thing you're going to be able to come up with here is just the equivalent of, "because f-you, that's why."

For the record, I don't think that's their intent. It's an oversight, but it's one they should correct.
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz:
" The guides are a ballpark of a huge data set that will work well for most people."

Fixed
  • 2 1
 @friendlyfoe: If it was that easy they wouldn't have all these "suspension setup" articles lol
  • 2 1
 @TheR: My favourite part about all of this is how a trivial sticker is having everyone all up in arms haha

How to use the internet:

1) open a browser
2) go to google.com
3) google the following "fox 32 psi rate"
4) Enjoy the adrenaline rush of doing something yourself Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @monkeybizz: Umm we're talking about a setup guide for the shock not the fork. No wonder you're confused.
  • 1 1
 @friendlyfoe: no no, I won't get into the math cause yea... also rear shocks don't come with stickers O.o which is the whole point of the convo here being centered around forks

Also as mentioned by you: "Fox has an air pressure guide for their forks that for me I've found to be accurate within 2 psi (and that when I wasn't within 2 psi and 1 click of LSC it was because I needed to remove spacers)"

Did i just not get the memo we're suddenly switching to shocks? LOL
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: The conversation was always about shock setup. Forks either have an online setup guide or in the case of FOX typically have a sticker right on the fork. Fox doesn't provide this for the shock because the bikes kinematics will affect the pressure you use.

I haven't had a bike that came with a sticker for the shock but there is usually a recommended psi chart based on weight on the website. I just bought a bronson www.santacruzbicycles.com/en-CA/bikes/bronson . If you go to the bottom where it says tech support and click on the tab for shock setup there is a chart for recommended baseline settings. Most manufacturers have this so that you have an easy starting point for setting up shock pressure.
  • 1 1
 @friendlyfoe: then I guess the bikes I buy aren't in $$$ sticker territory
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: Yeah, I notice you didn't answer the question about why they shouldn't include this information. Your answer pretty much amounts to "because you can figure it out yourself." Not a good reason, and certainly not good customer service. People shouldn't be cast off on an island on their own when they drop this kind of money, and this type of support costs Canyon next to nothing to make a customer happy. I do not own this bike, so I guess I really don't care too much, but you're wrong and so is Canyon.
  • 1 2
 @TheR: I don't really care to, you won't take any of my reasons seriously so in the end it would be pointless ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: No, I think you know deep down you're defending a bad point.
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: Many racers are crap at setting up there xc bikes. I was one. Over pressurized my xc forks to the point where they barely moved.
  • 1 1
 @TheR: you’re really that into this hey lol
  • 3 0
 @monkeybizz: At this point, I’m less concerned about what Canyon does than I am just fascinated by the illogic of anyone defending this oversight. It’s like I’m in crazy town.
  • 2 0
 Agreed. I bought the all black version of this bike. It’s an XL and weighs 23.5 lbs with pedals and cages. Setting up the bikes suspension was a breeze. And, at $6500 it was a great deal. The bike rips.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: I dunno why people care that much? If there isnt any sticker I just put my body weight in the shock and check the sag.
  • 2 1
 @mikelevy: why would you need a setup guide included in the box with so many variables and unique cases to address? Especially when this is the very thing that Canyon doesn’t do to keep the costs of their bikes so affordable. I mean a similarly specced bike from other brands is 2k more. I’d rather a quick visit to YOuTube university, and an extra 2k in my pocket. Wink Remember all of those included printed things are costs that Get passed on to the consumer, and this one really isn’t necessary.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Read my reply, above. Perhaps it’ll transport you from said Crazy-Town
  • 1 0
 @dfogle: At minimum the set up should be available on line then. Which apparently it is not. Which they state as well.

Can anyone name any other major companies that dont provide a basic set up for their bikes?
  • 1 0
 @dfogle: Thanks for typing what I just couldn't bring myself to because it should be that blatantly obvious. The words you used my still be too advanced for some people
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: devinci? trek even? if it's there, it's not easy enough for me to find before i give up and go to youtube. Maybe they just think people can go find better info in different places online? That's my best guess
  • 2 0
 @monkeybizz: took me approx 10 second to get to the trek suspension set up calculator and guide.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: lol yes, found it so cross trek off that list and just devinci haha
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: ever since weed was legalized customer service has gone to sh#t in Canada.
  • 1 0
 @fabwizard: yea, i hear it usually ends around 4:20 in the afternoon everyday :p
  • 1 0
 @monkeybizz: 420 then you are getting great service.
On my morning commute in i am guaranteed to drive behind at least one driver already smoking at 6 am. It starts early here. that being said it happened before it was legal anyway.
  • 1 0
 @dfogle: If you think including that information is part of what makes the $2k difference in price here, you are the flipping king of crazy town.

You don’t need a sticker or anything just the information readily available on the website. I have a consumer-direct bike. Their website has maybe 2-3 sentences devoted to the topic, which is all anyone is asking. It reads something like, “Sag should be set between 30-35% to start. As a rule of thumb, that is approximately rider weight plus 30 pounds.” That’s it. That’s $2,000 worth of information? Hell no. It would cost them virtually nothing to put that somewhere on their website, right in there with the other information about the bike. No good reason they shouldn’t do it.
  • 4 0
 Is it even possible to buy a Canyon directly from them in Canada yet? Last time I checked it was not.
  • 1 0
 The rd is amortized over the expected run of the design. The price should be expected to drop over the run based on demand for older designs lessening as they become outdated. I think consumer direct messes with that a bit as it is advantageous to show high value upfront, and the consumer direct customer is self selecting looking for a lower price. I think it would be interesting to compare a canyon customer to a bikes direct customer.
  • 3 0
 These reviews are providing good info that one can use to try and match a specific bike to their style/ terrain/ priorities. Very cool.
  • 3 0
 Nino Schurter can't be happy with his best friend, @mikelevy for testing MVDP's race rig while the Scott Spark is nowhere to be found in the Field Test.
  • 5 2
 Pro: Efficient when climbing... strongest point
Con: Slowest bike in the test
Me: "mkay"
  • 5 0
 It did put in the slowest time on their up/down lap test, but they also said it's the most efficient. If some flat sections were included in the lap this bike may have bridged the gap to the others in the test. Like most tests, it's impossible to remove every variable. Personally, I like these reviews so far.
  • 2 3
 @Counsel: Yeah, but is it really the most efficient in truth? Or did it just *feel* fast because the ride is so harsh? Attenuating vibrations sent to the rider from bumps on a trail makes a bike more efficient. More isolation helps efficiency (assuming bobbing and such is kept to a minimum). Fast bikes are by definition must be efficient because they are translating more of the the rider's energy into speed.
  • 3 1
 @WheelNut:
Most of the xc races is my country don't have too much(if at all) tech climbing and descending. There are a couple where you could go dh on your trail-enduro bike but those are a few and the no. of participants is less than 300, in one case, less than 150 ppl. For the most of them, participants from 1500 ppl and above. On those, with smooth fire roads up or down and smooth wide trails on 20-30% on the total length of the race, for those, it is the perfect bike.
For MVDP, it does not matter as he could ride my niece bike on a WC course and still finish 2 laps in front of 99% of us.
  • 2 0
 @WheelNut: On smooth bits of trail harsh is more efficient, on rough bits a more compliant suspension is more efficient. For a race bike like this, overly harsh is sorta a waste. I mean on smooth bits a racer would lock it out, right? I wonder if the harshness is from suspension kinematics or the result of a heavy handed damper tune?
  • 1 0
 @WheelNut: Here is my feedback as an owner. It’s stiff, but I wouldn’t call it harsh. The faster you go, the smoother the bike feels and better the suspension works. It’s race bike. It begs you to push it.
  • 4 0
 Great job with these videos, guys! Can't wait for the next one.
  • 2 0
 Stop teasing us please and get on with a review of the bikes we're all dying to see! I'm on a holding pattern and I need to know which one to get - within reason....
  • 1 1
 I really like these two but that wasn't great. Expecting a 70 degree HT bike to be the best at going down due to a seat post is dropper. Nah, the 67.5-68 will win the downs. Canyon has always been cheaper regardless if two years old as it is direct. Looking forward to Epic review and on to the DC bikes that will net small difference in lap times but really satisfy in the test environment and fun factor.
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike! Wish they spent a few dollars on matching the front fork w/ the frame though. Black/White/Red in any kinda combination would've been better than orange on this model.
  • 2 0
 DH times with a rigid seatpost would have been interesting to see too, as the other three bikes have got rigid posts.
  • 2 1
 We considered leveling the playing field with droppers on all bikes or none, but decided not to since these were conscious spec decisions made by the companies and while it's not that expensive to remove a dropper, it is to add one!
  • 2 3
 @sarahmoore: while I do understand the idea, I herewith officially ask for "control posts" in next year's XC field test!

(although, by then probably more XC bikes will come with a dropper post as stock)
  • 1 1
 @FloImSchnee: Hopefully!!!
  • 4 0
 @sarahmoore: Review on Specialized today?
  • 3 0
 @Bikerburt: Yeah, where's today's review! Waiting for the Revel Ranger.
  • 3 0
 Not the MVP then. Though that doesn't seem to stop MVDP
  • 18 0
 MVDP could rally a shopping cart to not last place in a WC.
  • 4 5
 So by process of elimination, the Epic is the fastest bike on the loop and descents, the fastest overall. Yesterday, based on their comments in the other reviews, I thought the Lux was going to be their pick for best in class. After watching this today, boy was I wrong. Putting my money on the Epic now, with Cannondale as the dark horse. The legion of Specialized haters that frequent this site are going to be so sad.
  • 20 1
 We mentioned in the Cannondale Scalpel review that it was my fastest bike on the climb segment + full loop while the Epic took the fastest time on the descent.
  • 3 1
 @sarahmoore: My mistake!
  • 5 4
 no. Scalpel is better
  • 3 2
 @sarahmoore: I still stand by my bet on the Epic, though. All in good fun. Great job on these reviews!
  • 6 2
 @TheR: change the bet, the scalpel is better
  • 3 1
 @ilyamaksimov: Could be. We will see. They really seemed to like that bike, too. And the Trek. This seemed to be the only one they didn’t really like.
  • 2 1
 @ilyamaksimov: Scott spark is the best
  • 3 0
 I hate Specialized but damn that Epic, especially the trail version is tempting!
  • 3 0
 My money is on epic, it has the most aggressive geo and Sarah, as with most of us, is probably most used to trail to enduro bikes so will feel most comfortable on it, hence the fastest times.
  • 2 5
 @dualcrownscottspark: maybe a new spark will be better, but now the scalpel is better
  • 1 2
 @ilyamaksimov: lulz just because one rider does better on a bike doesn't mean one bike is better than another. Especially since these bikes were stock and not fitted before testing.
  • 1 0
 @ilyamaksimov: I think it might be 100/110
  • 1 1
 @dualcrownscottspark: let's see how it will be, maybe so. I think it will be 110/110 travel, 67/75 angle RC version and 130/130 travel, 65.5/73.5 angle normal version
  • 2 5
 @ilyamaksimov: I'm sure Nino is going to be stoked going from a 73.8 STA to a ridiculous 75 STA that doesnt fit him at all. lol @ 65.5 HTA on an XC bike.
  • 1 0
 @clink83: I would think that it would be him influencing a lot of that change if that does happen.
  • 5 0
 @dualcrownscottspark: On the scott AMA here om pinkbikee bike he said his bike is perfect and he doesn't want to change it.

I had a 2013 Scale 900, which was 73.9/69.5 on paper. The 2020 Scale 900 has....73.9/69.5. For all the talk of how cross country is "changing" and "modern geometry", Scott hasnt changed their angles on the scale in over 7 years.
  • 1 0
 Remember, this was just the opinion of a rider and suspect setup. Not hating on the other bikes, but he Lux has won so much for a reason, and Spesh, Trek, Pivot, and others have taken note. As proven in these “new” designs.
  • 2 0
 Did you try changing the pressure in the shock to get less sag? Curious if that would affect the harshness
  • 2 0
 Sara said 25%, as per Canyon reco.
  • 2 0
 Or remove the bottomless token that it comes with?
  • 4 1
 Canyon said that the optimal sag the bike is designed for is +-25% and their product team ranged from riding it at 22% to 27% sag. I did try it with slightly more sag but that didn't help reduce harshness enough for it to be worth mentioning. With the Field Test format, we don't have time to play with tokens @mrkkbb and we ride the bikes as they would be sent out to consumers.
  • 3 4
 These bikes are hot, and I’d like to give them a try on the trail for an afternoon or so. Still, it’s very hard for me to get too geeked about how fast or how well a bike climbs. Just get me to the top for the fun part, please.
  • 1 0
 Does every bike in the XC race category feature a hard lockout (no movement under out of the saddle pedaling) for front and rear?
  • 2 0
 No. The new Epic uses the Brain for front and rear lockout. I believe the newest fork allows some movement even when locked out. I think it is equivalent to the amount of the recommended sag though.
  • 1 2
 XC bikes naturally have shorter wheelbases because steeper HA and shorter axle-to-crown forks. So they should have LONG reaches without the wheelbase being too big. Its not rocket science. Dont know why the XC crowd is so afraid of long reach.
  • 2 0
 If the head angle matters the cheaper build ups of the Lux have 110mm SID or Fox 34 SC forks.
  • 1 0
 Once they declare a winner in each category, both testers should back to back test those 2 bikes to get a comparison of the 2 different categories.
  • 2 0
 Was looking forward to the field tests every morning - but they seem to have gone missing the last few days??
  • 1 0
 Seriously @sarahmoore when does next review drop?
  • 2 1
 Looks like an upright Unno. Joke aide, I love this series of articles. Thank you for putting in the effort!
  • 2 0
 CON: feels slow (unless ridden by MVDP)
  • 1 0
 I’d love to see how much faster on the downhill a trail or enduro bike would be vs XC.
  • 2 0
 Is that with climbing at the same effort level first? I think you might be surprised how little difference there is.
  • 1 0
 We'll probably see that with the "downcountry" bikes (i.e. short travel trail bikes). Or hopefully we'll get a timed lap with the Grim Donut.
  • 2 0
 @denson-91: Unfortunately, it appears that each tester is only riding one category so the timed laps of the XC are not comparable to the DC. I'm hoping they at least each back to back test the winners of both categories to get a comparison of the categories.
  • 2 0
 I've not read the review. Are there any The Cramps references in there?
  • 1 0
 Can't believe no comments on how ugly that fork is on that bike. Would rather look at the scalpel.
  • 1 0
 "Geo holds it back when the terrain is challenging" Its an XC bike lads. xoxox
  • 4 3
 I’d rather have a Scott spark
  • 1 0
 Super progressive full sus flat bar gravel bike? or out of date mtb?
  • 1 0
 2 water bottle mounts is that what they're called? Really?!
  • 1 0
 Great test. Riding like a champ.
  • 1 0
 Spur... Can‘t wait for the Spur review...
  • 2 2
 Sounds to me like this would be a great gravel bike. MTB? Not so much.
  • 2 2
 XC Race bike rides like an XC Race bike Surprised Pikachu face
  • 7 7
 Scalpel is better
  • 7 0
 But is it $3000 better?
  • 2 10
flag ilyamaksimov (Jul 30, 2020 at 9:26) (Below Threshold)
 @nozes: in terms of price and quality, Chinese carbon is even better, but from the test bike scalpel is better
  • 13 1
 You again eh
  • 1 5
flag ilyamaksimov (Jul 30, 2020 at 10:55) (Below Threshold)
 @mikelevy: hopely scalpel SE also better in test? Wink
  • 3 6
 "It must be cheaper cause they didn't just put R&D into it." That's how #economics work apparently
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