Field Test: 2020 Ibis Mojo HD5 - An Easygoing All-Rounder

Dec 17, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Ibis Mojo HD5



Words by Mike Kazimer, photography by Trevor Lyden



For 2020, the Ibis Mojo HD5 maintains its 27.5” wheels and 153mm of dw-link travel, but it underwent the usual longer and slacker treatment, and now has a new fork and shock tune that are part of what Ibis refer to as their 'Traction Tune' suspension philosophy.

The HD5's shape stayed the same, but tube-in-tube internal cable routing has been added to help simplify housing swaps, and there's more room for running longer travel dropper posts. The dw-link suspension design is still there, but now bearings are used for the HD5's upper link, and bushing are used for the lower one, a similar configuration to what's used on the Ripmo.

Ibis Mojo HD5 Details

• Travel: 153mm rear / 170mm fork
• Carbon frame
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Head Angle: 64.2°
• Seat Tube Angle: 76°
• Chainstay Length: 430mm
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Weight: 31.2 lb / 14.1 kg (size L)
• Price: $6,658 USD
www.ibiscycles.com

The HD5 has a 64.2-degree head angle, a 76-degree seat tube angle, and a 470mm reach on the size large we tested. The chainstays measure a relatively short 430mm on all frame sizes.

Our test sled showed up with Ibis' XT build installed and an upgraded suspension package. There's 170mm Fox Factory 36 fork, a Factory X2 shock, Shimano XT 12-speed drivetrain and brakes, and a BikeYoke dropper post. That all tallies up to a total price of $6,658 USD.



Ibis HD5
Ibis HD5

Climbing

The HD5 had the shortest wheelbase our of all the bikes we had on hand in the enduro category, a trait that helped it wriggle around tight corners without stalling or hanging up. It earned top marks for the way that it balanced traction and efficiency on the way up, and there was never any need to firm up the rear end by flipping the Float X2's climb lever.

Compared to the other 4 bikes in this segment, the HD5 felt the most like an all-rounder, with less of a gravity-oriented focus. Head into mellower terrain on the Specializd Enduro or Yeti SB165 and it's possible you'll feel overbiked, but it's a different story on the HD5. It's a little more adaptable, with a wider range of usable terrain types, and it doesn't feel dull or cumbersome when the terrain mellows out a bit.


Ibis HD5

Ibis HD5
Ibis HD5

Descending

The HD5's geometry is on the shorter side of the modern spectrum, and the chainstay length, 27.5” wheels, and reach number all add up create to a bike with quick and snappy handling. It's easy to get up to speed and change directions, and that nimbleness also helps when it comes time to pump through flatter sections of trail.

The flip side is that it doesn't feel quite as unflappable in high speed, rough terrain. It required more energy to keep on line than a bike like the Specialized Enduro, and the overall feel was closer to an all-mountain or aggressive trail bike rather than race machine.

What about the Traction Tune suspension philosophy? The basic idea is that it involves running minimal rebound and compression damping in order to improve the bike's level of traction and responsive. I started with the bike set up according to Ibis' recommended settings, which had the rebound almost all the way open on the fork and shock, but found it to be somewhat frightening on jump trails. It was rideable on chunkier trails, but it didn't seem to deliver a huge performance advantage, and I felt like I needed to pay extra attention to the bike.
Timed Testing

Our timed lap for the enduro bikes took place on Schleyer, a Whistler Bike Park classic that includes a variety of features, including drops, chunky rock gardens, longer rock faces, plus a few jumps and stepdowns added into the mix. A handful of timed runs isn't the final say on whether one bike is faster than another, but it did give us a way to compare our perceived vs. actual speed.

Jason Lucas: "This bike was the slowest of the timed tests for me at 6% slower than my fastest time."

Mike Kazimer: "The Ibis was also the slowest out of all my timed laps, at 3% slower than my fastest time."

Once I slowed things down to how I would normally set up a bike I felt much, much more at home, and the level of enjoyment greatly increased. But just because I didn't get along with the suggested settings doesn't mean they're not worth a try. That's the nice thing about the Traction Tune philosophy – it's optional, not mandatory.



Ibis HD5


Pros

+ It’s versatile, an all-rounder with easy to handle geometry
+ Good balance of traction and efficiency on the climbs
+ Quick in the corners

Cons

- Doesn’t feel like the race bike it’s claimed to be
- Traction Tune isn’t going to be for everybody
- Not the quietest, and chain slap has already taken paint off the chainstay








The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible by support from
Race Face apparel & pads, Giro helmets, & Sierra Nevada beer.



323 Comments

  • 270 8
 Pros:
- didn't broke
  • 267 66
 Brake*. Psh. Idiot. Cant even spell write. I showed you though.
  • 17 0
 totes disappointed by the lack of drama :-(
  • 57 110
flag Chridel (Dec 17, 2019 at 7:16) (Below Threshold)
 @chillrider199: Hey chill, how many languages do you speak ?
  • 103 3
 @Chridel: I think he was being sarcastic.
  • 14 85
flag godii (Dec 17, 2019 at 7:23) (Below Threshold)
 @chillrider199: Break? lol
  • 85 3
 @tremeer023: He's Belgian....they don't do sarcasm.
  • 7 54
flag CapedBaldy (Dec 17, 2019 at 7:23) (Below Threshold)
 @chillrider199: break?
  • 4 1
 @Chridel: I struggle with my own! He’s joking.
  • 31 0
 Maybe not, but one will go broke at that $6,658 USD + VAT, Shipping and Toll.
  • 20 4
 @watchmen: He's German...they don't do sarcasm
  • 31 0
 @purplegorillaz: Apparently.....neither do the Danish.
  • 6 4
 @tremeer023: Considering the "write" instead of "right", I would hope so.
  • 47 0
 @chillrider199: well that slow pitch went right over several members heads. :-p
  • 19 5
 Pros:

weapon of choice for amazing JeffKendall Weed wizardry

youtu.be/QkiK_n9NTcg
  • 27 0
 Cons: one piece axle
  • 5 68
flag illc75243 (Dec 17, 2019 at 8:34) (Below Threshold)
 @chillrider199: Actually, it's break. If you're gonna correct someone at least be right. Wink
  • 38 1
 @illc75243: whoosh
  • 3 0
 @toast2266: actually, i think that should be a "pro"
  • 9 1
 @toast2266: one piece axle is not so bad, the problem arises when it become two piece axle wink wink
  • 6 0
 "The HD5's shape stayed the same" Is that another passive aggressive shot at Pole?
  • 13 0
 @chillrider199: I'm 1/3 French, I thought I had a pass on this things?
PS: upvoted your comment
  • 1 22
flag shmeagleeye (Dec 17, 2019 at 9:40) (Below Threshold)
 @chillrider199:*Right*. Psh. Idiot. Can't even spell right. I showed you though.
  • 2 0
 @godii: you must be new here.
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: I'm watching you...
  • 2 1
 @purplegorillaz: and swiss do? :rofl:
  • 7 0
 @watchmen: Bodies everywhere in this sar-chasm.
  • 3 1
 Cons:
- Is there really room for a water bottle
- Doesn’t look like a Session
  • 1 8
flag Biggiebull420 (Dec 17, 2019 at 18:30) (Below Threshold)
 @chillrider199: ???? break!!!!!!
  • 2 2
 @chillrider199: Don't forget that you think that Spain and Portugal are the same country since you came from the US... just sayin
  • 10 0
 @jean-germain: actually, I come from the US and I'm well aware that they are two different countries. Spaniards speak Spanish and Portuguese speak Portuguese.

The US is a very large place, with many varied cultures, backgrounds, levels of education, and levels of conduct. It's a shame that the world is focused on the more negative aspects of the US and not the more positive ones, and that there are in fact a lot of wonderful, good-natured, intelligent people here. Unfortunately they appear to be out-numbered when it comes to voting time.
  • 3 0
 @jean-germain: i think u mean Sportugal.
  • 190 10
 I love the Field Tests, but my occasional issue is that the categories seem somewhat arbitrarily drawn, then the reviewers tend to gravitate toward whatever is the most aggressive descending bike that got stuck into the grouping. Sarah loves the Guerrilla Gravity as a "downcountry bike" despite that it weighs as much (and literally shares large parts of its frame/spec) for longer travel bikes. Levy chooses the Pole as his favorite "trail bike" despite a geometry that puts it within the norm of enduro bikes (and that it literally broke doing things that XC bikes handled).

"Good all arounder" is mentioned, but it almost seems like a pejorative in its use here and with the Orbea.
  • 28 0
 Excellent point man. Excellent.
  • 13 0
 That's a very fair point, in amongst all the dumb comments (mine included)
  • 31 0
 I've got a feeling that pinkbikes only expertise are enduro bikes. The test team lacks a purebred CC weight weenie with 8% body fat who actually enjoys feeling bloody lungs.
  • 56 5
 @MarcusBrody, we try to make it clear what the pros and cons are for each bike, but it's true, the ones with superior descending skills do tend to 'wow' us a little more than the bikes that are more mild mannered.

We're not at all opposed to long, technical climbs - that's part of what makes mountain biking fun - it's just that at the end of the day the downhill sections tend to stand out the most.

Keep in mind that for the enduro category those downhill capabilities receive more of the focus, due to the fact that that's the main intention of these bikes.
  • 9 0
 @mikekazimer: Fair response, but the lines between the categories definitely get very blurry - I'd sooner ride an Enduro race on the Pole than the Ibis (we're all riding production swingarms here, right ?Smile )

If you'd slipped this bike into the trail category as an "all-rounder with Enduro potential" would it have rated higher?
  • 12 0
 @mikekazimer: I don't meant to be overly critical; like I said, I've loved reading the Field Tests. And you can't really blame the heart for wanting what the heart wants (which when you have Whistler Bike Park at your disposal, is probably to descent fast). I do think you do a good job of noting pros and cons, but the difference in enthusiasm comes through and I was just noting that it seems to be conditioned by where lines are drawn by category and the bikes' relative position within them.
  • 17 0
 @mikekazimer: You guys dive into "who this bike is for" at the end of the video - add it to the text!

While many people can read between the lines and know what kind of bike they prefer, I would recommend a "Who is it for?" section at the end of the review, would be super helpful to people using these to shop.

also a great way to avoid sounding negative about this being "all arounder" - this bike, for example, seems great for someone who wants a long travel trail bike they can do both enduro races and still enjoy mellower rides on - obvs not ideal for the all-out racer. (Guess what - rider#1 is WAY more common)
  • 7 3
 I needed to look this up:

pe·jo·ra·tive - adjective

expressing contempt or disapproval.
"permissiveness is used almost universally as a pejorative term"
  • 10 1
 Well, the categories are drawn according to how the manufacturer classified the bike. If you are looking for Ibis's most enduro-y bike, it's the HD5. Similarly, the Pole is branded as a trail bkke., And the Trail Pistol is marketed as, well, a downcountry kind of bike. The issue here isn't with Pinkbike.
  • 4 2
 Also, seems like the test lap didn't include any climbing at all for this one. Which would seem more apropos for a park bike category. I'd assume most people are still riding up and down their trails, unless you happen to live at a resort town and only ride during the summer when the lifts are running. I know during Enduro Racing they only time the downs, but really how many folks here are actually racing enduro. Amateur fields for enduro races are quite a bit smaller than the fields for XC races.
  • 2 0
 I agree. I think that the categorization isn't necessarily for the person who knows what they want. But if you know what you want the categorization might seem useless. For example, "enduro category" who's to say that a bike that is more energetic and doesn't plow as much is a lesser enduro bike. Enduro racing can offer a wide variety of terrain, and different riders can benefit from characteristics that play to their strengths or weaknesses. Not all "enduro" bikes need to be stick to the ground, mini-DH sleds.
  • 8 0
 You need to take all of these reviews with a grain of salt, and in the proper context. These guys live and ride in BC, of course the descents will matter more than anything else. Every review is biased towards descending, because lets face it, if you have that type of terrain to work with, its going to be easy up, gnarly down. You'd build it the same way if you had similar terrain in your hood. When you're wheeling up 5 miles of fire road to get to the good stuff, who cares as long as there's a climb switch. Reality is that 85-90% of everyone else does not have terrain like this as their local go to. If you have to climb as much as you descend, then the HD5 sounds like a fantastic bike to me.
  • 10 1
 These "tests" are fun and totally useless at the same time. There are really just a couple of couple of people who go around for a little while on different bikes and say "I like this one" or "I don't like this one as much" ...

And frankly statements such as "doesn’t feel like the race bike it’s claimed to be" (really, have you checked the EWS recently?) or "traction tune is not for everybody" are just beyond the meaningless. Not to mention timed runs where they report % differences (sigh) and that are supposed to indicate ... what? That nobody would win a race on this particular bike because somehow (by magic) it is slower?
  • 1 0
 @SickEdit: You are 100% right. XC riders have the same mentality as roadies and it's all about the fitness. PB is definitely biased in the other direction and that's not a bad thing. Hell that's what most of us come here for! Regradless of what RC might think www.pinkbike.com/news/poll-has-climbing-become-unfashionable.html

@TucsonDon: It did not. This category is supposed to be all about maximizing the fun on the downs. They still reviewed it's climbing ability but how quick you get there isn't why these bikes exist.
  • 3 0
 @friendlyfoe: Your comment made me think about things a bit more. I like to hear about climbing ability, but what I think I miss at some points is weighting the non-speed fun on the downs. We hear about multiple things that affect its overall speed, but not too much on the playfulness front where you assume it would have the advantage. In his Occam review, Levy notes that he was doing more side hits on that than any other bike in the category and it was (along with the Optic) the most entertaining bike in the group. And then rates it as his least favorite later.

Overall, I think these reviews are great. As someone who mostly knows what they're looking for, I don't think it's too hard to read between the lines. I just think that we see a definite descending speed bias that's more aligned with where the bike falls within its category group than anything else and I think that's something to note.
  • 1 0
 @SickEdit: LMAO!! Wink
  • 2 0
 @MarcusBrody: well don't overthink it too much Wink . In the trail category they didn't pick the fastest descender as their favourite, they picked the one that was the most fun to ride even if that meant going slower.

The fact that they included the GG in the downcountry category was just a mistake from the beginning.

And when it comes to the Enduro category I'd be disappointed if they focused on anything other than smashing gnarly trail.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: I have to agree with @MarcusBrody Also, the trails you rode in both the DC and Trail categories' videos made me think "If I was buying a bike mainly for doing that sort of stuff I would get one with more travel than what they are testing here" . Of course you need to include some of that rough stuff to see what the bike is really capable of. But in the final verdict you may have to correct for the fact that 90 percent of the time the bike is ridden on flatter, smoother terrain. That matters for which one you pick. I know I will have a better time on a Pole the one week a year I go riding in the Alps. But all my local trails are flat, pedally, tight-turn singletracks so most of the time I would actually be having less fun on it than on the other bikes in that category.
I understand that it's no fun riding tame trails all day and it doesn't make good videos either, but many of us live too far from BC to ride those sick trails every weekend.

For Enduro I agree downhill performance should be where the focus is.
  • 2 0
 @zsandstrom: Pinkbike should know better than manufacturer's use of random marketing buzz to desribe their bike. They should ignore that description and compare bikes that are actually similar. If that is what they want to do.
On the other hand, what it seems that they did with these tests, is deliberately toss a few bikes together that are at the end of their categories' spectrum, almost as if to make the point that there are large grey areas and there are different views of what a 'trail' bike actually is or should be.
  • 2 0
 @friendlyfoe: Levy was fastest on the Pole. Picked the Pole. Kazimer was fastest on the Optic. Picked the Optic. Sarah was fastest down on the GG. Picked the GG. Only James so far has picked a bike on which he didn't have his fastest timed descent as his favorite.

That being said, while I am over thinking it, we waited so long for this! We have to make the most of it! :-)
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: To be fair Sarah did pick her "favourite" and flat out admitted it wasn't the best DC bike there which deserves some rethinking. And Levy's response was more conflicted than him trying to figure out if he has his underwear on backwards in the morning (okay as conflicted).

These also aren't a selection of the best bikes in their category, but simply bikes that were new in a significant way for this year.

There's no question there is room for improvement in terms of making this more relevant.
  • 2 0
 @SickEdit: gotta clean my desk now because I exhaled violently reading this...
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer:

I'd agree with @MarcusBrody that there could have been more XC focus (instead of enduro) on downcountry bikes, but one can't really please everyone.

In this the scope introduced, you are doing really good job here @mikekazimer @mikelevy, 100%. A series of tests I really look forward to seeing more!
  • 1 0
 @Novakki: did the categories of rider match the bike categories? What categories are Levy, Kazimer, etc.?
  • 2 0
 @BenPea: maybe that's it - give enduro riders only enduro bikes and XC riders only XC bikes to evaluate, regardless if they ride the full spectrum or not.
  • 112 1
 Don't know if I can handle any mojokes.
  • 4 0
 Came back 14hrs later hoping to see if anyone left me some puns. Ibissed myself when there were zero replies Frown
  • 3 0
 @brappuccino: Believe it or not.
  • 89 11
 I just can’t get over the look of the ibis frame. I know beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but this beholder has no beauty in his eye for this Mojo.
  • 19 3
 100% agree, the front part of the front triangle looks like it doesn't belong the the back half and they just kind of merged 2 designs into 1.
  • 11 2
 I'm with you here. Not exactly a looker.
  • 11 3
 Even a decade ago I thought the Mojos weren't lookers...
  • 3 11
flag MTBrent (Dec 17, 2019 at 7:59) (Below Threshold)
 The front triangle is a work of art. The rear end is... not.
  • 11 8
 Agree 100%...all the Ibis are ugly AF (pun untended)
  • 13 2
 I like it, it's a classic Ibis Mojo, been that way for years.
  • 6 11
flag MikeyMT (Dec 17, 2019 at 8:08) (Below Threshold)
 @Jacquers: Thats the point...they have always been ugly. DW link fanbois cant see past it.
  • 25 3
 They're just continuing the tradition of the Mojo getting a bit uglier every time they update it. It really is hideous now. And complete with Food Poisoning Brown paint scheme just to add to the effect.
  • 4 1
 @MikeyMT: I’ll have to google DW link to see if I am a fan boy of it.
  • 4 0
 @PtDiddy: no u need to ride a DWlink bike.
  • 5 1
 And I think I saw that color out in my backyard this morning...thanks to my dog.
  • 5 12
flag MikeyMT (Dec 17, 2019 at 9:38) (Below Threshold)
 @dontcoast: Don't waste your time - the hype far exceeds the reality.
  • 13 0
 @MikeyMT: beg to differ.

like any suspension design, it's not for everyone, but it's pretty awesome at what it does.

if you want something that pedals real good standing up and is generally peppy and playful while still staying active when it needs to, most DW link bikes really do shine.

Want square-edge-gobbling-ground-hugging monster suspension? Yeah probably not your thing, that's cool.
  • 4 6
 @dontcoast: I test road the trance 29, which I believe is a DW Link. It was nice. I’m a grown man and a fan. So I guess I’m a Fanman of the DW Link.

I’m not that picky though. I’m riding a Humble Marin with a Horst link now and I’m perfectly happy on it. My Marin is way sexier than this ibis though.
  • 4 0
 @PtDiddy: technically Giant's Maestro linkage is not DW link , as it isn't licensed by Dave Weagle.

But you're not wrong in the similarity, in fact DW sued Giant over it circa 2013. Lawsuit got resolved without much fanfare so either there is a non-trivial difference or Giant lawyers beat DW (or somewhere in between)

Either way also rides nice. Lotsa nice option these days.
  • 3 2
 @hamncheez: A decade ago they were at least unique, but especially to an engineer, it looked like just extra material for the sake of someone's idea of aesthetics to the sacrifice of some marginal gains in stiffness to weight. The function follows form design hasn't aged well.
  • 3 2
 Agreed, I can’t put my finger on it but something doesn’t look right. Like the front and rear where never meant to be....or a cost savings thing with the molds??? But she’s ugly!
  • 2 0
 Totally agree—and it’s a shame, bc the carbon layup looks great. If any bikes would benefit from clean paint schemes and minimal graphics, it’s Ibises. I do think they nailed the Hakka MX, though. The paint and graphics compliment the frame really well.
  • 5 1
 Love the Mojo Look! Everything else is quite boring.
  • 1 1
 Agree. I even own one (HD3, looks quite similar) and I never got further than “doesn't look totally super ugly, but surely far from a beauty“. It's well executed, but i don't like the looks. Rides well though Smile
  • 1 0
 I usually like the aesthetics of ibis bikes.....but this one is truly ugly, and changing the color won’t fix that fact. It will still be ugly in black.
  • 1 0
 The first gen mojo and mojo HD were really good looking bikes. Since then the aesthetics have morphed and it hasnt really fared well.
  • 1 0
 @MikeyMT: Unpopular opinion, but I agree with you. DW link is not my thing.

Also, since everyone else is arguing aesthetics, not a fan of the Ibis bikes, other than the Ripmo AF.
  • 2 5
 I love all the Specialized fangirls knocking the Ibis with the same, and original shape, as their overpriced, fragile junk.
  • 44 1
 For those looking to match their Toyota Tundra and Yeti Tundra cooler combo.
  • 5 0
 It's just missing the Hershey squirt brown marzocchi used on some of their forks last decade
  • 2 0
 @onemind123: matchy match with the Brown Konas of that era.
  • 39 0
 Looks like an Ibis
  • 30 1
 Not exactly an enduro race bike since those are moving to 29" DH bikes with single crowns. I think that's what makes this bike great though, it's just a versatile rig built for aggressive riding. If you aren't a Stravaholic who has to KOM every ride, if you want to take the slower and more fun line after a long climb up to get to the goods, if you want to rip some fun jumps, if you aspire to ride like @jeffweed (I do) this is one of the better bikes to do it on.
  • 10 1
 I was thinking along the same lines. Ibis' aesthetic isn't really my style, but everything else about this bike matches what I like. I'd much rather ride jumps and steep, tight switchbacks than set KOM's through straight line rock gardens.
  • 6 0
 @gibspaulding: I'm right there with you. The look is polarizing. I don't hate it but I also don't love it. I like the idea that the 170mm fork with the HTA gives 153 mm of vertical travel to match the back, even if it's just marketing I think it makes sense. This kind of bike appeals most to me considering my current riding goals.
  • 13 0
 I agree. If you want a toothy, longer travel bike that pedals well and feels playful - Ibis HDx line has been a hitting that mark. Many people would be well served from an all-rounder vs a only kills it when its down and steep.
  • 3 6
 Not a race bike since they don't expect to sell enough of them to have bothered updating the swingarm. Too bad a Ripmo arm wouldn't work. Also, their carbon hoops weren't sent for test. Come and get it, fanboys.
  • 8 0
 @mtbgeartech Agree, sounds like this could be a really nice bike for quite a lot of people.
  • 5 0
 Funny not to call it enduro race bike when half of the Ibis EWS Team is ripping it at EWS and the new suspension kinematics it's based largely in their EWS riders feedback...
  • 5 1
 @PauRexs: It is a bit odd. Perhaps the EWS team has the skills to use the 27.5 wheels to their advantage whereas the testers benefit from the 29er's stability and straight-line speed? The reality is, the 29" wheel is dominating racing because it is faster in most cases.
  • 2 0
 @mtbgeartech Or then just take Ripmo. Easier to live with and probably much better climber
  • 5 0
 @pakleni: I would prefer 27.5s for my next bike. I don't care about going the fastest this go around. I'd rather have the fun that 27.5s highlight.
  • 6 0
 I think the Ripmo feels better both as a “Enduro” bike and as an “trail bike”. I didn’t get along with the ibis recommended rebound and compression damping. The Ripmo for me was faster and can be just as happy and playful going slow. I’m not sure why they didn’t extend the travel a bit more on the HD5 if “enduro” racing was their focus specifically.
  • 4 1
 @mtbgeartech: I don't understand why is still alive that abstract that 27 inch bikes are more fun?? Wheel size is just one part of the puzzle.

It's perfectly legit to want a specific wheel size, but please don't go with that "more fun" line.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: I suppose it's relative depending on your idea of fun. I agree, definitely a part of a larger puzzle. Perhaps even 26" could be "more fun' than either of the larger sizes. Semenuk and other slopestyle guys seem to think so. Then again, BMX bikes are silly amounts of fun and they're only 20".
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: I'd argue that the more fun argument is the only valid one when being a dick about wheel size. All other "faster" arguments require real data to back them up that, which no one can ever seem to produce.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: I'm not being a dick at all. I My last 3 bikes have been 29ers. I just rode a couple 27.5s with modern geo and they were loads of fun. I liked the difference. The "faster" data we would have to point to the wheel size that dominates the race podiums. If I'm not mistaken it was overwhelmingly 29ers in 2019. In a perfect world I'd have many bikes and could choose based on mood/terrain.
  • 3 0
 @pakleni: why? I've ridden numerous 29ers and still to this day enjoy riding a 27.5 bike more as Im able to play between different lines, riding isnt all about being fastest down.
  • 2 0
 @sethius: i have to admit that i haven't ridden many 27ers but I did have a chance to compare back to back 27 inch and 29 inch models of the same bike. Of course, 27er had a little bit more travel like usual. Bottom line is that I didn't feel much (if any) difference.
However, totally subjective, I felt a little bit more confident on 29er. More confidence, more comfort. More comfort, more will to try something stupid. Ergo - more fun.

(I don't really care about max speed. I don't race anymore. I'm already old, slow and lame)
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: would agree on 29ers giving you more confidence and from my time on a few of them, tend to more forgiving if you get it wrong. Wreckoning was prime example of being much more capable than myself as rider, and possibly opening a large can of worms! Genius LT not so much..
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: not calling anyone a dick, it's an expression. I did not state that any size was better, nor my preference. Also, correlation is not causation. DH teams may indeed have hard data, but I have not seen any, whether or not that data even matters to a recreational rider is another aspect is this silly wheel size game we play.
  • 1 0
 @dirtyburger: Cool. I know the expression, just thought you were calling me out.

I don't get worked up over wheel size debates. Unless you make a living riding bikes it doesn't really matter.
  • 1 0
 @mtbgeartech: same! Great minds think alike I suppose. This HD is my 1st 27.5er. It's loads of fun. For racing I might choose my Rallon but damn it if this HD, despite the shit suspension tune, would make it a difficult decision.
  • 1 0
 @Yetimike2019: with you. This bike needs at least 5-7mm more chhainstay, and a low BB setting for real stability. And then they'd need to address the rear travel. That said... for the speeds I realistically and safely get to.. it's damn good on trails.
  • 1 0
 @gibspaulding: I think I'm in a similar situation. Always have balked at Ibis athletics and also at the high BB and little wheels but I bought one on a whim and it's a great all arounder. I'm still working through revalves of the fork but I'm super picky. I have a Rallon and 2019 Enduro29 and a 2019 Stumpy.. anyway.. Rallon and HD5... tough to choose between them. Once I get the HD fork sorted I think it'll be my goto for basically everything except races. And even then it might be for that too..
To be fair Fox Grip2 leaves next to no room to improve damping curve profiles...
  • 1 0
 They oughtta make a Mojo AF
  • 27 0
 Very typical Ibis setup, great all around bike that balances climbing with descending. Doesn't hit the gravity portion of the spectrum for this market as well as some others.

Finally, my how times have changed, a bike with a 64 degree HA and 470 reach is called "nimble"
  • 1 3
 They are just adjectives thrown in to fill up space, they really mean nothing!
  • 17 0
 May not be the fastest, but for me, "good all rounder" + "quick" + "snappy" = fun.
  • 16 1
 So far the enduro field tests have been more of a let down than the RM Slayer.
  • 12 22
flag Yetimike2019 (Dec 17, 2019 at 8:12) (Below Threshold)
 I own the 2020 Enduro from specialized. It won’t be a let down. Fastest non DH bike I have ever ridden. It’s pretty fun as well if you size down. I did manage to snap some carbon links on mine, but with the aluminum links I have been hammering this bike and it’s really good. I’m not a specialized fan boy either.
  • 33 0
 @SnowshoeRider4Life, sorry, we can't break every bike we test.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Wouldn't that be something!
  • 6 0
 @Yetimike2019: looks like it’s time for a Name change then!?! Spechimike2020!?? Lol, real question I have is have you tried the first lower linkage long Travel 29er yet? The Megatower? Kuz that bike is my favorite.. unless the Ibis Company comes out with the RipmoWtf that’s longer travel and lighter weight carbon.. kuz dam that would be the best new bike of the next decade.. lol

Don’t mind me since I’m just daydreaming ;+p
  • 22 1
 @Yetimike2019: Dude we get it, you broke a link. We heard you on VitalMTB and also in the comment section of every field test so far.
  • 1 2
 @mikekazimer: just seemed like it failed to impress is all
  • 2 2
 @Jaybirdy: why would I change my name? That would imply that I care about PB more than just looking at cool shit. I don’t use Facebook or any other social media stuff, so this is just my bathroom reading and commenting time Smile . FYI if you are looking for an enduro bike try a the enduro 29, I got to demo it for free while my bike was in the shop. It blew me away how good it is, especially as a race bike.
  • 3 7
flag Yetimike2019 (Dec 17, 2019 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 @theg-man: lol I can’t recommend this bike without at least saying that I broke it. It’s kind of bragging I know, but more importantly i really want to recommend this bike as the fastest bike I have ridden, but I don’t want to just tell people that without letting them know it’s not perfect so far. Especially since specialized hasn’t sent me a replacement frame in over 2 months.
  • 1 0
 @Jaybirdy: oh I liked the mega tower as well. I think it looks better than the specialized visually. But to me, for racing, the enduro 29 was better. The rear wheel gets up out of the way faster and you can carry more speed. If it was just my trail bike then the Santa Cruz would win. I don’t play the brand loyalty game. My money goes to the bike that goes the fastest that month lol. That’s why I don’t have a yeti in the garage.
  • 1 0
 Lol I totally misread the first part of your comment. Honestly it would have to be RipmomikeAF2020 right now.
  • 9 1
 @Yetimike2019: bikes don’t go fast. Riders do.
  • 1 0
 @CircusMaximus: haha. True enough. Long travel bikes help me go fast though that’s for sure.
  • 1 3
 @CircusMaximus: tell a pro dh rider bikes don’t matter and that they should race on a trail bike.
  • 4 0
 @Yetimike2019: Sam Hill, 2017 World Champs.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Because you're getting soft. Man up and go kill some high end bikes!!
  • 1 1
 @Yetimike2019: You might have all the downvotes here, but when these tests are done, I predict the Enduro will lead the class. Watch. Buncha Specialized haters on here.
  • 1 0
 @Yetimike2019: I have the Megatower.. lol no thanks on the senduro ;p
  • 19 5
 These days, saying it’s the shortest bike in the field is nearly as bad as saying it broke.
  • 3 1
 Agreed! While a short chain stay bike can feel snappy and easy to get the front end in the air, it's also less stable at speed and through chunk. For this category of bike, I would take a little bit more stability over snappy handling.
  • 20 0
 @Curtis-Gillen: I think for a 27.5 that makes sense, but a 29er running minions, Fox36/Lyrics etc...man that's a historically high amount of stability right there. I think we've gone to far into the stability/long WB side and too far away from the nimble/quick/fun side.
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: Exactly the reason I just bought this. This review is everything I wanted to hear (as I haven't ridden it yet).

As for the chain slap, my frame is almost completely covered with rubber there, doesn't like like the test bike.
  • 5 0
 @Curtis-Gillen: we all know what chain stays feel “snappy” now.

...I’ll see myself out
  • 11 0
 So the "traction tuned" suspension isn't the way to go, eh? So decades of suspension research in mountain biking and related powersports is actually correct? Who would have thought?

Can someone tell R3ACT and NaILD this startling revelation?
  • 9 1
 The message could go something like this: Y0uR $u$P3N$10N TuN3 1$ DuMB
  • 9 0
 Jeff K-W seemed to agree during his tuning session on the HD5.
  • 7 0
 It's a light tune, nothing new. It may be a bit lighter than a usual light tune, IDK. The good thing is, if you don't get on with it you have enough range to dial it in to your preferences.
  • 2 1
 @mtbgeartech:
I own one. The traction tune is a good concept with a laughably awful execution. It's terrible But once you get it sorted the bike is adequate everywhere a trail bike needs to be and super fun in tight stuff. I'm on my 4th revalve and almost got it pretty ok...

There are huge holes in the damping coefficient curve..Which you can't actually get around, at least in the fork...

They'd have a much much better chance of getting this right if they used Rockshox suspension which have actual damper shim stacks.
  • 2 1
 @Ferd: So glad to hear that someone else is a fan of Rockshox. I'm loving my Lyrik Ult and Super Deluxe Ult right now. I am considering this frame, sounds like I should plan on swapping the shock... Would love to run the highly tune-able DVO stuff on it.
  • 2 0
 I'd be really curious to try their tune. I've been demoing a lot of different bikes this summer in the hopes of getting something new soon, and I've been finding that at least for me (140lb on size L) my best bet for a baseline is to set sag, and then just set compression and rebound wide open to start. Usually the rebound ends up slowed down a little, but it's pretty rare that I want to add compression damping. It might be nice to end up closer to the middle where I actually have some options.
  • 1 0
 Been riding Ibis for 10 years and afraid that I may have to look elsewhere. The sporty, supportive feel of the DW Link is what I liked about them. Can't justify spending all that money and having to revalve. Ibis may be wise to provide a firmer/classic tune as an option. Worth an extra $200.
  • 2 0
 @canuck-rider:

In all honesty, FWIW, you can for the most part click your way past the Traction Toon..

Don't let this keep you from a new Ibis. I love my HD5. It feels like the perfect one bike for me. Just have the suspension revalved by a competent tuner.
  • 2 0
 @gibspaulding:

This bike rides great. I'm super picky and sensitive to my suspension set up...150 lbs and have tuned my own enduro race moto suspension for years using somewhat rudimentary modeling software...

The Ibis traction tune doesn't really address compression in the fork. (I haven't pulled the shock apart yet as it seems relatively fine so far... if I get the fork to our match the shock then I will dig in there)
So you're probably best to send the fork somewhere for a revalve anyway...I don't actually know who / what is available. From what I have seen (now in the 4th iteration of tuning on my fork, the midvalve needs some attention...a new valve with slightly better ability to flow in the rebound would be 1st target. Then I'd look at the base valve..though that one has shims that can be restacked...

I f*cking love this bike..even the suspension sorting get me going...lol
  • 1 0
 @Ferd: I currently ride my 34 FIT and 36 RC2 with only 4-5 clicks from closed rebound. Compression about about 2/3 out. Not sure I'll be taking a chance on the New Coke suspension tune Wink I'm good with my HD4 and RipleyLS for now. Upgraded to the Fox Factory and haven't had any regrets or custom tunes.

If they bring the HD5 in for a demo day, I'll definitely try one and see.
  • 2 0
 @canuck-rider: Well Ima bet that you are heavier than me... but..how much pressure do you run. Just curious to see what others get along with..
I run no volume spacers and about 58 psi in his 36..bottom out maybe once a day. But I also like a super speedy rebound...compared to many.

I prob shoud go see if there's a suspension forum here...
  • 2 0
 @Ferd: 90 PSI in the 36 RC2 Fork. No Spacers. And around 240 PSI in the X2. One Spacer.
  • 1 0
 @canuck-rider: thanks man. Yeah I think Im just too skinny to get this to work right.
And yikes, pulled apart the X2 and it’s as I imagined..going to install a DPX2 and see if the bike will come to life. There’s more to work with in there
  • 14 0
 Technically, isn't the RM Slayer the slowest?...
  • 3 0
 I mean....ur not wrong.
  • 12 0
 This sounds like an absolute killer hard trail/ light Enduro bike, which is where a lot of us non-racer types sit.

Ibis builds great bikes it seems.
  • 6 0
 commenting only on looks here: The lines of this bike aren't aging well at all. that top tube, with the recurve just before the headtube makes the headangle look steeper than it is, makes the reach look absurdly short and the bike look overly tall. Generally, it kind of has the lines of a huck bike from the mid 2000's.
  • 1 0
 Agreed. Awkward design.
  • 5 0
 Got to ride one of these recently. It is an excellent climber as mentioned. I found it to be quite stable, but I haven't ridden the 29er enduro sled (mini dh) bikes. This bike was fun, too. Maybe the 27.5 wheels helped in that department.
  • 8 2
 “chain slap has already taken paint off the chainstay”

All the incremental changes and Ibis still can’t fix their horrible paint quality!

Traction tune is just Ibis customer tune.
  • 1 0
 I don't think it's a paint quality issue. As a (very happy) Ripmo owner, I'd say Ibis could improve the chainstay protectors, like other manufacturers have done.
  • 1 0
 My HD4 did the same...had to add some extra protection.
  • 8 0
 last time I saw something that colour was in a portaloo on the third day at Glastonbury Festival..
  • 4 0
 "I started with the bike set up according to Ibis' recommended settings, which had the rebound almost all the way open on the fork and shock"

on one hand, pretty terrifying thought that newer riders might pick this up as their first serious bike and hit the local jump track with these settings.

on the other hand, great for friday fails.
  • 2 1
 Can you say “donkey kick”?
  • 4 1
 am looking to get my first MTB. I grew up racing BMX and working at bike shops. I remember when we got the GT Tequesta in. About the time MTB came out, I moved on and got into other things, motocross, marriage, kids, etc. Now at 48 I want to get back into it. This was a bike I was really excited about, but this kinda took the wind out of my sails. I was hoping that I would get some confirmation of my bias. Oh well I do like going downhill more than pedaling up, but where I live pedaling up is certainly in the future do an all arounder might be what I need. Looking forward to hearing about a couple of the other bikes. Maybe I should look more in the trail category since I will only have 1 bike.
  • 3 0
 I came from a BMX background too and I honestly have more fun on shorter travel bikes. Unless you are riding steep, super chunky trails you’ll probably have a better time on a bike with more pop and feedback.
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: I was looking at HD4, then the HD5 came out. Also the Bronson, any other suggestions?
  • 1 0
 @jwashburn: if you’re looking to stay 27.5” and carbon, I’d check out:
Evil insurgent or calling
Pivot Mach 6
Norco Sight 27.5
Intense Primer 27.5

HD4 is still a great bike and may provide more of that bmx bike feeing than the hd5. You can probably get a good deal on an HD4.
  • 2 0
 @jwashburn @Paddock22 I share a very similar story. After months of looking at every bike, I settled on the Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt. It is an amazing all arounder. it has adjustable geometry in the best way possible. tweak to be a climber or slack it to be a descender or keep it in the middle for an all arounder. Never mind about the review of the slayer breaking, that is horse shit and shouldn't worry you if you're an average rider on the trails. It's a sweet bike! I just bought mine for $4000 and has XT parts and fox suspension! pretty sick and riding/bunny hopping/ shredding on it feels so light and easy!
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: Im likely obsessing way to much about nothing. I have been on a MTB 3 or 4 times in my life. 6 or 7 years ago I borrowed an old Mongoose something and rode a day at Northstar and a couple of days in Auburn. Then about a month ago I was hired to shoot some photos for a lululemon/wilderness collaboration and the organizer put me on Trek something (to be honest, I was shooting photos, not paying attention to the bike)

But that is what got me fired up about riding. Something that will be fun to ride at Northstar a couple of times in the summer, maybe some Downieville, and around lake Tahoe with friends. I dont need to set any records
  • 1 0
 @Paddock22: I also dont know if I want to stay Carbon and or 27.5. I am totally guessing at 27.5, 29 just seems like such a huge wheel. I have no actual input or reasoning as to why, it just seems big. As for Carbon, or Aluminum, I dont think I would know the difference
  • 2 0
 @jwashburn: well sounds like you are already a mountain biker! Welcome
  • 1 0
 Take a look at the Pivot Mach 5.5 and Mach 6. I tried both, expecting to choose the Mach 6. But the Mach 5.5 has been a fantastic one-bike, all-arounder for me.
  • 1 0
 @jwashburn: Test the Trek Remedy, 27.5, not super slack, not super steep. Not a planted bike, it likes to get airborne and thrown around.
  • 2 0
 @jwashburn: I grew up in that area and know the Sierra Nevada's well.

I still ride BMX (age 35) and I currently ride a Pivot Mach 429 trail (short travel trail 29er). It's still pretty playful and has a pretty good BMX feel but the big wheels/ and long wheel base certainly limit it's pop and manual-ability. Since it's a short travel bike I run the suspension on the firm/progressive side which makes it less supple but lets me ride a little rowdier terrain. 29ers look crazy compared to 26 or 27.5 but when you're riding them, you don't notice the size difference that much. That have their pros/cons in specific terrain or trails but on your average MTB trail, wheel size is probably negligible.

I demo'd an HD4 last summer and it rode pretty good. I could really flick it around and manual it well. I would be totally comfortable riding it in Tahoe or at Northstar.

As for Carbon vs Aluminum, the difference is pretty negligible honestly. What makes the biggest difference for me is a stiff fork chassis (say a Fox 32 vs a Cane Creek 35mm) and wheels/tires.
  • 2 0
 Another washed up lifelong bmx‘er here. I’ve tried a variety of bikes from different companies and Banshee has been my go to the last 2 years.
  • 3 0
 @jwashburn: I just got a Jeffsy CF Pro Race 27.5 and so far it is pretty much everything I wanted in a bike. I rode BMX (mostly skateparks/ramps) for 20+ years. So when I went to MTB I wanted that fun playful feeling. My first one was the DB Release and it was short and poppy and fun to throw around, but I wanted more travel and newer geo. The Jeffsy seemed to fit that bill nicely.
  • 6 0
 @mikekazimer

Remember, you are never Overbiked, you're just Undertrailed.
  • 7 0
 Cheers Boys for the reviews. I for one are loving them.
  • 7 0
 Great review...you guys do a great job Smile
  • 2 0
 One wrong comment in the video concerning the traction tune. There is no lighter compression tune. its the exact same GRIP2 damper as any Fox Fork, just a lighter rebound tune. That lighter rebound tune also only really makes sense for lightweight riders (sub 140)

Traction Tune is just marketing BS in my opinion. Like Kazimer said, he ended up just setting things up as he normally would.
  • 2 0
 When I pulled my fork apart I found a Tiny difference in the base valve's stack which let the stack "float" 0.2mm more than OEM would allow (how this fork's HS compression dial adjusts things)...so Yeah, there is Zero difference in the compression tune..
  • 3 0
 Previous upgrade HD3 -> HD4: Little bit longer, little bit slacker
Current upgrade HD4 -> HD5: Little bit longer, little bit slacker
  • 4 0
 Liked the hd4 a lot!! Dunno why but this one isn’t very appealing to me...
Next please!
  • 3 1
 Not doing it for me at all on the looks front - and that colour? If I'm going to spend serious bread on a bike it won't be on a bike that's borrowed a can of 1970's Austin Allegro Beige spray paint from my dad's garage.
  • 6 3
 This bike would be a great candidate for a MULLET. 150mm front + 29 to basically preserve the geometry, or 160mm front end + 29 to make it a touch more aggro
  • 1 2
 Do it and send pics, or it didn't happen.
  • 1 0
 @jrich2095: ok give me a minute to set up my gofundme. I can count on your contribution?
  • 2 2
 The geo math does not work out that way, even going 20mm down on fork travel, with the 29er wheel the front would still get lift up by 15 to 20mm depending on tires used. It would be more than touch more aggro with the 150 already.
  • 2 0
 My prediction is we will see Mojo MF in aluminum.
  • 2 1
 This looks like a bike that will "out do" my Bronson V3 (with Fox X2). I really want to rent this bike to see how it compares, but for at least 2 days, 1 day with lots of climbing then the next day at a real bike park like Mammoth, Trestle, or Keystone.
  • 4 0
 Somehow she ain't pretty. Used to feel that these were the most beautiful bikes...design language hasn't aged well
  • 5 0
 Am I the only one that likes this color?
  • 4 1
 Yes, pretty much. Sorry mate.
  • 3 1
 Yep
  • 1 0
 Was curious to give this a whirl. The sizing on my HD4 has felt a bit small at 5’11 ( I ride a large) I tested a pivot firebird/ a ripmo and tie sizing is way better.

I do agree it’s not much of a change when considering the old Hd4 is marketed to run a 160 or 170 mm fork which will net a similar HTA ( at 170) as the current Hd4.
  • 1 0
 I'm no geo and suspension expert but it seems like the short chain stay and relatively short wheelbase and overall more playful dimensions of this bike wouldn't be a great combo with the traction heavy suspension tune. Seems like a bike like this should get a more playful poppy type suspension setup.
  • 2 1
 light tune=poppy, typically.
  • 4 0
 So 470mm reach on a size L is considered short ish now?

Pole/mondraker sizing is the benchmark now?
  • 2 1
 Both Pole and Mondraker are around 470mm in a Medium, so we're still about a size off. But there's no denying that things are currently somewhat settled at S-425, M-450, L-475, XL-500+ right now.
  • 1 0
 Im Spotting a Suspension Measuring Device Mount on this in the Video, you can see it on non drive side replacing the lower spacer of the shock hardware

Are we going to see some fancy graphs for all the bikes tested here at a later date?? and this was the bike it was mounted to during the intro section? Or only this bike, and possibly testing somthing like a motion instruments data aquisition unit?? @brianpark
  • 2 0
 Good eye - that was a leftover from some testing we did before the HD5 launched with Motion Instruments. You can see how it mounted here: www.pinkbike.com/photo/17778870.
  • 1 0
 Aside frut om the wheel size difference, it seems to be the same way I would describe my Slash. It was an enduro bike when it came out but now I feel as though it is in the agressive trail bike category by todays standards. Not that i give a shit about categories....
  • 2 0
 If u look at all the new pivots they did away with the long yoke because of the side load issue. I don’t see anything different between old pivot yoke setup and the ibis setup.
  • 1 0
 I have to agree that the 2020 Enduro is just about the stableist at speed... unless you are dealing with rocks and roots..

I found the enduro to be superior in almost every way but for one flaw: BB height is too low - prepare for near constant peddle strikes.
  • 4 0
 You'd think this was the greatest bike of all time based on sponsored reviews.
  • 1 0
 Hey Pinkbike. Can you get Ibis to send you non-Traction Tune suspension?? I've seen video where they do back to back comparisons. I'm on a HD4 and it smashes. Don't think that Traction Tune is allowing the HD5 to shine. DW Link isn't supposed to be a magic carpet.
  • 5 1
 It’s so refreshing to see a bike not break in the first 10 rides.
  • 1 6
flag Explodo (Dec 17, 2019 at 7:11) (Below Threshold)
 It waits till the 30th ride.
  • 4 1
 Bike reviews are cool to watch, but I think the reviewer should be less “matter a fact”.. it’s just an opinion.
  • 4 0
 Thomson stems are nice. Adds a touch of personality.
  • 2 2
 man, when the ibis mojo hd first came out (2010 or 2011?) it was a pioneer in a great descending focused all mountain/enduro bike. have they just stopped innovating or are they purposefully migrated to the less descending oriented category?
  • 3 0
 I don't think Ibis stopped innovating with this bike, they just know their market. The "enduro race bike" they mentioned in the video is the Ripmo. The HD5 seems to be aimed at Mojo 3, HD4, Yeti SB5, Pivot Mach 5.5, ect owners who want a "more modern" bike.
  • 6 1
 Fact is, most people who own enduro bikes should rather be on trail bikes, and this bike is that nice middle ground between the two that will actually better suit most of its owners than a full on enduro rig
  • 4 0
 Why Mojo when you can Ripmo?
  • 14 12
 These tests have lost there mojo..Bible of bike test bring it on so much more interesting
  • 5 0
 Agreed.
  • 10 0
 I do like how the new Pink Bike format is where it's fairly plainly laid out. No more Bible of Bikes rediculousness of "I liked it but it feels ponderous in corners...sips PBR>". But yeah PB could do better here...most importantly they need to include popular reference bikes from previous Gen bikes.
  • 19 4
 Seriously? The Bible tests are miserable, joyless affairs. A bunch of guys getting a free holiday and free bikes and still utterly devoid of personality or joy. I'd rather watch my toenails grow.
  • 4 2
 The Bible reviewers kind of suck, but the bikes they test are usually more interesting and relevant in my opinion.
  • 3 3
 @honourablegeorge: especially when these guys appear devoid of any riding ability. It's hard to take a review of a modern bike seriously when the reviewer hasn't figured out how to weight the front wheel.

Note: this is speaking from previous years. Haven't watched any BoB for this year.
  • 7 0
 @jrich2095, I’m genuinely curious, what bikes would you have liked to see included this year? We try to have a good mix of brands, since we obviously can’t include every single bike on the market, but let me know what we missed.
  • 2 1
 @honourablegeorge: I'd rather watch your toenails grow too!
  • 2 0
 @mtbgeartech: I'm closing my PB account before I start getting unsolicited foot pics Smile
  • 8 0
 @mikekazimer: why, my obscure and unpurchasable brand of British steel hard tail, of course!
  • 4 1
 @mikekazimer: just spit-balling here: the new Orange Five, the Cannondale Habit, a Gurilla Gravity bike in another variation, Ibis Ripmo AF, Kona Process 134, maybe something from Marin, anything from Knolly. These are generally bikes I have been curious about. Also, an aggressive hardtail category would be so sick.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: All of the bikes in the test are brand new this year. Which means they're interesting, but it also means that it's hard to have a reference point. I think it'd be worthwhile to include some bikes that have been around for a year or three, kind of like a control group. Lots of people have owned, demoed, or borrowed various 2018 or 2019 model year bikes. Comparisons to those bikes are potentially more helpful than comparisons to bikes we've never even seen. So in this category, that might be a Slash, Reign, Patrol, Firebird, etc.
  • 5 0
 @sspiff: Agreed, the PinkB crew are much better riders!
  • 3 0
 @jrich2095: We did the Cannondale Habit last year, the Ripmo AF and Marin are still coming in our value bikes feature from this year, Kona will have a standalone review, Knolly will have a standalone review shortly...
  • 10 0
 @toast2266: I think we can do a much better job at comparing to existing points of reference, bikes that people have demoed or ridden in the past. Thanks for the suggestion!
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer:: Mike I don't remember, are you guys working on a review of the new 2020 Norco Sight? That would be very good.
  • 10 0
 I'm honestly not sure if the all the Bible testers could clear A line... Pinkbike's Tests are far more relevant IMO
  • 4 0
 @mybaben, yes, there's a review on the way.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Thanks mate.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: RAAW Madonna, Canyon Strive, Norco Sight, Radon Slide Trail, Forbidden Druid
  • 1 0
 @bekahn:

Raaw: www.pinkbike.com/news/review-raaw-madonna.html

Canyon: www.pinkbike.com/news/first-ride-the-new-canyon-strive-2019.html (and we have another one of their bikes in our value bikes Field Test upcoming)

Norco: a Sight full review is in the works. Stay tuned!

Radon: that Slide Trail looks really nice, it's on our list to see about bringing in.

Forbidden: www.pinkbike.com/news/review-forbiddens-druid-high-pivot-trail-bike.html
  • 6 3
 Timed testing doesn't mean anything, it's just BS pseudo statistics.
  • 1 0
 In other words, a great bike for most people, nice. I'd like to see the HD5 compared to an Esker Elkat, the well refined DW vs the Orion.
  • 1 0
 I can give you feedback on the Elkat vs HD4. Both large. Finish quality wise, the Elkat wins, basically what you would expect in a high end carbon frame. Ibis has dropped their quality in paint and finish considerably since latest Ripley LS, HD4 era.. Paint chips real easy, frame sanding is mediocre and you can see a lot of imperfections all around. Also the paint schemes since HD3, with the little bubbles and such gimmicks look..cheapish.. A lot of people would love the cleaner look of the original mojos/HD to come back, a la Ripley 4..
Benchmark is the original HD, it's paint quality was best in class (compared to Santa Cruz, others), still today a well cared HD and Mojo paint looks like new and somehow timeless.

Now ride wise.. I've been on the HD4 since summer 2017.. Elkat about 6 month's. Rear suspension wise, Orion feels plusher and with more traction, (HD4 -fox X2, Elkat DPX2) awesome really, maybe a tad more efficient, which may be due to the fact that it's designed for one chainring only?
Now, geo numbers are different, Elkat has a steeper seat tube which positions you better at climbing, but I wish it had more reach, on paper has 5mm more than the HD4, but feels more cramped. It is the faster bike in flats and climbing, with the same wheels and tires.

Now, going down, I prefer the HD4, more stable. Also cockpit is more comfortable. All around riding Elkat wins, but I love more the HD4 as I prefer high speed downs..

A comparo with the HD5 is needed, as it has a closer seat tube angle, maybe the HD5 would regain the climbing and flatter terrain speed the Elkat has? We'll see..

On the HD5 tune, before it's launch I was on Crested Butte, and during the days there, I ended tuning the suspension faster/lighter as it gave me more high speed control and traction over chunk. Not the same style and tune of course, when hitting jump trails.

The Orion suspension is indeed great!! Would love to see other brands jump on it!
@mikelevy @mikekazimer no Elkat test in sight?
  • 6 2
 Con ugly af
  • 3 1
 I agree, I do not like the double bubble look of the Ibis HD bikes. Ripmo is not bad looking, but that double bubble just makes the bike look ugly. For me, looks play a big part in my purchase.
  • 2 0
 @HendersonMike: Agreed, I have never liked that weird space in the frame either, and the colors have been shit the last two generations. Damn.
  • 3 0
 Seriously if im spending this much it better look good and ride good @HendersonMike:
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer
Rocky Mountain Slayer wheelbase (L) - 1234 mm
Mojo HD5 wheelbase (L) - 1243 mm

HD5 is the shortest in the group?
  • 5 0
 We tested the 29" Slayer, which has a 1248mm wheelbase.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Oops, missed that. Thanks.
  • 2 0
 Shorter, less slack, small wheel bikes are WAY more fun to ride IMHO. At least IBIS is still in the real of sanity
  • 3 0
 I stay watching Jeff Weed kill it on this bike.
  • 3 3
 I've owned a BUNCH of Ibis bikes--currently on a Ripley LS. I might pick up a DV9, just to have a hardtail again. But what I'd really like is an Ibis ebike. Call me a dreamer!
  • 3 0
 Ibis is da best! Beautiful bike.
  • 3 3
 "the overall feel was closer to an all-mountain or aggressive trail bike" and all that despite 170mm and fork for over 6600$.
  • 26 0
 I don't think the price has anything to do with that... And the fact that it feels closer to an all-mountain bike isn't necessarily a bad thing - for riders without Whistler-level terrain in their backyard this could be just the ticket.
  • 17 0
 @mikekazimer: That would be the VAST majority of riders.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: Thanks for saying this. I'm guilty of wanting/buying the most extreme bike in a given category. The Specialized Enduro for example. If I were seriously racing enduro and that was my main focus in riding the Enduro would be a great fit. If I race 2-3 enduros per year and the rest of my rides are 20-30 miles with fast and fun gravity segments (the parts I care most about) the HD5 would be a much better choice.
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: My preference is for 27.5 wheels. Based on what my favorite local shop has to offer I am looking at either the HD5 or Trek Remedy for next season. I've been on a 2018 Remedy 9.8 the past two years and really enjoyed it. Its a super fun bike yet "big enough" that if I am not riding a line that's on me, not the bike. I may do an enduro race or two a season but racing is not my focus.

You guys tested the Remedy last year; how would you compare these two bikes? they seem very similar?
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer: Maybe you should run the winners of the trail and enduro categories in the downcountry category as well. It would be interesting to see what you lose with these bikes when you ride them on tamer trails especially since the comments in the downcountry test debated the need for short travel bikes with aggro geo.
  • 1 0
 @kliss: Hey mate, I suspect the Remedy is due for an update. Not sure if you're someone who likes the newest geo/development kind of thing, but wanted to through that out there.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Mike is exactly right. It's like anything, we always want more cuz it looks good, but get that bike on the ground and it's often more than you need.

Bikes like the Ibis HD4, Pivot Mach 5.5, GG Shred Dog, Esker Elkat, these are what most people should be riding if they ride all mountain, ie climb and descend rugged terrain.

Lots of other forks could get by with less travel, like a shorty travel 29er.

The whole downcountry category, less the Trail Pistol, was kinda silly.

There are so few XC racer types these days, the ones that still exist are so particular that they really don't need a review to guide their decisions.

How about next year you guys/gals focus on short travel and mid travel bikes, break it down by wheel size (27.5, 29), that'll give you four groups that resonate with the majority of riders.
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: I own a pure xc race bike even though I don't race. I don't ride it much, but when I do it's a lot of fun in its own way.
  • 4 1
 Its beige!%#$!
  • 4 5
 So, "Traction-tune" isn't made for jumping...okay. You really should have to set up your suspension differently for stay-on-the-ground speed and jumping performance. If you want to do both, you'll have to make compromises.
  • 1 0
 Ibis says to add some compression for jump lines.
  • 8 0
 @Explodo, most riders aren't going to take the time to set their suspension up differently between each run. Imagine being out on a ride and needing to stop whenever you come across a jump...That's not going to happen.

Suspension setup is a matter of compromise, and in this case I think Ibis' suggested rebound speeds are going to feel too quick for most riders. It's worth experimenting with it, though, and you can always slow things down, which is what I ended up doing.
  • 1 0
 The only shock that let's you have 2 different tunes with a flick is the Push 11-6. With anything else it is a huge pain to have to change settings depending on what you are riding. If you have to change settings to from normal on what's supposed to be an enduro bike according to Ibis then they going about this the wrong way the start.
  • 2 1
 Coming from a MojoHD that’s been put through the wringer. All I wanna know:

Ripmo or HD5
  • 2 0
 That's your call! Depends if you like 29ers, and also what your main focus is on the bike, (racing, fun, jumping, etc.).
  • 1 0
 Reminds me of furniture lines from the 70s! Lemme drink more beer and see if it'll look better later.
  • 2 0
 seems this could be perfect for a mullet if u swap for a 150mm 29er fork
  • 2 0
 only if you want BB height from 90´s
  • 1 0
 Geometry is in the database for comparison... geometrygeeks.bike/bike/ibis-hd5-2020
  • 5 3
 Cons: you have to be at least 42 years old to ride an Ibis.
  • 2 1
 Pros: I'm still riding and can afford any of the builds.........and own multiple models.
  • 1 0
 This bike looks much better in the forrest than posing on the lawn for photoshoot.
  • 1 1
 I hope they put more material around the link connections to the front triangle.
  • 6 5
 ➕ It looks sexy and it isn't a Specialized.
  • 1 0
 Sounds like it's the longest travel "trail bike" Ibis makes.
  • 1 0
 Mike looks tiny with Jason sitting next to him
  • 3 0
 a 200 pound man, at Pinkbike!!!! amazing isn't it!
  • 1 0
 @jamesbrant: Riding wrong size bikes...
  • 1 0
 So Mike lost his Mojo after bucking the jump?
  • 1 0
 These DW bikes need a handlebar remote for the rear shock to flip the rebound before a jump. I got the same problem on my dw bike. Rebound damping almost zero, tracks great on the rough, jumps like a suicide machine!
  • 1 0
 @JohanG:
I've been working my for rebound. It's slow as molasses compared to what they did to the shock. Fox didn't make it easy with the Grip2 however. Nearly impossible without making a difference mid-valve.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: I ain’t going to denied this...
bucked a jump this Sunday (at the Devils Racetrack), crashed, got up with a broken ego and I’m still recovering emotionally.

Luckily, I can now blame Ibis DW for that even though I did the same jump a few more times without bucking. :-)
  • 2 1
 Hmmmm not one mention of water bottles...
  • 5 0
 Skip to 7:14 in the video...
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: my bad, went the reading route (work obliges).
  • 1 0
 no below threshold comments yet
  • 1 0
 nevermind left for 1 minute now theres a bunch
  • 1 0
 Mmmm Schleyer you say ... that will be a night full of sweet dreams
  • 1 3
 Wow, guess you guys actually didn't forget to tighten the axle on this bike. Amazing what happens when things get set up right. Good job to the "professional" mechanic on doing his job correctly for this bike set-up.
  • 2 1
 The Ugly Duckling
  • 7 10
 Why they still using a yoke for the shock? Did they solve the shaft wear issue from side loading? Having to rebuild shock every 3 months is a dealbreaker for me.
  • 10 3
 I haven't faced that issue with my rear shocks. Hope you get yours figured out.
  • 4 2
 the yoke isn't fixed to the shock, there shouldn't be a lot of side load with this design
  • 2 2
 @Blablablup123: it certainly is fixed to the shock
  • 2 0
 Looks like they did with the change to bearings. I know on my HD4 I have to keep up on making sure the bushings are clean and lubed or else I can feel it binding when I take take the shock off.
  • 1 2
 So basically a Nomad with a higher BB
  • 2 3
 Silly pinkbike groms A-line is not a trail and ferrentino shreds...
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