Field Test: 2021 Norco Shore - The Freeride Tank

Dec 8, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Norco Shore



Words by Mike Kazimer, photography by Tom Richards


The Shore is back! The Shore disappeared from Norco's lineup a decade ago, but it's returned for another round of freeride glory. This new version has 27.5” wheels, an aluminum frame, and 180mm of travel. There's also a park version that has 190mm of travel with a dual crown, 200mm fork for riders that don't have any plans of pedaling uphill.

The new Shore uses a Horst Link suspension design, but Norco also went with a high main pivot placement and an idler pulley. That allowed them to have a rearward axle path with minimal kickback, while still maintaining pedaling efficiency. It's designed specifically to be used with a coil shock – you could technically fit an air shock, but Norco say that the spring and damper won't allow the suspension to react the way its designed to.
Shore Details

• Travel: 180mm rear / 180mm front
• Wheel size: 27.5
• Head angle: 63°
• Seat tube angle: 77.7°
• Reach: 480mm (lrg)
• Chainstay length: 445mm
• Sizes: S, M, L (tested), XL
• Weight: 37.4 lb / 17 kg
• Price: $5,199 USD
norco.com

You're not going to find any carbon here – the frame and build kits were designed with durability in mind. There's internal cable routing through the top tube, bolts for a tube or tool on the underside of that top tube, and room for a water bottle. Other welcome details include a threaded bottom bracket, and clearance for up to a 2.6” tire. There's also plenty of room to run a longer travel dropper posts – the post on the size large I tested had 200mm of drop.

The Shore was built for the descents, and that's reflected by the slack 63-degree head angle. The size large has a 480mm reach, and 445mm chainstays. Chainstay length varies by size, going up by 5mm. Out of all the bikes in this long travel category, the Shore wins the longest wheelbase award, checking in at 1286mm. All those numbers might look like they were lifted from a DH bike, but Norco didn't forget that this was a freeride bike, and that means pedaling up to the top of the hill sometimes. To help with that, they gave it a nice and steep 77.7-degree seat tube angle.

The bike pictured here is the Shore A1, which retails for $5,199 USD. The Shore A2 goes for $3,199, and the frame kit is $2,099. That park version I mentioned earlier is $3,999.

What do you get for $5,199? Well, for suspension there's a 180mm Fox 38 Factory fork, a Factory DHX2 coil shock. The drivetrain is SRAM GX Eagle, and SRAM's Code RSC brakes handle stopping duties. Wheels are e*thirteen LG1 aluminum rims laced to DT Swiss 350 hubs, and those get a Maxxis Assegai / DHR II tire combo, in a Double Down casing. To keep things consistent, I ended up swapping those for the EXO+ control tires (Double Down tires were in short supply), but it is cool to see this bike come with extra-tough tires. Other nice bits are a Deity aluminum bar, and DMR Deathgrips.

Total weight with the control tires? 37.4 pounds. Yes, it's sort of a tank. But remember, Norco said it's designed for rides without stopwatches or finish lines in sight.




Norco Shore review
Norco Shore review

Climbing

Anyone that says weight doesn't matter should try grinding up a logging road for a couple thousand vertical feet on this thing, then talk to me at the top. No matter how you slice it, 37 pounds is on the heavy side of things. I mean, there are aluminum DH bikes out there that weigh less...

There's no getting around that number on the scale, but the good news is that the geometry and suspension design do what they can to take the sting out of climbing. There's no compression lever on the shock to firm things up for climbing, and there really isn't a need for one – even if you stand and mash the pedals there isn't a crazy amount of bob. That steep seat tube angle helps too – it's a nice and upright climbing position. That long wheelbase does help on chunky climbs, and as long as you can maintain momentum the Shore will keep clawing its way upward.

Still, at the end of the day, this is the most DH oriented bike in this group, and it shows. It takes more effort to muscle it around, and it didn't exactly inspire me to search out hard climbs. The results of the efficiency test that Mike Levy performed reflected that as well; the Shore ended up at the very back of the pack.


Norco Shore review

Norco Shore review
Norco Shore review


Descending

Hang on tight, because the Shore has a serious need for speed. It's big, slack and supportive – let gravity take over and this thing will go. It does a great job smoothing out rough terrain and big hits, but it's a different feel than I expected – I kind off thought it'd be this ultra-plush, super sensitive thing, but instead it sits a little higher in its travel. I ended up running the compression almost all the way open, and I'd be curious to possibly try an even lighter tune. Still, for this bike's purpose I think it works well.

I was also surprised how well it'll pump through rough terrain – let off the brakes, stop pedaling, and you can keep steamrolling ahead. The same goes for jumping – once you push into the travel that ramp up lets you load and then pop off the lip of a jump.
Timed Testing

The enduro and freeride bikes were all tested on a section of trail that included a mix of everything you'd expect to find on a race track. There were tight corners, a few drops, some sidehill sections that get trickier the faster you go, along with some higher speed, open corners.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Mike Kazimer: "The Shore feels incredibly solid and stable at speed, and it be an excellent option for someone looking for sturdy bike park companion. When the clock was running, it ended up in 4th place out of the 5 contenders, with a time of 2:44."

Overall, its manners are definitely on the DH bike side of things. It feels big and fast, but there were a few times when I lost my focus and felt like I was getting dragged along. It's a bike that definitely rewards an aggressive rider.

On paper, the Propain Spindrift and the Shore have several similarities. They both have 180mm of travel, steep seat angles, and reach numbers within 5mm of each other. However, out on the trail it's a different story. The big-wheeled Spindrift is a much more maneuverable, easygoing machine, despite the fact that it has bigger wheels. The Spindrift feels closer to an over-grown all-mountain rig, where the Shore possess more DH bike-like characteristics.

Norco Shore review

As far as components go, that 180mm Fox 38 fork is a standout, and it's partially responsible for the aura of invincibility this thing exudes. I did have an issue with the idler – I was pedaling on a tight, rolling section of trail, and somehow the chain came off and went behind the pulley wheel. It only happened once, and I spent time on much rougher terrain, so hopefully it was a strange coincidence. I also managed to dent the rear rim somewhere along the line; out of all the parts on the bike I'd say the e*thirteen rims will probably need to be replaced first, especially if you live in an area with lots of rocks.

Overall, new Shore is for the modern freerider, someone who doesn't care at all about weight, and is focused on the send. Do you have a secret trail out in the woods with sketchy steep lines and big hucks? This could be the ticket. It's a purpose built freeride machine, one that’s best suited to aggressive riders, and it's not the bike to go with if you want something for big pedaling missions.


Pros

+ Super solid – there's not much that'll stop this thing
+ Geometry helps ease the sting of those climbs
+ Very well supported suspension for big hits / hucking

Cons

- Heavy
- Very gravity oriented – not for someone looking for long travel all-rounder
- Extra noise / complication from idler




The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with support from Dainese apparel & protection, Sierra Nevada refreshments, and Smith eyewear and helmets. Thanks also to Maxxis, Garmin, Freelap, and Toyota Pacific.





339 Comments

  • 156 2
 So stoked for this thing. I think the better way to think of this bike is as a DH bike that has the added ability to do a little bit of climbing, especially as you can bump up rear travel to 190mm and run a 200mm dual crown. I have a frame on pre-order, and plan on replacing my current DH frame with it. I'll be able to pedal in places where I currently have to push the big bike, plus it will make resort traverses easier. Norco - start shipping!!!
  • 53 0
 If I had the money I'd buy this thing in a heartbeat
  • 88 0
 @DaFreerider44: name checks out
  • 24 50
flag ybsurf (Dec 8, 2020 at 8:15) (Below Threshold)
 Or you can just put a big range cassette and your current dh bike? I could do that to my phoenix with a dropper and I would still be way lighter than the shore.
  • 9 5
 @ybsurf: but who’s going to do that?
  • 55 2
 It shore looks good!
  • 5 1
 Considering preordering - could be a perfect bike for service rd climbs to get to the goods
  • 11 0
 yeah, they nailed it. I think this is the bike many riders have been waiting for. All you need is a matching terrain to run this beauty.
  • 3 4
 @artistformlyknowasdan: As long as you don't mind having to try and pedal this 37.5lb bike. I know it is all about the downhill, but looks like too much suffering to get to the top, unless you have lift access...
  • 1 2
 @rockyflowtbay: that's pretty much what that bike is especially if its bumped to 190 with a double crown.
  • 53 3
 @RowdyAirTime: my Meta AM29 ended up being 39lbs with a coil set up. Sure I started to get dropped a bit when the fireroads hit 10+% but over all after 4-5 rides you legs harden the f up and you get over it. After riding that tank all spring, riding any other bike became a breeze
  • 3 0
 other than a steep seat angle, how is this different from a DH bike with a big cassette? Not that there's anything wrong with that. . .
  • 54 3
 @RowdyAirTime: Young whippersnappers! Why when I was a boy, we had 45lb bikes that we used everywhere. They had tall gears, slack seat angles and we only pedalled up so we could huck dorp to falts. That's the way it was and we liked it like that!
  • 17 0
 @RowdyAirTime: to be honest PB should have pinned this against pedaling a DH bike. We know it's not an enduro bike, no one at the EWS is going to be riding this bike. It's meant for hucking at the bike park and scaring the shit out of yourself on those bootleg trails. Thanks for the review but us, the viewers, don't care SHIP US THE SHORE ALREADY NORCO.
  • 7 1
 @RowdyAirTime: thus fire rd climbs. I’ve pedaled plenty of 35+lbs pigs before. Hell my rune is just shy of 35lbs
  • 13 0
 I like your thinking. Steep seat tube angles and full insertion of seat post on a pedal-able DH bike makes tons of sense. There's so many steep trails with no shuttle/lift access and so many steep trails that have long flat or gentle climbing sections mid way that this would be a huge help. Also, as Kazimer says, it has a supportive ride, not a big pile of mush so sounds great!
  • 10 4
 The fact that this came in 4th in the timed test shows how unreliable low numbers are. That being said, this bike is probably going to be the most fun of anything in this group.
  • 1 1
 @gtill9000: Nothing, that's what I like about it! It's a DH bike that can pedal up a fire road for 45 minutes without destroying your knees (my knees have already spent 20 years doing that).
  • 3 0
 @ybsurf: I've done that plenty of times, but the seat post angle kinda sucks, this fixes that.
  • 4 4
 @ybsurf: would love to do that, except my DH bike won't take a seatpost long enough to pedal.

this thing looks awesome, but IMO norco missed by making it a 73mm bb and 148mm rear end. 83/150 would have been great so that people with DH bikes could swap their parts over
  • 8 0
 @RowdyAirTime: this bike is for the shuttling, pedal/push up the fireroad to get to the massive freeride feature or jump trail crowd. Those people don't care about the suffer.
  • 4 0
 A lot of dh bikes won't allow a full wide cassette on them. There's too much movement on say a supreme for the derailleur to take up the chain even with a super long cage. If the wait time wasn't so long, I would have bought one of these.
  • 6 3
 @RowdyAirTime: I suggest a) getting stronger and b) running low gearing so you can spin up those climbs
  • 14 0
 @grampa: Canfield the one.2
  • 4 2
 @SintraFreeride: Ha, ha, young whippersnappers...lol. Actually I'm older and have very steep mountains (with long vertical climbs) nearby, so that's why I ride a lightweight (27lb) great pedaling do-it-all trail bike (that's still very capable and loads of fun downhill). I also like a fun poppy bike. I do agree, these big burly long travel ground soaking machines have their purpose, but bikes close to 40lbs are just too heavy and would not work for me in my area, but would be awesome if you are mainly park riding. For that kind of weight (36-40lbs), I would get a EMTB with some pedal assist to help get to the top of the big steep mountains nearby (like the new Orbea Rise, Turbo Levo SL, etc)

I will say it is a good looking bike though. I've always liked Norco.
  • 6 0
 @RowdyAirTime: Fair enough.
I live in the French Alps and have a lot of very steep climbs when the lifts aren't running. I run a 22/32 crankset with a 52T rear cog. My bike is 18kg but with a nice 80º seat angle I manage to get up those climbs just fine. I don't like to compromise my bike on the DH so I just train harder and yeah I don't race up the climbs but I clean them nonetheless.
  • 2 0
 @SintraFreeride: Good for you, as a 40lb bike I'm sure is not easy to pedal up those steep climbs in the French Alps, Sounds like a nice place to live. Wow, that is definitely one steep seat angle you have. I don't live close to any lifts, so I would never look at such a downhill focused bike. I do understand not wanting to sacrifice anything on the downhill, but I like a lighter bike that I don't have to kill myself to get to the top and still have some energy to have loads of fun going down. Cheers
  • 4 0
 @SintraFreeride: This bike is 11lbs heavier than my trail bike which is a lot of weight, especially when I am only 147lbs. If I was younger and lived near lift access, this would probably be a great bike...
  • 6 0
 So question- if this isn't the fastest bike in the group, but its made for actually having fun (hucking, jump lines and the like) then does it really need an Idler pulley and high pivot?
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: I'm really curious about this- my guess is that the high pivot / idler allow more rearward axle movement to mellow things, but kazimer described that the bike still had a supportive feel. If this was a poppy, playful big bike with supreme dh / jedi like bump absorption, it'd be really interesting.
  • 6 0
 @hamncheez: It wasn't the fastest on this one particular trail. I bet you can find trails where it will be the fastest.
  • 5 0
 @TheBrosCloset: my Starling is 41lb with lights, tools, coil and proper tyres. Still goes up fine.
  • 5 1
 @lkubica: back to my main point- low numbers of observations (meaning riding each bike once on only a single trail) is bad for statistical analysis.
  • 4 0
 @50percentsure: Hell yeah I remember those days. 10lb Monster Ts and 3" Gazzaloddis .
  • 1 2
 @ybsurf:

I am all about big cassette and dropper on dh bike for pedaling, been doing so for years.
The main problem with that is too short of seat post insertion to fit a post that’ll go high enough to pedal efficiently and low enough to decend with agility. Also almost all modern decent droppers are internally routed and almost no dh frames have intetnal routing. Orange and Nicolai are of few companies with a deep seat tube dh bike.
  • 5 2
 @RowdyAirTime:

Most pro’s enduro bikes weigh 33-36 lbs. 2-5lbs more for this bike is 1-2% weight increase that you have to force uphill. Its the weight of 1 liter of water, really not a big deal. Rider strength endurance and weight and fat % bike suspension efficiency and aerodynamics all stand tobe much more a factor in getting to the top than bikes additional weight.
  • 1 0
 @gtill9000:

Availible Seatpost insertion and dropper routing is whats different from dhbike.
  • 2 0
 @ybsurf: what DH bike do you have with a 78° seat tube angle? That will make a huge difference with how this thing pedals.
  • 3 1
 @scotteh:

73mm cranks are better. Lighter, more options, narrower qfactor, more 175mm arms availible, better chainline for pedaling. 150mm rear spacing is nice for strong wheel with no downside but 83 rather than 73mm bb would be a poor choice.
  • 1 4
 @RowdyAirTime:

Bet you wouldnt ride the shit some of us ride
  • 2 1
 You got a 73mm crank and a 12x148mm rear hub on your dh-bike? Cause that’s what this frame needs. Pretty good idea to change the current dh-frame with this one, but you might need to buy 1-2 additional items if the needed standarts aren’t met in the first place! Wink
  • 5 1
 @getsomesy: I also rode motoX for years and this definitely helped me a lot on my MTB, but I agree I probably can't ride some of the stuff being ridden nowadays (40ft+ gaps, 20ft+ drops, etc). If I was to have a lift nearby and rode this bike, I'm sure I could ride even more stuff, especially much faster than I can on my trail bike now.

As each year passes by and I'm getting older with falls hurting more all the time, who knows, I may have to change my PB name from "RowdyAirTime" to "No longer RowdyAirtime"...lol
  • 3 1
 @scotteh: exactly. I need a new DH rig (I already have a pedal bike in a 150/160 Transition Scout). I would like the frame at 190mm and then I would transfer parts from my DH rig. having 83/150 would be much better. Without that my cranks and rear wheel are useless and I would have to purchase new.
  • 2 0
 @getsomesy: I should also have said, I started riding MTB's on the North Shore in the early 90's and bikes were damn scary to ride back then on near vertical drops. So yes, I have ridden some pretty technical stuff over the years...
  • 1 1
 @TheBrosCloset: I haven't weighed mine yet...don't think I could handle it, haha. But you're definitely right about your legs. Like friggin' tree trunks.
  • 1 1
 @TheBrosCloset: harden the duck up haha
  • 5 1
 @artistformlyknowasdan: I have a 2019 alloy patrol and with double downs it would be over 36. For an alloy bike with 180 mm and double downs I dont think 37ish is all that bad.
  • 5 1
 @iridedj: I think 37lbs for a freeride bike is reasonable. Not only that but could build it up much lighter depending on how heavy your wallet is
  • 2 1
 @iridedj: I think its 37lbs with the exo+ control tires, but I could be wrong.
  • 1 0
 @ybsurf: no you are right, vital weighted the stock version and it came in 38
  • 5 2
 @TheBrosCloset: haha exactly. The weight weenies complain about weight but it’s all a perspective I feel like. I would rather have a heavy free ride bike that’s 37 pounds and you become fitter by pedaling that thing up the mountain and you have a hell of a better time going down than pedaling a 20 pound cross country bike and cussing under my breath on the way down because it is more limited.
  • 3 0
 @erunner376: Yes, compared to a 20lb XC race bike, I agree. However, if you have extremely gruelling steep vertical climbs everywhere nearby, there are some very capable 28lb trail/enduro bikes that are way easier to pedal up and still have loads of fun on the way down compared to nearly a 38lb freeride/downhill bike.
  • 3 1
 @RowdyAirTime: This isn't a bike for technical climbs. It's built for being adequate on the way up so you are able to ride stuff that's borderline rampage level. It's kinda like a non-motor e-bike
  • 2 0
 @DaFreerider44: Great point. Maybe I could just sit on this bike and try and look cool while watching Rampage...lol
  • 3 1
 @SintraFreeride: I always read your handle as 'SinatraFreeride'
  • 1 1
 @50percentsure: Truth. These kids don’t know shit about 2x Freeride bikes! It wasn’t downhill without a little uphill.
  • 1 0
 @50percentsure: Haha. Totally. In the early to mid 2000s, this would have been a featherweight freeride bike.

My 2006 Norco VPS was well into the mid 40s and I rode it everywhere. Telescoping seat post, double chainring and 9 speed, yes sir. It was more like freeride light.

Here it was this past summer www.pinkbike.com/photo/17821991
  • 1 0
 @TheBrosCloset: I have exactly the same experience with my custom Spec Status! But boy, was I nervous when the scale went up to 36,37lbs!
After a few months riding it, I've put a few +31mile rides on it, and I'm pretty stocked. Still, I get the feeling that when the time comes to go to a lighter build, I'll be flying on the uphills!
  • 1 0
 @Rageingdh: thats what I'm riding!
  • 2 0
 @RowdyAirTime: I'm closing in on 50 and got tons of air time last year.. right before reconstructive shoulder surgery (didn't say it was "on the bike", technically. More of a catapault situation)
  • 1 0
 @katoom250: sweet. Do you got it set up with a 12 speed and dropper or dh mode?
  • 1 0
 @Rageingdh: I built mine with a coil rear, mezzer fork, 210mm dropper and shimano 12 speed. I love it, up or down.
  • 2 0
 @RowdyAirTime: The gearing is more important than the weight so the climbs don't actually feel that bad.
  • 1 0
 @katoom250: pics or it didn’t happen, maaan! Big Grin
Seriously, would love to see a One.2 with a Mezzer - why haven’t you posted pics of it on your pinkbike account?!?!?!
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: I have been too busy riding it! I put some up now, check it out.
  • 1 0
 @katoom250: Much envy, will implode! Big Grin
Seriously, great looking bike! Why the Mezzer? You fan of Manitou (like me)?
  • 2 0
 @katoom250: Nice bike. That looks like fun.
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: I'm a fan of the manitou air spring. It performs the way I want and its LIGHT!
  • 2 0
 @katoom250: why didn’t you go with a Dorado? This frame deserves it! Smile
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: I'm doing as much climbing as descending. I may pick one up later to swap for park days if I ever decide the mezzer isn't doing it.
  • 1 0
 @katoom250: would a Dorado be a problem when climbing? Back when i had one, i did some climbing on my dh-bike (nothing fancy, of course, but it did qualify as climbing) and i had no problem with the front being a double crown! Smile
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: I'm tall so could never run dual crowns in the past. Now bikes have better geo, it's not a problem. I've been running a Dorado on one of my torques for the last year and a bit.

If I end up getting a shore, in the second model year, the Dorado will move across to that.
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: The Dorado has a decent turning radius so it wouldn't be a problem on the climbs.
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: what was the problem with being tall and having a Dorado?
About your Shore/Dorado combo plan: a wicked idea! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: i know - i owned one (and will again!). Did climbs with it, wasn’t bad. But on the descends - ooohhh, the descends... miss those times! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar: back in the day (15+ years ago) bikes were short. So my knees hit crowns when climbing seated. Now it's not a problem. I climb fire roads nicely and have that ridiculous ride on the descents.
  • 83 14
 I don't care who you are, $5200 for a bike that can handle pretty much any descent with the components this has is a great deal.
  • 65 3
 Those wheels tho..won´t last for one run. The same are on 2021 Com Meta and the results are horrible.
  • 16 1
 @modryorangutan: yeah those wheels are not gonna hold up to the abuse freeriders put their bikes through
  • 71 1
 @modryorangutan: My LG1 damn near killed me when my front wheel completely folded on me while sprinting. E13 told me that it must have been because I had cushcore in there.
  • 18 1
 @fullendurbro: They said similar to me after I put a huge dent into a rim from an impact that I didn't even notice while riding, replaced with DT Swiss and have had no issues since
  • 42 1
 @modryorangutan: I’m convinced that ethirteen rims are actually made from folded up aluminum foil. Never seen one that didn’t have either: tons of dents, a massive hop, or the spoke nipples actually pulling thru the rim.
  • 10 1
 @Maxrez74: I have those rims on my Com Clash which i got in July. They dent super easy and are almost destroyed already and they weigh a ton.
  • 17 3
 f*ck E13. What a shit response. I hope they get blasted for their shotty parts hard for that @fullendurbro:
  • 31 1
 @fullendurbro: This is the part where e13 enters the comments, asks for feedback, and sends you a new rim after chatting in the DM's.

Which is great, until you get tired of breaking their parts ALL THE TIME and you realize getting a free replacement and excellent customer service is no substitute for buying something once and having it work well.

I avoid e13 parts at all costs. Been bitten multiple times by multiple parts and it sure sounds like that's the norm.
  • 5 1
 @modryorangutan: yep! absolutely destroyed 2 of those wheels in one friggin day at Whistler. Guys at the shop were saying how E13 gave them the wheels for free and they still hate them! lol. abject trash.
  • 36 1
 At least you get DT350s to lace up to proper rims once you grenade them...
  • 22 1
 @modryorangutan: In norco's defense, at least they have good hubs (dt350). I think I'd rather have a wheel set with hubs that are worth lacing a different, stronger rim onto when the rim is toast than a wheel set with a better rim but a cheaper hub (one that's not worth reusing, stans neo aka formula for example) so you have to buy a whole new wheel. Just my 2 cents.
  • 2 1
 @modryorangutan: Seriously cheese wheels. Would not buy again.
  • 2 3
 @fullendurbro: did you check your spoke tension after installing the cc? Most wheels I’ve seen the tension goes down after by a lot.
  • 1 1
 @TannerValhouli: Seriously went through all three of those issues the first month with my E13 LG1s
  • 5 4
 @danielstutt: I must have a unicorn pair of lg1's. Came on my yt tues and done 2 fairly decent bike park seasons and are still good to go for next year. Saying that I'm looking at another dh bike that is specd with lg1+ rims and I'm already looking swapping them out. Even though I had 0 issues with their lg1 wheelset and 7speed cassette and chain guide, there's something about seeing all my friends bikes in Whistler with destroyed e13 gear I spent 2 years just assuming it will explode at any time
  • 4 20
flag BenTheSwabian (Dec 8, 2020 at 8:10) (Below Threshold)
 No, it objectively isn't a good deal for everybody. It's going to suck, except if all you do is to ride park. And apparently it's not even a fast descender.
  • 3 1
 @jazzawil: I have a similar pair of lg1s that also came on my tues. No problems, running fine after a year of significant use.
  • 1 1
 @modryorangutan: Yep, just by frame and build your own spec.
  • 3 1
 @rickybobby18: Yeah, their warranty and customer support was great in my experience, but that doesn't really matter when I busted the rims within one week of getting my new Meta last summer. Even with Cushcore, it took one serious ride to crack them.
  • 48 2
 @TannerValhouli: They came on my 2018 Smuggler, still in like new shape after more than 2 years....



full disclosure... I replaced the wheel set the day I got the bike, so they have been in my basement ever since
  • 2 1
 Except you need 2 bikes if this is in your garage.
  • 27 0
 @KVJACKSON: Dude, I don’t trust anyone that doesn’t have more than one bike in the garage. Lol
  • 4 0
 @shredb4dead: Ha! So true.
  • 4 0
 @Tormy: HA that made me laugh out loud on a zoom call
  • 1 0
 @KVJACKSON: Why only 2?
  • 1 0
 @TannerValhouli: Can confirm, my rear E13 has all those things.
  • 2 0
 @fullendurbro: My 2020 Norco Sight also came with those e thirteen LG1 and while landing heavily from a road gap the front rim has snapped in half. Tyre pressure was 25 PSI so nothing to do with a wrong tyre pressure. I broke my collarbone. Now both my rear and front wheels are on DT Swiss EX511, give me the piece of mind that I needed after this nasty crash.
  • 3 0
 @DHhack: The spoke tension almost always goes down when you install a tire and inflate it. But the max spoke tension for wheels is meant to be measured without a tire, or anything else, on them. If you tighten your spokes to max tension after installing a tire, you will be over loading the rim.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: I agree. The only things they do well are chain guides and tyres.
  • 3 2
 @tgrummon: Cush Core drops it much more than just a tire does. Plus you’re also installing that tire. Put a tension gauge on it and check for yourself, fresh built wheel vs tire installed vs cc installed vs cc and tire installed.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: I understand that. I'm saying you shouldn't then tighten your spokes, even though the tension is lower. You risk over tensioning the wheel. It doesn't matter if its the spokes or the cushcore compressing the rim; the rim can only handle so much tension.
  • 1 0
 @fullendurbro:
Damn thats some bs so sick of companies tryn to pass bs blame like that instead of taking responsibility
  • 3 0
 @DHhack:

All wheels drop tension when inflated. Tensions i believe are given w/o tire.
Hard to believe uninflated wheel with cush core drops spoke tension
  • 3 0
 @modryorangutan: I'm running the same rims and have had zero issues in Squamish/Whistler. Granted I'm only about 170lbs and run at least 25psi in the rear. e13 mentioned in the last thread that they've updated the strength of their rims as of April this year so I think more people will have a better experience moving forward.

To be fair I've seen a bunch of DT1900, RF AR and Stans S1 rims (the lowest end rims for each manufacturer) dent and fail under heavier/more aggressive riders. All these rims are sleeved and made of softer 6061 aluminum so for some riders will never be awesome. All these companies make higher end rims made of stronger 6069/welded aluminum (including e13 with their Plus rims), but product managers simply don't spec these for cost reasons. I agree that FR and long travel enduro bikes should never really come with the lower end rims, but price points have to be hit I guess....
  • 2 0
 @getsomesy: or perhaps Cush Core isn't a wheel or tire company so they don't look into some of the details. It might help if Pinkbike did some lab test with and without the CC to show some non biased results from both the wheel manufacturing side and the CC side.
  • 2 3
 @fullendurbro: Sorry to hear about this. Ill reach out to you on DM for some more info. Im surprised one of our agents would say that. Here is our official statement on cushcore and other inserts: support.ethirteen.com/hc/en-us/articles/360037410712-What-is-e-thirteen-s-position-on-running-Cushcore-or-other-tire-inserts-Will-it-affect-my-wheel-rim-warranty
  • 14 1
 Hey Guys - Just wanted to chime in about some of the rim comments. Most of the sentiment about the rims stems from our previous years entry level OEM only LG1 EN rims. This was a fairly light low-end rim which was spec'ed on quite a few bikes with single ply tires that ended up getting extensive bike park use. The older rim was really too light for this type of use. As Kazimer found in his test, the updated version here stood up to the abuse with no issues. If you had issues with your rims or any of your products, drop us a line here and we will do our best to get you sorted. support.ethirteen.com/hc/en-us/articles/360038827791-Warranty-Request-Submission-Form

Happy Trails
  • 3 1
 @getsomesy: Take a look here for our official stance on inserts. We actually do recommend using them where appropriate however, just using inserts does not result in a rim which is indestructible. support.ethirteen.com/hc/en-us/articles/360037410712-What-is-e-thirteen-s-position-on-running-Cushcore-or-other-tire-inserts-Will-it-affect-my-wheel-rim-warranty
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: This. I got replacement cranks when the thread stripped on ride two.
But I don't trust them.....

Also have 2 sets of LG1 wheels that came on mine and my partner's commencal DH bikes and they're useless. 2 sets of wheels with front and rear cracked and buckled.

I don't want direct replacements for them just to do the same thing?
  • 1 0
 @modvelo: have you tried reaching out to e13
about the rims? OE rims are often always the lower end of what they make and might not work for everyone. They have stronger stuff (just like every rim brand) and might help you out. As for the cranks I have a set of their carbon cranks and my super heavy buddy is on TRS Plus Alu cranks with zero issues for well over a year and a half. I trust them way more than my last SRAM cranks that bent after a small crash. Stripped threads also happened to my brother’s XT cranks, but he rode his pedal a bit loose, and he didn’t install with the pedal washer so Shimnao didn’t warranty.
  • 3 1
 @timsim07: there is nothing else besides DT
  • 5 2
 @ethirteen-components: sorry, I’ve lost my trust in your rims after I broke my collarbone thanks to your rim being snapped to 2 pieces. BTW, in the same crash the rear rim (DT Swiss EX511) handled it like a champ and didn’t even dent.
  • 2 0
 @ethirteen-components: i didn't want to add anything to this whole "my rim is crap" until your "previous years entry level" comment.
how comes i have a "old" LG1 EN rim in my 2021 norco? this exact rim looked like a herd of cows ran over it after two weeks. comparing to your comment, this means:

1. i have a previous years rim in a 2021 model year, which shouldn't happen, since you know how low-end this thing is
2. the rim is still somewhat low-end and there is no improvement since the previous years

is there a possible 3.?

in the meantime wheels got replaced by dt swiss wheelset. running straight and no dents in sight.
  • 1 0
 You guys ever gunna wander why internet factory doesn’t run carbon cranks anymore? That bullshit about the protoype cranks is painful to watch a good wrenching guy take the fall for YOUR terrible product @ethirteen-components:
  • 1 0
 @ethirteen-components: Could you please clarify when the change from the "older" rims to the newer/improved rims happened. Is there a way to identify them? I just bought a 2020 Norco Sight with the LG1 EN rims and it sounds like ( @Edendino ) they are not safe to ride...
  • 1 0
 @covekid: Yes after reading the comments I reached out and the reply was as I expected : "Sorry dent and damage isn't warranty"

They did reply quickly and offer crash replacement, but the rims shouldn't dent and damage at the slightest knock - In response to the statement
"Most of the sentiment about the rims stems from our previous years entry level OEM only LG1 EN rims. This was a fairly light low-end rim which was spec'ed on quite a few bikes with single ply tires that ended up getting extensive bike park use"

Mine were on DH bikes with DH casing. If the LG1 have been spec'ed incorrectly, why are E13 allowing OEMs to do this? if it's having such an effect on their reputation.

Why isn't there some sort of recall or replacement going on?
I understand that wheels see wear and tea and you can't give warranty replacements on rims that have been abused, but if they know there is a problem why am I being stuck with the bill to replace them?

I certainly won't be paying to test a "higher end" rim from a company I have no confidence in.
  • 1 0
 @ethirteen-components: Thanks for this, BUT, are you going to pay for the wheel to be rebuilt? Or just send us a new rim and ask for us to pay for a rebuild and just hope we wont have to do this all over again?

I hope not.
  • 1 0
 @noplacelikeloam: Neither, they'll kindly give you the option to purchase a replacement. :/
  • 3 0
 @modvelo: ha! so ill just buy DT and throw the E13 in the trash like usual then . . . ;-)
  • 1 0
 @noplacelikeloam: That's what happened for me
  • 45 0
 In 10 years time this will the retro bike Brett Tippie is asking someone about on Whistler opening day
  • 13 0
 I'll still be in the comments asking where's the 30yo BigHit at.
  • 60 23
 Oh no the 180mm travel bike is not very well rounded. It should be able to climb like an xc bike with its specs.
  • 79 4
 Not exactly, but remember the Propain Spindrift was included in this batch of bikes, which also has 180mm of travel. There's a huge difference in how those two bikes handle. I'd happily head out for bigger days of pedaling on the Propain, while on the Norco, not so much.
  • 24 0
 I mean, it also was the second slowest on the descent. I think Mike was pretty fair in pointing out that in comparison to the other bikes, this is basically a mini DH bike that you can pedal. Except that it lacks the plushness that you'd expect from that designation.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: would you say the difference is due to weight?
  • 3 2
 @MarcusBrody: This bike is the only long travel non dual crown bike which I would definitely not buy. Simply because it was build for hardcore freeride, just look how long this thing is!. I am sure however, that this bike is capable well beyond it was tested. Secondly, Norco should have put an chaingide for this bike to reduce the lower chain growth. Rear derailleur's clutch is enough give a not-so-sensitive feeling. Also the shock tune was probably meant for more aggressive riding. So a lighter tune and a climb switch would make it better for sure.
  • 4 1
 @mikekazimer: I’m just joshing. I’m actually really hyped about this bike. But right now I’m can’t wait for the range to get out of embargo. 29ers baby.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: I have ordered Spindrift al and it’s about 1 kg heavier than tested carbon Spindrift. Do you think it’s still ok also for pedaling?It’s not a trail bike for sure but how do you think it will work compared to this lighter carbon version or compared to Norco? Thanks!
  • 1 1
 Seems to me that the tester is too light wheight for the shock spring. 2020 is 2020 so I understand, but yeah, that ought to affect both climbing and descending performace.
  • 4 0
 @kauris: It´s gonna feel like shit, is that what you want to hear now that you ordered the bike?
  • 2 1
 @Jolinwood, nope, that's not the case - I swapped out the spring in order to get the appropriate amount of sag.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: the spindrift can be described as a super-enduro, the shore - as a freeride. After all, one uses a 65mm stroke shock, the other - a 70/75mm stroke shock.
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer: aight if you say so! sorry bout that
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: Hah, not exactly. I would like to hear was it mostly the weight or was it also the different geometry that matters. My bike is for the bike park days anyways.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Is the Spindrift available to purchase in Canada? Last I checked there was no way to buy one here.
  • 1 0
 @JAK79: for climbing it´s always about geometry and unsprung mass (aka wheels) that matters, no one could ever tell 1kg difference on the frame all other things being the same, no matter what they try to tell you.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: good catch on the clutch, the thing has a massively rearward axle path due to high pivot and you'd expect it to plow like no tommorow, i've been thinking they mucked up with how much load there is on the bearings and leverage.

still could be leverage ratio though.
  • 42 12
 "You're not going to find any carbon here – the frame and build kits were designed with durability in mind"

Damn I didn't know carbon bikes were engineered to be not durable.
  • 18 3
 Carbon frames can be super strong, but aluminium is definitely more durable and more freeride. Just as an example if you had some kind of impact or strike to an aluminium frame you just need to check the damage with your eyes. If it looks fine it is fine. With carbon nobody knows if the frame is compromised now. Without x-raying it there isn't really a way to know what kind of damage it did.
  • 22 0
 "durability in mind"

also specs e13 wheels

hmmm
  • 38 0
 @ihertzler, carbon frames are very strong these days, but I'd still say aluminum is the way to go if you're going to be doing things like tossing your bike over a tailgate and driving up rough shuttle roads, or if you regularly watch your bike cartwheel through the woods...
  • 3 1
 Luckily I carry lots of foam padding everywhere I ride so my carbon bike doesn't break when I wreck.
  • 6 4
 @tom666: alloy builds up loads of invisible stress fractures over time that can't be seen - then it fails. carbon is way stronger and more durable. It can also be repaired.
  • 1 2
 Ya gotta admit Mike has balls (or incredible engineering knowledge on alloy vs composite construction) making a statement that alloy is the choice for durability. Hope the industry doesn't blacklist him to going against their marketing departments.
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer: this is something you should remember. Pretty impressive.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5eMMf11uhM
  • 6 0
 @nukedchipp: knew that would be the video shared. @mikekazimer clarified at what he was getting at further up. Aluminum bikes take crashes better. That does not mean they are necessarily stronger in conventional loading. That video explores load cycling the frame material and looking at both fatigue and ultimate strength in normal riding loads. Carbon will almost always win that with a similar design.

Go toss a comparable carbon and aluminum bike through a rock garden, however, and see which one walks away ridable. Carbon is far more likely to have a structural failure due to an impact.
  • 1 0
 @CTtrailpig: did you watch the vid till the end? I wished they'd shown the effects of whacking alloy against concrete
  • 2 0
 @CTtrailpig: I tossed mine down a waterfall area at Sedona. I thought for sure my carbon bike would be wrecked. Nope, just more chips of paint missing.

I have had a few nasty wrecks on a couple carbon bikes, nothing but paint damage so far.
  • 30 1
 Would love to see how it stacks up against other freeride bikes like the new Commencal Clash and the Rocky Mountain Slayer
  • 36 0
 A freeride field test would be sick. All 27.5 and 165mm or more of travel.
  • 5 5
 Or against the new wreckoning...
  • 3 1
 @Vicic: and commencal clash
  • 4 1
 Knolly Delirium
  • 4 0
 @TannerValhouli: Throw in a DH bike as a comparator for good measure...
  • 28 1
 Who cares how it compares to the other bikes in the test! How does it compare the 2010 shore?????!!!!
  • 29 0
 @mikekazimer you blew it by not including this comparison.
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: He mentioned it would be close in weight to the old shore, my friend is still on a 2007 and the thing pushes 45+ lb. This new shore needs a telescoping post to be legit.
  • 4 0
 @iridedj: And a hammerschmidt for maximum uphill wattage
  • 1 0
 Heck, or a 2012 Norco Truax. I'm reading this article to see where it improves on that bike. I just sold mine this summer, but 180 mm front and rear, Totem fork, dropper post, 34 lbs instead of 37... I'm super excited to see new freeride bikes again, but I don't know if I see anything substantially different from what was out 10 years ago.
  • 1 0
 @illerminaty: Yea is there really that much of a difference between this new bike and your truax with an angle set? I know my buddies 2007 suspension still feels quite good with well maintained double coil setup.
  • 18 1
 It felt like I was watching a review for a trail bike which was odd. Of course a freeride bike is going to be heavy.....and where were the stair hucks?
  • 17 0
 Needs a Totem.
  • 2 0
 Or a 66 might be an acceptable substitute.
  • 12 1
 So it's a DH-oriented 27.5" that is less maneuverable (playful?) than an equally long-travel 29er, and that descended more slowly than 60% of the field - primarily "less aggressive" bikes. Dope.

Given the excitement for high pivot bikes I was expecting a lot more. The pricing to component mix is compelling, but there are a myriad other bikes with bigger wheels and just as much suspension that would seem to be better going up and down.
  • 39 1
 Norco isn't selling you a particularly fast, practical, or otherwise sensible bike here. Norco is selling you a lifestyle.
  • 7 2
 To be fair, if you watch a video of the trail they tested on, it isn't one that would seem to advantage a high pivot bike. There isn't a lot of chunk to get hung up on, so the primary advantage of the high pivot's rearward wheel path is minimized.
  • 4 0
 @MarcusBrody: Seems like the trail is meant to mimic a more enduro race track. I'm sure if the trail was dirt merchant he might have more positive things to say about the norco.
  • 2 0
 @iridedj: Or the Canadian Open DH course
  • 1 0
 It doesn't even really matter: they are all sold out! People should just get the bike that is in stock at their local shop this year. It will be a very long waiting game to get the specific bike you want this year, even if it's a Shore.
  • 2 0
 @jubs17: hell yeah, because buying bikes is like buying toilet paper, you better hurry and buy whatever is left. Either that of buy perfectly fine low milage bike from buy/sell section, but who am I to say what´s right or wrong.
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: They sent the thing to Canada to be filmed. That's not Mike in the footage. Also, you reckon they only "test" bikes while filming?
  • 2 0
 @dirtyburger: The original comment talked about it descending more slowly than the other bikes. Mike shared what trail he did the timed testing on in the Altitude review (Double Down in Bellingham). I went and watched a video of it that Jeff Kendall Weed had posted, so my comment was based on seeing the trail there.
  • 1 0
 Looking at a video of that trail, that's not the place I'd take this bike. I'd absolutely be faster on my AM bike. This bike is for high speed DH/freeride.
  • 12 2
 I would love to hear what this bike feels like for someone more in the 190 lb - 5' 11" range. It seems like it might just be overbuilt for Kaz's weight, vs someone 30-40lbs heavier with an aggressive riding style might feel the bike wake up much more. Just a thought?
  • 3 0
 I might have 1/10th the skill of Kaz but I volunteer as tribute. Throwing a 200lb newer rider with little mechanical sympathy on it for a season of weekly park riding should be a good torture test
  • 19 11
 The second long travel bike recently in the hands of a Pinkbike tester, that is considered too long for its own good. It appears that modern designs have reached the end of what's to be considered practical.

This gives me hope that we're approaching the end of the "lower, longer, slacker at all cost"-fad and are about to enter the era of sensible frame geometry.
  • 13 1
 Did you not see the Grim Doughnut, the future of lower, longer, and slacker is alive and well.
  • 2 1
 Are you sure he said it was too long for it's own good? Or are you projecting?
  • 12 1
 This bike is Shore to get you... idk.
  • 9 0
 Shore thing
  • 16 0
 @usedbikestuff: I am not sure I shore your point of view, neither partially nor co-mpletely.
  • 6 0
 Really cool looking bike, and I know this is petty, but holy is that new eagle cassette just awkward looking as all hell. It looks like a cassette of old except someone replaced the dork disc with a big slab of aluminum. Compared to something like the shimano 12 speed, where the sprockets step up in a pleasing and meaningful way, it just doesn't make sense from a practical or aesthetic standpoint.

I know, it's super nitpicky. But we exist within a hobby where there are 400 different colours for your chosen type of grips, so obviously these things matter Wink
  • 5 0
 Genuine question, not a criticism:

"There's also a park version that has 190mm of travel with a dual crown, 200mm fork for riders that don't have any plans of pedaling uphill."

Why would you opt for something such as this as opposed to a DH bike, if there's no intention to pedal?

Again, not criticising or making a complaint. I genuinely don't understand.

I get that enduro is big travel where you have to pedal, and DH is bigger travel where you don't have to pedal (so can be optimised purely for downhill without compromise or concessions to pedalling). Where does the park version come in if it's not meant for pedalling but the frame is not optimised for pure DH either?
  • 10 0
 HEY EVERYONE! THIS GUY DIDN'T SEND IT!
  • 8 0
 Most DH bikes are designed for racing these days, which kinda sucks because most people don't actually race. I like DH bikes because they feel like a big dirt jumper to me, so if I were to get a gravity bike from norco I'd probably get the shore park over an aurum. I want a thrashable park bike that is set up for tricks and jumps more than going in a strait line really quick.
  • 2 0
 @DownhillDoozy: Didn't even buy a stamp.
  • 1 0
 @luckynugget: I think i can see that. That kinda makes sense to me now. Thanks for the reply.
  • 9 1
 Man could I huck some staircases on that thing.
  • 10 0
 I feel like the review should have had a whole section just on hucking things; staircase, garage roof, roof of the van.
  • 4 0
 @Woody25: pedaling be damned, I want to know if I’m going to be able to pop that curb and land on the stairs with confidence. Pinkbike again missed the Midwest freeride voice of customer on their review.
  • 2 0
 @usedbikestuff: Pinkbike is very focused on PNW riding and generally doesn't consider other areas of the world.
  • 8 0
 Sorry, there's no footage of any stair gaps or roof hucks (I did ride some sketchy skinnies, though). The good news is you will get to see this and all the other bikes in the upcoming Huck to Flat video.
  • 4 14
flag usedbikestuff (Dec 8, 2020 at 14:06) (Below Threshold)
 @mikekazimer: First, never apologize in comments sections. It makes you look weak, especially here.

Second, you guys have plenty of NWD3 Wade Simmons hucking over a Marzocchi truck-esque gaps up there.

A real review for this would have been if it gave you the confidence to huck that gap you’ve never done before.

Ten years later and freeride bikes are ten pounds lighter, progress!
  • 7 2
 That’s not that heavy. My Ripmo AF weighs 37.6 with dh tires on it. I’d rather suffer a bit more on the way up so that stuff won’t break on the way back down.
  • 10 0
 You're not alone there. I feel like a fair number of people complaining about the weight, likely either ride higher spec bikes (nicer components are usually lighter), carbon frames, smaller frame sizes, or regularly ride lighter weight bikes.

My size Large Kona Process 153 AL 29'er (base model) weighs in at 37lbs. The stock wheelset is over 2400g alone, and then when you add things like tires that have casings not made of paper... it adds up.

And, thats not to say that I "like" it being heavy. But, its my only bike. So yeah, its heavy, but, it just feels like riding a bike to me. My body has adjusted, and it feels totally normal at this point.

But, if you're a bigger person (6'1", 200lbs in gear here), with a smaller budget that wants a longer travel bike... you're looking at 34-37lb weight range no matter what bike you're looking at in that category (Norco Sight, Kona Process 153, Commencal Meta AM, Privateer 161, etc, etc).
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan:

Are they really that much?? I thought my banshees was portly around 34... I couldn't make the call between the banshee and the kona so glad I went banshee now...
  • 2 0
 @ocnlogan: agreed 100%
  • 1 0
 @rclugnut: Kona isn’t known for lightweight alloy bikes
  • 1 0
 @rclugnut:

I bought mine from JensonUSA, and when I got it, it had some paperwork.

Jenson had weighed before shipping it at 36.4lbs, with 2.3in exo DHF’s front and rear. I’ve since added a 2.6in WTB Vigilante, and Michelin Wild enduro rear tire to the bike.

Those two tires alone weigh around 300-400g more than the stock tires (the wtb is the “light” casing, and IIRC it weighs over 1200g by itself). So admittedly I haven’t weighed it myself, but the math checks out.

And yeah, Kona’s not known for their lightweight alloy frames.

That said... haven’t had any problems with the build, other than the rear rim being made of something like cheese, or tin. I’ve dinged it to the point it needs replacement. So it seems durable.
  • 1 0
 @ocnlogan: ofttt yeah my large prime came outta the box from jenson at 33. I too have smashed a wheel (e13 looking at you), upped tire casing, and a few other changes...
  • 1 0
 @rclugnut:
Prime V3? Or V2?

I've been eyeing a Titan for a while now as a potential upgrade. They seem like great bikes. Just wish I could ride one before buying a frame.

And, its kind of nice coming from my current bike. Basically everything is lighter Razz .
  • 1 0
 @ocnlogan: v2.... Part of me wants grab a v3 just to, but I can't really justify it the v2 hasn't missed a beat ... Sometimes it comes up a little short on travel with only 135 out back but when you're riding trail meant for a dh bikes hard to complain.

I hear the Titan is a beast as well.
  • 8 3
 Offer a 140 - 150 travel trail/AM frame with this suspension design, and I'm sold. P.S. make it mullet. Thx
  • 2 1
 Worst kept secret around is that Norco will be releasing a more "Enduro/All Mountain" version of their high-pivot designs in the spring (March-ish). More travel than what you're describing, but it also sounds like you would enjoy the Forbidden Druid. Smile
  • 3 1
 please do a shore - p.train back to back. you have the bikes and they are both variations on the high pivot design. id be interested to see how they compare for feel and descending. They both aren't intended to be climbing machines, so thats of less interest.
  • 5 1
 So it's a high pivot and the reviewer didn't emphasize this in the review?

I get the mini DH aspect, but I wanted to know if the high pivot made some difference.
  • 5 3
 "You're not going to find any carbon here – the frame and build kits were designed with durability in mind."

That's a silly statement. I thought the days of "plastic is fragile" were over with Santa Cruz, Guerilla Gravity, and others demonstrating that modern carbon is tough as f*ck. Not to mention that a composite frame can easily be built up extra thick and durable in common damage areas.
  • 5 0
 I thought the same thing, as soon as they release a bike that has no carbon option it's for the durability all the sudden.
  • 3 1
 I feel most reviews seem to be directed towards the same kind of rider, even though they are on different bikes. A gravity oriented bike is a plus to me, I think most people looking for a freeride bike care less about how well it goes uphill. I guess thats an important factor to include on modern bikes but the articles always make it seem like a major issue when bikes aren't designed to be pedaled for big Cross country missions. Personally the less a bike is focused on uphill the better IMO
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer Any chance of getting kinematic charts on this bike? Or at least for anti-squat? Looking at it in linkage design the anti squat numbers seem really low...especially as you shift further down the cassette. This makes me think that the shock's firm compression tune is what is making it pedal ok...
  • 2 0
 LOL - great start @mikekazimer

"Anyone that says weight doesn't matter should try grinding up a logging road for a couple thousand vertical feet on this thing, then talk to me at the top. No matter how you slice it, 37 pounds is on the heavy side of things."
  • 1 0
 A 160lb guy on a 30lb bike is the same as a 210lb guy on a 39.3lb bike when you look at the % ratio between rider and bike.

I'm 6'2" and 210 lbs, on a 37 lb Canfield 1.2.
  • 1 0
 @katoom250: Makes more sense for larger riders. I'm trying to cut weight off of myself, and it's noticeable for climbs. So I appreciate lighter weight bikes.
  • 2 0
 @njcbps: I still appreciate a lighter bike as well, but if my 160 lb friend is burning me on the climbs with his 30 lb bike, I tell myself I need to harden up a little.
  • 6 1
 The ONLY bike in this 'shoot out' I'm any where near interested in
  • 4 0
 @mikekazimer, how does the Shore compare to other full DH bikes you've spent time on recently?
  • 4 0
 Shorely a nice bike!. My Enduro is 37 lbs too, I feel your pain on climbing!
  • 4 0
 Will Norco bring this high pivot setup to more of their bikes?

I want a high pivot Sight!
  • 4 3
 Bike for park and shuttle days, check. Too bad the wheels are too small on this one. I went Meta AM 29 instead.

Yes you can pedal these things (I have) but I wouldn’t want to all day long. I have a trail/enduro bike for that. These type bikes are for smashing laps at the park and shuttlin’
  • 3 0
 Exactly, these are what many people should probably be on in the bike park instead of full DH rigs. These are just like the lines of freeride bikes from around 8-10 years ago like the TR250, Specialized SX Trail, Giant Faith, etc. Can do 95% of what a full DH bike can do in a slightly slimed down package. The average rider will never push the bike anywhere near its limits let alone a full DH bike.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: What weight coil was used on the Shore? I know they are spec'ing a 500 on the large which is much too firm for 160 lb rider. One of ours showed up with a 450 and I still only got under 25% sag.
  • 5 0
 A 500 would definitely be too stiff for me - I ended up running a 400 lb spring for my 160 lb weight.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer @mikelevy I'm lovin' the format of these review videos. Who did (or where did you find) the intro music for these vids! I love the sound. My 8yo son wants to start a YouTube channel and I'd like to help him create a nice standard intro for all his videos. Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer Did you time the uphills? I know it's not the best measure of how good a bike is, and that there's a lot of variables, but I would be interested to see the difference between them all.
  • 2 1
 What percent of east coast riders are interested in this bike category? I am more of a east coast non-race XC -" downcountry" guy so I am having trouble getting exited about this category. Even the trail bikes now I feel are overbiked for most east coast trail riding. I guess if you do regular park you buy these bikes as your one quiver bike...I guess I am just to slow and chicken to need this much bike. Great we have soo much choice but next we will have a category between trail and enduro...or is it already tagged upduro and between enduro and DH is downduro?
  • 5 1
 F? fffffffffffffffffffffrrrreeeeeeeeerrrrride is back?
  • 5 2
 Does anyone remember the phrase "veloschlosser" from back in the '90s? It was for bikes like this...
  • 4 0
 Somewhere @RichardCunningham just felt a chill.
  • 1 0
 Does this ride like a Jedi with a longer reach?

The ride description is interesting- supportive, but with a rearward axle path. Seems like a great park bike for places that are rocky like Angel Fire or Bootleg.
  • 1 0
 Jedi had 2.5” of rearward travel. Nothing is going to provide that type of chunder eating.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: Thanks! Yeah, I read that the Supreme has 3" of rearward travel so using that much isn't dead, though for a pretty different application, but I haven't seen how much rearward travel the Shore has.
  • 2 0
 why is prefenence a con. suppose i look for a downhill oriented bike that i can ride up. perfect.
suppose i‘m not, i look at a different one.
  • 3 0
 Is 17 kg a normal weight for this kind of bike? Seemed heavy if you ask me.
  • 2 0
 I have never understood when people say: This is too much bike for me.
Now I know Smile
Would still love to try it. Great that Norco has something like this in their portfolio !
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer : maybe it is still to come, but it would be interesting if you timed the P-Train on your time section and Levy did the same with the Rocky.
  • 3 0
 Levy, did you compose that sweet music? Nothing sounds more gnar than smooth jazz.
  • 3 3
 "I kind off thought it'd be this ultra-plush, super sensitive thing, but instead it sits a little higher in its travel."

Those (plushness and ride height) are not mutually exclusive, why are they being contrasted here? Especially on a coil shock: isn't the point of a bike designed for a coil, that it's always plush and super sensitive but still feels bottomless?
  • 5 0
 Downduro.
  • 1 1
 I hope Norco isn’t using the same crappy 6000 series aluminum that they have in the past. Doesn’t take long for people to forget their breakage issues since they have been using carbon for the last few years on most bikes.
  • 3 0
 We need a free ride bike shootout This, the banshee titan, the knolly chilcotin...
  • 1 1
 Anyone else think it's strange that bike which has been 'positioned' as a freeride bike, there's a section in the review dedicated towards pedalling? If I was in the marketing for a mini dh/freeride bike the least of my concerns would be around how well it pedals up hill as that's not what I'd be doing on the thing
  • 5 0
 I mean, it does come with a dropper post and a 10-52-tooth cassette - people are going to be spending some time climbing on it.
  • 1 0
 "There's internal cable routing through the top tube, bolts for a tube or tool on the underside of that top tube, and room for a water bottle."

Bolts for a tube? What could go wrong?
  • 1 1
 @MikeKazimer, could you expound on the HP rear suspension performance? This bike isn't in my wheelhouse at all but I am curious about the proclaimed benefits of idler arms and what the rider really feels.
Thx.
  • 1 0
 Interesting it came in last despite the idler - I wonder if the idler isn't worth it, or would it have been even worse or required kinematic compromises without it.
  • 2 0
 Choices are good. Never been a better time in mountain biking than right now.
  • 4 0
 Looks like a Grim Donut
  • 1 0
 I'd hate to be trying to compete with the Enduro in the long travel category... especially now that it's a couple seasons old so there's a decent used market as well.
  • 2 0
 Future bike park bike no1,... As well, over-biked anywhere else then in park
  • 2 0
 Idk, big shit exists outside of bike parks. I'd say most bike parks have smaller features than what you can just build yourself.
  • 2 0
 @luckynugget: that is absolutely true, bike parks mostly want people to survive to be able to come back again.
  • 1 0
 I really want to like/ love this bike.
It's kinematics are tuned for pop instead of plush. Like a DH bike trying to be an Enduro race bike.
  • 3 0
 Huckin' good job on this machine Norco!
  • 3 0
 Dangerholm has nightmares about this bike.
  • 3 1
 Only think I can think of when I look at this bike is FUN.
  • 2 0
 I dont care that they specifically say not to mullet it, I will mullet it.
  • 1 0
 I need protection for my brake levers, brake discs, derailleur too, I self eject a lot of landings.
  • 1 0
 good luck getting one any time soon, i hear the date keeps getting pushed back Frown
  • 2 0
 Hopefully this is proving grounds for a HSP range.
  • 1 0
 there are already pics of the new range with a completely different linkage, so i dont think it was dependent on this and it’s not hsp like the aurum. the seatstay is the main pivot while the chainstays drive the linkage
  • 2 0
 why are we suddenly saying aluminium is more durable than carbon?
  • 3 0
 I thought that Pinkbike unanimously loved alloy wheels over carbon. Now we are entering the age of alloy bikes being better than carbon.
  • 1 0
 Shore 2 is listed at $3200 in this piece but is $3700 online. Also listed as the 1/2 online and not A1/A2.
  • 1 0
 They need a big bike but not quite DH category. The Slayer would be in there as well.
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer , odd question. ~how many hours did you put on this bike... did anyone put hours on it before you ? Idler seems to have HELLA ano wear for a field test...
  • 5 3
 FREERIDE LIVES
  • 2 1
 Yesss the one I've been waiting for!!
  • 2 1
 YES BEEN WAITING FOR THIS ONE!
  • 1 0
 GTFOutofmyway!!!! WOOHOOO!!!!!!
  • 9 12
 I'd be all over this, except for the fact that Norco explicitly caution against mulleting it. The amount of awkward rocks and roots at both Snowshoe and Massanutten (where i'd ride this thing), I need a 29er front. I've only ever ridden 29ers but I see a lot of dh riders in the area (higher skilled than me) switching from 27.5 to 29er front and loving it.
  • 4 1
 Yeah this would be rad as a mullet!!
  • 1 3
 You'll probably be fine mulleting it. Any problems with the head angle and you can just run more sag in the front.
  • 4 0
 Ayyyy snowshoe gang. I have a Norco Aurum 1 with 26ers though, makes it a lot more playful on Skyline and Big Ash. Might do a 26/27.5 mullet though. Plus it handles Lower Hare Ball and A Gap just fine.
  • 2 1
 @Whit-Wallace: Was gonna say the same. The ole 26r does just fine. I most certainly dont "need" a 29 inch wheel on either end.
  • 15 3
 "I need a 29er"

Sure man...
  • 1 2
 Slacker than 63 degrees for a headtube is unknown territory, I assume thats why they are advising against it.
  • 1 0
 @nskerb: Yeah, nobody needs any particular wheel size. They just prefer a size (I am partial to 29, but can ride 26" just fine).
  • 4 0
 @DAN-ROCKS: there is plenty of dh bikes out there with sub 63 head angles. Geometrons are running angles under 62 for years with exactly 0 issues.
  • 4 0
 Nothing stopping you from fitting 29er boxxer lowered to 180mm...
  • 2 0
 @Mondbiker:

Not to mention the Doughnut and its sub 60 degree HTA Smile .
  • 1 0
 @nskerb: Yeah maybe "need" was the wrong word. Should've said "all my experience is on 29ers and I see no point in changing a setup that works." Also, I have nice 29er wheels already built up.
  • 2 0
 @Mondbiker: Well what's stopping me is Norco's website saying "putting a 29er front wheel would negatively affect the handling" I know all the geo calculations, ect. But a hack like me has a hard time going against the engineers that designed the thing ya know?
  • 1 0
 @Whit-Wallace: Yeah I'm sure I'd be fine on smaller wheels after getting used to them, but you know what I'm talking about when you lose speed in some of the awkward techy sections. To me it's more comfortable to have the bigger wheels to keep me rolling through. Lower Hare Ball is the only trail I haven't hit yet. Looking to cross that off next year.
  • 1 0
 @coletrane-mtb: my advice for Hare Ball is to let it go. Mostly back brake if any, and look for the smoothest lines, don't be intimidated by the field of just rocks. Scared me half to death when I first saw it, but yeah 29ers would probably help a lot. When it's open, it's my favorite trail by so much
  • 2 0
 @coletrane-mtb: I wouldn´t bet on that statement being written by engineers...
  • 1 0
 just wait for the new range
  • 1 0
 wonder how it rides routing the chain without the idler?
  • 1 0
 This bike is made for crushing the world
  • 3 3
 there is a need for a non plastic bike at this time that can take a beating period .
  • 1 1
 My carbon bike has held up fine. Missing chunks of paint all over, but the frame is fine.
  • 1 2
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5eMMf11uhM pretty impressive stuff for 'plastic'
  • 2 0
 @nukedchipp: As mentioned in the youtube comments: "On the first test the carbon frame was delaminating way before it snapped.
Once it starts to delaminate its over...
Carbon and aluminium have different properties. Simply saying carbon is stronger is VERY misleading."

I'd rather have an aluminum frame bend under me than my carbon frame snapping and splintering.
  • 2 0
 @monkeybizz: I think we'd all be on the way to the hospital in either case! Splintered carbon can be repaired though. I think saying carbon is more durable is misleading!
  • 1 0
 @nukedchipp: lol very true Razz I can agree with that! From a personal standpoint you can see dents and dings on aluminum. With carbon, you don't usually see any delamination unfortunately :/
  • 1 0
 when he hucked to flat sealant came out Smile
  • 1 0
 The pricing does not mention it is in US.
  • 1 0
 This thing wins the huck to flat. Hands down. Like it's asleep.
  • 1 0
 So is @mikekazimer working in a brewery during the pandemic?
  • 5 0
 Ha, no - the local brewery was kind enough to let us film in their space, since it wasn't being used for any other events at the time. Funny enough. I don't drink.
  • 1 4
 "To keep things consistent, I ended up swapping those for the EXO+ control tires"

I understand the consistency goal, but that's a disservice to a bike like this. DoubleDown isn't just about puncture protection: the firmer casing changes the ride, lets you run lower pressures for max traction, and push harder when on the edge with less fear of rolling a bead.
  • 4 1
 I can assure you that didn't affect my evaluation of the bike's performance. Supply shortages dictated the tires we got, but the EXO+ tires all held up well.
  • 1 0
 Why aren't the pics of the reviewer?
  • 11 0
 Here's a peek behind the curtain: Because the border was closed. I tested and filmed the talking portion in Bellingham, Washington, and then sent the bike to BC where the riding and bike shots were completed. This way the footage looked consistent for all of the Field Test videos.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: I may or may not have come here to call you out on crossing the border because I recognized the cakewalk drop... but never mind.
  • 3 9
flag ricochetrabbit (Dec 8, 2020 at 19:06) (Below Threshold)
 Stfu. Who cares if he crossed the border or not @drakefan705:
  • 1 0
 its Christmas and big brands pay the bills!!!
  • 2 1
 37 lbs and fourth out of fifth on the downhill section. Sounds great.
  • 1 0
 watching this made me want a sierra nevada
  • 1 0
 Shut Up!!! Just Shut Up!!! You had me at FreeRide!!!
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer in which trail is that sweet drop?
  • 1 0
 1328mm length for XL. You weren't exaggerating that it's a long bike.
  • 1 0
 My Voltage FR from 2011 weighs less than that.
  • 1 0
 This thing is so sick!
  • 1 1
 uh kay! I'll just install a $40, 50T on my DH rig....
  • 1 1
 Norco still fit their bikes with those shitty e thirteen rims. Oh well...
  • 2 4
 So absolutely nothing has changed from mountain biking in 15 years.. except head and seat tube angles. Win.
  • 1 1
 50 pound Shore in 2007.
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