Field Test: Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Alloy - The Golden Retriever of Bicycles

Dec 16, 2021
by Alicia Leggett  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Alloy



Words by Alicia Leggett; photography by Tom Richards



Four decades after its 1981 introduction, the Specialized Stumpjumper lives on. This time, it's in the form of the new Stumpjumper EVO Alloy, which brings the longified, slackified Stumpy EVO into a relatively affordable aluminum package.

The Specialized Stumpjumper EVO is a 150mm bike with a 160mm fork and 29" wheels (though there's an aftermarket MulletLink available to run a 27.5" rear wheel). Just like its carbon sibling, the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy has a clean, asymmetric frame design, internal cable routing, and the first SWAT box found on an alloy bike. Zooming in a bit closer, it has swappable headset cups that allow for a degree of adjustment in either direction and a rear flip chip that adjusts the bottom bracket by 7mm and changes the chainstay length by 5mm, also adding another half degree of headset adjustment. With three headset positions, two flip chip positions, and the option to run mixed wheel sizes, that's, what, 12 possible combinations?

Stumpjumper EVO Alloy Details

• Travel: 150mm rear / 160mm fork
• Aluminum frame
• Wheel size: 29" (option to run mixed wheels with MulletLink)
• Head Angle: 63-65.5° (geometry finder tool)
• Reach: 475mm (S4)
• Chainstay length: 438 - 443 mm (S1 - S4), 448 - 453 mm (S5, S6)
• Sizes: S1 - S6 (S4 tested)
• Weight: 34.38 lb / 15.56 kg (S4)
• Price: $3,800 USD, $5,600 USD, $1,900 USD for frame and Float X
Specialized Bikes

As for build options, the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy comes in two flavors, starting with the relatively inexpensive Comp build that comes with a SRAM NX drivetrain, Code R brakes, a Fox Rhythm 36 fork, and a Fox Float X Performance shock for $3,800 USD. For those who want fewer compromises, the Elite build comes with a SRAM GX drivetrain, Code RS brakes, a Fox Factory 36 fork, and a Fox Float X shock for $5,600 USD. Want to start from scratch? Specialized also offers a frameset with a Float X shock for $1,900 USD. And then, of course, the carbon version of the bike offers all the no-holds-barred, fancy options at higher price points.


Our test bike was the Elite build in size S4, which has chainstays that are adjustable between 438mm and 443mm and weighs 34.38 lb (15.56 kg). The build, with a workhorse drivetrain and sturdy components, would be easy to shave some weight from if that were a priority, but as is, feels like a smart spec, although it'd be nice to see a version with Fox's Performance Elite suspension, which offers all the same adjustments as the Kashima-coated stuff, but at a lower cost.

The SWAT box is the biggest and the best of the three in-frame storage compartments we saw at Field Test, and it's a nice touch to bring that feature to an aluminum bike. Also, Specialized is one of the few companies that got the memo that dropper posts need to be longer, so the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy came specc'd with a 180mm OneUp post. Similarly, the stock riser bar was a nice change from several of the flat bars that came on our test bikes, and though both Kazimer and I preferred the bike with a 40mm stem to the 50mm one that came with it, the stock bike setup was a pretty dialed starting point.




Climbing

While the Specialized Stumpjumper EVO Alloy doesn't present itself at first as a climber, it gets itself up the hill relatively efficiently and carries its 34 lbs gracefully. The shock tune has a bit more support than previous Stumpjumpers had, so the bike never felt too bogged down, even on long dirt road grinds. Of the bikes we tested, it's an average climber - not as snappy as the Propain, which I'd rank as the best pedaler, and significantly more efficient than the Starling and especially the Ghost.

On technical climbs, the moderate front center helped keep the bike feeling comfortable and nimble. There's no way it could be mistaken for a cross country bike, but at the same time, the compact, agreeable bike motored up just about whatever I wanted to climb. I'll attribute that not to any outstanding efficiency, extremely light weight, or other special climbing characteristics, but just to the bike's overall easy-to-ride, adaptable personality. It never felt too long, too short, too slack, or too twitchy; and if it did, it would probably be fixable with a simple geometry tweak.




Descending


The best thing I have to say about the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy is that generally when I rode it, I forgot I was riding it, definitely forgot to think about reviewing it, and just had a good old time. When a bike disappears like that and lets you just do your thing, the designers have done their jobs. One of my most technical rides of the trip took place on the Stumpy, and while there were features I was nervous to roll into, the fact that I was on an unfamiliar bike didn't even cross my mind. The bike is just easy to get along with immediately.

The bike feels quite stable and doesn't shy away from high speeds, even in the medium head angle setting. With a simple change of the upper drop-in headset cup, the Stumpy could become a bike park weapon, but the change never felt necessary even on some of the gnarliest Pemberton trails.

For a bike that has such middle-ground geometry, offers numerous setup possibilities, and has no outstanding characteristics other than just being really pleasant to ride, it would be easy to write off the Stumpjumper EVO Alloy as a boring bike, but that's simply not the case.



Timed Testing
Our timed lap for the trail bikes was about three minutes long and was a mix of choppy, rooty sections and some fast flow. It started with an optional rock roll, a little drop, some fast corners, and a small double. As it serpentined its way down the hill, it included some steeps, a few root hops, and a few slight uphills. While none of the track was overly technical, the bikes that excelled on the test lap had to be capable on both fast, rough sections and in quick corners.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Alicia Leggett: "The Stumpjumper placed fourth out of six on my timed lap, though it's worth noting that my top four lap times were so closely clustered that it's almost irrelevant whether a bike scored first or fourth. It felt easy to charge on, energetic, and powerful, but didn't ride as lightly as the two carbon bikes, which took the top two spots."

Sure, the review might be boring, because it just does exactly what a trail bike is supposed to do without any extra fuss, but the suspension is so energetic and the bike so willing to do whatever you ask of it that it's not a bike I'll forget anytime soon. It's a bike that I wouldn't hesitate to take with me to the bike park, throw on a shuttle truck, or take for a long pedal day.

It's worth mentioning that the Stumpy EVO Alloy was the longest-travel bike we tested in the batch of 130mm to 150mm trail bikes this Field Test, so it's a bit more bike than anything else we're reviewing this week. It's also the bike we would most recommend to those looking for a trail bike that feels ready to take on some enduro races, as the head angle adjustment and extra bit of travel make it the most capable and versatile descender of the bunch. Some of the other bikes on test, namely the Starling Murmur and the Raaw Jibb, were also plenty capable when pointed downhill, but pigeonholed themselves into their own particular niches without the all-around ability to do it all that defines the Stumpy.



Pros

+ So, so adaptable - and the geo adjustments are easier than on some other bikes
+ SWAT box is the biggest and the best of the in-frame storage boxes out there
+ Good value and smart spec
+ Good crossover trail-enduro option

Cons

- There's no true top-end build, and it would be so good to see more aluminum bikes with fancy spec options
- A tad heavy if we're counting grams
- Star ratchet issue with the rear hub prior to Field Test






The 2021 Fall Field Test is presented by Rapha & Bontrager. Thank you also to Maxxis, Schwalbe, and Garmin for control tires and equipment.





386 Comments

  • 308 8
 High spec alloy >>> Mid spec carbon
  • 198 15
 I am convinced that high spec alloy with carbon hoops is the golden ticket to mtb greatness.
  • 37 7
 YUP!
with inflation/costs and concern w/ env. impact of carbon, I would not be surprised if high spec alloy becomes A LOT more popular.
  • 35 2
 strongly agree, especially on a tighter budget, suspension, drivetrain, wheels and brakes all come before upgrading to a carbon frame, for me at least
  • 12 1
 @alicialeggett are the posted weights as tested with control tires and Cush Core?
  • 33 12
 Ya the hype around carbon is fading. Aluminum is just as good, and in some cases better. Spending an extra $1k+ on minor weight savings is just not worth it imo. Plus I was always worried about every little rock hitting my frame when I rode carbon.
  • 6 2
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: I got a trek slash 8 w zeb and carbon roval wheels. They forgot to mention with proper tires you have to add at least an extra pound depending on the casing. And yeah it's sweet. Not sure why anyone wants higher than gx drivetrain.
  • 3 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: i hope you are right getting carbon hoops for Christmas
  • 85 28
 @stumphumper92: Aluminium is not "just as good". That's simply not true. Carbon is superior in almost every practical regard.

However, it's a totally different question wheter the advantages of carbon are worth the huge price increase.
  • 20 0
 @badbietz: They are with control tires but no CushCore
  • 12 0
 @SATN-XC: makes you wonder where theyre going to go when inflation makes an alloy bike costs 15k and theres no one left to rinse
  • 37 1
 @Compositepro: I hear trail running is cheap :/
  • 9 0
 @SATN-XC: oh god no i cant run
  • 69 3
 I think the Carbon Expert build is the better value. For $500 extra they "downgrade (NOT!)" from Kashima to standard suspension, but you still get the higher end dampers. You get the carbon frame which saves weight and a better drivetrain with XO1 instead of GX.

They really should have put that build kit on the aluminum frame and sold it for $4500/$5K. Much better value than this build with GX and Kashima.
  • 1 0
 @SATN-XC: upvoted for humerous comment
  • 14 25
flag GlassGuy (Dec 16, 2021 at 10:15) (Below Threshold)
 @Muscovir: Having owned lots of carbon and alu frames(and steel, and ti)....what besides weight makes carbon so superior? Stiffness? This can be altered in the carbon layout, and alu doesn't lack stiffness. I currently have a carbon and alu version of the same exact frame and I ride both bikes....I actually ride the alu bike more and I've never sat on the carbon bike and it felt like it was far superior.
One big plus for alu(which I've utilized multiple times), is it can be welded when it cracks..carbon...nope
  • 21 0
 @makripper: due to availability, I ended up replacing my GX cassette and chain with XX1 units (oil slick b*%$h). I never thought there was any need to upgrade past GX either. The XX1 units shift crisper, quicker, and are quieter. Was able to get a GX cassette couple days later, so sold on the XX1 cassette, and confirmed that the XX! Stuff does “work”better. Kept the XX1 chain, and it’s a bit of a halfway point while using the GX cassette.

3 months later, I still pine for the XX1 cassette, but prolly wont make the switch unless I’m forced to again. Never should have tasted that forbidden fruit
  • 7 0
 @alicialeggett: @mikekazimer Curious your take on the Float X vs. DPX....carbon version you reviewed had the DPX..?
  • 1 0
 @makripper: I got a 2021 stumpy evo and sold my 2019 slash 9.8 but kept the carbon wheels for trail/xc riding... I'm a sacreligious boi too! lol
  • 11 0
 I have the $6k version in carbon and with X01 shifter/derailleur/cassette. No gold on my suspension, but otherwise $400 isn't much to pay for a few pounds. I'd be happy with either. They're great bikes.
  • 3 2
 @stumphumper92: You have any real evidence to show how aluminum is just as good?
  • 5 4
 @stumphumper92: I used to love seeing Cannonades clean weld lines (little did I know they used handheld belt sanders to clean them up...) however now I love the cleaner lines of carbon. The 1K+ for me is worth it for the look.
  • 23 9
 @GlassGuy: You cannot weld an aluminum frame once it cracks.
  • 2 0
 frame only option available
  • 13 9
 @Muscovir: Carbon is not "superior in almost every practical regard". That's simply not true.
  • 20 8
 Anyone saying alloy is better than carbon either doesn't ride hard enough for frame material to matter or rides so hard that frame material doesn't matter.
  • 20 1
 @stevenaver34: yes thats right. i got a cracked alloy frame welded and a week later it cracked exactly next to the weld. it was 6061T6 alloy and it cracked again as it wasnt heat treatet after welding. buddy had his cracked carbon frame gotten repaired by a local carbon repair shop and the frame is now stronger than ever. seen far more cracked alloy frames than carbon.
  • 11 3
 @GlassGuy: You're incorrect here; when an aluminum frame cracks, you're dead in the water. Steel, sure, but aluminum, nope.

Cracked carbon frames can usually be repaired, and often gain strength in the process.
  • 5 1
 @GlassGuy: How and why do you have the same bike in carbon and alu and what is it?
  • 2 1
 @pdxkid: bro science call and my guy answered!
  • 3 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: Agreed! I am in the midst of building up a pretty high spec Ibis Ripmo AF and I'm very stoked on the project.
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: I just ordered a new Meta TR Signature and already own some WR1 Unions. We'll see!
  • 12 0
 @Compositepro: If you see me running, it means someone just stolde my bike.
  • 5 9
flag GlassGuy (Dec 16, 2021 at 12:55) (Below Threshold)
 @stevenaver34: well that's weird...because I have....more than a few times and the welds never broke. Soooo....I guess I live in an alternate reality??
  • 12 3
 @BrambleLee: I've had a couple frames welded...held no problem. Frame cracked in other areas but not at the repaired areas. Sooo....may depend on who's welding it
  • 5 1
 @pdxkid: Transition Scout ...first gen. I like the bike so much I wanted a second so I always have a back up, and..Transition last I knew didn't have any replacement frame pieces. I actually bought a used front triangle from them and the last chainstay I was sent was for the newer model
  • 4 2
 @funkzander: I've had a couple alu frames welded...held no problem. Frame cracked in other areas but not at the repaired areas. Sooo....may depend on who's welding it
  • 8 11
 @Muscovir: Sure if you count "stiffness" as an advantage aside from weight. I'll take alu any day over carbon. Been there done that and won't go back. But saying carbon is "superior in almost every practical regard" is a crock of shit.
  • 6 4
 @sspiff: Yeah... $5600 is a bit too much for an AL bike. You can never get that weight back. There needs to be a larger price difference to make AL the right choice. For $400-$1000 more get the carbon bike/frame.
  • 3 1
 @Baller7756: i agree. I bought a 2020 meta am 29 essential and upgraded everything to fox factory and sold off the old stuff and came in $4500 so that price makes little sense
  • 3 2
 @GlassGuy: you have been lucky!
  • 4 2
 @stevenaver34: I'm a bit conflicted here. Theory says that weld repair of Al frame will leave a weakness, but @GlassGuy confirms it can work out fine.
To everyone who downvited GlassGuy, who are you to say "you're fact is not true"?
  • 6 8
 @Muscovir: Yet aluminium out performs carbon in every department from bars and cranks to frames and wheels except how much profit there is to make from it.
  • 7 3
 @onawalk: Srams machined cassettes are the best in the business and they stay working like that for years. They’re well worth the money. You’ll get through three GX / XT cassettes before you’ve even taken the anodising of an X01/XX1 cassette.
  • 4 1
 @nickfranko: professional DH racers prefer aluminum rims . There you go.
  • 2 1
 @GlassGuy: exactly
  • 4 1
 @SATN-XC: it used to be. Shame carbon was forced on us with diminishing specs on alloy models.
  • 1 1
 @GlassGuy: Carbon can be repaired?
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: I second that... even mid spec would do
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: *Trek Session has entered the chat*
  • 2 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: This is exactly how I have my Ripmo AF set up. ENVE wheels from the PB classifieds and a RaceFace Next SL crankset that's now living on its third frame. Very pleased.
  • 3 0
 @Chadimac22: Man, I bought a second hand Transition Smuggler a few years ago, aluminum frame, I9 carbon rims and hub (never went out of true) and a Cane Creek inline shock. I sold it when it started to get a little tired and creaky, but I really wish I hadn't. Easily the best riding bike I've ever had. Should just invested in a shock and pivot rebuild. At least I should've swapped the wheels, though I worried that they were 142 standard and wouldn't fit modern frames.
  • 7 0
 @GlassGuy: @GlassGuy: Yes, you can weld an aluminum frame, but frames are typically heated treated/tempered post welding. When you weld (melt) the base metal it looses it's temper and the heat affected zone will have different properties from the rest of the treated frame causing a stress riser (ei: the most likely part of the frame to crack). You might get lucky and never have an issue, but if that part of the frame cracked, it's likely because it was at least during the incident when it cracked, the highest stress area of the frame. Now you've also made it the weakest part of the frame, so yeah welding an aluminum frame definitely is not advised.
  • 1 0
 @stevenaver34: Sure you can. Just needs to be heat treated afterwards. Just had a seatstay welded on a 99 FSR DH. And had it heat treated.
  • 4 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: $1900 frame only for alloy vs $3200 frame only for carbon. $1300 gets you a brand new set of NOBL TR37s on DT350 hubs. Fantastic carbon wheels.
  • 1 0
 @rburroughs4: I broke 4 in a year and a half. They always took care of me, and I still run a set I haven’t broken, but I’m happier with my WAO wheels for the same money. Only broken 1 in two years.
  • 4 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: Norco Optic brotha. I owned a Smug, sold it, regretted it. Filled the hole with an Optic and absolutely love it.
  • 3 0
 @pb-kg: Building up a Forbidden Druid. Hope it also gives me that magic feeling Smile
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett: when talking about the bikes in the tests, not just the Specialized, it would be great to allude to whether or not the stock tires would effect any of your decisions or thoughts. Would it chnage which model to buy and whether or not you (PB commenters in general) would think an upgrade is needed depending on your location/trails? Often the lower spec models have harder durometer tires and upgrading would increase the out the door price.
  • 1 2
 @mikeyorange: even with super high end bikes they all come with cheap tyres you have to replace right out of the store in most cases. You’ll just get a max tera exo. Assume no matter which bike your buying you’ll need to replace bars, stem, grips, pedals and tyres to suit you and your local terrain.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: often the case but not always, and usually the tires aren't "cheap"; they're just a different tire than you prefer which effects performance. Definitely seeing more appropriate combos from more brands... DDs or EXO+ with maxxgrips.

Also, you forgot to say seat as well.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: well now I’m kicking myself for getting rid of that oil slick XX1 CASSETTE1
  • 1 0
 @mikeyorange: I’m going to second that opinion,
It must be difficult to be a product manager, to juggle parts spec, availability, trends, public opinion, and being the most attractive option to the most people, across different provinces, and countries.

The tires I liked in the Eastern part of the country, are not what I like now out West. Even different parts of BC require different tires to get the most out of them.

Even compounds, I prefer MaxTerra, EXO casings, cause I run cushcore, and the terrain has MaxxGrips worn out in 3 months of riding….

Different strokes they say…
  • 1 0
 @onawalk: they do it to feel light and snappy on test rides as well as definitely cheap junk. The tires on my last specialized were butcher grid but a paper thin OEM version same as my new slash 8. Xr5 and xr4 paper thin edition. Disappointing really. Yeah I tried to get along with the stock butchers but got a puncture after a couple rides. Went to double down and no issues.
  • 1 0
 @SATN-XC: this comment is aging well! Metal bikes!
  • 48 4
 Does it still annihilate rear shocks?
  • 20 1
 Not as much as the last generation but it's definitely side loading shocks more than other designs. I've been running an Ohlins coils on the carbon version for about a year and my shock has survived.
  • 3 0
 @WalrusRider: but didnt someone over on another post say bicycle shocks dont really suffer any great issues from this phenomenon
  • 24 1
 @Compositepro: I don't know what was said in any posts. I and several of my friends who also had 2019 Stumpjumper Evos broke multiple shocks over the course of a year. The damper shaft on the broken shocks had serious scoring and finish wear while the other side of the damper shaft looked normal. This is a strong indication of side loading.
  • 10 15
flag salespunk (Dec 16, 2021 at 10:08) (Below Threshold)
 Ran different versions of the Evo since 2018 without a single rear shock issue. so no they don't. Once they changed the rear shock mount from the shaft being hard mounted most issues disappeared.
  • 7 14
flag plustiresaintdead (Dec 16, 2021 at 10:57) (Below Threshold)
 Yes but only if you put on a shock that the manufacturer explicitly forbids due to a long yoke length like an absolute moron.
  • 17 0
 Cane Creek had a dartboard with my photo on it when I owned my 19 Stumpy Evo. I would have killed more than 6 shocks, I actually lost count. To their credit, they kept replacing them and eventually came out with an improved design suitable for yoke driven arrangements. Hat's off to them!
  • 1 0
 @Brasher: cool story bro. (Not a sarcasm)

I've trashed 2 shocks on my 16' stumpy and thought that the issue was fixed on the new models by not hardmounting the shock to the yoke, but looks like not.

Now I have bikeyoke yoke on it and Avalanched bomber cr, which should be pretty strong, so lets see. So far 4 months of, due to injury, not so hard use and no issues at all, hopefully it stays that way.
  • 2 0
 @Brasher: if you want to beat your score get an evil.
  • 1 0
 @WalrusRider: That’s probably because Öhlins coil shocks are the only ones that can take some amount of side load and also the only ones offered with spherical bushings as standard.
  • 33 1
 Kaz and I are on the same wavelength, bikes should have 4 piston brakes and dogs are overrated. It's not that I don't like dogs, it's more that I don't like dog owners who have their pups off leash with zero recall control and having said off leash dogs cashing me down the trail or rushing up to my 2 year old causing a total melt down.
  • 13 3
 @deiru I agree on the dogs off leash front. Having been attacked, chased, etc. Owners claiming "don't worry, they are friendly!" Whilst the dog is barring their teeth. Have to mention sh*tting on the trail, or off and just leaving it. Dog excrement bacteria levels are astronomical and hugely damaging to the biota of environment, especially in areas with a lot of running water. I didn't want to believe this for a long time, thinking it's "natural", unfortunately it's not.

www.doodycalls.com/articles/blog/pet-friendly-communities/epa-says-dog-poop-is-an-environmental-hazard-on-
  • 6 9
 4 piston brakes are overrated. 2 piston Formula Cura / Cura X are more than enough for anybody
  • 4 1
 @wburnes: that's only because those are some of the most powerful 2 piston brakes...
  • 2 1
 @AndrewHornor: that doesn't disprove my point at all
  • 29 3
 Dammit. After the Kazimer review of the Carbon version, I wanted one and couldn’t find one so I bought something else. Now this has rekindled that. Haven’t heard a bad thing about any version of these bikes.
  • 31 4
 There is a lot of talk about the carbon version having problems with the Dow tube cracking right where it bends to the BB area from rocks being kicked up. Check out the forum.
  • 4 0
 @nskerb: got it, thanks for that.
  • 8 0
 @vw4ever: it still looks like a sweet bike though. Some mastic between the frame and the plastic guard should remedy that issue. I do still really want one also.
  • 2 0
 @nskerb: What "forum"?
  • 53 7
 @nskerb: not defending Specilized, but given the sheer amount of Stumpjumper Evos sold compared to other bikes 2 people complaining on a forum probably doesn’t equal a lot. Maybe a fraction of a fraction of a percent? Idk.
  • 4 2
 you wont be able to find an alu one anyway
  • 26 4
 @thechunderdownunder:

If a company sells 100 bikes and 2 of them break in the same way there's an issue.

If a company sells 100,000 bikes and 2 of them break in the same way, maybe less so.
  • 17 2
 @nskerb: I picked up this bike in January. I have had some rock strikes and the carbon looks solid. Also the carbon frame is by far the the best build frame I have seen. I have owned Pivots, Ibis, and Yeti before picking up the stumpy. Pretty awesome bike honestly and I was reluctant to buy a specialized.
  • 8 0
 @William42: isn’t that basically what @thechunderdownunder said?
  • 4 0
 @thechunderdownunder: That is a good point to consider. I have obviously not taken a tally of how many people have had that problem but just skimming that forum it was pretty apparent it was more than 2. But like you said, the % of users experiencing failure is probably within the normal industry standard of carbon failures.
  • 8 4
 @nskerb: And the Enduro. Great bike, but huge durability issues. I've broken multiple frames. Totally unacceptable for a bike that costs 6k.
  • 3 0
 @Spidersanta: They’re not that hard to find right now.
  • 3 0
 @nskerb: This happened to mine... repaired it and still love the bike and don't regret the purchase. But yea, needs thicker carbon and/or stronger protection there.
  • 8 1
 @Spidersanta: they are available on Specialized.com in several sizes. Frame only just in smaller sizes, but you can search for stock locally as well. Have been able to find bikes from Specialized pretty easily over the last 18 months as long as I was willing to drive an hour or two.
  • 2 1
 @nskerb: I hope so. I put 2 layers of squishy double sided tape under the guard and then some sticky construction/hobby foam on the outside of the guard (plus bikearmor stick-on all the way up the downtube)
  • 2 2
 @ODubhslaine: yep. I was agreeing with him in different words. Never underestimate how many goobers there are on the internet that can't put two and two together!
  • 4 0
 @Peoreo1a: have a look over at mtbr. several users cracked their carbon 21 evos. i have mine since nearly a year and have no problems but i dont ride that rocky trails. would like to know in which scenarios the frames cracked..all from rock strikes? the downtube is scary thin compared to the santa cruz frames i had before but the bike rides like a dream.
  • 3 1
 Because there really isnt anything bad to say. they are just really good, well thought out bikes. everyone beats on big bike companies, but latley they seem to really pay attention to what people want in a bike, and impliment it.
  • 1 0
 @SimonJaeger: what's breaking?
  • 5 0
 @thechunderdownunder:

It's a known issue and not surprising given the very low weight of the carbon frame, which also has a huge ass hole in the downtube (as much as I loved swat on my 2017 stumpy and that frame was tough).

I had 2 friends pick up the new carbon evo and 1 of them had his frame develop a crack.

Specialized gambled with the frame weight and lost. The downtube just isn't strong enough for how that bike can be ridden. That doesn't mean it'll fail for everyone and for sure there are shtloads of these bikes sold so we're going to hear about the failures.

I've had great reliability on older stumpys and enduro frames but wouldn't gamble on this one. Love this alu version tho!
  • 3 0
 @SimonJaeger: now the 2020 Enduro Definitely had its issues. When they initially sold the Sworks enduro model it had carbon links, and they had some engineering/strength flaw. I think I broke them on the second ride.
  • 2 0
 @nskerb: im sure it’s more than two Wink I can tell you I’m scared of flying rocks on any carbon bike, Even though I have never cracked a frame.
  • 1 0
 @WasatchEnduro: haha well I don’t think they “gambled and lost” considering they sell a million of these things, but I’m sure there will be cracks and issues. I ride carbon bikes, and I’m always scared of flying rocks. I can tell you when I cracked the enduro, they sent me new links and got me riding in less than two days, so hopefully your friends got treated well.
  • 3 0
 @CFR94:
Bearing cups.
Broke mine too, waiting since 4 months for the new frame.
  • 2 2
 @Spidersanta: every LBS where I am at has them in stock right now and in multiple sizes colours.
  • 2 1
 @valrock: the alloy only comes in 1 color
  • 1 0
 @salespunk: dude, there is 1 size available on the website, and there aren't any within 800 miles of me. Glad you have the inventory near you though.
  • 5 0
 @nskerb: Mine broke there pretty quickly, just from rocks getting kicked up while… mountain biking!

SBC refused warranty for what I see as releasing an under engineered product. Turns out the DT is only ~0.8mm thick in that zone which is road bike territory. I have data to back that claim.
Had it repaired at Ruckus Composites in PDX for $600 including additional material to not have the problem again.

The bike is probably better than new, and the solution was way cheaper and more responsible than the $2000 option SBC gave for a good faith replacement frame set. f*ck those guys and the BS ‘customer first’ story they tell.
  • 1 0
 @Spidersanta:you are right, I was looking at the Evo Alloy, those are easy to find
  • 37 9
 People actually adjust their geo??
  • 18 2
 I certainly would.
  • 17 1
 I would say no... but you have choices to find the combination that works best for you.. I will use the head angle adjust for bike park days though, its really quick..
  • 11 27
flag browner (Dec 16, 2021 at 8:16) (Below Threshold)
 adjust body > adjust geo
  • 13 0
 I have the carbon version and I absolutely do. It gets a slacker head angle for bike park days. Super easy to do on these.
  • 14 0
 The way I've used it in the past... and I think others do... is they have an idea of the bike and geo they want. They buy the bike, adjust the geo to what they're after (longer/slacker, etc). Then just leave it alone. I've ridden mine in both settings (I only have two) and prefer it in the slack setting.

Yet my next bike has the geo I'm after in the neutral setting so I'm anticipating using the geo adjust for park days.
  • 4 0
 Maybe initially. It’s just another option to add to cockpit adjustment, worth it if it’s included, can’t fault having options.
  • 5 5
 No, but we tell people that we have a bike that has an adjustable geo.
  • 5 1
 Did it once on my old trail bike, then was too lazy to ever mess with it again. I feel like these 84-position bikes would overwhelm my brain.
  • 1 0
 I wouldn’t be constantly changing it, but I’d figure out what I liked and set it there.
  • 1 0
 Nope. I have the carbon version since last Dec. I haven't change it once.
  • 4 6
 Nah, I can't imagine they do. Most people don't even adjust their suspension settings, sag or tire pressure. It would be a stretch to assume they adjust stuff that actually requires work. It probably is a set-and-forget thing for most people. Find the combination that works best for you and be done with it. But they will definitley brag to you about their new bike having adjustable geometry.
  • 8 0
 I think some of the appeal is that without being able to extensively demo a bike one isn't sure they'll like it. Having a lot of adjustments means one would probably be able to get it closer to your preferences. And most people don't try enough different bikes to even know exactly what their preferences are. Me for example, I don't know if I prefer shorter or longer chainstays. I know the chainstay length on my bike seems fine, but not having tried anything else in the last few years idk. So adjustable geo gives peace of mind to customers uncertain of exactly what they want for geo.
  • 1 0
 I do, I have a 2021 Altitude. Position 9 for XC rides, position 1 for bike park / shuttle days.

Either or though. I don't mess around with anything in between that.
  • 3 0
 @bryce77: yeah, too many options and adjustments is just brain melt down for me. I just ride.
  • 7 0
 Pick an adjustable geo setting then be a dick about it. That's the standard formula I think..
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: Yeah, the appeal of adjustable geo is the ability to custom fit the bike to your body and your riding style. Once you have it set, you probably wont ever adjust it again... like dialing in suspension.
  • 1 1
 Nah. But my bike is in the high setting and I ride 175mm cranks. So what do I know.
  • 6 5
 Imagine adjusting your head angle by a degree and thinking it’s going to make a difference?

“What’s got in Kevin today? He’s absolutely flying, he’s like a different rider”.

“Oh he’s steepened his head angle by a degree and now he’s pro”. A conversation that will never happen.
  • 1 0
 I have actually never done much adjustments but I am now on Stumpy Evo And it is fun to play with it. I am now on high and slack (low is a pedal wracking struggle for me) and it is ok. It is a great bike, makes me smile all the time :-)
  • 4 1
 All the time. Specialized nailed with how easy it is to change the headset cup and get real head angle differences. Not the silly .5 degree that most bikes have. I run it fully slack for the bike park and fully steep for trail riding and it is a significant difference. I’m a fan,
  • 24 2
 Would have loved to see another bike like an alloy Transition Sentinel in the test as well. Seems like it would be a good more direct comparison to the stumpy Evo.
  • 28 6
 I think what everyone wants to know is how does it compare to the Transition Spur?
  • 11 38
flag barbarosza (Dec 16, 2021 at 8:52) (Below Threshold)
 No,everyone wants a SPUR. dont need to compare garbage to a Spur.
  • 2 1
 They talk about that on the podcast
  • 1 0
 @CustardCountry: clever clever!
  • 16 0
 The top tube to seat tube brace always looks a little awkward to me, but I like the clean look overall. Definitely a palate cleanser after the Ghost yesterday. And no silly stickers on this one either. I don't need by bike telling me to party or pedal harder, I just want it to work. Looks like a success here. 'It does exactly what it's supposed to do' might not sound like high praise, but clearly not every bike has that mastered.
  • 13 0
 $5600 for an alloy build! If you were able to buy an Elite carbon build Evo last year you got the deal of the century. Same spec as the Elite aluminum build here minus kashima coating and $4900.
  • 7 0
 Picking up an Evo Comp for $4100 last January is feeling like more and more of a deal over time as well. It's still competitively priced, but IIRC it was ~1k less than the Ripmo Deore with the same suspension at the time.
  • 5 0
 And pre pandemic the Elite carbon was $4300 with XO1!!!
  • 4 0
 @salespunk: the elite was $4900 for the 21 evo and not quite x01 it was an x01 derailleur and shifter, gx cassette and chain, but yeah still a smoking deal compared to now. I built an s-works frame for a little over 6k with carbon wheels and similar components to the elite build
  • 2 0
 @kingch24: I actually bought one when they first came out and it was either $4300 or $4600. They then raised the price to $4900 a few months later.
  • 1 0
 @salespunk: I meant expert not elite, idk if elite is even a thing. Anyways, I ordered mine before they were released and expert was $4900 from day one in the US.
  • 1 0
 Got myself an evo comp earlier this year and it´s looking like I made the plunge just at the right time before price hikes everywhere!
  • 9 1
 What about a comparison between the Evo Allloy, Evo Carbon and the enduro? And you wanted something for big backcountry days but also fun and stable at a bike park? Could you argue the alloy would be better in the bike park than the carbon version? And now you can find Enduros at comparible prices? Maybe that could still be a better all arounder considering the weight is similar?
  • 2 2
 As an owner of the current Enduro, I almost struggle to see the point of the Stumpy EVO. I say that because (for what it is) the Enduro climbs really well, and it is DH-bike capable on the descents.

No question, you have to have the terrain to justify the 170mm bike. The bike comes alive on chunky and fast terrain. That said, I came from an SB150, a bike that I very much liked, and I would never go back. Smile
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: I think the point seems pretty obvious. If you don't constantly ride on terrain that justifies the enduro, but want to get rad on bike park days or weekend trips, I'd say the Stumpy evo is the better option. Like I could see mostly keeping it in the steep setting and riding my local uppy downy chunky east coast trails, but then slackening it up for trips to the bike park trips or a month in Vermont. The Enduro would be overkill for everything by the bike park days.
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: The Enduro is a very fast bike doing whatever,that is my conclusion over a year ridding the bike. I found myself chasing road&XC bikes and blowing my mates on ebikes on the bike lanes. DD front assegai,2.3 butcher gravity and this thing still moves fast really easy. It was really a surprise how efficient this bike is.
I had ACL surgery in my left knee 15 months ago,so I do tons of hours of road bike and not very aggressive enduro&trail rides.
The Enduro is a lovely bike to ride,it is very predictable and fast bike.very easy to ride.
  • 15 5
 Specialized sounds like the ebike of Manufacturers. Everyone hates them but secretly, they one one. LOL
  • 5 7
 They have a history of lousy business practices. Their current allocation model during Covid has been notably bad for smaller shops.

But…..current bikes ride really, really well.
  • 5 0
 Their bikes are the golden retriever of bikes but the company is like the puppy mill of bike brands. Great products, questionable business practices.
  • 7 0
 To me one of the allures of this bike (and likely the only reason I bought a specialized again) is because you can explore a variety of positions.

I have have ridden all at least 3-4 rides except those with the steep headset cup (total of >800 miles of riding on this bike since Feb 2021) . On an S3 the longer/lower setting add stability but detract from playfulness for me. I have enjoyed the slack headset cup at 63.5 and middle setting 64.5 HA with the shorter chain-stays (438mm) and this has been able to help me understand the range of geometry that I prefer. I would take a steeper STA though happily.

Overall I like the bike, I am glad Pinkbike are not claiming this is an excellent climber (it is okay) and for me the rear suspension has been a good but not great and is a bit linear (As compared to my 27.5 Devinci Spartan, which climbs better in technical trails and descends just as well).

Glad I got mine before prices went up >$1200 per model!

There are a lot in stock currently (every size across alu and carbon models) here locally...
  • 12 3
 Headline: Specialized Bicycle Co sues dogs over use of trademarked term “golden retriever.”
  • 3 1
 Yeah-love this bike. Not crazy about the red S business practices. Suing AKC over a breed name would track with prior actions.
  • 8 0
 Specialized - can you just use a Deore groupset on the Comp for the next model year? Supply issues aside, why won't NX just go away?
  • 2 3
 Nx and deore are about the same.
  • 10 1
 How does it stack up against a Sentinel ?
  • 3 0
 THIS! I have a 2019 Sentinel and the S4 is so close in numbers. It has been over 15 years since I've owned a Spesh, having owned Ibis, Yeti, niner, Evil, Tranny and Konas.....and they all make GREAT bikes...but this bike really ticks a lot of boxes and quiet honestly, that SWAT box is absolutely genius and I know I'd use it on every ride. So curious to the thoughts on riding a V1 Sentinel to this and how they compare. Not much on the nets about it.
  • 1 0
 @johnnygolucky: I can tell you about the carbon version of both those bikes.
  • 1 0
 @garrisond5:

You can? So are you asking for something to spill the beans? Some kind of barter? Perhaps a pumpkin bread recipe? I think a few people, including me would be curious to the thoughts of someone who has ridden both extensively.
  • 1 0
 @johnnygolucky: recipe first.
  • 1 0
 @johnnygolucky: I rode the sentinel V1 for two years on all sorts of terrain. I did put a Cascade link on it pretty quickly because the rear end felt like a trap door. That link fixed it big time. It's an awesome bike and I have zero complaints about it. It did everything well. I ran it with a coil mostly and it was glued to the ground. The stumpy Evo is just another level better in every category. It's a better climber on smooth and technical climbs. Even with air springs front and rear it feels more grippy climbing tech. Downhill is also just another notch better. It's very comfortable but still supportive for jumps and stuff. By far the most comfortable bike I've ever ridden from ergonomics to geometry it just feels so good. I'm 6'3" on an S5 for reference. I also spent about 6 months on a sentinel V2. It's closer to the stumpy than the V1 but still not quite as dialed. Plus the swat box! I mean... Come on!?!
  • 1 0
 @johnnygolucky: I have also installed a Cascade link on the stumpy. They only do good things for a bike in my experience. I have left the stumpy in neutral position which is technically steeper than the sentinel but somehow feels slacker. The sentinel was also a fair bit heavier. Similar build was 32lbs on the sentinel, 30lbs on the stumpjumper. Not bad for 160mm front and rear. Contemplating bumping the fork to 170 and compensating with the flip chip in the stays to maintain geometry. I'm a specialized hater for the most part, but I can't say a bad thing about it.
  • 6 1
 We bought a regular Stumpjumper alloy this year for my son. It blows my mind how competent that $2,500 bike is. This thing is on my list to replace my Hightower. I am tired of worrying about my carbon bike when shuttleing and based on how the regular one climbs this should be an awesome one bike solution for aggressive riders.
  • 1 1
 To be fair, a carbon bike from Santa Cruz is probably the only carbon bike that you don’t have to worry about. Them and maybe Norco.
  • 4 1
 Got to try a carbon one of these. The geometry is on point, but what stood out was the suspension tune. 3-4 years ago, I’d have said Specialized had soggy suspension that worked great descending but at the cost of any pretense of climbing efficiency.

Not anymore. This bike has juuust enough compliance to stick to lumpy trails with no compromise descending.

Good geometry, great suspension setup. Sizes for almost everyone. If only they weren’t sold out for the next year or so……
  • 4 1
 Really like the simple geo adjustments offered here, especially the “drop in angleset”. I have 2 Works angle sets and they’re a great product but not something I’d swap out more than once.

Funny thing about the these reviews though- in pictures this bike looks to have identical or even higher standover than the Ghost, but no mention of this bikes tall seat tube. (By the numbers, Ghost seat tube only 1/2” longer...?)

And sounds like the testers did decide to swap cockpit components on this one, to a personal preference. Others pointed out that the Starling review did not get then same courtesy.
  • 4 0
 The seat tube lengths are actually pretty short on the Stumpjumper - this S4 (essentially a size large) has a 425mm seat tube, compared to the 441mm length on a size medium Ghost.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer:

....yabbut.... in my opinion that’s small potatoes in the land of seat tubes. Sounds like the real issue surrounded the 8pins dropper, which has the promise of more travel than competitors, but in practice that seems hard to achieve.

Anyway, the field test series is awesome, love what you guys are doing. Thanks!
  • 3 0
 Questions for Alicia: How tall are you, and how did the S4 feel? I ask because I am 5-8 and put a leg over an S4 and did a parking lot ride. Honestly, it did not feel that big or stretched out, though, I had to drop the seat an inch or so. I am supposed to be an S3, but it wasn't available. Great job with the article and video!
  • 1 3
 My 5'7" wife rides an S4 and has no issues with feeling stretched out on the trails, although her arms are on the longer side for her height.
  • 5 0
 Hey there! I'm 5'10" and the S4 is spot-on for me. My ideal reach with modern trail bike geo is right around 475 to maybe 480 and I typically ride a L frame. The S4 (475mm reach when the head angle is middle and bb is high) is on the smaller side of a L frame compared to most trail bikes. The reach also shortens a bit when you drop the bb into the low mode. It sounds like you could probably ride either the S3 or S4, but it's worth taking whichever one you want out for a trail spin before you commit!
  • 3 0
 FWIW, I'm 5'9" and totally happy on an S3. Nimble enough yet stable enough smashing through any trail I point it down.
  • 3 0
 Thanks for the responses. I will go with the S3, which means I will have to wait. The S4 is available for the taking, but I don't have Alicia's long arms and legs to make it work for me.
  • 1 0
 I got the S3 frame. It's more beautiful than I could have imagined! It weighs about 8.4 pounds on my bathroom scale with rear axle, SWAT cage and tools. This is noticeably lighter than my size M 2019-20 Transition Sentinel alloy frame, which weighed in at a hefty10.0 pounds. (FYI, the Transition website had the Sentinel at a little more than 9 pounds.) Total weight for the Sentinel is 34.1 pounds with pedals, DD rear tire, and no carbon to be found anywhere. I think I can build the Stumpy EVO to about 32 pounds with the lighter wheel/tire combo that I am going to use and ONEUP carbon handlebars.

Thank you, everyone, for helping my choose a size. Alicia, love your review(s)! Keep on doing what you're doing!
  • 5 0
 Great title: this is a bike that's hard to hate (even though they seem to try). Wish I would have pulled the trigger when the carbon Expert was $4900...
  • 8 0
 I got the regular Stumpjumper expert when it was $4800, and I keep telling my wife “it’s basically like I got it on sale, it’s $6000 now!”
  • 3 1
 The got a late shipment of the $4900 builds which just sold out a few weeks ago. Someone I know had to argue with the dealer over what the MSRP was because they couldn't believe it was that affordable for what you got. Bummed they are all gone now.
  • 4 0
 @Chafingdish: same here, bought my expert last year for $7k CAD, which was hard to swallow, exact same bike with a new paint job is now $8.5k. So i tell my fiance i basically made money Smile
  • 1 0
 Congrats guys, enjoy the bike! And thanks for rubbing it in! My 2021 Status will have to suffice. It's more a bruiser, and doesn't have the SWAT/geo tricks, or climbing efficiency. Any complaints about the older DPX2 shock?
  • 3 0
 @ultimatist: We're on the regular 'ol stumpjumper, which has the DPS shock and flex-stay rear end which are both excellent.
  • 1 0
 @ultimatist: dpx2 is garbage for anything more than mellow trail riding. I was at 25% sag and biggest volume spacer, actually one bigger than fox said was allowable, and still had harsh bottom outs every ride.
  • 5 0
 For this test it would be interesting to hear how regular Stumpy alloy (Comp) comperes to other bikes with its 140/130 travel?
  • 6 0
 Agreed - we're working on getting one in for the next Value Field Test.
  • 4 1
 I have 996 miles on my 2021 Expert Evo model. I have ridden those miles since August of this year. My bike is stock except for Tannus Tubeless Armor, AbsoluteBLACK Oval 32t and bars cut to 760mm. I am 6’2” on the S5. At 44 years old, I am PR’ing a lot of trails on this bike. I kept it in the middle head tube angle and the high BB setting as I ride in Western Colorado and there are a lot of rocks on the trails. I have had zero issues with the frame or any components- the tire inserts are awesome! www.Strava.com/athletes/jmallow
I know people either love or hate Strava but I love it for motivation and tracking mileage and cheering on others. The PR’s are a nice bonus and hoping people can recognize some of the trails I ride and lend some legitimacy to how great this bike is! I had an SB150 and then downsized to an SB115… I love descending rugged, technical trails so I sold the SB115 and got the EVO and I have never regretted owning this amazing and well thought out bike!
  • 2 1
 Props for cutting your bars down to fit your body. I'm 6'0" and cut my bars down to 760. Made a huge improvement in ergonomics on my bike.
  • 2 0
 @haen: thanks! The trails around here have a lot of rocks and juniper trees that suffer no fools and or wide handlebars. There are also mini cattle-guard gates on the Palisade Plunge and 760mm wide bars reduce the pucker-factor at speed through those babies!
  • 1 0
 @Sparkula: You must have been on an XL SB150… probably too big, but supposedly the correct size for your 6’2. Getting the S5 would also be too big, but the adjustable geo (including shortening your bars to 760) has allowed you to customize to an appropriate size.

There is no way you should be faster on Stumpy Evo versus the SB150… unless we are talking tame trails perhaps. One is a pure bread enduro race bike, and the other is a big box trail bike.
  • 3 0
 @Baller7756: thanks for the feedback, I’ve been riding and racing since the early 90’s. I live in Grand Junction CO. and ride a lot of technical terrain and I was able to demo L and XL SB150’s before choosing the XL- I demoed both the S4 and S5 EVOs and went with what felt best for me both times. I don’t like to brag but you can check the KOM’s on my Strava link. I do all right no matter what bike I’m riding (short travel, long travel, hardtail… LG.. XL... etc..) I plan on doing some Enduro races on the EVO so I guess we’ll see how I do. If you’re ever in Wester Colorado hit me up, we can go ride and I’ll buy the the beers. Cheers!
  • 7 1
 It's basically a Geometron G1 for joiners. Which is a compliment I think.
  • 69 67
 PSA:

Take this review with a grain of salt - Specialized now practically owns this site.

You might think I'm joking, but I'm not. Pinkbike, as we all know, has been acquired by and is as of this year oprated by a company called Outside. Outside, which formerly was known as Pocket Outdoor Media, is a brand owned by a venture capital fund called Zone 5 Ventures - which is owned by, you guessed it, Specialized.

They self describe as "an early-stage investor with Specialized as our sole limited partner" and "Specialized's Venture Fund" on their Linked In page.

Look it up for yourself and draw your conclusions. Big red flag for me tbh. Seems like a huge conflict of interest.

And just to be clear: I'm not saying that the review is intentionally deceptive. I'm not accusing the editors of lying. All I'm saying is that it now seems unlikely to be a coincidence that even Specializeds more mediocre products get so much exposure and such raving reviews on this site.
  • 44 6
 You may be right, but the Stumpy (and Enduro) gets rave reviews from all the people I know who own them, and Specialized seems to really be innovating in great ways more than most brands right now.
  • 36 4
 I want to hate on the evil big name brands as much as the next guy, but honestly Spec really hasn't been putting out any "more mediocre" products recently. Their lineup is killing it these days.
  • 18 7
 @rickybobby18: Right. The Enduro even got a raving review from me. Until I broke the frame. And the replacement frame they sent me.
  • 24 13
 I hope you know that downvoting doesn't make it not the truth LOL
  • 15 2
 Great observation here. My first thought was that there was no way that was true but you are 100% correct. Zone5 is not the sole owner of Outside and it is likely a smaller minority share given that the last round of financing was led by Sequoia who is a much larger VC outfit, but the point still stands. No matter the size, specialized has a direct ownership stake in the website.
  • 38 2
 Unless I missed something, Zone 5 did participate in the Series B funding round of Pocket Outdoor, but wasn’t even the lead fund on the investment. Characterizing Specialized as the “owner” of Pinkbike is a bit of a stretch.
  • 4 11
flag ridingofthebikes (Dec 16, 2021 at 9:10) (Below Threshold)
 go peddle your supple surly hater.
  • 33 4
 @SimonJaeger Pinkbike's reviews have always struck me as being super careful to start by describing the characteristics of a bike and then build a case about who it's best suited for for rather than be boiling it down to a positive/negative impression or simplified rankings, which is the kind of thing you would do if you were just promoting it. Basically what I'm saying is, their journalistic integrity is demonstrated in their reviews and this one seems consistent with that.

A good example of bias would be, say, to form an opinion about something based on the company that owns it rather than evaluating it on its own merits. Hmm...
  • 14 6
 @Savagm: It doesn't matter if they are a lead investor or not. They still have a direct ownership in the site. And even the smaller VC investors usually get a board seat in return for their investment.

I'm not saying that this review is biased. 1) I think the individual reviewers are doing a straight review, and 2) I have a stumpjumper alloy and I agree with everything they said.

But that doesn't mean this is a non issue. You always have to consider the source and the potential biases of any information you consume. And one of the biggest bike companies in the world now having a direct ownership in this site will be something that always has to be considered going forward.
  • 15 2
 While I doubt the review is biased...a disclaimer that Specialized is an investor in the parent company that pays the salaries of the reviewers is in order I would argue.
  • 99 3
 I totally get the concern. But do you realize just how many brands put money into Pinkbike? Lots and lots and lots, including at least 8 of the 12 brands we tested at Field Test. Maybe more - I'm just going off of the advertiser list on the sidebar of the homepage. Specialized isn't special in putting some amount of funding into PB, and tbh that connection you're making is WAY farther removed from Pinkbike than direct advertising.

As for the editorial side of things, we face no repercussions from saying negative things about bikes, Specialized or not. I have no particular feelings about Specialized except that it's a company that has a shit ton of resources for extensive R&D... which more often than not, results in better bikes than the companies that don't get to spend as much money on product development. I went into this test not wanting to like the Specialized this much for that reason. I want the underdog to win. That said, I can't deny that Specialized hit it out of the park on this one. It wouldn't be fair to hold back my praise just because of my personal bias against big corporations.

Plus, pretty much every bike brand is going to sell out of everything this year and next year and the year after that. There's a bike shortage. Do you think there's any actual pressure to put out a positive review? Even Ghost will sell out. Even the Ghost Riot Trail Full Party.
  • 8 4
 So that's not * quite * true. You stated that Zone 5 owns Outside - Pocket Outdoor Media has received funding from Zone 5 and Zone 5 has a seat on the board. Big deal. But so do representatives from other VCs from which they've also received funding. I couldn't find anything on the actual breakdown but I didn't look that hard, just enough to confirm my suspicion that Z5 are just one of many investors. So it's more accurate to say that Specialized, through their private equity fund Zone 5, hold some amount of equity in the parent company that owns Pinkbike. Meh.

That's quite a bit less suspicious than the way you phrased it.
  • 5 4
 Kinda went the oversimplified clickbait route with this comment.

Any potential conflicts of interest SHOULD be disclosed by any journalistic outfit, but there is no indication that this review is biased.

I’ve tried a Stumpy Evo, and I’d say the review is spot on. It’s a bike that can be ridden hard on high consequence terrain (up and down) on the first ride.
  • 4 2
 @wyorider: Exactly. Likelihood of bias is very low...disclosure silences our Swiss friend and any others who buy into the 'conspiracy' - but look at his post history, clearly has a beef with Spec given a broken frame.
  • 1 0
 @SimonJaeger: to be fair though Switzerland is rather mountainous and the Alps are quite rocky Wink
  • 12 1
 @alicialeggett: Ghost roast, nice lol.
  • 1 2
 My gosh ! We found Pinkbike whistle-blower ! And have you seen that they are so deceitful that they have slipped some cons n the review and all this ratchet thing... Nous sachons...
  • 1 0
 @SimonJaeger: I love my enduro, so very much. Really hoping I don't break the frame at any point.
  • 1 3
 @hankj: Actually, Switzerland is mostly cow pastures, all the way up to the high Alps. You really have to search hard to find natural trails there.
  • 3 1
 @p1ne: I would like to hear them offer some definitive options more often. If every bike is great, then why do we need reviews. Just say... this bike sucks... this bike is OK, but here is a much better bike... this bike is the best in its class!
  • 8 1
 @alicialeggett: Great response and reasoning here. Your insights and reviews in the field test have also been awesome, so kudos on that, and thumbs up to whoever made the decision to bring you aboard. Hope we are reading your takes for a good time to come!
  • 3 3
 @alicialeggett: As I'm sure you can see, there's a big difference in potential leverage of influence between paying Pinkbike a couple of dollars for advertisement versus actually holding an ownership stake in the parent company that pays the editorial team's salary.
If its as unproblematic as you say it is, then way has no one disclosed that connection in the first place?
Like @MikeyMT said, a disclaimer would have probably been in order.
  • 3 2
 @wyorider: Yes, I did. It definitley was a clickbait-y tounge-in-cheek kinda take.

But just because I'm an a*shole, doesn't mean I'm wrong.
  • 3 0
 @WY228: I wasn't necessarily talking about their bikes. They are really good except for some apparent quality control issues and ridiculous price tags. I own an Enduro myself and it's been a great bike so far (for those times it wasn't broken anyways).

I meant stuff like that helmet they brought out recently or that new line of shoes or that dumb carbon strider bike. It all got big coverage here, despite not being exciting at all and not any more relevant than competing products.
  • 2 0
 @SimonJaeger fair enough, I see your point now. I agree I have seen a lot of coverage for their stuff but I think brand power has a lot to do with that as well. When one of the big players in any industry releases new product its going to garner attention. Plus I think that strider bike got a ton of attention last year purely because of the ridiculousness of it.
  • 4 1
 Perceived bike quality increases as budget decreases. I mean, there is at least person out there who walks onto a Toyota lot, looks at a base-model Camry and goes, "Daaaanng, that thing is DIALED!"
  • 3 0
 I'd like to meet that person. For science
  • 9 0
 Base Camry is dialed for 200k miles of trouble free motoring. If you don’t need all the fancy trim, a base spec Toyota gets the job done.
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: preach!
  • 1 0
 @wyorider: so marketing is what has me running AXS instead of GX?
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: A base-spec Toyota is the equivalent of a tan, velcro, well-fitted orthopedic shoe.
  • 2 0
 The trails around my area vary. We have steep and rocky, steep loose, long climbs, slow speed low angle super rocky, and out by the beach is faster flow with low tech. I think it would be fun to test which geo works best on each zone.
  • 2 0
 I didn’t get on well with the DPX2 when I tried the carbon version. I just had it a few days and didn’t have the opportunity to mess about with volume spacers, so take that for what it’s worth. I’ve definitely heard of others feeling the same way though who’ve moved to Storias or aspire Deluxes or whatever.

Kaz obviously really liked this bike with the DPX2 last year, so it makes sense that he wouldn’t have felt much need to compare and contrast the two, but I’d have been curious to hear a comparison between the two shocks.
  • 3 1
 I couldn't get on with the DPX2, tune was too light or something. Didn't matter what I did I would just blow through the travel and have harsh bottom outs even with one size bigger spacer than Fox recommends. Ended up putting on a cascade link and that helped a bit, put on a coil and that was the solution. Would be interested in trying a Float X at some point.
  • 2 0
 Just out of curiosity, @alicialeggett @mikekazimer @mikelevy @henryquinney : what kind of gloves & riding pants are you all wearing during these wet & cold rides? Have definitely struggled finding a good pair of gloves that keep hands warm and dry in these PNW winters.
Thanks in advance!
  • 1 0
 Oh! and have to ask @mattbeer too!
Thanks!
  • 2 0
 @RBalicious: Not answering for them but found two good ones.
Fox Ranger Fire glove if not wet or windy warmer but breaths better than Fox Ranger Water which I use if windy or really wet when it's the warmer one =)
  • 1 0
 @LDG: Thanks! I just picked up some of the Fox Defend Fire as well as their Water gloves, but haven't been able to use them yet. Hoping to get a response as my lady is trying to sort that out on her end as we have tried a few different types for her as well.
Appreciate the input!
  • 1 1
 @RBalicious: don't get why you don't use regular gloves. Just wrap them in food film and you're good to go !
  • 1 0
 @Ricolaburle: Not sure if you are being sarcastic or snarky. But, because I try not to add unnecessary pollution to the environment like cling wrap... Not saying DWR is good, nor defending DWR treated garments. But that is better than single use plastic cling wrap.
  • 2 0
 @RBalicious There are no shortage of great pants out there these days. Having two sets is ideal; one lightweight/highly breathable and another for full water proofing. I wear the Fox Ranger Water gloves six months of the year because they have great dexterity for their warmth. Handup also has a great winter glove that isn't bulky.
  • 2 0
 @RBalicious: it was just a wink in relation to our discussion on trailcross and sealskinz socks ;-) ! Nothing more
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: Thank you sir! Greatly appreciate your insight. Glad to know the Ranger water glove should do the trick. Excited to use them for the first time this weekend.
  • 2 0
 @Ricolaburle: haha, fair enough. And good on ya for the memory. Wink
  • 4 0
 @RBalicious, I'm a fan of the 100% Brisker gloves for colder weather rides. I can't stand gloves that feel bulky, and I'll typically run lighter weight gloves even when it's really cold for that reason. The Briskers make the grade because they keep the insulation on the back of the hand, while the palm is nice and thin.

For pants, it's really whatever's not still wet and muddy from my last ride. I have a pair of fully waterproof Gore C5 Trail Pants for days that it's actively raining. On less soggy but cooler days I like Rapha's MTB Pant, Ion's Shelter pant, or Pearl Izumi's Summit pant.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Thanks so much!
  • 1 0
 @RBalicious: covid time for me,nothing else to do (apart from watching Dexter for the third time...) ! Thanks for being a fair player ;-).
  • 1 0
 @Ricolaburle: What?! Not watching the Great British Baking show?! OG Top Gear? Grand Tour? Loki? Wishing you speedy recovery if you've contracted the virus.
  • 1 0
 @RBalicious: Thanks buddy !
  • 7 1
 Am I the only one that can't stand flat hat bills?
  • 2 0
 I haven't touched a specialized in YEARS, but historically they all ride the same to me. They do the job perfectly well, but have no personality or life to them. I'm not a person to own a golden retriever, more of a weird mutt from the pound, or a pitty rescue kind of rider.
  • 5 0
 I had the first evo and it seems to get better and better
  • 5 0
 it's stunning looking, that's for sure. what a beauty.
  • 1 0
 Do these roval 370's with the ratchet ln have much better engagement than the previous gen? I bought take offs from a specialized enduro last year and the engagement was terrible. I've never been fussy about hubs in general, so I was suprised how much I disliked them.
  • 1 0
 I don't know how old the ones you have are but I have a 2021 Stumpjumper and the engagement is great, much better than it was on my 2016. It's fine for me, I don't feel any need to upgrade it and I do ride a lot of technical climbs where back pedaling is necessary.
  • 2 1
 We had a 2019 Stumpy Evo in our fleet and the only issue with it was the low BB height - hit the apex of a wood feature on that bike and ended up with a very badly fractured wrist. This year's model looks like the BB can be raised higher, which is a good thing. The asymmetric shock placement worries me a bit, but it probably shouldn't.
  • 2 0
 Anyone have issues with the adjustable headset squeaking? I haven't heard any, and if that's the case it's pretty impressive engineering. I test rode an S-Works version, and it was a good bike but didn't blow me away.
  • 2 0
 Dude, 5600 for an alloy bike? I realize it's got Factory suspension, but for that price everything should be carbon(other than the frame). I'm sure it's a great bike, but dang that isn't a value prop.
  • 1 0
 Too bad the entry-level build uses NX on a bike this good. Charge another 200 and give it GX shifters and derailleur.

Also "Star ratchet issue with the rear hub prior to Field Test"
O NO! After already losing XT brakes (wandering bite point), have we now also lost the final bastion of absolute trust and reliability in MTB'ing?
  • 1 0
 Aluminum is a great option if sufficiently cheaper and speced well. The resale is a bit tougher as carbon, correct or not, is viewed by most as superior.

The previous evo comp Slx carbon from 2021 is hard to beat for value. At the time $5300 Canadian. Slx brakes and drive train.

I am ok with getting less as long as I am paying less. (Ie nx deraileur non hd drivers inability to put a cassette with 10 tooth cog on. )
For an all rounder like this bike gearing range can be fairly important.
  • 1 0
 The carbon v alloy is a non argument in structural strength, carbon is stronger with directional force but its flex its hard to control and when it reaches tipping point its a clean snap, alloy however has much better cross directional strengh so some may say this out weighs the pros of carbon but reality is you might not snap a chainstay on alloy on first dodgy impact but it will cause a stress and eventually fracture and snap, anyone who has snapped an alloy chainstay will of noticed how thin the thickness is so close to "structural weld" either way the pro and cons of carbon out way each other it purely personal choice. Also when you see these spectacular frame fails its never because they've executed the perfect tail whip and landed it txt book its because they've landed it spectacularly wrong carbon or alloy they every chance the frame could snap depending on where structural strength has been comprised

Interestingly Atherton bikes are claiming they have sorted this cross directional strength issue with unique weaving and layering process, we shall see!
  • 1 0
 Late to this but I have to say one of the best features of the stumpjumper line is the sizing. S1-S6. I bought the S6 comp last december and it’s the first time I have had a bike that is almost too big. I’m 6’3”. Big complaint is that the longer these bikes get, the bottom bracket stays the same height. Too bad there was no evo al for 2021. And the rear hub is cheese
  • 5 1
 can you pin field test to the front page please mods? x
  • 3 0
 Wish they didnt just blow through coils! Would love to have a coiled stumpy evo
  • 2 0
 Progressive rate springs are available for some shocks, Cane Creek, DVO, some other can’t remember
  • 2 0
 @DizzyNinja: I more so meant blowing shocks because of the side loading due to the linkage design. Spherical bearings on it would help
  • 3 0
 I run an EXT arma on my carbon version and no issues... Need to make sure its a thicker steel shaft coil, but there are several that fit the bill
  • 2 0
 Surprised at the value with factory level suspension. I’d like to know how it compares to a Commencal Meta TR with Fox factory level suspension.
  • 2 1
 Maxxis Tires not Specialized, interesting! Why they don't put a downtube protector on a bike in this category is beyond me. I don't want to hear rocks hitting the tube and don't care to see the damage afterward.
  • 4 0
 We use control tires on all the bikes!
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett: makes sense, thanks
  • 3 0
 Stupid question: Can someone explain the benefit of the sidearm design that Specialized uses?
  • 3 0
 Leaves more room for the bottle and allows for piggy back shock.
  • 1 1
 Funny how the Stumpy went from sub 30lbs to 30+lb for carbon and now 34lbs for the alloy version. I had mine down to 26lbs once with carbon post, XTR components, and light XC tires. However, with a dropper post, upgraded rear shock, and beefy tires and rims, it's close to 30lbs - and this is alloy frame and rims, not carbon.
  • 3 0
 Can you guys please do a review with the mullet set up? your all awesome by the way, love the podcast too.
  • 2 0
 did anyone on this test actually try out different geometry settings or just talk about how great the option is?
  • 2 0
 Kaz did extensive testing on the carbon version last year... he mentioned that and decided to just stick with the stock position for this one.
  • 9 9
 Banging my esthetics gong once again, but another hideous offering, this time from Specialized. This will age like the stucco-clad 90's houses of Greater Vancouver–IE not well.
  • 3 0
 I don't agree about the bikes appearance, but you get an upvote for the comparison. Stucco was and is a terrible look
  • 1 1
 @AndrewHornor: Thank you for your generosity. It's too easy to end up in Downvote hades, never to be seen again.
  • 6 3
 aesthetics* I have to agree the frame is heinous. But DAMN if it doesn't check ALL the other boxes. And this is coming from a long time Spesh hater.
  • 8 1
 @njcbps: lol, sometimes I have no idea why things get downvoted. It's just an opinion, save the neg props for racists and sexists and whoever came up with salmon coloured stucco!
  • 2 0
 Funny! My sister lives in Duncan and there are so many stucco houses there. Not a thing here in the US PNW.
  • 1 0
 I think 150/160mm is the sweet spot for trail-enduro bike. Can climb relatively well, but can tackle a lot of the downhills. Very versatile that can cover most riding.
  • 1 0
 I could say the same about a 130/140mmm bike. I think the suspension and geo of the new bikes has made them as capable as the 150/160 bikes i had a few years ago like a nomad or hightower.
  • 1 0
 @DDoc: I have a 130/140mm 29er with very good geo. It is a rad bike, but I just think I want a little more travel for the trails I ride. Not enough bike for some rocky technical downhills. I had a 150/160 carbon bike that I sold before the pandemic because it had a little older geo. However, I really like the amount of travel for the trails I ride. I wanted to replace it, but the pandemic has made it difficult to get anything without paying ridiculously high prices for.
  • 6 3
 34lbs is too heavy for a trail bike.
  • 3 0
 @GlassGuy: 160-150 is too much travel for a trail bike.
But you know,if they told us this bike is great for (not EWS level) enduro,few people would buy the Enduro,so... it's got to be a trail bike.
  • 2 0
 @nozes: Yeah they keep calling it a trail bike but its clearly not with a 160 fork.
I think it goes like this..
Fork 160-170 - Enduro
Fork 140-150 - Trail
Fork 120-130 - Downcountry
Fork 100-110 - Xcountry
  • 3 0
 @DDoc: You forgot all-mountain - back to the drawing board!
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: RIP all-mountain
  • 3 0
 This bike would be boss AF with Shimano SLX and DW Link. Oh wait.....
  • 1 0
 $2200 CDN between lowest and highest price EVO Alloy models, hmmm. that's enough $ for a few drivetrain change among other maintenance upgrades.
  • 2 2
 Serious question: should we really be celebrating the adjustability of this bike when it's achieved with an angleset?

I mean... zip-tie a 2-degree angleset to my Slayer and boom, so much more adjustability!
  • 2 0
 Just dropping a line to give kudos to the amazing photography on this review!
  • 3 0
 Need a head to head of this vs. aluminum sentinel
  • 2 0
 Another star ratchet failure? Anyone have info on what is going on?
  • 3 0
 DT will service it quickly if you have an issue:
www.dtswiss.com/en/ratchet-exp-maintenance-notice
  • 2 0
 @imjeffinghungry: can confirm from personal experience that DT is hassle free on warranty and is quick about it
  • 3 0
 There is a massive thread on MTBR on this problem. I didn't think it involved the lower end hubs though. The pros/cons section above doesn't really say what the problem was and how it was resolved unfortunately.
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett what do you think about this bike for a enduro race like TC this past year?
  • 4 0
 I would be very happy to race it at something like the TC! It's fun to ride, it's not too much bike to climb, and it feels good on a variety of trails. If I was going to nitpick I might want something a tiny bit lighter for all the hike-a-bike hours, but that's not a real issue.
  • 1 0
 @alicialeggett: yeah the bike a bike stuff was bit over the top this year, a necessary evil unfortunately, that wore me out....I did it in 2018 also and it had significantly less, but big climbing days where these trail bikes that climb well seemed to be the hot ticket....
  • 2 1
 anyone else wish the stumpjumpers evo and reg versions didn't have that side shock strut? look so much better without
  • 1 0
 The side strut is a non-issue. The new frames are updated and look clean, smooth, and modern.
  • 3 1
 Except Golden Retrievers are not corporate bully a##holes
  • 1 0
 As always, jack of all trades, that perfectly suites majority of riders with awesome warranty and global service access
  • 1 0
 Was hoping to see a Golden Retriever in the review. A little bummed but that is a nice bike.
  • 2 0
 Is the non evo not the trail bike?
  • 1 1
 Cut the time lap confusion, I’d like to know which was the fastest on typical DH trail with a mixture of different types of terrain!
  • 1 1
 I mean, really the review should be conducted in a every possible geo configuration right? Might have been fastest in the 63 HA
  • 2 1
 Glad to see they stuck with horst link on the aluminum version. Flex point single pivot is not the way to go.
  • 1 0
 I have a 2021 carbon Stumpy. Already wish I had gotten the Evo. I could use a little more travel.
  • 1 1
 So no cons with regards to the frame aside from being a 'tad' heavy. Sounds like a winner.
  • 2 1
 Buy mine, i am selling a 2022 SJ Alloy Comp S4! YEEHAWW
  • 10 12
 Ha ! That comment about "The Golden Retriever of Bicycles" instantly reminded me of my favourite Blonde joke of all time.

The smartest Blonde I ever met........was a Golden Retriever ! lol
  • 1 0
 Mustard colored jackets - so hot right now.
  • 1 0
 nahhh I'll take the ghost over this one any day of the week hahahaha (jk)
  • 1 0
 Can you run a coil on this frameset ?
  • 3 1
 35lbs with pedals. :/
  • 1 0
 What if I want the Australian Shepherd of bikes? Which one is that? Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @sylentk which ever one looks good, yet has the flexiest rear end, unfortunately.
  • 2 0
 @sylentk oops! I misread that as German Shepard, my bad. Derp!
  • 1 0
 If only you could get one before 2023...
  • 1 0
 Specialized has a handy bikefinder feature that knows where all the bikes are located. Almost all are available if you are willing to drive a little.
  • 1 0
 lol @ 14:57... pesky fly on the downtube
  • 1 0
 was a good looking huck-to-flat
  • 2 2
 Maybe you should also talk about all the downtubes that cracked on the carbon model.... #pinkbikeishidingthetruth
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer what 40mm stem did you run?
  • 1 1
 Wow that's heavy my Levo SL only weighs 17kg with 2.6 tyres and a manitou mezzer...
  • 1 0
 breaking news: outside magazine acquires specialized bikes
  • 1 0
 Got the comp with hunt trail wide wheel set. = fire
  • 1 0
 now someone tell Santa Cruz to start making affordable alloy bikes again.
  • 1 0
 My Golden Retriever, Spike, approves this review.
  • 1 0
 yikes! weird looking bike there. no shot of the open ended side lol
  • 1 0
 Anyone on an s1 bump the travel up to 160mm?
  • 1 0
 Take My Money!!
  • 1 0
 Stumpy review 1000
  • 6 7
 Never been a fan of Golden Retrievers.
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