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Field Test Review: 2022 Trek Top Fuel - Same Name, Different Bike

Dec 3, 2021
by Henry Quinney  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Trek Top Fuel



Words by Henry Quinney, photography by Tom Richards


Trek is a brand with many racers to satisfy. With professional teams and athletes in nearly every discipline, they make a huge number of bikes. Whereas some brands have more of a gravity focus, or have their roots firmly in shorter travel applications, Trek, quite simply, has to offer seemingly everything to nearly everyone. That's all very well and good for your competition-focused categories, but what about bikes that by their very nature aren't built for racing?

Step in the new Top Fuel. Once a purebred XC race bike, it's now morphed into a longer travel contender in the downcountry and trail category. But how does it stack up, and has it lost any of its bite since leaving the race scene behind?
Top Fuel 9.9 XX1 AXS Details

• Travel: 120mm rear / 120mm front
• Wheel size: 29" (except XS)
• Head angle: 66° (low)
• Seat tube angle: 76° (low)
• Size tested: large
• Reach: 480 mm
• Chainstay length: 435 mm
• Sizes: XS, S, M, M/L, L , XL, XXL
• Weight: 26lb 3 oz (11.9 kg)
• Price: $10,500 USD (as shown)
trekbikes.com

To look at the geometry chart, it becomes clear that the Top Fuel is a fascinating prospect. Its slack head angle and long reach seem to have been plucked from bikes with far burlier intentions. However, it's not quite as radical as something like the Rocky Mountain Element, nor is it as tall at the front as something like the Niner Jet RDO, both of which we also tested.

The Top Fuel has one or two geometry dimensions that set it apart from the others, most notably it's a lot lower on the front than some of the other bikes. Its stack figure is around 25mm lower than the Niner, for instance, and that's not even factoring the high-rise bars that come on that bike. The dimension of stack can not only have a large effect on the handling of the bike, but also what terrain the bike will thrive in.


It's also the longest bike on the test. In its high setting, it has a reach of 484mm. Yet it's not the steepest in the seat tube angle. It's certainly very adequate, but the long reach, combined with a 76-degree seat tube does give it a moderately long effective top tube length of 630mm. Although this is 2 and 4mm less than the Rocky Mountain and Niner respectively, the Trek feels longer because the bars are that bit lower.

At the rear of the bike, it has the near-standard 435mm chainstays that are very common in this category. The bike uses 29" wheels for all models except the extra-small in its range.

The bike uses Trek's ABP suspension layout, and benefits from the clean silhouette that the design enables. It's a very sleek looking bike, and that's before you take into account the rather beautiful Bontrager RSL one-piece bars and stem that came on our test bike. The bars came in a very wide 820mm width, which we duly cut down, and has an effective stem length of 45mm. The 27mm rise bars are certainly elegant to say the least.


Another feature of this bike that Trek seemed to have got right is their integrated storage. Dare I say it, its door seems maybe one of the best executed of all the mainstream brands, and there's ample volume inside.

Our bike came with a RockShox pairing for the suspension. A SID fork featuring their Charger Race Day Damper and an inline Deluxe shock covered damping duties. We ran the shock in its most open setting and found it to be very well damped for somebody that wants to push on. The fork was exemplary in terms of performance and really opens up what you can ride on a bike like this by giving adequate support. Truly, both the SID and the new 34 really do help bikes like this fulfill their potential. That said, our fork did develop bushing play, something that's unfortunately happened before on other SID test forks.

The bike is also compatible with a longer 130mm fork. Assuming all other things are equal, the additional 10mm would reduce the head and seat tube angle by around half a degree. All the normal suspects are there in terms of frame spec. This includes internally guided routing, a SRAM UDH, and a bottle inside the front triangle. The bottle cage on this bike comes as standard.

The new Knockblock widens the range of the steering inputs and is an improvement on previous versions. However, I don't feel it's as well-executed as other brands' offerings, mainly due to the fact that it uses keyed headset spacers that fit into notches in the stem. That means switching to a 'regular' stem requires a special adaptor, an inconvenience that doesn't seem like it should be necessary.




Climbing

The Top Fuel is a very good climber, even if it's slightly heavier than something like the Santa Cruz Blur TR or the Rocky Mountain Element. It doesn't ride like a heavy bike, but if you're looking for all-out lightweight, this might be a very small stumbling block.

The bike is very surefooted and tracks very well, although I would say it's more suited to people who want a bike that responds well to accelerations and surges in power, rather than having a very active suspension system that lets the wheel get up and over obstacles easily. It's also very efficient. In fact, by our reckoning, it's the most efficient bike on test.

On the technical climbs, it was very similar to the Rocky in terms of speed, but both were pipped by the ground-hugging missile that is the Santa Cruz Blur TR. For a bike that is so capable on the descents, though, the Top Fuel still packs a mighty punch when it comes to gaining elevation.

The one area it doesn't shine is fit, for me at least, due to the longer and more stretched out seated climbing position. In some instances, it felt like this made it harder to get my weight over the bars, and made it feel slightly disjointed in tight, technical turns. Would a steeper a seat tube angle have helped? Possibly, but that could potentially diminish the bike's comfort on flatter and more undulating terrain, so I understand why Trek chose the numbers they did.





Descending

The Top Fuel is a very capable descender, but its well-proportioned geometry is just half the story. It manages to strike a great balance between grip, tracking, and precision. The whole bike seems to just will you on to hit things faster and with more precision.

It damps the trail very well and is remarkably predictable and consistent. It offers a level of support that will really appease riders who are used to bigger bikes and want to ride this 120mm bike hard. That level of damping does mean that some riders might find it to be a little too firm, especially when riding rougher or more chattery trails.
Timed Testing

The downcountry bikes were all tested on a section of trail that included a mix of everything you'd expect to find on an aggressive XC loop. The first section included a rock slab into some braking chatter, before the track opened up into fast turns and some small drops and jumps.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Henry Quinney: "The Top Fuel and Element traded blows in our timed testing. The Trek was the fastest on the efficiency test, the third fastest on the singletrack climb and the second fastest bike on the downhill section of our loop. In the latter, it was narrowly pipped by the Rocky Mountain Element by 0.3 of a second."

In terms of the shootout at the more aggressive end of the downcountry spectrum, it's perhaps not as supple off the top as the Element. The two bikes could be so similar, but they ride very differently. For steeper trails, I would say the Element has the edge, and if you hope to hang on to your friends on longer travel bikes, that could be the more suitable bike. However, if you intend to stick to trails more like the bikes were intended for, the Top Fuel would be my choice of bike.

The low front end of the Trek does put your weight further forward over the axle, but that comes back to you in flatter turns. The Trek has got a lot of personality, and it is a bike that not only inspires precise and confident handling but really encourages you to push on.

Ultimately, it felt like a 120mm tailor-made for someone that wants a short travel bike that excels on aggressive XC trails and is light enough to ride all day.


Pros

+ Great suspension performance
+ Frame storage
+ Strong climbing performance

Cons

- Knockblock isn't as well executed as other brand's versions
- Works well when pushing hard, but might not be the most comfortable for all



The 2021 Fall Field Test is presented by Rapha and Bontrager. Thank you also to Maxxis, Schwalbe, and Garmin for control tires and equipment.



263 Comments

  • 149 24
 The Corvette of the mountain bike world. A weapon that will embarrass bikes costing 50% more when ridden by a competent rider, but will most often piddled around greens and blues, shown off in the parking lot to other like-minded individuals, and wiped down with baby diapers after every time it leaves the garage. NEVER ridden in the rain - don’t want to hurt the resale value.

No, you can’t try it out.
  • 57 58
 yeah imagine washing and caring for your bike. You must be a bad rider if your bike doesn't have 4 years' worth of accumulated shit on it and is working as it should.....
  • 15 2
 "...wiped down with baby diapers" Was that a typo, or...? The intentionally rusty "rat rod" style of modified muscle cars is so over: it's all about shit rods now.
  • 29 3
 @kcy4130: not a typo. I’ve seen guys bust open a new box of Huggies and take the filling out of the diapers to wipe down their cars because the filling is softer than microfiber towels. They’re insane.
  • 14 7
 Those thru-shaft shocks are Corvette (un)reliable. Modern Trek MTBs ride great, but having to puke up another few hundred dollars for a reliable shock sucks.

Don’t believe me? See how many Trek specific shocks are on PinkBike marketplace.
  • 4 1
 @sjma: Ha! that is so hilarious and insane. Any car owner who does that must be really anal.... tehe.
  • 4 0
 @wyorider: yup. I have a brand new Slash 9.8. blew the thru shaft Super Deluxe Ultimate on the 5th ride.
  • 19 0
 Corvette of the mtb world? I guess we're now going to see a bunch of older dudes with goatees riding Treks. . .
  • 40 22
 Insult to Trek. Calling a Corvette a "weapon" is like calling Bon Jovi a rock band
  • 7 1
 Somebody doesn’t like clean bikes
  • 23 3
 @jwdenver: classic pinkbike commenter. If theres one thing they dont like its a clean bike, or a recent bike, or nice bike, or an ebike... damn, theres more than I tought
  • 7 5
 @max252: correct, Pinkers like a well-ridden bike. Clean, recent, nice ebikes don't tend to get ridden so much, or so well.
  • 10 0
 @max252: Obviously your comment is at least slightly sarcastic. But at this time, when wear parts like cassettes, chainrings, and chains are scarce and/or expensive - I'm cleaning off the drivetrains to try to extract a little more life from them. I don't care what the rest of the bike looks like and have never actually "washed" a bike, but I'm definitely brushing off the wear parts so I don't have to buy new ones.
  • 6 0
 @mannekepis: How european of you
  • 9 0
 @max252: Never remove the PLOD.
[Protective Layer of Dirt]
  • 1 0
 Even Santa Claus doesn't let anybody ride his bike.

vimeo.com/149709364
  • 2 0
 @sjma: Nah, the diapers are probable a fetish thing, if the Sprinter's a rockin' ...
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: It's true, unfortunately. I've had bad experiences with durability on 2/3 re-activ shocks I've owned. Harsh knocking and cavitating have developed in less than a season's worth of x-country riding. Bummer. Trek and Fox insist it's normal.
  • 1 18
flag juansevo (Dec 3, 2021 at 15:13) (Below Threshold)
 Corvette? Pretty insulting to the Top Fuel. The Too Fuel is more like a Mercedes E63….a comfortable daily driver that can bitch slap vetted and chargers. It’s far more reliable and will last decades after a vette is retired to the scrap yard.

You must not be a car guy.
  • 3 1
 @Marquis: I'm with you. Besides, cleaning a bike is a good check routine to see if something needs to be fixed instead of finding out at the parking lot or worse yet, the trail... Sponsored by Huggies
  • 2 0
 @Marquis: it wasnt slighlty sarcastic it was completely sarcastic. I look after my things and enjoy cleaning my bike which seems to be controversial
  • 20 0
 @juansevo: Car guys would know the Mercedes suffers much worse depreciation and will end up in the scrap yard long before the Vette as small repairs greatly exceed the value of the car after 10 years. The Corvette will retain its value until it becomes a classic, and if it's written off, that LS might even find it's self swapped into the junkyard Mercedes as some 17 year old kid's budget project.
  • 3 0
 @juansevo: you must not be aware of the difference between car guys and just watching too much YouTube. I'd even have more respect for someone into stance cars.
  • 1 0
 Hmmm, na I'd say more like the Mazda Miata of the mountain bike world.
  • 3 5
 @takeiteasyridehard: No doubt Mercs are better quality and offer a more comfy ride than a bloody plastic Chevrolet.. but what the Vette has is soul, any car enthusiast can appreciate that. The E63 has no soul...and is usually driven by wanna be g's that buy older models with 200k miles on them in a desperate attempt to look cool when they barely have the iq to string a sentence together. The Vette looks way better, handles better, will remain a classic and has character. The e63 is what some rich old man buys, sells after a few years then some tosser buys one for cheap even when it's falling to bits in a desperate attempt to look cool.
  • 3 0
 I think the bike is overpriced to start with.
  • 2 0
 @juansevo: You should drive the c8 I think.
Also, I don't think of a vette (or any sports car really) as a reliable daily driver, but I certainly don't think of trek as any more reliable at all. Between blown shocks and cracked carbon frames, I think it's almost insulting the corvette more than anything.
  • 4 0
 What a world we live where this $11k Trek is a great value compared to bikes costing “50% more”.
  • 2 1
 More like Toyota or Honda. Built well but not flashy. Will go forever as long as it is well maintained.
  • 1 0
 @mannekepis: But the Corvette beat Porsche, again, at Le Mans this year. Agree 100% on the Bon Jovi thing though.
  • 69 0
 The model you tested definitely isn't the 9.8 GX AXS. It's got the Line Elite dropper from the GX model but that's a full XX1 AXS drivetrain, and the GX model doesn't come with the RSL bar/stem either. The price you listed is for the GX AXS model at least. But the bike you tested is quite a bit higher end.

It's also worth noting that the claimed weight for the stock GX AXS model is about 1.5 lbs heavier than the stock XX1 AXS model. Other notable differences include Line Pro vs Line Elite wheels, G2 RS vs G2 Ultimate brakes, and a SID Ultimate vs a SID Select+ fork.
  • 24 0
 Yup, this build is US $10499 in the Project One configurator...
  • 7 0
 Also something else to clarify from the video: the new Top Fuel comes in 7 sizes, but not in every model. For the 9.9 and 9.8 builds, it only comes in 5 sizes (S, M, M/L, L, XL); for the 9.7 it comes in 6 sizes (XS, S, M, M/L, L, XL); and the alloy models come in 6 sizes (S, M, M/L, L, XL, XXL). So depending on how tall you are, there's a Top Fuel for you, but not necessarily the one you want.
  • 70 0
 @seraph You're absolutely right and, quite frankly, I don't know what I was thinking. It clearly is the XX1 model. A few weeks of back-to-back bikes clearly going to my head. I've amended the article and we'll leave a note on youtube saying something along the lines of "Henry is an absolute lemon - this bike is the XX1, obviously".

I hope you like the video regardless and thanks for the heads up. Cheers.
  • 39 15
 "not your dad's xc bike" uhh you sure? 120 29'er megareach sooo siick imma young shreddy rad dad who doesn't ride boring xc bikes like the other dads
  • 43 0
 Is ‘dadbike’ the new downcountry? Only time will tell….
  • 163 2
 @sngltrkmnd: dadcountry
  • 61 1
 It’s like upduro, but with a bike trailer attachment on the back and diaper wipes in your swat box.
  • 13 0
 dadbodcountry. The downtube bulge perfectly mirrors my beer belly in the pedaling position.
  • 4 0
 I know several fathers who have these on order at our shop. Checkmate, Quinney.
  • 7 2
 @j-t-g: It's not that I'm making fun of XC or dads, but if your not ready to commit to fest jumps, your not ready to commit to fatherhood.
  • 18 1
 My dad bought this bike last year, its his first full suspension bike. He is 71. and really happy.
  • 21 0
 Man, this ain't my dad! This is a cell phone!
  • 6 0
 @brianpark: I like DownDaddy...but maybe that’s for another “sport”.
  • 59 1
 Message from Dad Country. "We are who you want to be, someday, if you are lucky. Still riding into our 50s, 60s and 70s. Able to afford to ride whatever the hell we want. Not caring about your judgements about where/when/how we ride."
  • 1 0
 Please, as someone who is out of the loop, please tell me what a "Dad-bike" would be. What qualifies a bike as a dad bike?
  • 19 1
 @codypup: So damn true. My dad is 65. He just got a brand new S Works epic evo, and promptly put giant bullhorn bar ends on it like it's still 1995. I give him a tremendous amount of grief for it (as does everyone at the shop he bought it at) but he does it his way, doesn't care what we think, and still loves getting out on his bike. The dude still shreds, and climbs way faster than most of my friends...
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: And mac-ride spacer!
  • 7 1
 @BenTheSwabian: The reference is a pejorative to people who are past the "Bro" stage, who may or may not wear their ball caps with flat brims, who generally have top end bikes, but may not ride the hardest lines, perhaps because they are still financially supporting their "Bro" offspring and can't afford to miss work.
  • 2 0
 Lol, remember how the two Mikes are basically in their early 40s and Henry is probably not much younger. And they agree that the bike is aimed at them. It's basically a modern dad bike, not that there's anything wrong with that.
  • 4 0
 @sngltrkmnd: dadbike to match my dadbod. Not quite in good enough shape to be competitive on the climbs, but can still throw down on the descents. Perfect.
  • 1 1
 @jgoldfield: Sorry pal, gonna need pics, or that definitely did not happen.
  • 8 0
 @jaycubzz:
Oh, it most definitely did happen.

imgur.com/a/OTdhGZr

This photo was accompanied by a text noting how wide bars have gotten these days.
  • 3 0
 Oh please Pinkbike, let's all do our best to make DadCountry a term that lives on beyond this comment section. You need to talk about it in the next podcast to get it out there Smile
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: you saw it here first folks
  • 4 5
 Rad Dad!!!! I love that equipment descriptor! Everyone in the outdoor sports world instantly know exactly what you mean: the stuff that makes charging hard as easy as possible, that middle-aged men ride hard at a sub-expert level.

Rossignol Enforcer skis
Hayden Shapes Hypto Crypto Surfboard
Yeti MTB's
Anything the Laird Hamilton uses or endorses

Not hatin' - dads got a right to get as rad too! Load it all up into the Sprinter and then stay home because the wife said the garden needs weeding!
  • 2 1
 Oh those young folks! You realize that fatherhood might be knocking pretty soon?
  • 3 1
 @hankj: as long as they are riding as hard as they can, who the f really cares.. and why?
  • 14 0
 @brianpark: How about making a Coen Brothers parody: 'Downcountry for old men' . Shot in Texas of course.
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: hummmmmm. You kinda need someone on the team to write from a Dad perspective.
  • 8 0
 @luckynugget: alternatively, once you commit to fatherhood you realise that ending up injured trying to impress your mates isn’t worth it. It’s really hard being a parent with broken bones.
  • 3 0
 @brianpark: can’t deny I’ve had legit daydreams about fabricating a full suss trailer so I can tow my toddler around on some mellow trails.
  • 2 0
 @codypup: message from child-free country. “We do all that in our early 30s while still limber and fast(ish), and we don’t need to find a babysitter to do it.”
  • 3 0
 @jgoldfield: Thats actually sick, thanks for the photographic evidence. Shout out to your dad.
  • 1 0
 @luckynugget: around here they ride Scott Genius and just leave the suspension locked lol
  • 2 2
 @sspiff: Good for you. Take a sec to thank your folks sometime for having a little different set of priorities
  • 2 0
 The hostility some people here have to dads wanting to go out and ride bikes is pretty fucking weird.
  • 1 2
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: dads need to stay home and raise their kids properly instead of indulging in selfish activities.
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: not sure if serious.
  • 3 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: I just thought you enjoyed being upset by internet trolling.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Good lord dude, you just described my life these days and I don't hate it.
  • 2 0
 @sngltrkmnd: If the trails are mellow, who needs a full sus trailer? BTW, no need to fab it yourself, they already exist. www.youtube.com/watch?v=s0LxdQ1vhHY
  • 1 0
 @codypup: ^ This!!!!
  • 28 9
 When is Trek just going to bail on the Knock Block that everyone simply HATES? First thing I did on my last 3 Treks was belt sand off the top of that chip that mounts on the top tube and the two little steps on the top spacer so I could run a different stem (belt sanding was a little cleaner than Henry's hacksaw approach.) Dump the KB!
  • 10 0
 "Trek Knock Block Headset Lockring Spacer" run any stem you'd like and you don't damage your downtube Wink
  • 23 3
 Ha, I quite like the knock block. Keeps my bars pointed the direction they were intended.
  • 30 2
 @mbl77: yeah, un-popular opinion: I like knock block.
  • 10 1
 Yeah-Knock Block and disposable rear shock are the 2 things I didn’t like about my Slash. And I loved that bike!!
  • 5 1
 Enjoy your smashed up downtube Smile
  • 6 0
 the knockblock on my remedy drove me crazy. the new knockblock on my new slash doesnt bother me. I still think it's one of the dumber idea in mountain biking and trek needs to drop that and the thru shaft. dunno why they're so stubborn about keeping tech that people dont like.
  • 1 0
 @blackercanyons: the new slash has removable knock block.....
  • 4 0
 @blackercanyons: how much do you think Trek has in the development of Thru-Shaft shocks? My guess is they need to justify the development cost.
  • 1 0
 @CrawfordMTB: I'm aware of that. like I said, they changed it and it doesn't bother me anymore. the angle is wider so it doesn't limit you on tight switchbacks or putting the bike on a tailgate.
  • 5 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: ironically, with all the thru-shaft hatred here, care to guess what isn't on this bike?
  • 1 0
 knock the knock bloc?
  • 3 0
 I hate it because it did not do its job and my fork hit my frame breaking the frame and knocking the top cap off the for which broke the damper. This was not covered under warranty. This is why I can't recommend trek to anyone despite the fact that the bike rode pretty damn well.
  • 3 0
 @zanda23: maybe you didn't have it set right.....
  • 1 1
 @CrawfordMTB: Have you considered a career in treks warranty dodging department? They are seeking people with gaslighting skills. I appreciate your concern but when you have knock block you feel where it is stopping whenever you pick up your bike or play with the bars. Plus they give you a nifty arrow. And they basically admitted their design flaw when they made all the new bikes have fork crown clearance on their downtube.
  • 1 0
 @zanda23: depends you think I should? only If I would be dying stupid claims ppl make for their slash 9.8

I have knock block on two bikes and know if it gets worn or is set up the tiniest bit off it will hit their frame
  • 2 1
 @CrawfordMTB: I get that guide pricing has you starry eyed for them but I think you are saying I am doing it wrong because of your bias. I am actually a competent mechanic with two years of shop experience. I own a North Shore rack so my fork crown is in my hand every time I take it off my car so I could easily tell if the adjustment was off. the fact of the matter was it was not making contact and I would notice if it was. Also as an armchair engineer (don't take this as seriously) but since the knock block is held in place by the stem and spacers the only way it is connected to the fork is by the stem bolts. Bikes of all brands can see forces that twist the bars so I see it as very likely that me hitting a compression hard could twist the fork from the bars and my continued weight downward pushed it into the frame. Either way As a mechanic at a local dealer said "Trek warranties defects not design flaws." Which is scummy of them because for the reasons I specified above They screwed me by standing by a bike that self destructed.
  • 1 0
 @zanda23: you work at a trek dealer and they still didn't warranty it? Problem is once they realized how big the design flaw is they would have so many claims
  • 1 1
 @CrawfordMTB: except for crashing and damaging something doesn't mean that there is a manufacturing or material defect. And working in a shop doesn't mean your warranty claim is automatically approved.

I've found Trek to be pretty generous when it comes to warranty claims over the past 6 years.. But, when it's apparent that its crash damage, and a crash replacement price is offered.
  • 1 0
 @lumpy873: didn't say it was
  • 1 0
 @CrawfordMTB: Bought it when i worked there, left and had the issue later
  • 1 0
 @lumpy873: That is the line of reasoning they used. I contend that a prooduct that "prevents" the fork from hitting the frame (the work prevent is a quote from the knock block release video, they should stand by it when that system fails. I would obviously not feel this way If I dumped it on a rock but if I hit a compression and the bike self destructed I personally. think it is something they should stand by
  • 1 0
 @zanda23: You'd have to have proof that it was properly installed for them to stand behind it since user error can make it not work
  • 2 1
 @zanda23: as a person who formerly worked in a warranty department and someone who understands how the knock block works, I would deny your claim based on what you posted here. Simply " hitting a depression " is like claiming JRA. The knock block assembly is under no load or stress until it hits full lock on the steering.

I'm not a real fan of knock block, but I've also had no issues with it over the past 2 years on my Slash..
  • 1 0
 @NorCalNomad: I understand that, but that just seems like a further issue with the system. Either way I don't want to own a bike that I have to take pictures of before each ride to prove that the knock block is in the exact right place. Either way I am happy I am off trek and don't plan to ever support them again.
  • 1 0
 @lumpy873: I see where you are coming from. Though it may be semantics, a bike that failed with both wheels still on the ground is a bit different than the a crash. I was still upright on the bike and the force of the knock block hitting the frame sent me over the bars. My thought is if they sent Florian Nicholai to race on it, it should handle what I do to it.

I don't hate knock block either, My issue is that it didn't do its job, and that they designed a downtube that couldn't be cleared by the fork.
  • 2 1
 @zanda23: I am willing to bet you were going over the bars before you hit the knock block.

Also, as far as it being good enough to handle a pro, remember those guys know what they are doing 99.9% of us posting here are hacks in comparison. Most of us will break more stuff than most pros because they don't tend to make the mistakes that we do. During my time in this game, I've seen way more broken stuff from schmoes than pros.
  • 1 1
 @lumpy873: JFC. No one cares. Shut the f*ck up, armchair quarterback.
  • 2 1
 @blackercanyons: yet here you are...
  • 2 1
 @lumpy873: yeah because unfortunately everytime you run your boring ass mouth, i get a notification about it because I commented on this thread a week ago. You're armchair quarterbacking someone else's crash that you didn't see and have no idea what actually happened, on a week old article on pinkbike. give it up.
  • 2 0
 @blackercanyons: you know , you don't have to click on the notification... You seem a little bit on edge... Maybe try decaf.
  • 1 1
 @lumpy873: and you don't have to sit here and write comment after comment mansplaining at someone you've never met about a bike you've never seen about a crash you didn't witness. get over yourself.
  • 2 0
 @blackercanyons: and you are the comment section overlord? All discussions must be approved by you? Gotcha..
  • 1 1
 @blackercanyons: Thanks for the reply. I do in fact get annoyed by people who's first instinct is to root around for something I did wrong.
  • 20 0
 My dads been dead for 11 years, but I think he would have ridden this bike given the opportunity.
  • 20 1
 I can't believe the Sid is still having bushing play issues. What's going on with that Rockshox?
  • 7 0
 Yup, I just bought a 2022 Top Fuel a couple months ago and mine had the same issue. Pretty disappointed
  • 2 3
 Biggest problem is the small volume of oil, flip it upside down or hang it by the front wheel, service it regular. I've had one for more than a year and it is still tight and knock free.
  • 6 1
 It's a turd. Mine was warrantied twice for bushings. Once new out of the box and again at 120 miles.
  • 12 1
 @Joecx: It's not a lubrication problem. Mine had bushing play out of the box. The first warranty replacement was lowers only, which still had bushing play. The second warranty replacement was a full new fork because I rode it with sloppy bushings for a few months and destroyed the stanchions. I now joke that the 50 hour 'lowers service' for the SID is a full lowers replacement, and the 100 hour service is a full fork swap. The only perk is that you never have to touch the damper.

Oh, if anyone wants a brand new, in-box SID Ultimate, you can find my listing in BuySell.
  • 1 0
 @Joecx: Low splash fluid and knock could be correlated. Oil takes up the space between bushing and stanchion and if it isn't there you can have knocking.
  • 2 0
 @half-man-half-scab: What does worn bushings feel like? Wobbly front end or stuttering under braking?
  • 7 0
 @jpcars10s: at least they would warranty yours. I bought a 120mm SID 35 select with the normal charger damper in April and rode it on my singlespeed. It had so much slop by September I pulled it off. Naturally you cant deal direct with RS and my LBS couldnt get anywhere either. Its a literal paperweight that I have been unable to sell for 160 bucks with full disclosure. Bought a DVO sapphire to replace. Its 500g heavier but better in every other way. I can call and talk to them directly, order replacement bushings (not 300 dollar lowers FFS SRAM). I will never butmy another RockShox product and I had previously loved several Pikes and Lyriks.
  • 4 1
 @AccidentalDishing: Even better than the warranty was my LBS replacing it with a Pike Ultimate at no charge. They also swapped the broken out of the box Reverb for a OneUp.
  • 2 1
 Probably still working through "new" old stock. Says 2022 but its really 2021... the 2022 stuff is on a boat of the cost of CA.
  • 3 0
 @DaneL: oh man, I have been wanting a Sid for a while...I guess not anymore Frown
  • 2 0
 @the-ultimate-cyclist: 1 month I’m on my 22 TF and bushing play was noticed almost immediately. 300 miles in and it’s not any worse but still present. Bummed but it happens.
  • 21 3
 5 Years ago this was the EX
  • 6 2
 I owned a previous-gen EX. Maybe two gens back? That bike wasn't great... This seems much more competent and fun to ride than an EX has ever been. These bikes got a lot better when they got rid of that floating shock design.
  • 2 2
 It's essentially an ex with 10mm less travel right now. Might be time for the EX to get a bump in travel and some geo tweaks.
  • 1 1
 @ranchitup: The 2020 model trek fuel ex is essentially this bike. I have put a Marzocchi z1 bomber on the front and it is a downright weapon. As confident as a slash but just slightly slower then the outgoing top fuel, It is a wonderful bike for 20-30 mile rides. Fox Factory 3 position DPS and works perfect. Thru shaft was a warranty nightmare and don't just take my word I worked for trek and we had a huge backlog of failures always in the pipeline.
  • 14 0
 @mikelevy The real question is you have a 20 mile 3500 ft vertical ride on moderately technical PNW trails, are you picking the Top Fuel, Epic EVO or Spur?

@mikekazimer are you ready to swap out your Spur for a new Top Fuel?
  • 7 0
 Totally agree. The current kings of this category seem to be Epic Evo for up-centric riding and Spur for down-centric. It would be great if they stated so explicitly and weighed whether or not any of the bikes from this year can dethrone either bike.
  • 14 0
 @Davemk, that's a really tough matchup. Having ridden all of them, I'd stick with my Spur, mainly because it's dialed in exactly how I want it. The snack box on the Top Fuel is sweet, and it does have a snappier, more efficient feel while pedaling compared to the Spur. Still, I do like the traction and the slightly less stiff feel of the Spur for the comfort and grip it delivers in rougher terrain.

You really can't go wrong with any of those option - one isn't head and shoulders above the other.
  • 4 0
 Buddy has the spur and said it improved his climbing from a 2019 anthem on a particularly difficult 1.3 mile 1200 ft climb on singletrack full of rocks and roots.
  • 1 0
 Good luck actually getting your hands on a Spur, maybe 2025 if you order one now.
  • 11 0
 This is basically a current gen Trek Fuel EX short-shocked with a 210x55 for 118mm of travel. Would of liked to see this bike light so there was a difference between the two. This is not light for a 'down country' bike-no longer a raceable weight for anyone serious about racing.
  • 6 2
 The weight of a downcountry bike should fall between an XC race bike and the higher end of the trailbike spectrum. So anywhere between 24 and 27 lbs IMO. This guy sits comfortably in that range.
  • 6 3
 @seraph: This bike with the stock tires (which most people leave on) and pedals is pushing 28lbs. That is a trailbike. And not a really light one either. Downcountry bike implies racing XC with it. >26lbs is heavy for an XC (downcountry or not) race bike. That said, this Top Fuel isn't a 'heavy' bike, but it's been a XC race bike forever--and that it is no more. Maybe Trek will roll out yet another bike that sits between the Supercaliber and the Top Fuel--but the jump between the two is pretty massive. A 60mm XC race bike up to a 28lbs (stock with pedals) 120mm trail bike. The FuelEX will be bumped up to 140 next model year. So maybe Trek will do a real 100mm XC/downcountry bike next.
  • 5 0
 @btjenki: Carbon everything and still 28lbs?
That's way too much.
  • 5 0
 @btjenki: Downcountry definitely doesn't imply racing. Modern downcountry bikes are lightweight trail bikes. Also the stock weight of a M/L Top Fuel XX1 AXS is 26.12 lbs. Add another 397g for a set of XTR Trail pedals and you're at 26.99 lbs. Not bad for a stock bike with 120mm front and rear.

Trek saw people buying Top Fuels and bumping up the fork travel, putting bigger tires on, and slaying singletrack, so they changed the bike up a bit to appeal to those riders. The Top Fuel really hasn't been a true XC race bike for a number of years.
  • 2 3
 @seraph: Lol, OK, so yes, if we get the $11,000 build it's 27lbs flat--A light trail bike. Which is what it is. And that's cool. All the rest of the builds are realistically 28lbs+ with pedals. Which puts them solidly in the 120mm trail bikes category. Which is fine, that's what they are. And they're great bikes. Point is Trek may/will bring out a real downcountry bike in the 100mm range. And to do that they will need to drop a pound from the frame (hard to do with the frame storage) and spec it with lighter wheels. Which is hard for them to do because with Bontrager wheels it's either the super expensive light wheels or the reasonably priced heavy carbon wheels.
  • 3 3
 @btjenki: I still take issue with you claiming that the Top Fuel isn't a "real downcountry bike". Downcountry is a new category that is still evolving. It's not defined by any set parameter yet, whether it be travel or weight or geometry. I don't think that a 100mm travel bike with a 65 degree head angle and a dropper post is going to be any more of a downcountry bike than what we see represented in these tests.
  • 3 0
 @seraph: I agree with you 100% and that's exactly what I did. I'd also argue that downcountry, isn't enduro bros looking for a second bike to ride with their girlfriends. a lot of us still have access to old school tech., punchy singletrack, steep lines cut into the side of the hill with a dirt bike tire that bottom out in a gully and go straight up. this kind of riding used to be called cross country, then it became "trail" and now apparently it's downcountry. What concerns me is now downcountry seems to mean banked, flow trails in pedal and descend networks.
  • 1 0
 @seraph: well...not when you have to buy the $10k version to get to 27lbs. I'm still unsure where the mass is coming from.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: That massive down tube!
  • 1 1
 @seraph: for $10K XC race bikes hit 22-23 lbs range. Trek is too heavy for the $$$
  • 12 0
 Stop pretending a 28# bike with ISCG tabs is an XC bike. It's not.

Sincerely,
2018 Trek Top Fuel RSL owner dreading the day he cracks the frame.
  • 8 1
 Trying to understand this cult like hate for knock block. Are these people complaining constantly trying bar spins off of every little jump on a regular trail ride? I don’t like it or hate it, it’s never really bothered or effected me.
  • 2 0
 I think the frustration with it comes down to a few things.

First, it was introduced as necessary for straight downtubes and increased stiffness, which Trek thankfully walked back and made room for fork crowns on their new bikes. If it'd been launched as an optional, removable thing on their XC bikes with a message of "hey if you're racing and you want to avoid damaging your cables when you crash, we have this handy rotation stop," I don't think anyone would have minded.

Second, it's added complication and weight for (as you say) a thing that generally doesn't affect the rider one way or the other. I'm not an engineer, but if you move the couple grams that Knock Block weighs into a thicker, more typically shaped downtube instead, I bet it's almost a wash.

And finally, for people who do want a rotation stop on their bike, I think there are way better, simpler ways to do it (see the way Canyon does it on the Lux, for example).
  • 1 0
 I don't get it either. Both Specialized Evo and Scott RC could use this. Why would you not want pay $6k and get a top tube knick from controllers the first time you lay the bike down in a turn?
  • 1 0
 It's annoying when transporting a bike. Won't sit flush against a tailgate pad on a truck and won't slide into a hatchback like other bikes will.
  • 9 0
 Pinkbike, can you please give us frame weights? Even manufacturer's claimed weight would be nice.
  • 1 0
 Trek claims 6lbs--and the usually publish weight with shock--however, in this case I think it might be without shock.
  • 3 0
 Mine is fully decked out in light weight XC parts and is barley under 26lb.
  • 12 4
 everyones waiting for the Murmur, admit it.
  • 5 0
 Waiting on the blur, to see if it rides as good as it looks
  • 3 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: I demoed the exact config on test and SC's description of the Blur is spot on. Absolute rocket going up and very capable going down, but doesn't pretend to be a trail bike. Looking forward to Henry/Levy's take on it.
  • 4 0
 As a dad, who’s been riding mounting since the early 90s and always on a hard tail, I’ve been recently considering a susser to add to my quiver. This thing seems just about right, except I think I want more front travel. I have a Rootdown as my current main MTB and I run it with 150mm up front. I think I want something along the lines of 130 rear 150 front. I have been kicking around the idea of a Reeb Squeeb or a GG Smash, maybe a Banshee Prime or a Nicolai Saturn 14. All of those spec a longer fork. I really don’t like the ascetic of most carbon bikes because of the massive downtubes, I so used to a steel frame with its svelt looking tube set. The Fuel EX is just so bulky looking.
  • 3 5
 just get a Scott Spark and you will be about 10yrs ahead of every other brand, also you get a 130mm front shock
  • 5 0
 I run a 130mm fork on my Top Fuel with 115mm in the rear. It slackens the head angle to about 65 degrees, lengthens the wheelbase, and raises the BB a bit. It feels great with 10mm more travel up front.
  • 3 0
 @Theonelazarus: The Top Fuel 9.9 XTR comes with a 130mm Fox Factory.
  • 2 0
 Cotic might be up your alley! Lovely looking things.
  • 1 1
 @Theonelazarus: I'd be all over it except the Euro-low front end, particularly in the larger sizes. Not gonna race so I'd rather sit up
  • 2 1
 130 rear with 150 front.. easy, Nuke Reactor. In the flats, I used it with XC tires on cross country trails(not on xc races though); in/on the mountains, with double downs, I used it as an enduro-ish bike. Did both jobs very good.., the enduro part having a little more assurance; it never hold me back on anything.. instead/in fact, I was holding the bike back, my un-fit/skilled body beeing the weak part.
As long as you know what you are getting, the Reactor is one of the good bikes you can get.
  • 1 0
 The smash boogies, all around fun and climbs like a beast. I have an alloy gg currently set up mega trail but the smash is an awesome bike.
  • 4 0
 there is something like it;s great about the 3 of you, nice talking points. as a side note, you not in the 3rd grade, can you change a little bit the enviroment? be on a couch, or in the forest or smth, the visual scenario is like your at school Smile sorry for beeing franc
  • 19 12
 Those bars.... Another fad that needs to die!
  • 3 0
 I found Henry's comment about the bike being almost too long (at least seated) really interesting. One of the things that Trek does well is the ML size which, well it splits the difference between L and M, which is pretty great for someone like me at 5'10". My preferred reach is right around 465 and Trek's ML nails it. Would've been interesting if they tested that size.
  • 2 3
 Yea, bikes are getting too long in some cases. 6'0" EWS level riders would probably be torn between the MEDIUM/Large and Large models in the Trek lineup. A 'normal' rider has less skill and speed so they should be on a relatively shorter bike than an EWS racer. So, yea 465 reach for 5'10">6'0" is probably ideal.
  • 6 0
 @btjenki: hmm I’d say the opposite. EWS riders rather size down then up. Longer bikes give you more stability. Ride went from a L to M from SB55 to SB150 which is a 445 reach at 6 foot.
  • 1 3
 @ESKato: Definitely... from experience, 5'10 - 6' guys should size down to a Medium (typically 460mm reach now a days). Learned the hard way (costly way) that the tenancy for LBS's to recommend Large is based on race posture, not fun posture. If you want to be bent over in attack mode for your entire ride... go with the Large.
  • 2 0
 @Baller7756: larger bikes keep unskilled riders plowing through the chunder with stability
  • 4 0
 @ESKato & @Baller7756 : I think you misunderstood my point-I was saying that 6' EWS riders would probably choose the Medium/Large (smaller) bike with 465 reach. As @Dogl0rd said, larger bikes keel less skilled riders plowing through tough terrain. Good riders tend to not ride such huge bikes as fashionable these days.
  • 6 0
 @henryquinney "looks like an Ellsworth" is my vote for field test reviewer comment gold.
  • 6 0
 This is not a downcountry bike. It is a trail bike that is too short on travel.
  • 5 1
 I'd take this bike over my Spur. In fact I might have to search out a frame. It's really efficient, has storage, has the UD, and looks amazing.
  • 4 0
 That's a surprising take from you. I tracking this shootout closely for options should I not find a Spur soon. Feel free to expand on your thoughts as I know you like your Spur.
  • 1 2
 Nah... you must be kidding. Or suffering from your privilege owning a Spur. Or are not using the Spur as intended.
  • 2 1
 @Baller7756: duh wut!? My Spur privilege? Lol
They are the essential the same bikes however the Top Fuel improves specifically on the few shortcomings I see with the Spur.
Since I can sell the Spur for exactly what I paid for it, and I really like bikes, everything is on the table.
  • 2 0
 look at kazimers comment on his spur further up
  • 1 2
 @SunsPSD: They are just on different tiers (in the same segment). Trek is a big box bike... wont be worth half its MSRP in a couple years. You already acknowledged that the Spur holds its value... and it does so for very good reason.

To each his own of course... if the cubby hole offsets the quick depreciation, and the knock block, and the other proprietary components, then go ahead and sell that Spur.
  • 3 1
 Modern Treks ride great, but the through shaft rear shocks need to go. Killed 3 in a year and a half.

PB classifieds always have a bunch available….for good reason.

Otherwise, I’d say bump the fork up 10mm and this thing seems ready to rip.
  • 8 0
 This bike doesn't have through shaft
  • 2 0
 If anyone is reading this review thinking either:
a) I should trade in my old top fuel for a new one
Or
b) Man I wish I could buy a much cheaper second hand top fuel from the classifieds, but that geometry sucks

You’ll be needing a 9point8 Slack-r headset - I took option b) and hot piss, it is my new favourite dad-country whip
  • 5 0
 @kaz are any of these better than the Spur?
  • 1 0
 Bike looks sick! Probably fun as hell and handles rough terrain without the heavy pig feeling of many “enduro” bikes. I think this is where it’s all heading (aside from e-bikes). I’m getting this bike when it’s available in 2025.
  • 3 0
 Curious there thoughts of the Trek vs Scott Spark Trail ....although I am not a fan of the Scott Nude and lock outs on every bike.
  • 2 0
 I love the fully internal cable routing, but... i only see one hole on the right side. What about people who run their brakes the opposite way, are we forever cursed to ugly cable routing??
  • 1 0
 why you said that Knockblock isn't as well executed as other brand's versions... you are comparing it to blocklock which the lower cap turns inside the frame and make the system useless? At least the one from Trek seems that works
  • 2 0
 Shame inflation has made this bike stupidly expensive with poor components. Nearly 5k and it doesn't even come with branded shimano brakes for the 9.7. My 2021 slash 9.7 came with GX and code r's for a grand less than this.
  • 3 0
 Also that rock roll at 10:00 in the video was properly gnarly. Sick riding there.
  • 3 0
 Internal storage is the perfect place to add some ball bearings or marbles to your buddies bike . Smile
  • 3 0
 It’s a fast easy way, but the best way is inside the stem with a dab of grease. Angry Bike Mechanic has some clever ones too, add a 2nd star nut and hide one in-between, or in the fork crown when the uppers are out.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Take a length of a 700c tube, tie off one end, add desired number of ball bearings, tie off the other end, insert inside handlebar. Easy weight added without a noise giveaway.
  • 2 0
 @seraph: isn’t the point to add an intermittent annoying noise that can never be found? Ball bearings with some grease in the stem is the best I’ve found. They rattle on the trail and then stick to the side of the stem in the workshop, never to be found.
  • 2 2
 Dropping random crap in exposed holes is one thing, but bro you unscrew anything on my bike and you’re getting a cassette wrench to the face I don’t care who you are
  • 1 2
 @fewnofrwgijn: are you as fun at parties as you sound? :-)
  • 2 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: ooooooh the starnut one and the fork crown are delightfully cruel
  • 1 1
 Really curious to see how this compares with a Transition Spur. Look at the geo charts for the two bikes. Seriously looks like a copy/paste job. The only very slight differences are in the bb height, stack, and wheelbase. But we’re talking tiny tiny differences. At least in a size large the two bikes are exactly the same in reach, seat angle, head angle, and chainstay. Of course the Transition has a much lower stand over height. Given that a just a year ago in the Field Test the Spur was a bike that seemed to dump this category on its head and redefine what a downcountry bike can do it’s funny to me to see people comment and crap on this bike.
  • 3 0
 If I was wealthy I'd buy my dad this bike.
  • 1 0
 What's with this derailleur cage which you run over in the intro? It's an illuminati hidden message? Did I win something for spotting it? Smile
  • 10 1
 It was a random derailleur cage we found on the trail so we made Matt Beer nose bonk it, as you do.
  • 1 0
 Very impressed with the lack of flex in the head tube and the SID fork - handled the drip to flat better than some enduro bikes over the last few years!
  • 4 2
 The only issue is that it doesn't feel like a stiff fork because the bushings are so sloppy.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: well, only if you have a defective one.
Mine is a year old and running sweet.
  • 3 0
 When are bikes going to get shorter again?
  • 3 0
 2025 or 2026… shorter, steeper and more fun.
  • 2 1
 This seems like a decent bike, but originally living in Wisconsin where Trek is located everyone had a Trek. It just kind of turned me off of the brand
  • 2 0
 Thank you Trek for speccing even the alu frames with the Bontrager Doob Tube
  • 1 0
 Good review. You guys have a nice chemistry. Good mix of humor and info. Waiting for the element review to break the tie. Perfect bike for the BC bike race on my bucket list.
  • 3 0
 Seems like an Epic Evo without the ability to get to XC weight?
  • 2 1
 Gonna have to post this on every PB review it seems - what is the ‘actual’ seat angle? This is a super relevant stat for many riders.
  • 2 0
 Every review I've read about the SID fork talks about bushing play. I'd rather have a Pike and a little extra weight.
  • 1 0
 I honestly love this trio, great banter between them and it's generally just great watching. What a creepy comment - recedes back into the bushes like Homer Simpson.
  • 3 3
 So on the Ups it was hard to get your weight over the bars, but on the downs your weight is too low and over the bars... This bike sucks going BOTH ways.
  • 3 0
 they should be on the m/l size; or run more stem spacers
  • 7 4
 @housem8d: Yep. As per usual, Pinkbike testers are testing bikes that are too big for them.
  • 5 3
 @jwdenver, Henry is 6' tall - I'd say the size large is very appropriate for his height. It's also the size that Trek recommends.
  • 3 0
 @jwdenver: you must have missed the hubbub over the Knolly Warden LT ;-)
  • 1 0
 @toooldtodieyoung: lol that was the one exception
  • 2 0
 I'm a dad and I want this bike.
  • 2 0
 If only the knock block would develop bushing play like that Sid.
  • 1 0
 Trek wising up with a threaded BB, will consider one of these in the future.
  • 1 0
 Which adds to this heavy weight "XC" bike... Nothing wrong with a good press fit bb if you have the know how and tools to service properly.
  • 1 0
 RockShox forks are increasingly Race Day. Lasting just a few days. It's worse than the CR125's 2T engine.
  • 2 0
 Trek is getting stale other brands are kicking their butts in designs
  • 3 1
 Its a real let down what Trek did to this bike.
  • 1 0
 I know Trek doesn't get a lot of cool points, but they have the nicest paintjobs of anyone.
  • 1 0
 The weight indicated is not the right one.
Trek said it’s 27,6 for this model in gx axs
  • 2 0
 What makes this a $3700 frameset?
  • 2 0
 SID bushing play still nice
  • 1 0
 the only and rather significant drawback is that it is impossible to install a large 0,75-1L bottle of water
  • 1 0
 Henry, Thank you for spitting out most of the marbles and embracing Her Majesty's English.
  • 1 1
 Great. Fork manufacturers didn't yet learn how to glue a steerer tube properly, and now we're stuck with bushing play as well... Goddamnit, get things sorted out!
  • 1 0
 I don't even bother servicing my SID fork anymore, just get new lowers every couple months courtesy of SRAM.
  • 1 0
 First 6 seconds is the best bike review ever
  • 1 0
 i am almost angry for not showing geometry charts...
  • 1 0
 since when did 10k bikes become acceptable?
  • 1 0
 Surprised that saddle slid all the way forward don't make the cons list
  • 1 0
 How does this compare to an Ibis Ripley
  • 1 0
 Henry, how does compare to the Kona Hei Hei?
  • 1 0
 Hehehe country part
  • 1 0
 looks good! fun video!
  • 1 0
 130 fork please?
  • 4 6
 KNOCKBLOCK IS A STUPID FEATURE ANYWAYS
  • 2 4
 Its like they are incredibly hard headed and stubborn. Nobody likes it... no other manufacture uses one... its a solution to a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 3 1
 No, IT is the problem. Can't wait for someone to create a solution, then have to buy their 'special space grade' instrument to solve the issue of the knockblock. You know, when you could just remove it entirely.
  • 1 0
 @Waldon83: What is the actual problem that you're referring on?
  • 1 0
 @nonihei: having Knockblock is the actual problem.
I’m joking in saying that someone will come up with a solution that makes them profit, rather than just not having knocmblock.
  • 3 1
 @Baller7756: i like it. you can run shorter cables.
  • 1 0
 @mm732: well you probably have never ever ridden a switchback with it. its awful
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