Field Test: Giant Trance Advanced 29

Dec 11, 2018
by Daniel Sapp  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Giant Trance Advanced 29

115mm of travel coupled with a progressive geometry and aggressive component spec.

Words by Daniel Sapp, photography by Trevor Lyden



Now in its seventh generation, the Giant Trance has been reimagined with less travel, 29" wheels, and much more progressive geometry than the prior version.

The bike delivers 115mm of rear travel that's paired with a 130mm fork, which gives it a 66.5-degree head angle, 74.5-degree seat angle, 435mm chainstays, and a reach of 442mm (size medium). The Trance still uses the Maestro suspension layout that was found on the 27.5" version, but there's now a carbon upper link, which is said to save weight while increasing stiffness and strength.

There is an aggressive component spec that, on the top of the line build, uses DVO suspension, and throughout the line riders will find Maxxis Minion tires, wide 35mm diameter handlebars, and SRAM 1x drivetrains.

Trance Advanced 29 Details

Intended use: trail
Rear wheel travel: 115mm
Wheel size: 29''
Frame construction: carbon fiber
Head angle: 66.5-degrees
Chainstay length: 435mm
Sizes: S, M (tested), L, XL
Weight: 26.7 lbs / 12.1 kg
Price: $8,715 USD
More info: www.giant-bicycles.com
In addition to frame and geometry updates, Giant partnered with DVO suspension on the top model of the Trance Advanced. It's rare to see a company, especially a large brand like Giant, go with a suspension company that's not Fox or RockShox on a high-end bike. This relationship stems from their race team partnership, and Giant say that it allowed them to be very hands-on and involved in the development and tuning of the Trance Advanced's suspension.





Climbing

A 115mm bike should pedal uphill exceptionally well and feel more like a cross-country race bike than a 160mm travel enduro rig, and the Trance does just that. With that being said, the seat tube angle is a little bit slack at 74.5-degrees. For me, with a long inseam, I found myself a bit over the back of the bike and squatting into the travel just a little when I had the pedaling platform wide open. There was enough support to keep the bike from going too deep into its travel while pedaling, although that compression switch can come in handy on longer, smoother climbs.

While I did at times wish I was a little more forward on the bike, I always found generous amounts of traction while heading uphill. The suspension stays very active, and with the short 115mm of travel, the Trance is easy to put right where you want it without feeling bogged down. For a bike that can handle some pretty aggressive terrain when pointed down, it doesn't feel held back at all when you're going up. It's a confident climber and a bike that won't wear you out in technical, undulating terrain.





Descending

Descending is where the Trance Advanced 29 really stands out. As a 115mm bike, the geometry helps it ride as if it has a little more than that in terms of travel. The other factor in keeping it a confident and capable descender is the parts spec. A Minion DHF/DHR II combo on wide rims, 800mm wide handlebars, and good brakes give the Trance some bite. The bike is stable and quick. It manages trail feedback well as long as you stay light and ride with some finesse over the top of the trail rather than going for the 'plow and pray' approach.

The Trance's small bump sensitivity is excellent, and the bike does a great job of smoothing out small and medium-sized hits. There's plenty of end-stroke ramp up - that last little bit of travel takes some work to get into, which is a good trait given that there's only 115mm of travel to work with.

As far as turning and picking lines goes, the relatively slack angles, short chainstays, and a 44mm offset fork help the bike corner impressively well. It's fast in and out of turns, when carving from one side of the trail to the other, and while pedaling up and over obstacles. The bottom line is that this is one lively and fun machine.
Shock issues?

The original DVO shock that came on our test bike failed, apparently due to a seal issue. Giant and DVO say the shock was an early test model and that it was not supposed to be on the bike we were testing. While "pre-production" is a common refrain when products fail, we did get the bike prior to its release and Giant supplied a new shock that we have been riding for several months now with no problems.

Mistakes happen, but it's worth mentioning and we'll update this if we have any issues with the replacement shock.

The Trance is for the rider that wants to ride a variety of terrain on a bike with the ability to get in the air and play around. It's totally capable of taking on more technical terrain (withing reason), but still efficient enough to prevent former XC racers – who finally realized that riding bikes for fun is better than vomiting and cramping on a weekly basis – from feel like they're slugging around a bike built for dude-bros that shuttle short climbs and wear goggles with half shell helmets. It's a versatile bike I would choose for a large number of locations and variety of terrain.





Pros

+ Supple, effective suspension performance
+ Parts spec won't hold anyone back
+ Progressive head tube angle & reach for the category
Cons

- DVO dampers not proven (yet)
- Uncomfortable seat
- Seat tube angle could be steeper



308 Comments

  • + 283
 Down-country AF
  • + 43
 I'm down with country.
  • + 96
 Waiting for up-duro bikes
  • + 24
 "Down country", the new "Over Mountain".
  • + 4
 @danielsapp: Downieville!?!? haha Probably a great bike for most trails!
  • + 50
 @Grmasterd: I've been pushing hard for upduro.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: There ya have it! lmao
  • + 5
 @brianpark it’s called a shuttle service.
  • + 2
 That's some metal AF carbon right there.
  • + 34
 I love that PB has a female on this field test.
  • + 75
 @MrDiamondDave: That's me! Big Grin
  • + 14
 as long as we're all clear that "down-country" is a joke, it's all good. Just be careful, because Super Boost Plus.
  • + 12
 NWO conspiracy - New Wheel Order - Giant now makes 29ers after making a bold statement that 27.5 was the only future. Funny!
  • + 3
 How did someone win both the leatt helmet and the polygon bike?
  • + 6
 @phile99: its becoming less and less of a joke.
  • + 4
 @phile99:
Down country wouldn't be a joke if someone put out a solid down country bike so I could buy it.
  • + 3
 @phile99: Coming soon to a Pivot near you: Super Boost TURBO!
  • + 1
 Fight'n words.
  • + 3
 Australia?
  • - 1
 I'm going Down on Country
  • + 2
 @bennorth: must have been very good this year
  • + 4
 @phile99: A german news site used 'down-country' to describe a bike and I'm pretty sure that they didn't use it as a joke!
  • + 0
 Don't know about you guys but I'm going Down Mountains, not Countryside
  • + 2
 @onek5: I bet Sarah LOVES Reno.
  • + 2
 @bennorth: That was a copy/paste mistake (sorry!) - it's been corrected now. It is possible for one person to win two prizes, but highly unlikely!
  • + 0
 @RollinFoSho: yeah bunch of idiots!
  • + 4
 @danielsapp: Honest question - how is it that over 4 years after the Process 111, Smuggler, and Following, the concept of a short-ish travel, capable, slack geometry 29er trail bike is something noteworthy? The original Tallboy proved 29ers didn't have to suck; those three proved they could be downright fun and way more capable than you'd think. If you google reviews (including those on Pinkbike) of those three bikes when they first came out, you'll find a lot of what's talked about here in this review - feels like there's more suspension than the actual numbers, confidence inspiring, playful, good at technical climbing, great for all around riding, and so forth. It's all true, and it's always getting lost in the rush to bigger and beefier bikes, but just because it took Giant almost two product cycles to catch up doesn't mean it's a new thing.

These kinds of bikes are remarkably awesome -mine is fun anywhere from tame beginner trails to the bike park, and even on the local pump track. They truly do represent an awesome one bike quiver for a huge range of riders, styles, and terrains. So can we finally dispense with the surprise that this should be so and just focus on which of them do which parts of the job best? And while it's not sexy - how about a comparison of all the current bikes in that niche; yes, the Smuggler is not new this year, for example - but I'd argue that just because the Giant is all new this year says more about it being late to the party than having made the rest of the segment obsolete.
  • + 1
 @sarahmoore: Thanks for conformation
  • + 8
 @g-42: biggest reason? Those bikes (Tallbot v2 being the exception) were all tanks. The 111 was an 8lbs frame, and the Smuggler, even with a carbon frame is nearly 7lbs. New Tallboy isnt all that light, either.

The Giant is the first of these aggressive short travel bikes that is actually as light as some XC bikes (Epic Evo). And for $4500 you can get a Carbon frame and Carbon wheels.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: great point. The other common point and generally one of the only complaints about all those aforementioned short travel trail bashers is the weight. They're rarely under 30lb and more commonly 32-34lb so the giant being sub 27lb is definitely worth pointing out.
  • + 1
 @Patrick584: that is a sign of the impending apocalypse....
  • + 1
 @markar: I wouldn’t call all the people trying to start another genre of mountain bikes called down-country idiots but..
  • + 172
 If *every* trail bike feels like it has more travel than it does, maybe you guys just need to recalibrate.
  • + 7
 Wise words
  • + 10
 They didn't say it about the Process
  • + 1
 Travel sits deep but still have plenty of travel.
  • + 1
 @Dogl0rd: They did about the Process 111, about two product cycles ago. And then they said about the current 153 29er that it feels like it has less travel than it does where you'd want that sort of thing (technical climbing, playful riding on not-quite-enduro terrain), but has the squish you need when things get rowdy. Which was interesting - I'd be curious to ride it back to back with my 111 to see if it delivers the same versatility in not-fully-epic riding but adds that extra little cush and margin for when you go for it.

But yes, it's sometimes like that whole revolution of slacker short travel 29ers never happened, so now they get awfully excited about Giant finally catching up.
  • + 63
 So weird how every time some component breaks in a bike test it's because it was a prototype that should have never left the shop
  • + 33
 For what it's worth - I along with a couple dozen other people spent two days riding the bike pre-launch in Europe with no issues whatsoever. After the shock was swapped out on the test bike we had in Whistler we had no issues. It's definitely a common phrase we've heard before but seeing the shock pulled apart and several of us putting in a lot of time on the bike, I do want to believe Giant in this case. We'll keep riding the bike hard and if any issues come up, we'll give an update.
  • + 6
 @danielsapp: Yeh for sure. I don't mean to discredit the review or Giant or DVO, the article even calls out the fact that this is a common refrain. Kudos for following up!
  • + 3
 @danielsapp: Is it approved for Pisgah? I love riding in NC every chance I get and I currently have a '16 Giant Reign Advanced 1, which is a great bike and very underrated IMHO. Could this Trance be my future replacement?
  • + 4
 @Tearsforgears: For me, it would be one of my top choices. It's a lot less bike than the Reign which is fine with me but I am pretty picky in line selection. If you just plow then it's going to be a rough time out here.
  • + 5
 @danielsapp: Or.... be like me & just Sell your road bike that you always stare at, but are too scared to ride around the drunk drivers in Napa, & buy this as the alternative option to riding the Reign SX everyday on trail's that don't really call for 160-170 travel..! -2 Bikes to School them All-!!! ;p haha Bike problems hacked!
  • + 4
 @Jaybirdy: Yep - More bikes is always a good decision.
  • + 6
 @danielsapp: Thanks guy's for this review!! It was "My" most awaited review of the year besides the SB150! & I was not let down at all! Great Bike Comeback by Giant!
  • - 4
flag bohns1 (Dec 10, 2018 at 16:44) (Below Threshold)
 @Tearsforgears: not with that crazy slack seat angle it shouldn't be!
  • + 6
 @Jaybirdy: Don't be so insensitive. They aren't drunk, they're texting.
  • + 2
 Wonder if any of those “test model” shocks ended up on bikes being sold. Certainly makes me think twice...
  • + 1
 @kosmoHR: hahah.. right!?! Must just be Drunk Txting Drivers!?! Whyyyy!!?? They are controlling my future and fate to make me consider selling my TCR for a DownCountry XC Trail Enduro thingamabob!! Haha.. Thanks Giant!!!
  • + 4
 Many bikes that are sent to journalists are preproduction because companies want press for their new product launches...
  • + 5
 I've been riding DVO Suspension for the last year, I haven't had any issues with either my forks( I've had two) or my shock. So far so good, reliability wise. As for ride Quality, Wow am I ever impressed.
  • + 0
 @skelldify: can I rub the jewel on your belly button? Wink
  • + 27
 You know you can slide that seat forward, right?
  • + 16
 Yep, and testers ended up with it much more forward than that by the end of the Field Test - the profile shots were taken before the riding really began.
  • + 25
 @mikekazimer: As someone who puts great trust in scholarly articles, I wish to see unrefuted and minimally biased evidence that suggests that variations in seat position alone improve a bicycle's character, whether in speed, comfort, stability, or suspension kinematics. I support the Oxford Comma.
  • + 15
 @mikekazimer: do you ever think how wild it is that not even a year ago the bike that won bike of the year now is considered trail/enduro has an offset fork that is robbing us of our preciouse mechanical trail a head angle not nearly slack enough to be remotely stable and a seat angle so slack its shocking that we can even ride up hill?

...crazy...
  • + 2
 @A-HIGHLY-EDUCATED-PROFESSIONAL: nice try, @ezrathedog
  • + 3
 @A-HIGHLY-EDUCATED-PROFESSIONAL: is your education geared towards polishing white mouth bone protrusions?
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: Does everybody who tests mountainbikes have tiny femurs? You know sitting straight on top of the bottom bracket makes knees unstable causing potential injury.
  • + 1
 @mikekazimer: I have, an see many bikes with the seat shoved forward but, do the rails flex properly, as designed with that set up? Genuine question. I'm currently looking at Ti rails in the Jan sales for a bit more comfort
  • + 0
 And the slack seat angle is an issue in a medium... Imagine an XL!
  • + 1
 @OnTheRivet: why would it cause instability?
  • - 3
 @A-HIGHLY-EDUCATED-PROFESSIONAL: Go ride one of the new yetis and you'll see.. Sure u can slide the seat forward but why mitigate reach and no, I don't want to utalize a longer stem!
  • + 0
 @bohns1: See what? The new Yetis are, for a 'mainstream brand', relatively steep in the seat post category, as in they do not have an actually slack and offset/bent seat tube. Which means the actual seat tube angle will be somewhat close to the advertised one regardless of the rider's size.

Unlike most other frames out there, Trance 29 included.
  • + 8
 @mikekazimer:
I see this stuff about seat angles all the time in reviews, but it always sounds like you’re just trying to find something to write.

If we assume that 76 degrees is steep enough, then the difference between a bike with a 74.5 degree seat angle and one with a 76 degree one is about 15mms in terms of saddle to bars distance. Otherwise known as ‘in the tester’s head’.

I really don’t believe anyone is sensitive enough to bike setup to be able to notice a difference that’s under the 3% mark. I suspect any apparently differences of this kind are just confirmation bias.

JP
  • + 1
 @Primoz: huh? My point... The seat tube on the Yetis are 77d... Some of the steepest out other than say pole or mondaker... Can I have some of what's in your pipe please?
  • + 1
 @bohns1: That was my point, did you mean to say Yetis are steeper and thus should be more efficient or that Yetis are supposedly steeper but don't give a difference in feel. Looks like it's the first option.

As for my ramblings further in the comment, it's just a general observation about things maybe getting better. Only for brands to kick in the dark again with a horribly bent seat tube (like Whyte is doing with some of their bikes for example).

@Jprestidge if you're around the M/L frame size, so 'an average joe', you can take the seat tube angle valuse like they come, since your seat is relatively close to the top of the head tube in height. And that's where the angles are measured. Once you go towards XS/XXL territory, the story changes - the smaller the frame, the steeper the angle and the larger the frame, the slacker the angle due to the way the frames are shaped. And the difference gets much more noticeable than 15 mm. I'd say you could easily get a difference of between 5 and 10 cm between a major brand's bike and the Pole Machine, wich has an insanely steep seat tube.

The other thing with all of this is that in the case of the (X)XL rider,t he weight is then further back, squishing the rear suspension on the ascents even more. Slackening the seat tube angle additionally. And you geat a seriously slack seat angle and that weird feeling.
  • + 0
 @Jprestidge: The seat angle on this bike is 74.5 at exactly one place in its height, and that's at a relatively low point. Anytime you raise the seat above that point, you're dropping the angle. At full extension for a tall guy on an XL, it's probably more like 70 deg. If you think this doesn't matter, you haven't ridden (ie. pedaled uphill) a Transition, Pole, Yeti, Geometron, etc, lately. (or my favorite - Sick Bicycle's Gnarpoon)
  • + 2
 @powderturns: I take it you have? Glad to hear there actually is a difference. Based on the calculations, the Bird AM9 i'm going to buy should be between 75 and 76 ° at the actual seat height i need. My 2015 Reign currently looks to be at about 72°...
  • - 1
 @the angle is referenced to the ground so how does it change at difference heights? The effective Tt length varies with height. But the angle is fixed.
  • + 3
 @lifted-d: mmm, pretty sure it is referenced to the center of the BB. If the seat tube is not inline with the BB, the the effective angle changes as the seat is raised or lowered.
  • + 2
 @TheBearDen: Don't forget that the cockpit is also so cramped it's uncomfortable and "unnatural". And that's for a bike only a year old. Some people claim to ride bikes older than that, but I don't see how it's even possible.
  • + 2
 @lifted-d: It's referenced to the wheelbase line so it's parallel to the ground. The line, to which the seat tube angle is measured to fromt he wheelbase goes from the BB to the intersect of the effective top tube and the seat tube/post. This gives you an effective, virtual, etc. seat utbe angle, that is used in marketing. This value is true only for riders, that have a seat height around the stack height (so mostly between 70 and 75 cm of inseam length, ballpark).

Actual seat tube angles are, in most cases, slacker than this measurement due to an offset at the BB (if the tube is straight and goes all the way towards the BB. Here the seat tube centerline doesn't pierce the BB axis of rotation, but goes towards the ground more forwards. Example: Santa Cruz) or due to the seat tube being bent (for example, there's a vertical section coming off the BB that then bends backwards and has the seat post inserted - most bikes go for this solution nowadays. Example: Trance 29 or any other full susses Giant has made in the past few years).

As mentioned, all is well if your inseam is around 70 cm. When you get to much longer (90+ cm inseams, for riders in the XL category), there's a noticeable difference between the advertised seat tube angle and the actual seat tube angle, which would be measured to the line between the BB and the top of the seat where you actually seat (where the seat post line would pierce the seat - sliding the seat on the rails changes this angle again).

With your center of gravity being higher (since you are taller), the weight transfer when going uphill will be greater already (moment being a ratio of force and lever with the lever being larger here). It's a safe assumption taller riders will also be heavier, so you also increase the force. You then give to a rider, that is already twice at a disadvantage another disadvantage by giving him a slacker seat post angle, moving his butt (and CoG) closer to the rear axle. So there are three reasons an XL frame will squat more (when set up properly) when going uphill, slackening the frame even more. So giving another disadvantage. It's a nasty catch-22.

In all actuality smaller frames should have slacker and larger frames steeper seat tube angles. The same frame in different sizes would then be wildly different from each other, which is expensive to make. And we would have even less XS and (X)XL frames than we have now, since it's catering to a smaller market. But that's what we have now.
  • + 2
 @Primoz: Amen, my brother! Totally true about frame sizing - XL's should have the steepest seat angles.
And yes - I bought a Fezzari La Sal Peak. I love it, though it's been put away for winter. I crushed climbs (both short tech and long grinds) that had me off the bike previously, and I was the obnoxious guy in my group finishing a ride and pushing to go for another lap. A steep *ACTUAL* seat tube angle is a revelation if you're a tall guy and/or have a long inseam.
  • + 1
 @ReformedRoadie: , hey ya! thx for pointing this out.
  • + 1
 @Jprestidge: Honestly I came from a 16 fuel ex 9.9 to a yeti sb130 and the notice is drastic.. Its not just seat angle tho it's the entire re do of the geo.. The added reach and slacker ha don't feel as drastic with the seat angle kicked forward more.. This makes tech climbing pretty damn sweet on that rig.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Of course the longer reach doesn't feel as drastic since the effective cockpit length doesn't change.

It's not that bikes are getting drastically longer, as it might seem with all the masturbation around reach numbers, they are just getting better. But the cockpit lengths (well... more or less effective top tube lengths, which change much less than reach numbers do) are staying the same.

That is the reason i am always yelling around the internet why the reach number is so useless on anything other than a DH bike.
  • + 11
 I've been riding this bike and absolutely love it. It's perfect for fast and flowy trail riding that has some chunk here and there. However, if you find yourself on something sketchier than you thought you would, it still handles it just fine (though you can feel the end of the travel sometimes). Riding it back to back with the Reign SX, it was faster almost everywhere in the bike park, though a little more tiring. It's freaky fast!
  • + 10
 I would love to see a comparison with a Tallboy and maybe a Stumpjumper ST or others. Bikes like this check off a lot of boxes for those of us who honestly don't need 140+mm rear travel, ride terrain that's more flowy than gnarly and do more distance and climbing.
  • + 3
 Yeah in hindsight it would have been awesome to have a Stumpjumper ST in to compare this to. Both really interesting bikes in the category.
  • + 1
 @brianpark: Add to that a value option- Fezzari Signal Peak.
  • - 1
 I love my Tallboy 3, but it’s at the end of its product cycle... Don’t expect to hear much more about it in the media. I expect a Tallboy 4 by late summer. Im glad to see this field of aggressive short travel bikes expanding, in both front center numbers and in how many good choices are available. Pivot 429 trail comes to mind as well- and the new whyte S-120... (which I hope to see on test at PB this year)
  • + 1
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: people will downvote you for mentioning the Fezzari stuff but they currently have the cheapest carbon full suspension bikes on the market. Id love to see them compared against the YT stuff. My guess is that the $3000 Jeffsey carbon would destroy much of Fezzari’s lineup.
  • + 4
 I'm not Pinkbike, but I recently demoed the Trance, SB100, Pivot 429 trail, and Tallboy.
The Trance was my favorite for XC trail riding.

SB100 was too XC for my liking, it got overwhelmed in tech sections, and is really an XC race bike with slightly slacker angles. Best climber of the bunch on smooth trails. Surprisingly it was also the most fun on smooth jump lines. Geo and fit is perfect for jump/dual slalom type bike in addition to XC.

Pivot felt a bit dead and unresponsive for the tamer XC terrain I am intending to ride the bike on, but was the best tech descender of the bunch, like a mini enduro bike.

Tallboy rode similar to the Trance, but the fit and geo on the Trance worked better for me.

Trance was light, responsive, and playful on XC trails, with just enough beast mode for tech sections. Geometry was spot on for me. Best climber of the bunch on rough tech climbs, and sits right in the middle between SB100 and Pivot in tech descending capability.
  • + 12
 Would you say I will be less depressed if owned this bike while living in Reno?
  • + 2
 Yes. I've ridden in Reno a lot - from the rocky barren desert of the northern part, to below Carson and of course up to Tahoe. A bike like this would be great for all of it - in Reno-proper, its very XC-ish overall. I personally feel like this would be a good one (I'm on a Yeti 4.5 which is somewhat close in terms of travel).
  • + 2
 That's dark.
  • + 4
 @Dogl0rd: after the Zink vs Levy showdown It seemed fitting. Lol
  • + 7
 Thanks for the great review pinkbike. I ended up picking 2019 trance 2 29er from a fellow pinkbiker for $2500 and ripped it in squamish this past weekend. Let me say that I am very impressed with how this bike rides...its not like my other ride a carbon sentinel...but for sure can handle the gnar....you just have to pick your lines a little differently. I threw in a couple extra volume spacers in the fox 34 and voila...pretty capable and for sure feels like more travel then the 115mm that its supposed to be and stays pretty composed...definitely a step forward for a big bike brand. Like the format and keep the reviews coming
  • + 1
 @werner333 How did you like the Fox Rhythm? Which fork do you have on the sentinel?
  • + 7
 A step forward for a traditionally pretty conservative company for sure! By no means are aggressive short travel bikes new, but Giant's a pretty prude company when it comes to current trends.
  • + 22
 Aside from the 2015 Reign being almost the standard for a "modern"enduro bike - sure. And the whole TCR thing.
  • + 8
 @Clarkeh: True, the TCR is an example of radical innovation in the road bike world, so big ups to Giant for that (and of course, the idea of a compact frame came from MTBs...once again, roadies just can't stop playing catch-up) Giant may be prude and slow-reacting to trends, but they make f*cking good bikes, the 2014 Enduro kinda brought the idea of an ENDURO bike to the main-est of streams, in my memory at least. Giant just did it better with the 2015 Reign Smile
  • + 3
 @mnorris122: Yeah that's fair.
  • + 5
 I'd like to see a comparison of the 27.5 and 29 Trance. My previous gen 27.5 Trance flirts with enduro-level capability. I was really hoping the big wheeled Trance would be more, rather than less capable in the rough.

How much big-line capability is this bike leaving on the table with such a short travel read end?
  • + 5
 Not as much as you would want to think. It surprised me and I would say that this is very in line with the previous generation 27.5" Trance as far as what it's capable of, and I have ridden both.
  • - 2
 @danielsapp: very skeptical how that could be the case with more than 20mm suspension difference. Giant already has a bike that fits this bill, called an Anthem.
  • + 6
 @kev-bike: I have both....you can't compare a 69 degree ht xc bike to a 66.6 degree trail bike. They are as different as can be. Daniel is correct that the Trance 29 trends closer to the capabilities of the Trance 27.5, however it climbs way better.
  • + 1
 @OzarkBike: the head tube angle on the anthem is 67.4 and has 110 rear 130 front.
  • + 1
 @kev-bike: Sorry, I was speaking of Anthem the 29er.. more apples to apples.
  • + 6
 I'd love to hear more about the climbing behavior. This thing looks like such a sweet "little" bike, and I always though Giants pedalled really well in technical terrain, but curious about the efficiency?
  • + 2
 top of the class i'm sure. This is simply another evolutionary step in what has historically been a very efficient steed. 7 gens now! crazy!!
  • + 6
 It's efficient. I get a little bit of bob running the pedaling platform open but even at that, it stays well supported and is what I would consider an excellent all-rounder both up and down. It is a solid "little" bike that packs a big punch when you aim it downhill.
  • + 5
 I've put a good 800kms on my trance Zero. What i have noticed. LOWEST BB in the world. Im an XL i have put 170mm cranks on and raised the front fork to 140mm, the bb is now doable. By comparison, same course, 2016 sworks enduro with same tires and basically same wheels, no pedal strikes. 2. Change the tires to Bonrtrager XR4's , lost 1 pound of rotating mass and easily tubeless. 3. Carbon Truvativ bar, no clue but it is seriously the best handlebar i have ever used. 4. Change the grips 5. Contact DVO about the bladder and main chamber psi .. im 205 fill bladder to 200psi main chamber to 240. run in either middle or firm. 6. Had the same issue with the rear shock, DVO was amazing at customer service even on FB messanger. 7. Get a good ass bash guard (see 1)....other than that, im begining to love the bike more and more with each ride.
  • + 7
 How dare you remove The Internet's beloved Minions! What wasn't easy about tubeless with the Minions tho?
  • + 1
 @mnorris122: nothing to be honest, was just saying the xr4's are a better overall tire. but didnt want to get my pb hacked by the russian bot minion police lol... cool thing was, they came set up for tubeless too, rim strips and a bottle of sauce.
  • - 1
 Maybe if you had some pedalling skills the bb wouldn’t matter as much eh steve
  • + 1
 That's weird - BB measures at 338mm, which is pretty standard for the range, and more than some bikes with more travel (Hightower, Fuel EX, Tallboy, Stumpjumper, etc).

Edit - I see why you're probably getting so many - the Enduro has a 352mm BB. That's higher than most of the trail bikes of the past 2 years, so it's probably just something you'd get used to after a while.
  • + 1
 @mnorris122: a pound less means flat tires, eh..
  • + 1
 I'm thinking of an XL as well, I bought a L but I think it might be a bit cramped while standing. 6' 35" inseam with long arms. I'm wondering how we compare to help with my decision. No XL in stock where I would exchange at.
  • + 6
 "Seat tube angle could be steeper"

Looks to me the seat is slid farther back in the post. At least put the saddle in the middle position before commenting on the seat angle.
  • + 4
 @flattire - It is a little back in the photos, however, those were taken just after the bike was built and before we set it up to ride. I put the saddle where it needs to be for the fit I run on almost every bike - pretty centered and, on the Trance, it's in the middle as you suggested. We also measure stuff like that when swapping from bike to bike to make sure our fit is consistent across the board.
  • + 4
 The photos were taken when the bike was sparkly clean and before we adjusted and rode the bike. We ended up with it much further forward than that by the end of the Field Test.
  • + 3
 @sarahmoore @danielsapp: you guys mention that you’re 5’7” and 5’10” (I think?) respectively. Who’s set-up is pictured? I’m just trying to get a feel for what the seat to bar drop would be for my own height.
  • + 2
 @irck - those photos are before we rode it. I’d guess it’s between the two somewhere. Mine is a little higher than that with a seat height of 73.5 cm.
  • + 4
 @irck: If he is 5' 10" Daniel should most likely be on a size large on this model. Especially if he has a long inseam.
  • + 2
 @OzarkBike: I have a shortish reach and the medium fits me best. As we mentioned in the review, sizing up to a large isn’t out of the question for someone on the cusp of sizes.
  • + 3
 @danielsapp: I hear ya. 5' 10" is an in between size for Giant. Most 5'10" folks size up in my experience. Nice feedback...Thanks
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: Thanks, that’s helpful info. Probably a dumb question, but is seat height just measured vertically from the top of the seat to centre of the bb?
  • + 2
 @irck: Not a dumb question - people do it differently but I measure from where you would be on the saddle with your sitbones (once it compresses if it's soft) to center of the BB - that keeps it uniform with different saddles - It's not an exact science but gets things pretty darn close.
  • + 1
 @danielsapp: That makes sense. Thanks!
  • + 7
 If I had a nickel for every review that complained about seat tube angle....
  • + 1
 Yeah: Just move your butt forward on the saddle....or move the saddle forward.
  • + 7
 I've never heard of a drawback to having a steeper seat angle, nor had anyone complain that they couldn't get their seat far enough back. So why do some manufacturers persist with making the rider perch themselves on the nose of the saddle to stop the bike flipping backwards on climbs? After changing from a carbon Trance to a heavier allloy Transition Scout with much better seat angle, I was amazed just how much more pleasantly the Scout climbed despite the weight penalty.

Slack seat angles make bikes feel like you're pedalling a recumbent uphills and it is such an easy thing to fix. Measuring SA at stack height is pretty useless though, because if the manufacturer has enough kick in the seat tube you can have a 76º+ SA and still end up over the back axle at full seat post extension.
  • + 27
 @mrtoodles: Got to disagree.... Steep seat tube angles (STAs) are good for sitting and spinning up super steep trails on long travel bikes that squat into their travel - that is it. Try pedaling hard on flater turf for an hour and feel how much less power to the pedal you get with your quads vs your hammys. Steep STAs engage the quads a lot more where a modest STA lets you pedal with your hamstrings/posterior chain muscle groups which is far stronger. Riders who get paid to put the power to the pedal all day are almost always on modest STA bikes. On a long travel bike I can understand the steeper STAs. Those bikes squat a lot into their rear travel and harder to climb with. But, shorter travel bikes don't squat into their travel. Also, I personally don't sit and spin up our techy, steep trails. Maybe those dirt road riding to the top of the hill sit and spin. I don't. I'm out of the saddle, so the STA is somewhat a non-issue where I ride. Steep STAs put more weight on your hands as well. Go for a pedally four hour ride on a steep STA bike and you will feel it. Yes, if you are climbing a long travel bike up steep non-techy climbs only to bomb back down, STAs are good. But for an all around shorter travel trail bike, I'll take a modest STA. That is one reason I went with the Trance 29 myself.
  • + 3
 @MikerJ: Ah true fair call. I guess I'm coming at it from a climb to descend riding point of view. For flatter terrain it might be less ideal. I used that Scout for a few marathon XC events and loved it for pedalling comfort although I'm only a Sports class punter, and I've got short femurs so I've always run my seats pushed all the way forward on the rails.
  • + 2
 Hey if you save your nickles ill pool in with you with all my Fork offset nickles and maybe you and I can buy a tandem bike with steep seat angles, short stays, long reach and short offset fork and go ride trails!
  • + 3
 @MikerJ: get this man a f*cking beer!
  • + 2
 5 cents from me!
  • + 1
 @jddallager: It's not enough. My Evil has the seat all the way forward and it's still a balls smashing, wheelie inducing ride when going uphill. So backwards!
  • + 2
 @MikerJ: A good bit of perspective from you Mike. That being said, I think we've gone WAAAY too far slack for, well.. ever. Middle ground is good, or steep for people living in mountains like me.
  • + 2
 @mrtoodles: I just went the other way around. From a 2017 Scout to a Trance 29er... I'm not climbing slower and the Trance helped me clear stuff I was not capable of on the Scout. I'm riding with the saddle tip to my prostate on both on hard climbs anyways. It's all down to personal preference.
  • + 2
 @jddallager: or drop your handlebars low
  • + 2
 @MikerJ: If you're climbing tech out of saddle and using predominantly hamstrings, your technique must be something else. Tell me it's being done on flat pedals too!
  • + 4
 Effective seat tube angles are irrelevant to tall folks like me... when my seat is fully dropped it is about level with the handlebars on my XL frames. Can you guys measure and report the actual ST angle on your test bikes?

Thanks for the great reviews PB!
  • + 1
 A-f*cking-men! Tall guys unite! I don't think our esteemed reviewers are aware of the effects of actual seat tube angle vs. the BS effective number they routinely parrot in these reviews.
  • + 6
 Is it just me, or did this Giant/DVO fork combo flex less than any of the other bikes reviewed so far on the huck to flat test?
  • + 7
 I would have liked an more in depth comparison to fox and RS suspension. Cool that Giant specs bikes with an alternative.
  • + 7
 After 4 days on my '19 Reign Advanced 1 with DVO, compared to the '16 (RS), '17 (Fox) and '18 (Fox), I am really impressed with the small bump sensitivity of the DVO. I am not at all a suspension geek (once I get preload and rebound set right, I'm happy), but I instantly noticed how the first few cm of travel are very supple on the DVO. Definitely a faster bike than the '18!

I am a little disappointed that only the higher end RA0 and TA0 come with the Diamond D1 that has the adjustabilty of the OTT knob so greatly touted by DVO as the bees knees. The "lower" end RA1 and TA1 use a Diamond D2 that doesn't come with an OTT knob, instead with a pre-tuned internal setting "custom tuned". But since I'm not a suspension geek, I quickly got over it after a few rides. Turns out I only missed it on the internet while I was reading up on how to set up the DVO.
  • + 2
 @heckler73: I prefer a review from some one who sets and forgets the knobs . Then one can concentrate on the performance. You have had RS and Fox and the DVO is better at handling small bumps.
I believe you can order any part as an upgrade through DVO. Still its annoying that OEM parts tend to be stripped down versions of the after market parts. in the name of saving money at the expense of the consumer.
Glad you are enjoying your DVO fork Smile
  • + 3
 @heckler73: Its a little more work but there is an OTT adjustment on the D2 forks. You unfortunately have to pull the lowers to do it (internal adjustment(3 positions)) but it is possible if you want to take the time to do it.
  • + 5
 After my first giant with the DVO tuned for the suspension, I won’t be looking for another rear suspension brand. They really do have the most easy to talk to customer service in the business, with SRAM being a close second in terms of availability and willingness to send out spares.
  • + 1
 @nicnok1: oh! thanks! That will entice me to grease them up with Slickoleum. I'll start going through the service guides this week.

What's the factory norm for DVO in terms of out of the box lubrication? My RS always got greased as soon as I had time to open them up.
  • + 4
 @heckler73: One of DVO's selling points for me is the fact that they run more oil in their systems then most companies. I own a Diamond (on my Reign) and a Saphire (going on my new Trance 29 build) and have had zero issues with my Diamond out of the box. If you know how to do your own suspension work though and winter is upon you like it is where I live, I would say just open it up and give it some fresh lube.... it won't hurt. DVO puts more effort into their product at this point though.... A. I think it's because they are still small and can put in the extra time in assembly and B. they truly are a riders company, for them it really is a quality vs quantity, at least until they get to big for their own good.
  • + 8
 What happened to all of Giant's 27.5 propaganda?
  • + 8
 We're supposed to forget Smile
  • + 6
 Right, I had a original trance 29er. The year after I bought it they discontinued it and had a big campaign (see this video www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-IqnKvotUg) about 27.5 was the "end all to be all" and the same pro ridder who was singing the praise of my 29er was now towing the line on the smaller wheel (I don't blame him, the man has to eat). Now after years of other companies making some great 29ers along comes Giant again with a less travel (not saying it is not good just 20mm of less squish) and over twice the price of my trance 0. Interesting, I am going to think about this tomorrow when I take my Ripmo out for a spin.
  • + 4
 Just checked the Giant site and this bike is the basically the same price in Canada as it is in the US. So someone from US could buy the bike in Canada and save themselves like 2 grand!?! that doesn't seem right...
  • + 2
 There are a lot of brands that this is starting to be consistent with which is good for us I guess. However this seems to be the largest difference i have seen for brands. It's even worse for the UK.
  • + 2
 It's $9500 NZD over here - that's $6525 USD. The tariffs are real?!?!?
  • + 0
 Yet ANOTHER reason in the laundry list of reasons to visit and spend our money in Canada! (only not on wheelie inducing machine with such slack seat tube angles as this).
  • + 1
 Giant pricing has long been like that.
  • + 3
 As far as big brands go, I’ve always liked Giant. They are pretty neutral riding and looking. And besides Overdrive, nothing is weird about them. Totally interchangeable with aftermarket. But dropping Jeff was a bit much. I’m still sore.
  • + 5
 Looks like the bike was designed for the riding around Bend, OR! Light and efficient for high mileage days, and not too much travel so the trails don't feel so boring.
  • + 6
 Front tire clearance looks extremely tight.
  • + 2
 I was going to ask the same thing! It looks like there is ZERO mud clearance.
  • + 5
 @danielsapp, saw in another review that you'd spent some time on a 429 Trail; how would you compare these two?
  • + 11
 As close as they are in numbers, they ride far more different than I would expect. The Giant feels more supple off the top on the rear end of the bike the way its suspension works. It's also a touch longer and slacker than the Trail 429. Component spec plays a large role in how they feel different. The Trance is spec'd with a 44mm offset fork and the Pivot is 51mm. The Trance also has 800mm bars and the Pivot has 760's. That being said, I just put a 140mm 44mm offset fork on the Trail 429 and wider bars so soon as the snow melts here, I think I'll be able to give a little better comparison between the two. I think they both are equally capable bikes but straight out of the box, the Trance has a little more rowdy in it.
  • + 5
 @danielsapp, thanks for the great review. I was really counting on the bike for climbing and all reviews I have seen so far have highlighted the climbing abilities. I am also rather tall with a 36 inseam so your review makes me a bit nervous as I always find myself too much over the backwheel with not enough grip on the front wheel. Is there anything better out there for climbing for trail bikes?
  • + 6
 @rambis123: The 429 climbs really well. If you're on the correct size, which you should be anyways, I wouldn't hesitate to get a Trance, it's a ripper and does climb well, it's just as steep as some other bikes in the seat tube area. Take for instance the SB130 - a little more bike than the Trance but similar and with a lot steeper seat angle so you're more over the front.
  • + 5
 You missed the only con that really needs a mention, the Rock Shox Reverb...
  • + 5
 This sounds like the new Kona Process 111! Me likey!
  • + 1
 It’s not that the seat tube angle is too slack, it’s the chain stays on bigger sizes that need to be longer. It makes no sense that as Bikes get bigger a rider is on a too short rear center. But that is a cost consideration.
  • + 1
 ...i just have the habbit of applying a mild appoxy to my BB and then insert it into the frame,all you need is to apply it thinly and let it dry/set properly...that way you’ll never have a creaking PF BB,and it keeps the BB from moving and protects it from water and dust. True story - try it.
No one needs the downtime waiting for a replacement frame when you can fix it yourself.
  • + 1
 Solid review......

I absolutely love my Trance 29! It is a great bike for 90% of my everyday type riding. It really does ride bigger than 115mm and its light and efficient enough to pedal all day. Mine weighed in very light at 26lbs 5oz, however it feels as solid as an enduro rig. The DVO suspension is incredible all the way from the top to the bottom of the stroke.

The seat tube angle is a non factor in my opinion, however I only have a 31" inseam. My seat rails are right in the middle of their range.
Since all modern trial and enduro bikes are super low, I opt to use 170mm cranks on all my bikes. I also swapped the 40mm stem for a roomier 50mm. Otherwise it is perfect out of the box.

I got suckered into a pretty big 2+ hour XC type ride in the U.P. and ended up with some locals hitting 25+ ft doubles on this bike. Handles the big jumps surprisingly well .
  • + 4
 Is everyone going to ignore how someone won both the leatt helmet and the polygon bike?
  • + 2
 It bugs me that DVO couldn't put blue anodized knobs on fork and shock... the mix of the blue, green, and black just looks bad (which is funny coming from someone who owns a 2014 RM Altitude Rally Edition)
  • + 2
 I was going to say 'go with the less spendy Trance Adv 1 which is green, but shit, it comes with green Fox suspension with blue knobs!! The Reign Adv 1 is the best of the bunch - green DVO with green knobs.
  • + 4
 Nice Review! Now i just have to wait 2 to 3 years to get one "lightly used" at a reasonable price
  • + 1
 Anybody ride this and a Stumpjumper ST? I've demo'd a Stumpy ST and really enjoyed it. But with slacker, less conservative geo I wonder how this compares. I get the impression that both can handle and excel on similar trails but in different ways.
  • + 4
 $8700 for a Giant??? Tell me again how the Yeti is so expensive...
  • + 0
 Never thought that joke could ever be true
  • + 1
 @danielsapp and @sarahmoore, just curious as to what trails you guys rode to test this bike? Was it mostly Dark Crystal and/or Micro Climate?
No problem if you aren't allowed to answer.
Thanks,
Tom
  • + 3
 Hey Tom - A lot of the west side of 99 in the Valley. A bit of a mix...we were riding the slightly heavier duty bikes on Dark Crystal although the Trance did make its way over there and was a good time.
  • + 3
 I have been riding the Trance 29 Pro 0 with DVO for a few months now. I The review is 100% accurate!
  • - 1
 What the seat angle is too slack and the suspension blew up?
  • + 2
 @jclnv: ST angle is 74.5 (medium) which is steeper than Norco Sight, Tallboy, Hightower, Hightower LT, Ripley LS, etc. I actually don't care for super steep ST angles like the SB 130 at 77 degrees... I end up pushing my saddle back a little to work the glutes and hams more! DVO is GOOD stuff! No problems at all :-)
  • + 2
 Is it just me or a smaller huck to flat for the lighter category of bikes, or does that DVO flex way less than RS and Fox forks? :O
  • + 5
 Squish starts @1:16
  • + 3
 Still waiting for a Giant Reign 29. Guess i will have to wait another year for Giant to catch up
  • + 0
 "DVO dampers not proven (yet)" What does that mean? And how long does a company have to be around before they're considered "proven"? I think DVO makes a product just as good if not better is some instances then Fox, Rock Shox and Ohlins.
  • + 30
 It means that we had an issue with the first shock that came on the bike, and need to put more miles on the replacement before fully endorsing it.
  • + 11
 @mikekazimer: Boom. Headshot.
  • - 5
flag jcelli2013 (Dec 10, 2018 at 13:06) (Below Threshold)
 DVO is not advertising in Pinkbike....
  • + 1
 Yeah, that stuck with me too.

But the thing with shocks especially, is how flimsy the seals are, irrespective of brand and in a lot of cases, age/use. So a seal failure doesn't necessarily mean a bad product to me (although it pisses me off to no end, especially if rebuilding requires proprietary tools).
  • + 3
 @rivercitycycles: A guy I ride with has an emerald up front and the jade rear shock on his canfield. He races for canfield and wouldn't ride anything else for suspension.
  • + 1
 @pikebait2013: what's his name?
  • + 2
 @jcelli2013, whether or not they're an advertiser doesn't change anything.
  • + 2
 @mikekazimer: I think you're preaching to deaf ears. People don't read the full reviews, they don't watch the videos. They see a line (or a photo of the seat position) that upsets them and lose it and cry foul. It appears people assume the editors (who do this for a living) either have a hidden agenda or don't know what they're doing.
  • + 1
 @Session603: His name is Jared. He's pretty crazy on his jedi lol
  • + 2
 @Session603: ''what's his name?''
and his name is John Ceeeenaa
  • - 2
 @mikekazimer: You've could have put that line in the review itself. The con in the summary doesn't make sense without it.
  • + 0
 @mikekazimer: I was just kidding and making a parody of past comments re: brands that advertise on PB. Fair enough of you to hold your judgment.
  • - 2
 @Session603: @Session603: Randy. You obviously haven't met him yet.
  • + 2
 @Archimonde: You're joking, right? Or did you seriously only look at the pretty pictures and ignored the words?
  • + 1
 @danielsapp Did you have any specific thoughts on how the Sapphire performed compared to other forks in the same category (reduced offset options like the Pike, 34, and Ribbon)?
  • + 2
 No mention of the fork? How do you compare to some of the smaller mfgrs out ther like mrp for example?
  • + 2
 Was hoping for more travel, at least 140 like 27.5 version
...Can we have 29er Reign please???
  • + 3
 Maybe by the time they make a Trance29 SX or a Reign29 they will bring that Seat tube angle up to a whopping 76 degrees.. by then Pole will probably come out with a 86 degree seat tube angle.. lol i think everyone wanted to see the Trance29 with more travel but in all honesty it’s just a very capable “Trail bike” the Trance 27.5 was just shy of a true “Enduro” bike & the Reign is much more suitable for tackling anything the EWS has to throw at it!
  • + 3
 Short travel wagon wheel fan here, i like it.
  • + 1
 My next purchase is this bike. Last year I got a 2018 Trance 2 and that bike kicks ass. Now available in a big boy shape for a 6'1" doofus like me
  • + 0
 Can't really point out anything bad about it. 29 inch wheels are the way to go in my opinion. Also, you spend all your time travelling up hill realistically, as much as you don't want to believe it.
  • + 0
 ."...from feel like they're slugging around a bike built for dude-bros that shuttle short climbs and wear goggles with half shell helmets"

Whats wrong with googles and half-shell helmets now? Not cool dude-bro!
  • + 2
 Well this DVO does not flex at all....
  • + 2
 Still waiting on my Advanced 1 Frown
  • - 1
 Nice bike but $3300 for frame only..... oh but I see it comes with powercore bottom bracket and its 92mm. Also overdrive steering tube which is 1.5 - 1.25. Touche. Well worth the asking price then.
  • + 2
 powercore is pf92 but overdrive is 1 1/2 - 1 1/8 . It was Overdrive 2 that was 1 1/4. they have since stopped doing on mountain bikes
  • + 2
 @bballboy388: opps I actually meant to write 1.125. I realize overdrive 2 is gone. Just making fun of their marketing jargon. It's pretty ridiculous.
  • + 2
 Frame only, in the US, is significantly less than other big brands. Another reason I bought this frame.
  • + 1
 @MikerJ: what’s a frame for one of these worth?
  • + 2
 @irck: when first out a frame msrp was $2800 US. With a headset included, and so minus another $125 for a King (Cane Creeks/Creaks and I don't get along), you are looking at maybe $2675. And if you were nice to the shop owner deals can be had. Compare that to Yeti's msrp which is something like $3300-$3500 for a frame only. Yetis are in high demand and often there is little wiggle room on price negotiating. Giant really impressed me with my Glory frame. That frame has seen some wicked hard use and is still in perfect functional order, pivots and all.
  • + 1
 @MikerJ: Good to know. Thanks mate.
  • + 2
 NM, question answered above.
  • + 1
 This is mentioned elsewhere, but the shots were taken before the bike was ridden.
  • + 2
 how does it compare with equivalent bikes ? tallboy 3, scott spark etc ?
  • + 4
 Equivalent bike would be Evil Following...
  • + 3
 @yzedf: yeah the following was in the etc, I did not want to make an actual list
  • + 0
 Aesthetically this bike just doesn't look like it should cost $9k. Not sure why, and it sounds like it rides great regardless of how it looks.
  • - 1
 Because tariffs apparently, it's $6500 USD in NZ.
  • + 1
 The weirdly high toptube and the unadorned matte black paint job make it look like unbranded Chinese carbon to me. Also black+blue=yech.
  • - 1
 @rezrov: also the suspension pivots look like something off a Walmart Mongoose. But that could be for serviceability.
  • + 2
 @JohanG: What's wrong with the pivots and hardware? Carbon rockers and alloy hardware with laser-etched torque settings are low budget now?

Easy serviceability is a great thing to have, but in my experience the Giants don't particularly need it. In the 7 years I had on my 07 reign 1, and 5 years on my Trance Advanced 1, I've never had to service the bearings (the Reign did go through DU bushes on the shock every year or two). In contrast my buddy has had to replace the bearings nearly every year on his Santa Cruz Tallboy since 2014. Free bearings for life, sure, but that's also days in the shop every year while they get fitted.
  • + 1
 Yo pinkbike, field test the Commencal Clash
  • - 3
 HEY PINK BIKE I love these reviews on video . Is it me ? Or does anyone care about brakes ? Not even peep about what brakes the bikes comes with, let alone how you like the brakes and rotors and modulation or what ever you can share . Yea I know we all know the brakes out there but maybe these are new brakes and at least tell us what brakes the bikes come with. Maybe You Pink biker reviewers are do skilled you don't even use brakes.
Maybe I didn't here about brakes in the last 3 video reviews and I had my head up my Brakes. I been racing all my life and most of the time people talk about what kind of stoppers are on a bike & car or what ever your piloting . I do like the new videos although this one on the Giant seemed kind of on the vanilla side I like strong opinions even if I don't agree with the reviews .
Cons : put some spice in your opinions
Cons : No brake review ?
Cons : review more bikes that go down that need brakes
Pros : I like the guy with all the tattoos
Pros : I like the guy with all the tattoos what happened to him ?
  • + 10
 We had no issue with the SRAM Guide RSC brakes with 180mm rotors. Don't worry you'll see more of the tattoo guy. We'll work on the spice for next year!
  • + 7
 @sarahmoore: lol.. all I got out of that comment was: Brakes Brakes Brakes… & "I like Strong Opinions" & Tattoo Dudes! haha
  • + 2
 @scarl cut yer bars!
  • + 1
 suki nato nga trail. lol
  • + 1
 8700 dollars for a Giant bicycle... really?
  • - 3
 Whoever allowed that little "shock issues" blurb to be published is an absolute moron. RS and F have both released several substandard products in massive OE quantities over the years and to question DVO's product integrity over a prototype unit is absolutely ignorant and irresponsible. Once again showing us that Pink Bike's "journalists" are nothing more than spoiled babies who can't function in the business world or anywhere else. Congratulations Pink Bike, those of us who know can clearly see you for what you are, oblivious loud-mouthed children.
  • + 2
 tell us how you really feel
  • + 1
 The Devinci Marshall/Hendrix comparison to this bike should be very close.
  • - 1
 I bought Alu version and do not recommend it at all. Very soft rear suspension and you really feel it while cornering.
  • + 4
 Try a little less sag. 25% of stroke or a touch less.

Here's a DVO custom made for Giant squish setup. Couldn't find a Rockshox version for you though, sorry, but the % sag recommendations are for the Maestro, not the suspension model.

tech.dvosuspension.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Giant-setup-guide-2.pdf
  • + 3
 I assume you have a Trance 2 aluminum? If so I would guess you need more air in the Fox shock. I would also speculate some flex is coming from the cheaper narrow 25mm inner rims on that bike.
  • + 1
 @OzarkBike: could be. Compared with Kona Hei Hei and Specialized Camber.
  • + 3
 Make sure you have 25% sag (11mm)!
  • - 1
 Is the cable routing full racist? Can I put the brake hose and dropper cable through the drive side entry port?
  • + 1
 You can swap sides with the brakes. Easy!
  • + 1
 @OzarkBike: Good to hear. I thought there might be internal tubes that prevent two cables on the drive side.
  • + 0
 but whatttt about the pivot 429 traillllll
  • - 1
 $8715????? Isn’t Giant the biggest manufacturer in the world?
  • - 2
 Pretty cool bike. Won't support those huge prices for a company which has extreme means of manufacturing.
  • + 1
 The price is in line. Keep in mind on a bike like this Giant only makes the frame and rims. So they have to buy all the other 3rd party suspension, components, tires, etc on this model. Not to mention the price of DVO and the small scale of production.
  • + 1
 It's the US tariffs dude, it's $6500 USD over here in NZ.
  • + 1
 @Clarkeh: Interesting.. very interesting!
  • + 0
 @OzarkBike: to add to your point, Giant is still using people to lay up the frames too... Much like every other company that makes carbon bikes.. There really hasn't been a better way to do it yet.. And when you factor in a couple hundred pieces of the magical black stuff that has to be put in the right place and in the right direction, it's a time consuming process...
  • - 2
 $8700? GTFO ????
  • + 8
 It's their flagship model. Top-end bikes from some other companies go above $10K.

That said, you can get this Trance Advanced 29 with a lower-spec build for under $5K.
  • - 2
 yawnnn...
  • - 3
 Dropping Lenosky after almost two decades of loyalty to them makes me like Giant less.
  • + 5
 I liked them less when they started to make everything with PFbbs . I am confident that Leonsky could find a new sponsor more than I am confident my bb will never creak.
  • + 7
 @raditude: I had PFbb on several bikes (all Giants) and they did not make a sound ever over many years of abuse, racing, powerwashing, bikeparks etc. I do have threaded BB on my new bike and after two weeks it already started creaking so I hade to disasemble it clean it lube it and put it back together. And it happened again after 2 more months so whenever I hear QQ about PF vs Threaded BBs I call BS.
  • + 4
 @lp130i: Totally agree. PF done wrong might creak, but I've gotten about the same life (1-2 seasons) out of PF bb's as threaded ones, and no issues on several Giants with them.
  • + 2
 @lp130i: And then there are people like myself who have had issues with both. Had a PF frame that was just bad from the start and had to be warrantied and then have also had problems with threaded BBs on other bikes as well.
  • + 2
 @lp130i: Totally. So, so much PF hate. I've never had a problem with any of mine.
  • + 1
 @lp130i: Well, we are both entitled to our opinions. I've never taken a phone call working for a handful of large manufacturers with a shop angry over why we didn't use pressfit and used threaded instead. I don't know if I've ever heard of that call either, a shop asking for pressfit.
  • + 1
 @tunnel-vision: Just like I have never broken a frame. I don't really understand how so many mukluks do it, but here we are.
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