Field Test: 2021 Ibis Mojo 4 - The Trail Rider's Trail Bike

Nov 28, 2020
by Mike Levy  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Ibis Mojo 4



Words by Mike Levy, photography by Tom Richards



The Mojo name has been in Ibis' catalog since it was a high-end hardtail way back in 1994, but we're more familiar with it as an efficient mid-travel trail bike meant to do a bit of everything. You're looking at the fourth generation Mojo that, no surprises, is the longest and slackest yet, but Ibis says that the intentions remain the same: To be that fun-loving “The all-mountain play bike.

Ibis' recipe for fun cake includes 27.5" wheels - that's right, this is a new trail bike that's not a 29er - and 130mm of travel via a dw-link suspension layout. There's a 140mm fork up front, and my SLX test bike came with optional carbon wheels and handlebar that bumps the price from $5,399 to $6,267 USD. All that adds up to 28lb 9oz, including the Maxxis DHF and Dissector control tires we installed.

Mojo Details


• Travel: 130mm rear / 140mm front
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Head angle: 65.4-degrees
• Seat tube angle: 76.6-degrees
• Reach: 485mm (lrg)
• Chainstay length: 425mm
• Sizes: Sm, med, lrg (tested), x-lrg
• Weight: 28.6 lb / 13 kg (as pictured)
• Price: $6,267 USD (Inc. wheel, handlebar upgrade)
www.ibiscycles.com

Is it just me or have full-suspension Mojos always looked the same? The frame is all-new, with a different carbon layup that's said to save a bit of weight compared to the previous version, but there's still no mistaking this bike as being from any other brand - its swoopy lines say 'Ibis' from miles away. More important than losing weight, the new frame also sports pass-through, tube-in-tube internal cable routing. You'll also find a threaded bottom bracket, an ISCG adapter for guides or smashers, and a whole bunch of frame protection. There's even a tiny fender to help protect the suspension's lower link. What you won't find is room for plus-sized tires - Ibis says there wasn't enough demand - although you can still get 27.5" x 2.6" meat in there if you want.

On-bike storage is a hot topic these days, with many brands competing to see who can put the most threaded holes on their frames or be the first to fit Anthony Messere inside their downtubes. Instead of that, Ibis sells their Pork Chop frame bags that pop into place inside the front triangle. It's like a fanny pack but for your bike; it works really well but I suspect that many Mojo'ers will choose fashion over function.

There are no surprises when it comes to the new Mojo's 130mm rear-end: It uses the latest version of dw link suspension, a layout known for its relatively high amount of anti-squat. The result of that is usually a fast feeling bike. Compared to other designs, it employs a Fox shock with a light-ish compression and rebound tune - Ibis calls it the 'Traction Tune' - with the suspension layout creating efficiency rather than damping. The recommended settings for this feel, er, relatively undamped on the trail, but I settled on a more traditional, slower setup. The new lower-link runs on bushings that come with a lifetime guarantee, whereas you’ll find sealed bearings up top.

If we're talking geometry, Ibis has generally been known as being fairly conservative compared to some other brands, making them a good option for a rider who doesn’t want to go the really long and slack route. That said, the new Mojo ain’t exactly behind the times, with a 76.6-degree seat angle and a head angle at 65.4-degrees, nearly 2-degrees more relaxed than the previous Mojo. The 27.5” wheels allow for short 425mm chainstays on all sizes, and they also get 37mm-offset forks. As for reach, my large-sized test bike sits at 485mm.

Note: Note: After testing was completed we learned that our bike came with a 2020 Fox 34 FIT 4 fork due to bike boom related product shortages. The correct spec, and the way the bike is shipping now, is with a 2021 Factory 34 with a GRIP 2 damper..



Field Test Tom Richards photo
Field Test Tom Richards photo

Climbing

If there were a shortlist of trail bikes that climb well, I'm sure Ibis would have a couple of theirs on it. But the latest Mojo is the longest and slackest ever, which had me wondering if it could match my expectations. One thing I wasn't questioning, however, was how it felt on the gas.

I'm not sure if it's the same width Maxxis tires on smaller diameter wheels, but the Mojo looks more rock crawler than hill climb weapon to me, especially when leaning up next to the slim new Stumpy. But it took a few hundred feet of steep gravel road to remind me that small wheels don't mean slow speeds, especially as I had just come off the heavier and, er, "more relaxed" Actofive P-Train. If you're the type of rider who doesn't take a relaxed approach to climbs, you'll love how the Mojo encourages you to work harder for it on the way up. And if that doesn't make any sense to you, you might be more of a P-Train kinda rider. What about the new Stumpjumper with its reconfigured suspension? The clock shows it just barely a nip behind (8-seconds over 12-ish-minutes) on the way up, but neither will disappoint a rider who cares about these things.

I ride a lot of 29ers because that's what that's mostly what new bikes are, but also because I (usually) enjoy technically challenging climbs and I've always had better luck on big wheels. Then again, I got lucky an awful lot aboard the Mojo; it's certainly more bike than the previous version, but it's still impressive in the tight and twisty bits, and especially against the purple Salsa or P-Train.

If you're a trail rider that puts just as much effort into a climb as you do on a descent, or maybe even a bit more, you'll be happy aboard the Mojo.


Field Test Tom Richards photo

Field Test Tom Richards photo
Field Test Tom Richards photo


Descending

The good news: Thanks to its updated geometry, the newest Mojo is the most capable one yet. The bad news: Everyone else has shuffled their trail bikes along as well, especially the four others I've been riding back-to-back non-stop. To be fair, the Salsa and P-Train, with their 160mm forks and focus on descending, were always going to drop the Mojo on any remotely challenging downhill; that's too much of an apples to oranges comparison to be kosher.

But the Stumpjumper and Trance X are definitely in that same do-everything-equally-well category as the Mojo. Up against those two, it's the Stumpy that consistently felt the most capable on Squamish's rocky trails, although I suspect a Trance X with passive suspension would have made it close. The Mojo comes across as the most 'trail bike' of them all in that it'll do anything you point it at, but it's closer to the edge and gets knocked around a bit more when things are fast and rough.

If you're the kind of rider whose ass needs saving on a regular basis, I'm not convinced this is the bike for you.

But if you're more concerned about having a good time than finding the limits of yourself or your bike, or your local trail inspires more flow than fear, the 130mm-travel Mojo will make sense. And especially so if you're the rider who uses every lip, root, and root to get into the air.
Timed Testing

The trail bikes faced timed descent and climb sections on different trails, with the latter being a mix of smooth singletrack switchbacks leading into rooty and rocky steeper sections to evaluate low-speed handling. The timed downhill has everything a trail bike should face and maybe a bit more, most of it covered in roots and rocks.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Mike Levy: "The new Mojo felt quick up the climb and the clock confirmed it: 2nd place and 19-seconds behind the Live Valve-equipped Trance X. It was the same two bikes at the back of the class for the time descent, with the Mojo in 2nd place, 7-seconds ahead of the Trance X in last."

That flowing, rolling singletrack that rewards a bit of effort is where the new Mojo comes into its own, and even more so if you can spot a good backside. While the more forgiving bikes can easily lose speed if you're not working the trail, it's like the Ibis was doing that sort of work for me. That makes it an entertaining bike, and even more so if that's how you ride anyway.

The Mojo also has a knack for making the awkward feel a bit less awkward, with it seeming to stop and stutter less on those old-school, slow-speed trails where the answer is to embrace the jank. I never got that feeling on the Blackthorn, that's for sure.


Tom Richards photo


Trail bikes are getting wildly capable these days, with some of them approaching what was used on the EWS circuit only a few years ago. That increased descending ability has come at a cost, though, with many ‘bigger feeling’ bikes that are, in some cases, less well-rounded and therefore less suited to many riders in many places.

The Mojo isn't that kind of trail bike, though, with Ibis using updated geometry to make it the most capable version ever but without taking away from its classic trail bike vibes.


Pros

+ Fast, efficient, and well-rounded
+ It's a new 27.5" wheeled trail bike!
+ The most capable Mojo yet

Cons

- There are still more capable trail bikes
- Inconsistent bite point on Shimano brakes. Again




The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with support from Dainese apparel & protection, Sierra Nevada refreshments, and Smith eyewear and helmets. Thanks also to Maxxis, Garmin, Freelap, and Toyota Pacific.






303 Comments

  • 151 0
 I just want to add my voice to all the others who've said similar things, I FREAKING LOVE THESE REVIEWS! The Field Tests are awesome. Thank you so much for providing such excellent content, PinkBike.
  • 7 6
 PB reviews are awesome.

I will say Ibis is the worst though. Had a bike on order (Full Deposit) since the second week of March, before covid really hit, and they said it was a two week lead time. Six empty promises later they finally said we will make sure you get it by the first week of December. Got a call last week and they said...It will be March of 2021. A good product ruined by terrible support. Wouldn't trust a thing these guys tell you.
  • 1 0
 @vjunior21:

I'm sorry for your pain, vj.

Ordered mine (RAF) in late Feb via lbs and had it in mid Apr. A friend ordered via Backcountry in late March/early April and had his 2 weeks later.

Yeah there's really no visibility into how dealers jockey for position for inventory and this year in general has been a clusterfk on the supply chain side for lots of brands. Hopefully you didn't sell your old whip. That's too bad you got the runaround though.

There are other fish in the sea though. If mine had been hung up longer than it was (which isn't THAT long in retrospect) I would have gone Sentinel or Smash or Prime.
  • 4 1
 @WasatchEnduro:
Yeah the shop kept getting it from the company on new lead times. This has gone up to the top at Ibis and they promised a early December delivery. It is unfortunate how the company kept coming back with promises and breaking them.

Not sure why the original comment go downvoted. I am telling my experience of the shop calling at the time of purchase and Ibis said "we have it in stock and it can be shipped within the next two weeks." I took them for their word then and every time they kept coming back with a few more weeks. This is a cautionary comment for those who may be buying an Ibis as this will likely happen to you too.

Simply put... the customer service at Ibis is a joke.
  • 1 0
 @vjunior21: I ordered first week of August and got mine in October... I emailed Ibis and Scott got back to me right away. I guess they had lots of people working from home and didn't have it all ironed out? They should have at least given you a frame but from what I heard parts availability is Spring or summer next year even from big boys like Sram.
  • 1 0
 @vjunior21:
I put in an order for a mojo 4 frame the day it was announced, kept getting told it would be one more week, one more week... Gave up in July and bought an sb140 instead...
  • 1 0
 @BentonRidesBikes:
This story sounds all to familiar. Ibis it terrible.
  • 2 0
 @vjunior21: I have no doubt about your negative experience; however, as a counter-point, I've had only positive experiences with Ibis and their customer service. (ordered a ripmo in february and had it less than 3 weeks later)
  • 1 0
 @fcwiss:
The shop called and confirmed with was in stock at the time and the bike was available to be shipped within two weeks. Placed the order at that point and paid the full amount. Today I still don't have a bike. I a lot of BS how they got themselves to this point and a number of empty promises from the Ibis staff.

Glad to hear you got your order filled but to me...Ibis is terrible.
  • 70 2
 Not even joking, while watching this Mojo video a targeted advert popped up saying "Protect your Dental Practice from Frivolous Lawsuits" or something like that. That made me laugh.
  • 96 43
 Why is everyone bagging on Shimano brakes bite point. If it's a con for this review, then how come PB doesn't list it as a con on all the other bike reviews they do for bikes with Shimano brakes. Just saying.
  • 34 4
 Short list of cons and just needed something for that list is my guess
  • 39 0
 For a long time, they did. Trust me.
  • 30 1
 PB reviews have brought this up a lot. They even mentioned it in the last podcast if I remember right.
  • 7 35
flag ORTOGONAL555 (Nov 28, 2020 at 7:50) (Below Threshold)
 This is why test should be conducted with the exact same components. I get this is not done because they are not reviewing the frame by itself, but the conplete bikes as they are sold (which is fine). However, issues with components should be aknowledged as problems of the specific bike reviewed only if they are traceable back to the bike brand. Wandering bite point ( for example) is a "con" only if it's due to cheaper manifacturing for spec part. Is this the case? Are shimano brakes problematic only when they are stock on bikes because brand xxx wants xtr brakes but is not willing to spend too much? Hard to know really.
P.s. I don't know is shimano brakes are actually bad, it was just for example.
  • 17 1
 They’re (Pinkbike) probably just sick and tired of mentioning it, it’s just standard for Shimano
  • 106 5
 @tonyplanet - Sorry, this is only the 8457 time I've talked about Wink
  • 9 29
flag Korbi777 (Nov 28, 2020 at 8:04) (Below Threshold)
 my trickstuff have an awesome bitepoint
  • 30 3
 They literally bring it up every time in a review that has Shimano brakes. Kaz staded in the most recent PB podcast that he wished every bike just came specced with Codes.
  • 7 15
flag nurseben (Nov 28, 2020 at 8:30) (Below Threshold)
 @ORTOGONAL555: if only that was possible, but suspension set up would be tough to standardize as each bike has specific go to shocks and tunes.

Honestly, a little difference in braking or shifting is not a game change and if a skilled rider is bothered by such a thing I’d be surprised.

I think they’re just picking nits.
  • 69 6
 I think i must be the only one to prefer Shimano to Sram brakes.
  • 13 4
 @nurseben: I had some and they were a nightmare. Just couldn’t predict what you were going to get each time you pulled on the lever. Skilled or unskilled ... that’s a deal breaker!

They even came on hard once when I just went through a compression without touching them. That led to a crash and the final straw. After generations of shimano brakes I swapped to hope about 4 years ago and given the ongoing issues have no intention of going back. Still dedicated to shimano drive though!
  • 56 2
 2010 SRAM drivetrain w/Shimano brakes....2020 Shimano drivetrain with SRAM brakes. That's 2020 for you.
  • 16 0
 @nurseben:
If anything that sort of thing should bother a skilled rider more because they're more in tune with the bike.
I like to push my riding to my limits most days and if my brakes aren't performing as well as they should that could end badly. I'm also fed up with inconsistent bite point on my SLX brakes...
  • 12 2
 @LukeDaws: how is this possible? Do the hoses get compressed or deformed somehow leading to a change in system volume? If so, why is that specific to Shimano? Or is there a component in there that's deforming elastically and causing tiny variations in volume from one pull to the next? I don't get it.
  • 21 1
 Because wandering bite point doesn’t happen with all Shimano brakes? But if you have experienced it - it can be really annoying.
I’ve switched to Codes. No more XT brakes for me.
  • 7 1
 @Allen82: I've never had an issue with Shimano brakes at all but Sram brakes do feel better IMO
  • 1 0
 @nurseben: then it hasn’t happened to you.
  • 15 2
 My last two sets of Shimano brakes were awful. Bite point was jumping around all over the place. Shimano hasn’t addressed or fixed the issue so I’m now riding TRP’s. That’s why people are bagging on Shimano brakes. Fix your $hit Shimano and make them perform like they used to. Do that and maybe I’ll come back.
  • 6 1
 We've been hearing about this issue since the beginning of time. I've had Shimano brakes since around 2005 & never experienced it, I've never had servo wave ones though so my guess is it is to do with that. Has anyone actually tried to figure out what is causing it? Does something in the mechanism not return to its start position properly or something?
  • 10 0
 @mikelevy: I was really hoping you would let us know exactly how many donuts the Mojo bag can safely hold.
  • 1 0
 I've had a couple Shimano brakes with the wandering bite issue. After going through the bleed procedure, I simply throw them away and buy a new set. Currently have three sets of SLX and XT brakes and no wandering bite point problems.
  • 6 2
 @pipm1: I’m with you- I don’t doubt the issue is legitimate as it is so commonly brought up, but I’ve never personally experienced it. That said, I assemble & full bleed my own brakes, so I wonder if the issue is related to mass production factory assembly / factory bleed that rears its head on OEM & pre-bled sets? Perhaps Sram is more tolerant if there is a tiny bit of air in the system? Just a thought.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: I’ve felt it. It’s why I literally have Codes or MT7s on everything. I still think stock mojo brakes are better than the guide 2s, which feel great the first half of a run followed by completely not working on the bottom half of a run.
  • 3 0
 @pipm1: It’s only been a problem on 2017 ones or newer in my case. Two sets in a row for me and well documented by others. No amount of bleeding by me or local shops could fix the issue. I left for TRP’s on my latest build, so far so good.
  • 11 14
 @LukeDaws: some of the most skilled and most picky riders ride shimano brakes. You really think Minnaar, Bruni, Vergier, and other would keep that sponsorship if the brakes were as bad as pinkbike editors make them seem? Allegedly the bite point has been moving forever, so it's not like there was ample opportunity to renew contracts. As you said, skilled or not, a moving bite point should be a deal breaker, so for the most picky and also skilled, it should be a literal deal breaker, except evidence points to it really not being a thing.
  • 7 5
 @BenPea: I heard Shimano was originally a North American company but had to move overseas due to lawsuits over wandering-bite-point and was once attacked in my bed by a 'pair' of Saints so I guess it didn't happen to me @CircusMaximus
  • 4 1
 @Korbi777:

For the first time ever it’s probably easier to get Trickstuff than Shimano right now
  • 1 2
 @LukeDaws: And I always swap sram brakes for the amazing shimano????
  • 3 10
flag just6979 (Nov 28, 2020 at 10:31) (Below Threshold)
 @pipm1: you might have nailed it with the servo wave mention. I doubt the point is actually moving, but the servo action might be exacerbating hands getting tired and then relaxing and getting strong again between long downhills and climbs
  • 7 4
 Used Shimano brakes forever. Latest set of XT's now 12 months old and no issues. Bled them straight out of the box which takes about 10 minutes compared to the painful Sram process which you need a £20 kit for. Love the instant power, with firm bite point. My Jeffsey came with Guide RSC's which latest 6 months before the seals went on the front caliper and the rear suffered uneven piston movement.
  • 4 0
 im happy they list it as con and in the video its pretty clear they find it bad. im happy because i like when theyre not saying everything is perfect and all bikes are great - because its easier to do so as you please most people that way, even if its not really true.
  • 11 3
 @BenPea: Shimano doesn't anodize the inner bore of the master cylinder after machining it. This, coupled with the off-center push of the ServoWave link, leads to the piston ovalizing it, or in some extreme cases, scoring deep gouges there. The seals are unable to do their job, fluid goes past them, and bingo, your lever goes to the bar.
  • 6 0
 @southoftheborder: Yahtzee. But this bike has new brakes
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: like it. So the bite point goes deeper and never comes back due to the fluid being gone forever? Or is it fluctuating back and forth in some cases (temperature-related issue?)?
  • 3 1
 @ceecee: read both without and with 3rd eye connected. May have to do further research..
  • 9 0
 @BenPea: the fluid goes back and forth, remember the master cylinder has a timing port and an overflow port connecting it to the reservoir. So instead of the seal going beyond the timing port and closing the circuit, the fluid goes past the seal and returns to the reservoir. Sometimes a couple of fast pumps on the lever are enough to restore the seal's ability to do its job, but when you're panic grabbing the brakes it's not something you would to instinctively.
  • 7 0
 @ceecee: I've seen master cylinders scored with just a couple of rides on their backs. The top tier models have metallic pistons in there, which aggravate the situation. Deores for instance seem to be less prone to the suffer from the dreaded bite point wandering, but they have plastic pistons in their MCs.
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: Jesus... you have to rearm them manually before you brake, essentially. I know this doesn't happen on all their brakes (XT brakes are everywhere here), so who the f knows?
  • 3 0
 @southoftheborder: I'm convinced. What brakes are you using/wish you were using? I'm ready to ditch my 8000/20s and would like to be able to ignore this topic permanently.
  • 6 12
flag Solorider13 (Nov 28, 2020 at 15:13) (Below Threshold)
 @scoobydan: I prefer srams method of bleeding with Two syringes rather than the worlds worst bleed method with that stupid reservoir on the handle and hope you don’t pull air in. It’s a larger pain in the ass to deal with that reservoir than fill two syringes and have no mess
  • 8 2
 @just6979: It is probably worth noting that the best riders in the world are not running the same anything that we mere mortals are. Everything on their bikes is hand fitted and setup by some of the best mechanics in the world. Your experience may vary. I have had 5 sets of XT brakes and have only had the wandering bite point on my latest bike. I could not get them to work correctly and got a replacement caliper. Works okay now but does not feel like the pre 2017 XT's. I am not a good enough rider to explain the difference.
  • 2 0
 Has anyone tried dealing with Shimano on this; will they do anything? My Slx breaks on my Ripley are all over the map and it really sucks. It might need 1 mm of pull or 50, who knows? They also sound like a truck down shifting on the highway when wet. Any advice?
  • 5 0
 @Solorider13: You can use two syringes with Shimano.
  • 5 0
 @Dtwillow: initially Shimano would send out a warranty replacement at the first mention of wandering bite point.
Unfortunately corporate changed the script at some point from "sorry, we'll send you new brakes" to "we haven't heard of this, contact your dealer".
  • 7 0
 @just6979: It's not a thing for those guys (Minnaar, Bruni, etc) because they have professional mechanics whose job is to make sure their Shimano brakes work perfectly. And as sponsored riders, I'm sure they can swap to new sets of XT's, XTR's, whenever they want.

The wandering bite point is a real thing for so many consumers. It sucks.
  • 1 0
 @Allen82: I take it you've never owned codes.
  • 2 0
 @just6979: Bruni is not sponsored by Shimano brakes.
  • 3 2
 @Solorider13: that "worst" bleed method has been a standard practice for ages and is 100% reliable if you're not a potato. IMHO puts less stress on the seals than blowing fluid back up the M/C.
  • 1 1
 @Allen82: In real word I think a lot of riders, here in my area almost every bike from xc to dh is with Shimano brakes or Formula.
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: I might not be the best example, as I'm still on Formula RXs ;-). Maguras and the newer Formula Cura 2 rank high among the modern brakes I've tested/worked on, but to be clear, none of them have the power and modulation of 4-pot Shimanos.

I've heard/read nothing but great things about Trickstuff's Direttissimas, except for their price and availability. But I'm still far out their price bracket.

TL/DR: if money wasn't an impediment, I'd happily go Trickstuff. Then Formula (can't stand the lever shape of the Maguras), and then TRP or even Hayes.
  • 1 0
 @Camstyn: almost
  • 2 5
 @healthcare1: hand fitted brake pistons? Highly doubt it. Yeah, they're assembled and tuned by some of the best, but that doesn't change anything if the parts themselves are allegedly no good, as is being stated. And except for suspension internals and maybe some custom parts for fit, the pros are pretty much riding what can be bought by us.

Shimano is too perfection driven to allow that bad of a system out. Hell, just look how long it took them to get HG+ dialed in and ready for sale.

And you saying a replacement caliper helped it completely reverses the others in this thread who claim it's lever driven issues, as well as the fact that pinkbike has been bitching since before 2017...
  • 3 1
 @jaydubmah: yet here in this article we're hearing about it on a brand new bike... So how does swapping to a new one fix that? Also they can't just swap in a new one at any time, they don't carry infinite spares. If it were as bad as pinkbike likes to make it out to be, they'd need to carry dozens of brakes, which just doesn't happen.

And it can't be set up, because people claim it happens right after a "perfect bleed", and while the pro mechanics are obviously great at doing bleeds, they can't really do anything extra to a brake internals besides that.
  • 2 2
 I won’t buy or recommend anyone buy a bike specced with shimano brakes. It’s really frustrating, especially now since I’d say most people want SLX/XT drivetrain and Code brakes, with the option between fox and rocks box suspension. you’re not going to find that anywhere though, or at least I haven’t been able to. So now you have to go with Codes and sram drivetrain, which is fine, but you lose out on fox suspension most of the time - or go frame only and spend way more $$.
  • 3 1
 @Solorider13:

Not sure why you're getting hate for this, but the two syringe method applied to Shimano mtb brakes gets fantastic results. I just built a bike with 7120s, rear brake had the wonderful wandering bite point. A thorough dual syringe bleed and it's rock solid. Shimano road brakes are different, and the funnel method works better, even if it's a hassle.
  • 4 0
 @Glenngineer: the problem is it will return.
  • 2 0
 @snowwcold55: product managers are slaves to accountants? As there's still discounting and pre-owned, and getting what you want is meaningful, I'm spending.

@southoftheborder: options! Thanks. Rode Magura on a local shop owner/tech's bike and they felt rich, knob shapes almost palpable in lever--don't know if it was carbon--with mild bite point good for dry/loose. Mountains here are mostly one-finger anyway. Will go Italian on complementary bike to complete historical tour of axis of evil majors, funds permitting.
  • 2 0
 @mm732: never had the pleasure of messing with them. They're hard to come by down here.

However, the data in this spreadsheet (put together by Udi at Ridemonkey) suggests they don't have the same amount not mechanical advantage as other models/brands.

docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1sjPSmOYbhjDBFxcvXVw1ufKfowEBu1AKh8sB6T8e24Y/edit#gid=0
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: Cura 2s are high in both leverages. Good sh$t
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: the power is shocking. I have e4’s and the power just isn’t there. Look the part though, but that’s not much good.
  • 3 0
 @lance2012: defo different feel to shimano. I really struggled with them at first because shimano (when they worked) are so powerful. Over time though I started to really appreciate the modulation of hope and being more balanced in breaking.

That said, I’m certainly not saying Hope are the best out there but they are consistent and reliable. After a number of rides (which aren’t always easy to find time for) were ruined by shimano issues I’ll take reliability every day.
  • 1 0
 @LukeDaws: I agree. Sums them up just right. You do get used to them in the end.
The lever feel consistency is unmatched from any other brakes I’ve had so they’ve definitely got that going for them.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: just 1 more time than every bike's shock pedal mode adjuster lever jawn...never get sick of hearing about how you didn't have to flick it even though I do all the time. Ps- there's a test idea that could be pretty interesting
  • 2 0
 @southoftheborder: what?? 4 piston maguras are at least as powerful and have WAY better modulation then shimanos.
  • 4 0
 I used over a litre of Shimano Brake Fluid since March just bleeding my wife’s and my Shimano brakes before every second ride. Literally. No lie. No exaggeration. Tried brand new XT levers, Zee levers, Deore levers. 4 pot Deore calipers, SLX calipers, XT calipers. Was tired of going into a manual and having to cross my fingers before braking.
The best solution I found was replacing them with all with Codes/Guides.
  • 1 0
 @southoftheborder: This is the best (only) explanation I've heard for this phenomenon. That said, I doubt that servo wave is the culprit, as it should produce lower off-center forces than brakes with a direct connection between the lever and mc piston. It seems more likely that there is an issue between the hardness of the MC and a harder piston. Given that there seems to be a mix of brakes that never work and brake that work their entire lifetime, it seems that there might be an assembly issue. Do you have photos of the MC scoring you could share.
  • 2 0
 @cjeder: unfortunately, I don't have any pictures. Most of the time it's just the MC bore getting ovalized thought. I've seen scored MC walls in XTs and XTRs. But every single model from SLXs and up do suffer from this phenomenon.

Another possible cause are micro cracks developing in the calliper's ceramic pots because of repetitive thermal stress. Sometimes you find a leaky calliper with no obvious failure, and I've come to think of how the ceramic pots react to repeated heating/cooling cycles, such as the ones they'd experiment when suddenly getting splashed with water after a long descent with heavy braking. Or maybe Shimano simply sucks at reaming inner bores and both their MC and calliper pistons are unable to seal properly...

All in all, I know the ovalization of the master cylinder is measurable after the wandering bite point happens. The scored walls point to a non concentric piston sliding.
  • 1 0
 Why would a micro-leaky caliper cause wandering bite point? If fluid is very very slowly leaving the system, it would just be refilled from the res until the res ran dry then you'd just have squishy brakes.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: not the leak by itself, but imagine if those micro-leaks do also let air in...
  • 1 0
 @southoftheborder: Then you would still get squishy brakes, like a bad bleed. However, people claim the wandering happens even right after a "perfect bleed"...
  • 1 0
 @just6979: hence my thoughts (and experience) on the MC bore's ovalization.
  • 4 0
 @just6979: you wandering-bite-point denialists are all similar.

Pinkbike poll: would you rather upgrade your kids' rides to lightly used SLX or above brakes, or have Mike Levy babysit them?

Suppose he didn't experience w-b-p for this review, and is only parroting as a public safety warning something he heard from someone more knowledgeable, but is correct anyway. There's plenty of testimony right here, and it doesn't sound like it's coming from agents or fanatics of SRAM, Hope, etc.

Look on the bright side: other brakes may develop problems too
  • 1 1
 @Allen82: I to prefer shimano. I just advance the pads closer to the rotor to eliminate the issue
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: Not owned. But ridden bikes with them.
I find them vague. If that makes sense.
I think Ive grown to like the bite of Shimano's and use my fingers to modulate rather than the brake it self.
  • 1 0
 @tonyplanet give everyone a day on cable pull rim-brakes from the 90s and we'll all be so thankful Sram and Shimano have made good stuff for us to use
  • 1 1
 @foggnm: Wait til I tell you about cable disc brakes...
  • 2 0
 @BenPea: @tonyplanet: already did both of those for years (cantilevers on an MB-6 in 1995, then Deore v-brakes, XTR parallel push v-brakes, then disc with BB7, Elixirs, Hopes, Guides).

only thing I missed is hydro rim, though I did have a frame in 1997 that was kinda made for them: there is full length housing/hose routing for the rear brake on my Giant ATX-890 Tomac Signature frame.

side-pull is better than canti, any disc is way better than either. and hydro disc is better than cable disc, but they are way closer than the gap from rim brake to disc brake.
  • 2 0
 @ceecee: This misght be also handy: a peak force/leverage visualization tool based on the spreadsheet I mentioned earlier:

brakes.ddzyne.nl
  • 3 1
 @just6979: had a '97 ATX-970 as my 1st proper bike. Put a BB7 on the front in 2002 when I moved to the Alps. Still run them now. Only decent experience with hydros was HFX9s, Guides on a Sanction and Hopes on a V10. All disappointing. I have a fairly intimate relationship with those Avids and mention them as much as possible. I remain convinced that the only thing holding back their popularity is people's vanity and the need to run a bizarre floating cable line down the frame to make them feel good.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: My rear brakes are still not right. But as I said in my original note, I cannot tell why. The front brake setup is great and feels just like all of my past XT brakesets. The rear just does not. Don't get me wrong it works, it kind of feels like the pads are glazed over. I did change the rotor, I changed to another set of finned pads, no change. I did try some Clarks sintered which make the brakes usable. If I did not have the Clarks pads just laying around I would have chucked both brakes and bought Magura.
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: floating cable line? You mean the full length housing, since it was pretty rare back then? The BB7s didn't have to run full housing even on the ATX with it's odd bosses. I actually ended up with the brakes on the cable-stop bosses and ran the front mech full length, made the brakes feel actually really good since there was less housing to flex!

Also used a a2z IS-mount disc adapter that clamped onto the left side rear dropout in order to run a BB7 on that frame. Worked well, except if you ever had to brake hard in reverse, then the adapter would spin and you'd get some lag as the first forward braking spun it back into place. I guess I don't miss the 90s, hahaha.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: I am talking full-length housing, but the floating bit (probably the wrong term) comes from the housing being fixed tight to the swing arm and then running through a couple of zip tie loops along the top tube (there are zip ties all over the show to be honest). These are just guides and the housing just slides back and forth through them. So suspension compression just results in the loop in front of the handlebars moving back and forth too. No tight chicanes caused by suspension action, smooth lever feel, can't remember when I last changed the rear cable). I'd love to know if anyone else has done this (I doubt anyone is clinging on to BB7s as stubbornly as me - I'm pretty weird in that respect).
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: I see. Well, on a modern bike you could easily run a full length housing without a bunch of zip-ties since they're designed to carry a hose already. Cable-actuated disc brakes' big down side isn't weird cabling, it's smoothness, or lack-there-of. A hydraulic system will always feel smoother that pulling a cable through a few feet of housing, and it will stay that way, unlike a cable slowly getting more drag as it wears/gets dirty.

However, anyone who says it's the power holding cable discs back doesn't know what they're talking about, because BB7s and other cable-discs are definitely one-finger brakes with lever force levels comparable to hydro systems. Yes, some hydro brakes are insanely powerful (small lever force generating massive caliper force), but compared to the average hydro brake, modern cable discs are still in the ballpark.

Wintertime fat-bikers know what's up, running cable discs to avoid potentially sluggish oil in hydraulic systems (though this only really applies to mineral oil brakes, since DOT4 and especially DOT5.1 are designed for cars which regularly have to deal with below freezing temps). And long-distance trekkers or bike-packers might choose cables for ease of repair.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: You need the zip ties because you have to follow the natural trajectory of the cable + housing, which requires loops about half an inch in diameter on the left-hand side (the front one of which has the gear cable going through it too - I'm telling you it's either nuts or genius, I'm split). Without that it won't slide cleanly. This is why the lever action is smooth and pretty much as light touch as the hydros I've ridden. I tend to avoid mud too, which helps keep the cable clean for actual years. But maintenance wise, cost wise, bleeding wise, wandering bite point wise, fade wise, adjustment and reliability-wise (oh, and power wise)? Very pleased with them.

I'm feeling like a fringe nutter.
  • 49 0
 "- There are still more capable trail bikes"
Yes, there are plenty of enduro bikes claiming to be trail bikes just for sales sake.
  • 18 1
 Sure seems that way, doesn't it? 160mm fork on trail bikes lol
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: are we not ignoring that a few of these are all mountain?
  • 3 0
 Agreed. Makes me smile everytime a new "trail bike" with 140mm++ front or rear is published.
  • 1 0
 Im sure its great for the right trail... but almost 30 seconds off the pace of the P-train in descending is going to ruin the day for descending with similar capability mates. 5-6 seconds is what you might expect..... and its not even an incredible climber, 19 seconds off the Giant... but I guess its smack bang in the middle which is what you want for very traily trails...
  • 2 0
 @CircusMaximus: @mikelevy That's a valid point. The "All Mountain" category is inconsistent across brands, and is possibly going away. So, I think that's a big reason brands are making really burly "Trail" bikes. It's Trail or Enduro...
  • 51 5
 I thought 27.5 was dead, but it looks like it’s really getting it’s Mojo back this year.
  • 12 1
 I thought all 27.5 bikes were buried deep in to the Ibis
  • 41 1
 I think honest to goodness trail bikes are kind of at a disadvantage in these tests. Most trails just aren't as burly as what you deal with in Squamish. Like I get that it's a world class destination for MTB lovers, but you typical local trails are probably gonna be mellower. Which is where a bike like Mojo would probably really shine. I think I remember last year's test where the tester loved the Occam on his local trails, but was not keen at Squamish. I love the format, just keep in mind it favors the bikes that lean more aggressive than makes sense on most trails people ride.
  • 13 1
 Under rated post....but your opinion doesnt matter because squamish is the nurburgring...neruemberg...nursomething... however the F you spell it....I hope you get my point. Regardless, everyone wants to drive Porsche's around their city commutes. None of it makes sense. You know what bike will shred your trails...and probably not the longest lowest slackest steeziest internet(PB) burning machine. Keep it to yourself...ignorance is bliss...
  • 11 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity - Yup, for sure good points. I live in Squamish and prefer more classic trail bikes with 130 - 140mm of travel and slightly steeper angles than most riders here.

@takeiteasyridehard - No ignorance here; I say exactly the same thing in many reviews Smile
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: yeah the ignorance part was probably a bit harsh. It is probably the added stability that those long low slack bikes yield that the average Joe's, or under average Joe's want. I'm with you, I like a little bit more maneuverability and exciting ride, even when riding fast rough stuff. But we have the skills to control it. If you didnt have those skills(or think you do but dont) the longer slacker lower bikes probably just give people more confidence...and descending is largely a head game for all ability levels.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: I've come around to your way of thinking. Sold my Stumpy Evo for an Ibis Ripley and I'm not looking back. There's something to it...
  • 29 1
 Looks like a rad bike. People buy short travel rigs in large part to climb well and be playful on the trail. It's strange to me that the 27.5 bikes don't get marketed as hard to this end. From household name brands, only the 5010, Scout (sort of...), Calling, and this bike come to mind. Unrelated: as a guy with an Optic on the way, a quick compar-o of the winners of each category from the previous year's winners might be cool...
  • 6 8
 True but Overall 29er are a tad better for a lot of people as they roll over obstacles better - thus giving more confidence.

My 29er Stumpjumper is also playful - but mostly because of the "short" reach and steeper ha- the 650b must also be hella fun.
  • 9 2
 Knolly warden. Probably best of the bunch @scvkurt03
  • 2 0
 @ricochetrabbit: That's a bigger bike, than the others, though. I guess it's in line with the Scout...
  • 14 0
 I love my new Banshee Spitfire. I can see how not everyone would like these shorter travel 27.5 bikes. But I wouldn’t want anything else, it’s perfect for me and my riding style.
  • 3 0
 @ricochetrabbit: I was actually quite shocked when I realized they chose the Trance over my coil-sprung Warden as the dedicated climber. I can only imagine it was due to COVID related shortages ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 2 4
 Surprisingly my 180/160 warden climbs like a billy goat @Wocket-in-my-sprocket:
  • 2 0
 Intense Primer 27.5. Has excellent pedaling kinematics.
  • 3 0
 @Dyceman: I had V2 version and that bike was a blaster, my very favourite
  • 3 0
 I agree, I personally love this kind of bike. 27.5, mid travel, lightweight, snappy handling. The good thing I guess, is when they do a 27.5 trail bike shootout, there will only be a handfull to choose from. Should make the buying decision easier.
  • 4 2
 I don’t get the Salsa and Actofive. They’re enduro bikes with slightly less rear travel. Same length, same front travel, same angles. Why not just get a full enduro bike then? Probably won’t climb any worse, and will descend better. Kind of pointless to call them trail bikes. Actually, there are bikes (Spec Evo, Ripmo, Switchblade) that do the trail and enduro thing better than these 2, let’s see those 3 go head to head.
  • 27 1
 " it's like the Ibis was doing that sort of work for me"

I see what you did there. hehehe
  • 2 0
 Came here just for this
  • 1 2
 It's supposed to be "doing the job".
  • 22 0
 I think it is a fantastic trail bike in the truest sense of the word trail. It is snappy and handy and it climbs well. It is not a wannabe Enduro or an Enduro that also wants to be a trail bike. Works perfectly in many regions on this planet. Cudos to Ibis to have something like that in the portfolio also with smaller wheels. I love the white frame. But it came too late this year for me. Otherwise I would have gone for one. Maybe next time.
  • 1 1
 I agree the Mojo 4 looks so playful and it's not trying to be anything but a fun trail bike right down to it's original routes. However, I would like to see Ibis offer a XTR and X01 drivetrain, or even a XX1 (non AXS) build. Even more importantly, you cannot get even one build with SRAM brakes at Ibis???
  • 22 0
 Take a drink every time Levy says "rocket ship"
  • 1 0
 HA! Came here to make the same drinking-game proposal.
  • 2 2
 Or mentions specialized...
  • 18 0
 "if you can spot a good backside" - sounds like the bike for me!
  • 3 1
 If you don't think to yourself "sweet backside" or "nailed that backside" and giggle about it at least once a ride, you're doing it wrong
  • 20 2
 Framebags rule and thank you for bagging on the fashionistas
  • 7 1
 Came here for this. The bag is legit. Think it'll fit a smartphone?
  • 4 0
 The ol “gas tank” bag
  • 3 0
 @Fabris: Depends on the phone. My iphone SE fits in there nicely
  • 17 0
 I don’t think we should be comparing bikes with slim shocks and 34mm forks to bikes with piggybacks and 36s.
  • 6 0
 Agreed, but "trail bike" means different things and the Mojo is more up against the Stumpy.
  • 20 3
 doesnt look like a session...
  • 16 1
 The only constant is change. Embrace the xt experience.
  • 5 0
 LOL
  • 11 1
 So cool @mikelevy you mentioned the fact that there s no significant difference in between the SLX and the XT drive train. Quiet off topic regarding the Ibis but very very notable aspect.
  • 20 0
 Except that XT and XTR get multi-release shifters, which I wouldn't want to be without. Luckily, XT shifters are quite cheap, so you can just upgrade the shifter and run SLX for the rest of the components.
  • 2 0
 @Crossmaxx: Yeah thanks a lot !
its an eyeopening knowing it. Id get a Stumpy Evo Comp then just get carbon wheels laced to fast i9 hubs and maybe get those Magura calipers and Shimano levers and its a winner.
  • 6 0
 @barbarosza: You save a fair bit of weight with the XT cassette for not much money too. Worth the extra on a fresh build or once you wear out the original SLX cassettes.

I built my hardtail with XT shifter and cassette, SLX derailleur and chain. A sram GX crankset from an old bike and Code R brakes and I think that I've nailed it on price/performance components.
  • 3 0
 @mtb-sf: Yeah you sure did right there !

I dont ride as much or I dont keep a bike as long as the cassette wears out.I change the chain 2 or 3 times and thats about it.Then 2 seasons is up and Id swap as I get bored and need to try something else. Plus the re sale value is super low if you keep a bike more than 2 seasons.But thanks for the tip and I get your point.
Ill be good on SLX and get a sweet crankarm like the Cane Creek one or the brand that Kovarik is sponsoder I forgot it now and then some Magura calipers with XT levers or even SLX and im ok or yeah go the Code way
  • 2 0
 For what it's worth the SLX cranks and chainring combination is lighter than the XT combo. That and I prefer the SLX looks by a mile. I got SLX cranks, chainring, cassette and derailleur. And got XT shifter and brakes.
  • 1 0
 @Mesmomesmo: According to R2-bike, SLX 7100 crank with 32t ring is 644g. XT 8100 with 32t ring is 632g. It would be more accurate to say that they are the same weight. The SLX with aftermarket ring is only about 60g away from XTR, big value there.
  • 9 4
 I so wish in one of the next podcasts you guys would speak a little bit about geometry.How does the TT lentgh has even more influence than reach.

And then Im one of those idiots that finds himself right in the middle of Mediums and Longs both reach wise and WB wise.
Im 1.75 I dont have long legs and they re not short either.Im good reach wise in anywhere in between 460 and 475 and then WB wise Im 1200 - 1235 maybe.... Yet besides Ibis or Commencal ( Meta TR of course ) I dont even know what to get.
I was so thrilled when the new Stumpy Evo super adjustable came out but then I d love the reach of the S4 - 467 to 475 but the wheelbase is way too long with the shortest being 1240, I love the WB of the S3 but Reach wise id hate a 442 - 448 mm and its such a cool agressive trail bike....For the regular Stumpy I could go either way , S4 or S3. I cant afford 2 bikes cause if I could Id go with an S3 Stumpy and an S4 Evo but im not there yet. Can only have one trail bike and my dirtjumper which has already a 445 reach ( Transition PBJ ).

I know I know Im super annoying for bringing this up again and again but it is a serious issue. Im in between the sizes seriously now.

So far my Bronson V3 in large is the best geo ever in the world for my body.....but I need a 29er now .

Thank you.
  • 4 2
 Not sure why you're being downvoted, there's a ton us tweeners, we're literally the most common height. I'm 5'10" (178 cm I guess) and almost always between size on most bike charts. Like you, I think my happy place is between 465 and 475 reach, but that often results in a barge. And the TT length is a weird measure now, since the steep seat tubes have come into play. I feel like there is a lot of pressure on my wrists on a lot of these steep STA bikes. It's definitely an issue.
  • 2 6
flag barbarosza (Nov 28, 2020 at 20:43) (Below Threshold)
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: Right ? ..... but that with that Stumpy Evo I just look so retarded.Literally.They made it so adjustable so that everyone could have a good ride,yet im right in between and im so frustraded...So wished they had one with all the Reach Numbers from S4 and then some Wheelbase numbers in between S3 and S4 or just a 1230 one and call it a day. . . 465 and 1230 is to be found only on the Commencal Meta TR , then some Ibis has it similar and the Pivot has it at 457 with 1227 or so ..... others is bananas.....Sentinel s 450 with 1233 .... again that reach is on the small side of the spectrum for what I like...I need to be roomie up on the control room but I dont need to be more in between the wheeels than 1230
  • 1 0
 @barbarosza: did you check the Orbea Occam? It seems to tick a lot of boxes for what you want in a 29er. I'm also a short chainstays/longer reach lover, still on 27.5 wheels for the same reasons. An Occam in size L with a -2 degree angleset would be tits.
  • 2 6
flag barbarosza (Nov 29, 2020 at 6:18) (Below Threshold)
 @southoftheborder: nah I never checked those as I dont like the name...Orbea...ha ha ....plus re sale value dont think is too good and when I put close to 8000 $ in a bike id expect after 2 seasons to get back a minimum of 4500 $ or close to 6000 $
  • 2 1
 Yup, that one is in the works!
  • 1 2
 @mikelevy: Thank you
  • 6 0
 I mean, if you want to make this bike more capable and fun on the DH, just throw a piggyback shock and a 150mm 35/36mm stanchion fork on the front. Boom. You've just Jeff Kendal Weeded your Mojo.
  • 6 0
 And it already has the Kendal Weed stash bag...
  • 3 0
 Pretty solid comment there. I had a Mojo HD (2nd version, 163 mm rear, 160 mm front). It came with an inline shock and really needed something more to make the thing come alive. I ended up push tuning it and it worked great, but alternatives would have also worked.

For this new Mojo, it appears a similar rule applies. Sounds like the suspension is getting in the way of what could be a more capable bike up and down. Say even a DPX2 and a 36 150 mm fork if you're into that thing, of even just a GRIP 2 34 140mm. I'm surprised they don't offer fork / shock changes, most of their other range they do.

Different bike, but that's why you can spec a Deore RIPMO with Fox X2 and 36 Grip 2 Factory level suspenders. Spend it where you want, not where you don't.

PS: I subscribe to a somewhat Ibis diehard fan.
  • 5 0
 A buddy of mine spent three years on the Mojo 3 and I begged him to ditch that DPS for something else. He was content to complain about it constantly and mess with the dials every ride. I just lol'd.
  • 2 0
 @FuTAnT: That's what I'm saying. Jeff Kendal Weed put a DPX2 and a 150mm 36 on his Mojo 3. I have an HD3 and my GF has a Mojo 3 (which I regularly "steal"). Once she can afford it, I'm making her do this upgrade. I'm also a pretty diehard Ibis fan.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbxmIvBiu6s
  • 9 2
 Another 27.5 bike that’s rather good. Good to see they are not being killed off as simply rolling straight over stuff is kind of lame.
  • 6 2
 It would be a cool idea for bike company's (or bottle company's) to design a conforming water bottle / cage that's specific to their frame design where space is an issue. Do water bottle's need to look like a traditional bottle??
  • 1 1
 YT does something along those lines.
  • 8 0
 proprietary water bottles? It might be time to take up fly fishing.
  • 2 1
 @RobKong: I've got some $250 nippers I could sell you.
  • 2 0
 A short and wide bottle: www.yt-industries.com/detail/index/sArticle/2476
(835ml!)

Clever.

I'm surprised, that Fidlock still hasn't launched their own version of it (without YT logo) yet.
  • 1 0
 The only bottle I've been able to find that works on my Ibis Mojo with a piggyback shock is the Fidlock. Works great, but took tons of trial and lots of errors to find the right product that fits.
  • 4 0
 I'm coming off a V1 Ripmo and now riding a Mojo 4 MULLET with a 130 Grip 2 fork. It was a fun bike before the mullet setup but now it crushes everything, including the descents! WAY more fun than my old V1 Ripmo, especially cornering. I love the mullet setup so much that I just ordered a carbon mixed wheelset. At 5'9" and 140lbs, I can't imagine a better bike for me.
  • 4 0
 Enduro bro hate machine! Small wheels and 130mm of travel? What? I love bikes like this. Fun, that’s generally my goal of a bike ride. Darty and quick, all the trail side jibs are fun. There is no replacement for displacement if speed is your fun. Exploring backcountry on trails not purpose built for bike is a lot of fun on a bike like this.
  • 8 3
 I actually really like my new SLX 4 piston brakes. First time I have had shimano brakes in years and can’t say I have had any bite point issues.
  • 9 0
 Most don't wander until you're further along in the relationship. =P
  • 5 0
 It's weird with Shimano brakes, some do and some don't. My 9020 XTR's are faultless, my Saints are atrocious.
  • 4 0
 @Blackers: That has been well documented, and its also the reason why the issue doesn't show up in all reviews. Probably due to manufacturing tolerances, some brakes wander, others don't.
  • 4 1
 They’ve talked about it so much, and so many people here in the comments have written about it, I have no doubt it happens. But I either don’t know what they mean by “wandering bite point” and have no idea it’s happening, or it’s never happened to me.
  • 4 0
 @TheR: you're riding downhill fast, get to a tech bit, hit the brake lever to slow a little, pull it normal amount, get normal biting point, then the next time you pull the brake lever, maybe a few split seconds later, it's biting the disc super early with much less pull of the brake lever. Then you have to either decide to carry on with that weird bite point - depending on how steep/technical that section of trail is (ie can I let go of the brakes here and hope it readjusts itself, or just carry on with unwanted early bite point)... so if possible you have to release the brake lever and pull it again, hoping the bite point is back to where you set it up originally. It's weird, happens to me most rides, not the best as I live in Nelson BC and there's lots of steeps here. Never caused any crashes for me but its unusual & unnerving for sure.
  • 4 0
 I hope 27.5 never dies. For me I prefer 29in but I was just talking with my girlfriend today and she is 5'3 and 115lbs soaking wet. She just can't move around and get comfortable on a 29in bike.
  • 1 0
 I'm a guy, but I'm the same numbers as your GF. Agreed. I can't find a 29er that I get along with. I honestly wish 26" was still a thing for us short stackers. BUT 27.5 has proven to be fine now that I get used to it. I just prefer the ride of a 26.
  • 44 38
 Pros: It's an Ibis so it pedals well.
Cons: It's an Ibis so it is ugly.
  • 6 1
 Looks like a bird.
  • 2 4
 sort of what i‘m think, without the climbing part
  • 2 3
 You beat me to it.
  • 1 1
 I think this would be a real fun trail bike to ride but wish they put a bit more MOJO in the looks...
  • 5 3
 the bike is beautiful the bag is ugly
  • 2 1
 @madmon: Yes, it does look much better w/o the bag on it...
  • 7 1
 Clever idea for the storage but not sure about the look of it.
  • 6 1
 I had one for a while. Loved the bike and the storage bag, while looking a bit goofy, was really convenient way to store all the bits/snacks for a ride.
  • 1 1
 Same here. I rode a Mojo 3 for three years and used the bag all the time.
  • 7 3
 Thanks for the reviews. It's been a good field test so far. Please consider reviewing more brands outside the mainstream like Banshee, Canfield, and Knolly.
  • 2 1
 Yes because I want to read about bikes that I am even less able to find...
  • 7 4
 Unpopular opinion: for piggyback reservoirs that interfere with water bottles, there's plenty of room to have the reservoir mounted sideways; if shock makers would offer that it would work fine.
  • 2 0
 I up(down)graded my old shimano XT brakes (front with a saint caliper) with the new BR-M4100 Deore levers. Im a big fan of shimano brakes, but the inconsistent bite point and the fact that theyre a bit too grabby early in the lever stroke made me look left and right to other manufacturers. Then i saw these new levers that are just 16 euros each and tried them. So far i really like them after 3 rides (one in steep terrain and in muddy conditions). You get a firm and precise bite point and loads of modulation with these levers. Theres no more change in bite point, no matter the temperature outside, the temperature of the brake etc. The max. power of the brakes is nearly the same (the levers are longer than the servo wave and XTR Race levers), maybe a tiny bit less than with the servo wave levers. You only have to adapt to the new modulation. If you want mor power you have to pull harder, but like i said... when you need full stopping power with the servo wave levers you have to pull them hard, as well. So its just the part between full power and just touching the brakes that changes. the next thing I will try are some trickstuff power brake pads. The only thing i noticed is that lever position and reach is critical on these brake levers to get the full power of the brake where your finger has the most power.
  • 4 0
 Shouldn't rocketship also be in air quotes? It could be confusing to children
  • 3 0
 Bike industry:
Let's design Pressfit bottom brackets, this is so cool
Years later: Pros of this bike : There is a threaded bottom bracket !!
  • 8 3
 28 lbs is pretty good for a bike like this.
  • 4 1
 The 5010 seems like a tank compared to the Mojo.
  • 2 1
 You can get it down to 26 fairly easily. None of these components are really weight conscious.
  • 1 0
 Great review! Glad the s35 rims proved durable, but I more wonder how the 35mm IW and 18mm depth rims and 2.5” tires (I think 2.6” may actually be stock) affected real and perceived ride characteristics, if at all. The wide and shallow rims and 2.6” stock tires on the 27.5” build seem like choices Ibis thought/hoped would translate on the trail.
  • 5 0
 27.5 bikes look so much better than 29
  • 1 0
 I love that you say most will take fashion over function on this bike. I think they needed a bigger bag to cover the whole awkward frame. Saw one on trail and it is even uglier in person. If you want a DW bike just buy a Pivot.
  • 3 0
 How does it feel in comparison to the new Ripmo in its climbing agility/descending confidence?
  • 2 1
 Good/not near as good.
  • 5 4
 Actually the bottom out resistance is decent which makes the Mojo fun to jump and get a little wild, but the small wheels get lost in the really chunky stuff.
  • 1 0
 @thechunderdownunder: I agree, the Mojo 4 slays the jumps. It gave me a big boost in jumping confidence over my 2015 Ibis HD3.
  • 1 0
 @blizzardmk: lol looks like other people who have not ridden it disagreeWink
  • 3 0
 @thechunderdownunder: Apparently. Your comment about jumping and chunky stuff seems pretty reasonable, not sure why so many are down-voting. Maybe the same people moaning about how ugly it is (I disagree).

I don't have a lot of steep chunky trails in my area, but there are quite a few fun jump trails and a lot of old-school twisty singletrack. I think the Mojo 4 makes a lot of sense.
  • 2 0
 @blizzardmk: it’s such a fun bike! I have only two rides in the Mojo, but it was plain fun. I owned a Ripley and a Ripmo V2. All great bikes. However I’m super super stoked on the new Stumpjumper! I don’t know how other people like it, but damn I’m impressed. And I’m an Ibis Fan Boy.
  • 3 0
 The problem I have is my 2009 26" Mojo SL still rides and performs great right down to the pushed rear end
  • 2 2
 It would be interesting to see a bike like the Scott Genius or Transition Scout compared with both the trail bikes and enduro/freeride bikes to see if an all mountain bike could be a goldilocks bike. It was the reason i bought the V2 spitfire. It could race local endure and yet still be a fun playful trail bike.
  • 2 0
 @ibiscycles Make this color combo available on the Ripley....plz.... ! :-)
Great work Pinkebike! like these fieldtest artikels alot.
  • 1 0
 Does no one else find it incredible that @ibiscycles specs Fox Factory suspension on EVERY new Mojo build from Deore to AXS and there's not one mention of it from @pinkbike? Bravo Ibis
  • 5 4
 Don't know why this test has the Fit 4, as Mojos 4 I've seen come with the Grip 2 damper. Which I was surprised in this category.
  • 8 0
 Not in the vid but in the article:

"Note: Note: After testing was completed we learned that our bike came with a 2020 Fox 34 FIT 4 fork due to bike boom related product shortages. The correct spec, and the way the bike is shipping now, is with a 2021 Factory 34 with a GRIP 2 damper.."
  • 3 0
 Yeah I just checked the website and saw even the base Deore comes with Grip 2 which is pretty fantastic. Maybe it was an old build that didn't get updated??

Edit* I just saw that they wrote in the article that Covid caused them to have the wrong fork.
  • 9 9
 Ripmov2 a way better apples to apples bike for this field test in the trail cat. Climbs better then mojo and certainly descends more confidentially with 36 g2 and wagon wheels. Weight pretty much same.
  • 19 4
 how is it gonna climb better with heavier (bigger) wheels/rubber, heavier frame and heavier fork?
  • 4 6
 @2wheelzgood: 29ers....
  • 16 1
 Ripmo is their enduro bike. Do marketing categories mean nothing to you people???
  • 3 2
 @Giddyhitch: actually the Ripmo is and “enduro capable” Trail bike. The HD5(which is less capable) is Ibis’s “enduro bike”Smile
  • 3 1
 Agreed, but Ripmo has greater than 140 rear travel, which they defined as their limit.
  • 4 5
 If u ride shimano brakes n want to love them...Learn how to bleed a set ...
  • 1 1
 @2wheelzgood: same wheels and same control tires used on all bikes in the field test. 36 fork is heavier yes, but frame isn’t and the 2 of the comparative bikes have 36 forks in the trail cat. Plus there all 29’ers. My point is that it would have been a better comparison. Yes it has a twitch more then 140mm travel but under 150mm. Or have 3x 27.5 trail bikes and 3x 29’er trail bikes to give more relativity. All said I’d love to try the mojo myself. Minus gear bag, just no.
  • 4 3
 Mojo 's are so much better looking than ripmo's.... Obviously once your on a ripmo riding it's moot. But just something about that frame design that bugs me...
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy Trolled the comments..... couldn't find anything about that SEXY AF T-Shirt.

Tell me more about THAT
*goes and grabs a beer and returns to mac*
  • 3 0
 The Grim Donut shirt! You'll find it in the store. Maybe. I think.
  • 1 0
 And @mikelevy, no protestations about the 27.5" wheel's ability to roll over things or otherwise be a detriment on the descent.
  • 3 2
 Think this bike in a medium would have been better for you. That is a f’ing huge front center/reach to go with the very short chain stays. Weird geo for a trail bike.
  • 5 2
 Nah, don't think so.
  • 9 8
 If bikes like this were designed around being a mullet, they'd be far more capable.
  • 1 5
flag herzalot (Nov 28, 2020 at 7:58) (Below Threshold)
 That's the beauty of a 27.5 trailbike, you can make any of them a mullet with a fork and a wheel. You will have to manage the numbers up front by either decreasing the fork travel or accepting a 20mm higher front end, but damn it's a great option. 1/2 degree slacker per 10 mm increase up front.
  • 8 6
 Why the fascination with mullets, I’ll just never know. I’ve been riding mullet on and off for years, it’s just a thing, it does not make a bike more capable.

I just switched back to full 29 and within fifteen minutes I felt comfortable, climber better, felt more confident.

The only thing I like about the smaller rear wheel is it feels like I can initiate tech moves easier and the back end feels quicker.

The down side is less rollover and some wierdness in carving.
  • 6 5
 @herzalot: 29ers generally make for better mullet conversions than 27.5 bikes
  • 8 2
 @herzalot: if you go from a 27.5 fork and wheel to a 29 fork and wheel, without decreasing travel, you're raising the front end by ~40mm, not 20.
  • 1 1
 @thegoodflow: agreed on this. bb drop close to disappears when you plonk niner fork on 27
  • 3 0
 The Mojo is more capable, it’s just more capable in other areas beyond only descending. If descending capability is your thing, don’t get a trail bike, go enduro. But if you want a bike that rides up, down, and everything in between good , but not great, then get the Mojo.

If I had to replace my HD3, this bike would be a strong contender vs the Ripmo.
  • 2 1
 @nurseben: That's why the fascination, you get the quicker acceleration and it feels a little more nimble. I think most mullets are just a compromise however. A few more years of r&d and hopefully we'll see well conceived mullets come out. I for one would love one in my fleet if it worked as advertised without the geo being compromised.
  • 2 8
flag lukazy (Nov 28, 2020 at 11:43) (Below Threshold)
 @herzalot: putting a 29” front wheel on a 27.5 bike only lifts the front end 10mm.
  • 2 1
 A 29 inch wheel is just better in the front in the downhills.
  • 2 4
 @thegoodflow: and @lukazy Both of you are incorrect. 1.5" is close to 40mm. However, half of that is above the axle so doesn't make any difference in the height, leaving 20mm of extra height below the axle. Since I went from a 170 Lyrik to a 160 Lyrik, I accounted for 10 of that 20 mm. Thus I only raised my front end 10 mm, and slacked it out 1/2 a degree. It rides great, including rollover (since the back end kicks up less than it does on a 29er), quicker in turns than a 29er, but with all of the plow-ability that the big front wheel affords. Revel Rail FWIW.
  • 3 2
 @herzalot: "However, half of that is above the axle so doesn't make any difference in the height..."

Yeah, half the wheel is above the axle... and that's why you swapped to a 29er with a longer a2c to accommodate the larger wheel. So, you raised the axle, and you also increased the a2c length. No way you only slacked the bike by half a degree.... probably more like 1.2 degrees
  • 1 0
 @thegoodflow: I'll check my numbers again and actually measure it out. The bike rides great, but I will confirm what you are asserting. Maybe I was wrong (something you never hear anyone say these days).
  • 1 2
 @thegoodflow: So I went out and did an actual side-by-side comparison of the two forks. Guess what? They are nearly identical in axle to crown - maybe 1mm difference. Soooooo, you are sort of correct. That would make my bike about 20mm taller, not 10mm. And that means 1 degree slacker and not 1/2 degree. Hmmm. Well, I rode it up some steep switchbacks today without issue, and railed the descents, so I still love it!
  • 3 2
 Trail Riders all over the planet: " Ah yes this is the bike i've been waiting for" LOL
  • 3 1
 Great job and review Mike! Thanks.
  • 1 0
 Looks like there’s a good chance Specialized will come up with another W in a field test.
  • 3 2
 That triggers folks. Careful.
  • 1 1
 When Ibis makes this 140mm rear and a 29er I will buy one. I love this classic frame design and just cant get behind the ripmo for some reason
  • 2 2
 So you want an Intense Primer 29. You didn't know you did, but now you do.
  • 1 0
 “because that's what that's mostly what new bikes are.” What’s that what? That?
  • 1 0
 No Fox X2 of DPX2 on a bike this expensive? It would definitely give the bike a better look
  • 1 0
 At first I thought this was an ebike
  • 5 9
flag tonyplanet (Nov 28, 2020 at 7:23) (Below Threshold)
 That's actually a good thought. I think Ibis should get into the ebike game. The Mojo would make an awesome ebike platform... it's already halfway there with it's looks.
  • 2 5
 @tonyplanet: I agree, I think Ibis would make a great lightweight ebike. Will we see a E-Mojo or E-Ripmo (which will Ripmore) in 2021?
  • 2 2
 I have an "08 Mojo that I turned into a mullet and it's the capablest bike I've ever ridden !
  • 3 1
 A top tube hump, hmm.
  • 4 5
 That poor bike looks hideous, and I wouldn't buy it for that reason. I'm riding something equally as hideous ... but if shelling out large $$$ then it has to look decent.
  • 3 1
 Dat bodybag tho...
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy What is you opinion on the Bikeyoke dropperpost?
  • 3 0
 No issues, nice remote.
  • 1 1
 Blah blah........more capable........fun tho?
  • 1 1
 So.. conclusion is that.. this is a bike?
  • 1 1
 Odd that this premier-type content was published on Saturday.
  • 1 0
 yikes
  • 4 5
 What's that inconsistent bite point he talks about in every review?
  • 18 1
 If you drag shimano brakes for say 5 seconds, release then pull again, often the engagement is way out. Release for a sec, and it returns to normal. on steeps mostly. 60% of the time it happens every time.
  • 2 5
 @kelownamike: never noticed this. I mean I never brake for 5 seconds straight either.
  • 11 1
 Count yourself lucky. Under any kind of braking the bite point can move drastically and unpredictability between pulls.

Had several sets (warranty) of XT's on my previous 2 bikes with the problem. The most meticulous repeated bleedings in the world make zero difference.

Finally threw in the towel and picked up a pair of dirt cheap MT-5's, performed one lazy 5 minute bleed. Bite point hasn't moved in a year.
  • 2 5
 @KalkhoffKiller: i've never noticed it either and i've been on shimano for 8 years, slx, xt, zee, saints, 2 piston, 4 piston etc. i'm not saying it doesn't happen, i just don't notice it or its just never bothered me.
  • 2 5
 @50percentsure: MT5's are way harder to bleed then shimano. I'm currently running shigura and XT 4-pots but was running Shimano ever since the endless bleeding of my Sram brakes drove me nuts. They had a different bite point because you never could bleed them right and even if that happened they were pulling air somehow.
  • 2 2
 @2wheelzgood: This is what I’ve been saying. It either happens and I don’t realize it/doesn’t bother me, or it doesn’t happen to me. Everyone else seems so sure about it that I fully acknowledge that I could be the insane one here.
  • 1 1
 Sick shirt
  • 7 10
 That is a ridiculous reach for a trail bike
  • 1 1
 Why do you think that?
  • 2 8
flag PhatBrett (Nov 28, 2020 at 9:26) (Below Threshold)
 @chakaping: because it brings your thighs too far forward and you lose power.
  • 6 1
 @PhatBrett: that’s what she said?
  • 4 3
 @PhatBrett: Rather sounds you are talking about STA, not reach.

Reach has no direct influence on your seating position. Reach is about, how long the bike feels when you stand.
  • 4 10
flag Baller7756 (Nov 28, 2020 at 13:05) (Below Threshold)
 I think I’m with you here... the geo, the travel, the slim shock/fork, the wheel size... are all misaligned. This bike doesn’t fit cleanly into any category. And I think the review sums it up... it doesn’t do anything well.
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