Video: Spur vs Ranger vs Scalpel vs SB115 vs Epic EVO - Field Test Round Table

Aug 20, 2020
by Mike Levy  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Five bikes doing down-country differently



Words by Mike Levy, Photography by Margus Riga


With many brands now offering some sort of short-travel machine that aims to combine cross-country and having fun, it seems like down-country might have some legs under it. And if you think that's an unlikely pairing, you really should throw a leg over one of these bikes - they're all a blast to ride and much more capable than you might expect. But with all five of my test rigs tackling the challenge from different angles, down-country is the haziest, most ambiguous of made-up bike categories.

Sure, all five have around the same amount of travel, but their intentions, geometry, spec, and as you might expect, personalities on the trail are vastly dissimilar. And while there's no right and wrong way to do it, weeks of back-to-back testing on the same terrain revealed each bike's strengths and weaknesses. You can hear all the details and comparisons in the above video, or watch the five individual reviews below. And if you want to know how we tested, you can learn about our control tires, timing, and the loop that all the bikes faced.


5 Down-Country Bikes

Specialized Epic EVO S-Works
• Travel: 110mm rear, 120mm front
• 29" wheels
• 66.5° head-tube angle
• Reach: 460mm (large)
• Weight: 21.88lb
• $11,525 USD
Transition Spur X01
• Travel: 120mm rear, 120mm front
• 29" wheels
• 66° head-tube angle
• Reach: 480mm (large)
• Weight: 24.74lb
• $5,999 USD

Yeti SB115 T2
• Travel: 115mm rear, 130mm front
• 29" wheels
• 67.6° head-tube angle
• Reach: 450mm (large)
• Weight: 27.17lb
• $6,900 USD
Revel Ranger X01
• Travel: 115mm rear, 120mm front
• 29" wheels
• 67.5° head-tube angle
• Reach: 473mm (large)
• Weight: 26.23lb
• $7,199 USD USD

Cannondale Scalpel SE 1
• Travel: 120mm rear, 120mm front
• 29" wheels
• 67° head-tube angle
• Reach: 450mm (large)
• Weight: 25.27lb
• $5,500 USD


Levy's Recommendations

The back-to-back nature of the Field Test series means that it's much easier to not sit on the fence with my opinion about these five bikes, and there was a clear winner in my mind: Transition's Spur surely won the hearts and wallets of many PB readers, but... I'd rather reach for the wildly versatile Specialized Epic EVO. I'll explain my thinking in a sec, but first, let's hand out some awards.

The 'Confused-Country' award goes to Yeti's SB115 for its impressive suspension action but handling that can't match less-forgiving bikes that offer more capability. If the SB115 was released in 2018, it'd likely impress. It's not a bad bike, but as an SB100 with a bit more travel that isn't more capable, I have a hard time getting excited about it.

Who wins the 'We Can Make Two Bikes Out of One' trophy? The Scalpel SE 1, of course, that's assembled around the same frame as the ultra-light race bike. That sounds like nothing but trouble, but it really isn't. The SE 1 is more of a long-legged cross-country rig than anything intended to compete with the Spur, and it works because that's precisely what Cannondale was aiming to create.

Next, Transition's new Spur earned the 'Maybe I don't Need 150mm of Travel' prize for being a wildly competent machine on the descents. I suspect that's all some of us need to know, even if the cost is some climbing potential. For a place like Squamish that isn't short of steep, rocky, rough trails, the Spur makes a ton of sense to me.

Mike Levy
Mike Levy
Height: 5'10" / 178 cm
Weight: 155 lb / 70.3 kg
Notes: Tech editor, gas station snack connoisseur

The Revel Ranger and the Specialized Epic EVO offer the kind of versatility the can replace both a pure cross-country whip and a more capable trail bike, but it's the Ranger that I had the most fun aboard. Its mix of energy and ability means that not only is it quick, but it also loves a long manual, a nose bonk on that old stump, and any inside line you've got on your mind. For those reasons, it gets the 'Cross-Country Really is Fun' nod that still might not exist for some people. Get on the Ranger and you'll see, I promise.

And if I had to choose one of the five to be my down-country bike, the winner is going to be the Epic EVO. Sure, it being an S-Works bike means that it's mega-light and mega-pricey, but it's the handling that won me over, not the amount of carbon fiber. Specialized has put together an oh-so-right combination of climbing and descending balance, and the result is a bike that can be ridden incredibly quick almost everywhere. Yes, the Spur is better on rough and fast downhills; yes, the Scalpel is better on tight singletrack climbs; and yes, I probably laughed more when I on the Ranger. It's not perfect, but the Epic EVO does a damn good job of combinng the best traits of all five bikes into one tremendously versatile package.






The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with clothing, protection, and support from Giro. Control tires provided by Schwalbe, and power meters provided by SRM. Filming took place at The Backyard pub in Squamish.





233 Comments

  • 247 57
 The Specialized Epic Evo. A great bike. Best in its class.

But sadly, some people will never own this bike. Not because it’s too expensive. Not because it’s not the perfect bike for the terrain they ride...

But because they suffer from a tragic condition called SDS, or Specialized Derangement Syndrome. This tragic disease affects roughly 6 out of 10 Pinkbike commenters and manifests itself in hyperventilation, red face and outright rage anytime a Specialized product gets a good review; and a marked refusal to buy anything from Specialized. Some have been known to mutter the word “sue” repeatedly.

This year has been a tough year for these victims of this crippling illness. Not one, but two Specialized bikes have won best in class in this year’s Pink Bike Field Tests. They need your help... please give generously to the SDS fund, which I have bravely established. Look into your heart, and please give generously. Proceeds will go to help those suffering from this tragic condition. Or maybe beer...Together, we can end the suffering.
  • 23 2
 Or to mutter "2 page e-bike ads in MTB mags"
  • 39 24
 Based on the prop to neg prop ratio, it looks like the poor souls suffering from this disease are 1 out of every 5 Pinkbike users. Please, it's not too late to help... Look into your heart and give today. In the aaaaaaaaarms of an aaangel...
  • 93 2
 @TheR: Specialized makes great bikes. I feel most would agree. It's just as a company, they have revealed themselves as pricks on multiple occasions with customers and shops/dealers. On top of that, many Specialized dealers fall into the 'smug bike shop' category as well. Many fine folks work at Specialized and I as said in the beginning, great bikes, but they have earned their reputation honestly.
  • 32 31
 @TheR: You're misinterpreting the props my dude. I love Spec bikes, want to marry that Epic, and still neg propped you for being a boring old dork.

Fun fact, ~100 comments in and you're the only whiner who got red-faced and posted a wall of gibberish about suing Smile
  • 22 23
 @bananowy: C'mon man! Have some fun! This is imaginative, creative -- comment gold! It's going in the Comment Hall of Fame, under about a million of WAKI's.
  • 24 8
 @bananowy: he didn’t get red faced. He wrote a clever comment poking fun at those who get mad at specialized
  • 13 18
flag TheR (Aug 20, 2020 at 12:56) (Below Threshold)
 New update 12-, 60+ on the props. Ratio still 1:5! Hahahaha!
  • 14 4
 I don't hate Specialized, I would just never want to buy one. On my local trails 80% of bikes are Specialized, Santa Cruz, Trek, and Transition. They're all great bikes, but there are plenty of other great bikes that also manage to be interesting. For me the weird thing is not why some people don't want to own a Specialized, but why some people do.
  • 6 18
flag TheR (Aug 20, 2020 at 13:19) (Below Threshold)
 @sdurant12: This guy gets it!
  • 7 10
 @swansejack22: I've had two. The 2002 Stumpy hardtail took a beating and still functions today as my "road" bike. My 2010 Enduro was a great bike, and at the time, a great value compared to other bikes on the market. It's fun to try other stuff, though. No one locally seems to have the bike I currently ride, and while it means nothing, I enjoy the uniqueness. Until I need a derailleur hanger in some remote spot.
  • 4 0
 Let me guess, you own not one, but two Specialized?
  • 3 6
 Aweful resale value too.

I’ve had an s-works enduro frame, sold it after 2 years, and only managed to get about 1/3 of the rrp back after holding our for ages.

If that was a santa cruz or pivot or yeti you’d get at least 50%...
  • 2 9
flag TheR (Aug 20, 2020 at 14:16) (Below Threshold)
 @Molesdigmyjumps: One currently. See above. A hanger-on from 2002. Sold the Enduro.
  • 4 18
flag TheR (Aug 20, 2020 at 14:20) (Below Threshold)
 @Richt2000: There’s hope for you. We are working on treatment for your condition.
  • 2 0
 @Richt2000:

Speaking from experience, that doesn’t apply to Pivot. Sold my Immaculate frame for a 3rd the rrp after 2.5 years, effectively throwing in a factory spec fox fork for free too
  • 13 1
 I don't suffer from SDS, but rather ILTSTMOAB–It's ludicrous to spend that much on a bike.
  • 3 5
 @njcbps: Nice work getting mountain bike Mecca Moab into that!
  • 14 12
 @TheR: I miss waki
  • 8 2
 I'll never buy a specialized bike because I have gotten horrible customer service from them when I tried to make a warranty claim which they didn't honor.
  • 2 2
 @njcbps: what does ILTSTMOAB mean?
I'm allergic to acroymns
  • 5 1
 I too once thought of specialized as the evil empire, but that is a thing of the past. They have come a long way and there is no denying that the bikes speak for themselves.
  • 3 6
 @levizbrown: Would you like to lead our 12 step classes?
  • 11 2
 I'm not sure many people would deny they make good bikes. I think it's them as a company that people dislike, and for good reason. Which is fair when you're talking spending thousands of dollars on a hobby. Why would I want to give my money to a company like them? There are plenty of other great bikes to pick from.
  • 3 2
 @Whitey5: What happened to Waki?
  • 4 0
 They just patented Down Country and are sueing all these other bikes ????
  • 4 7
 @johnnyo5: There was a flap about Pinkbike censoring comments. One of his got censored or something, so he packed it up and went home.
  • 3 1
 Some Spez bikes are great. I love my 2018 Enduro, especially the colour but its been far from perfect. Start with the too low stack height in XL, move on to the bearing eating wobbly rear hub, feeble rims with too low spoke count and you have a bike which is overpriced at full list price and will cost you even more when the low end parts fail. You can't use the hubs to build strong wheels becauss of the low spoke count. In contrast, my cheap Giant hubs on another bike have been going strong for 7 years. This Evo is overpriced too. You can build a lighter bike for less using off the shelf componenents and the frame alone. Spesh are simply not good value for the consumer.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Thanks, I didn't know.
  • 19 3
 @bman33: @bman33: Local specialized dealer told me how shit my trance was, that "even a Maori (indigenous people of New Zealand) wouldn't even want to steal it" and that I should buy one of their Mondrakers or Specialized. f*ck you, iRIDE, you racist pigs.
  • 4 4
 @TheR: I like fun, hence why I avoid men in anoraks who scratch their neckbeards over seat tube angles or get all riled up about a bike they like "winning" or not this entertaining little review, all the while confusing cringeworthiness with humour. Don't worry though, it's not just you. This whole field test was a magnet for the type, just look at the Spur fanboys marching at Levy with pitchforks for not testing the size they wanted him to Smile

@Whitey5 It's kind of like saying you miss chlamydia. It might have started out fun, but turned embarrassing really quickly.
  • 2 2
 @Johnsterfer: Wow. Yes, unfortunately Specialized (and to a degree Trek) dealerships seem to attract true pricks. Yes, there are exceptions, there are some great folks at some dealerships, and I actually like some of the bikes from both brands. However, their shops in particular earn their bad reputation. I have lived in 4 major US cities and visited many more...can confirm my view holds true in all of them
  • 4 10
flag TheR (Aug 21, 2020 at 5:25) (Below Threshold)
 @bananowy: Ah, geez, man. You sound like a real hoot. Invitation to my next party is forthcoming. There, we can talk about the usage of “hence” and “why,” and how they mean the same thing, and why you don’t need both in the same sentence. (Or if you prefer... hence, you don’t need them both in the same sentence). It will be smashing.
  • 3 3
 @bman33: We have a lot of shops here in town that sell Specialized, along with other brands. At the one shop, I was certain it was their Santa Cruz and Yeti brands, not Specialized that made them douches...

Nah, just kidding. They’ve always been good to me. I haven’t really experienced douchiness from any shop in a long time, Specialized or otherwise. That’s just me. Not denying anyone else’s experience.
  • 5 0
 But if he "had the most fun and laughs" on the Ranger, why didn't it win? Isn't that what actually matters the most?
  • 6 0
 @TheR: English is not my first language but go on and make fun of it if you have to grasp at straws. How's your Polish, pal? Smile

Thanks for the invite but I don't believe you understand the definition of "party". I've already told you what I think about a bunch of boring nerds arguing about 0.1 mm of reach all evening, so it's a hard pass.
  • 4 3
 @bananowy: I didn’t realize English was your second language. For that, I apologize. For what it’s worth, many, many native speakers misuse it as well.
  • 2 1
 @bananowy: You know where you and I would find common ground? I have. Ever given a single F about seat tube angle.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Thanks, no offence taken. I've heard native speakers use it and made the mistake of assuming that made it correct - you learn something every day. Now that I know, I'm totally gonna be a dick about it to my British mates in the office though.

And yeah, ST angle doesn't help much on the fun bits, does it? There had to be something in common Smile
  • 3 3
 A Specialized dealer recently told my 68 year old mom that she's a "f-ing c--t" for asking to get her $3200 ebike fixed. There is some truth to the stereotype of dickhead Specialized dealers.
  • 2 1
 @PullMyBrakeLever: Recently I was buying a bike for a 145cm kid. Not only the Spec dealer convinced my son to buy too large S instead of XS he did not have in stock, simultaneously he sold an 29 inch ebike to a 150cm woman who could reach pedals only when the dropper post was fully recessed...
  • 1 0
 @SlodownU: Agreed I wish he’d explain that more!
  • 3 1
 Hahaha you're so not wrong. I got kicked out of a PC Bro dude Facebook group (Drunkcyclist Degenerates, though Drunkcyclist Crybabies might be more appropriate), for boldly stating I like Specialized.

**Disclaimer** If I had known said Facebook group was run by PC Bro Dudes I would never have requested to join, lol.
  • 87 2
 Congrats to Revel for getting such great reviews. In a short time they’ve done an amazing job. Had a chance to talk to them a bit at a demo day- great bikes made by great people.
  • 14 0
 I’ve got a Revel Rail and it’s the best park/enduro bike I’ve had in years, the hype is real. Just waiting till the Ranger is available so I can upgrade my trail bike.
  • 32 81
flag duzzi (Aug 20, 2020 at 8:52) (Below Threshold)
 These "tests" are mostly an exercise in subjective ... blabbering. Starting from the absolutely silly ways to measure and reporting performance "differences" and ending with a deluge of meaningless categories and vague adjectives.

If you read between the lines you realize that all the commentary reads like a version of the press release of the manufacturer. How can it be different: there is no blinding of any sort. Most of the commentary ends up paraphrasing the press release, somewhat corrected by performance measures that are irrelevant fractions of seconds (reported in per cent!) and only reflect random variation among runs, not differences in speed (?) among bikes.

Do yourself a favor, forget these meaningless ranking and try a bike before you buy!
  • 34 2
 @duzzi: lol, your comment was anything but objective. I find these pretty entertaining. Not selling me anything, but giving information, feedback, and most importantly entertainment. I’m in CA surrounded by flames. These videos are great distractions from that, not to mention Covid. FYI non of my local bike shops are demoing bikes right now, so good luck getting in the test ride if you really need a bike quick.
  • 15 0
 @duzzi: Well of course you should try a bike before you buy it. I think the point of these type of tests is to help narrow down your search because not everyone has access to every bike on the market. And not everyone lives in western canada.

You have an unreasonable expectation. This is a small group of people not charging you a thing testing the bikes they are sent. Of course it's going to be subjective. How could you possibly even put together a real blind study on MTBs and MTB trails where small variations in line choice can add seconds to a run. You'd need 200 hours, you'd have to control for diet, lines, develop bike coverings that don't interfere with the function of the bike and completely obscure the linkage, put the same size dropper on every bike- which interferes with testing since some could take different length droppers, etc etc. Not saying it couldn't be done, but I don't see any bike site ever being able to devote enough resources to do it.
  • 11 1
 Im loving my Revel Ranger, if you are not strapping on a number plate, I would grab the Ranger over that Sworks every day, plus save that extra $5k, you know, that I just have lying around...
  • 18 4
 @duzzi: >> Do yourself a favor, forget these meaningless ranking and try a bike before you buy!

Or the opposite: just buy any of them and odds are you will be happy.
  • 6 2
 @duzzi: Magazine comparison tests allow us readers to compare various bikes before purchasing. Yes, many of the comments are subjective, but it's still better than the manufacturers' PR releases.
  • 6 0
 @plyawn: that’s been my philosophy ever since I got started biking. The bike I have is the best bike I’ve got so it’s the “best”
  • 3 0
 @BamaBiscuits: I was of course (mostly) joking but there's some truth that bikes are just so darn good these days that while you can fine tune your selection, everything available is better than a few years ago.
  • 2 0
 @avg-roadie: As you know, Specialized has Evo models that compete more directly with your Ranger than the S-Works model. For some strange reason PB decided to test the most expensive one.
  • 2 0
 @rlsedition: the comp and expert look great and dare I say, reasonable value. Spesh’s builds are looking better these days. Less proprietary crap only helps their cause.
  • 1 1
 @rlsedition: they tested the Evo. It’s an sworks Epic Evo. But it’s still the Evo.

They also tested the regular sworks epic, but that was tested by Sarah in the XC half of the field test
  • 4 0
 @avg-roadie: ranger looks sweet, but price difference isn’t 5k, top spec Ranger is $10k. XO1 Evo is 6k, XO1 Ranger is $7.2k. Specialized overcharges for S-works, but other models are competitive on price.
  • 3 0
 Levy said that none of the bikes surprised him that much, but his description of the Revel seems pretty surprising to me given the numbers. 67.5 degree head angle, yet comparable to the Spur in descending stability is very impressive to me!
  • 1 0
 @plyawn: much better, out of this review I'd not be able to test one of these bikes here. We don't all that luxury in our country. Most the big brands have stopped demo days years ago.
  • 7 0
 @BamaBiscuits: Reminds me of "Every dog owner thinks their dog is the best and they are all right."
  • 2 0
 @rlsedition: IINM, They take what they get from the manufactures. They don't purchase them and have to send them back when the testing is completed. Of course the manufacturers are going to put their best foot forward.
  • 100 14
 Yeti owners over the age of 38 are wondering how the Yeti did so poorly since the shop told them that Yetis are the best bikes ever made.
  • 26 4
 It is a sad day at the dentist's office.
  • 25 0
 Spotted the 37 year old Yeti owner! Razz
  • 17 0
 I bought my SB130 at the age of 38.
But I‘m not a dentist.
Is this possible?
  • 4 0
 Actually so did Pinkbike when testing the SB130 ;-)

And we did however see similar tests of the SB4.5 some years back - and suddenly everyone wanted one anyway after testing it themselves. :-)
  • 2 2
 28.99, a few days shy of 29 based on my experience.
  • 51 0
 Overall I really liked the review process. You tried to stay unbiased with the tires and the pressure why not the price of the bikes tested ? I mean the specialized is almost twice as expensive as the rest of the field... Seems counterproductive to me.
  • 7 0
 This is well into the world of diminishing returns (or marginal gains depending if you stand up at the dentists) so the difference between the s-works and the “expert” level (At 1/2 the price or less) is probably Substantially less for most of us than between the expert level and an entry dual suspension bike, so while the bling is nice, and a bit less weight would be great in this type of bike, the bulk of the review will still be relevant.
And for someone like Levy who will notice the nuances may tip him a bit Of the way to nicer words than sending an entry level bike.
  • 13 1
 It’s the top of the line model and it’s design carries over to cheaper models, so while it’s fancier the bike will feel simlilar.
  • 6 36
flag duzzi (Aug 20, 2020 at 8:58) (Below Threshold)
 I don't think these qualify as "tests" in any conceivable way.

There is no blinding. There is a huge amount of built in bias because the "tester" read the press releases of a bike before they try it , and the lap timing they report has nothing to do with the "performance" of a bike but only reflects random variation among runs ... All you are reading are a paraphrasing of press releases and a discussion about statistically non-significant differences of timed runs ...
  • 3 0
 @bubbrubb: Probably similar in feel to the S-Works, but just how similar? Why should readers have to guess how the more affordable model performs? PB should have demanded either the Evo Expert or Pro models instead for this comparison test.
  • 5 0
 @duzzi: In my opinion, it doesn't need blinding. A good rider can really see how the ride characteristics are from bike to bike. Even just riding several bikes at a demo day, you can really see the different ride characteristics of the different bikes in a short time.
  • 14 0
 @duzzi: Hey duzzi, looking forward to you starting a website and providing us that info!
  • 6 0
 @tacklingdummy: Disagree! I want blindfolded huck-to-flat!
  • 1 0
 @bubbrubb: Unfortunately you do get the lower class suspension on the lower models, which is probably the only thing that would be noticed as different if you're going fast, other than the numbers on the scale. I wouldn't want the lower-end dampers for how fast I'd be pushing this bike, and I'm not gonna spend 11k. 7 or 8k, alright, that's what I spent on my last XC race/burly trail bike, but 11k is just getting ridiculous in my eyes.
  • 5 0
 @duzzi: Can you point us to your approved reviews since this one is so unacceptable? You could just be trolling, but if not you might be the most annoying person I've seen online in a while. Obviously that is a high achievement.
  • 1 0
 @rlsedition: VERY similar save for weight and the controls
  • 1 0
 @TucsonDon: actually the same exact dampers can be found on bikes like the Spur, at $6k so I don’t see how it’s an issue for you. The dampers are only as good as the rider tuning them in a lot of cases. If you were to take the Sworks kinematics and compare them to a regular Epic Evo would they be identical? YES.
  • 35 0
 Thanks Pinkbike for making all this awesome content. You guys do a fantastic job producing high quality vids with these field tests and I always look forward to the next in the series. I'll be watching this on the chairlift in between runs today at the bike park.
  • 7 0
 Agreed, ignore the haters. Great content and your hard work is appreciated!
  • 29 4
 Let's face it. You'd really want the Epic EVO to be brilliant if you'd just paid actual money (that you once had) for it...but there is no way that this review could ever convince my bank manager, my drug dealer, my beloved or me to even think it would ever be a good idea to give my local Specialized dealer (whoever that is) the money required to own such a thing...

If you can and you can exploit it to its full potential then 'Well done'. But I think you might be a figment of my imagination.
  • 35 2
 I seriously don't understand why companies keep shooting themselves in the foot by only sending in the craziest, most outrageously priced model in for the reviews. Ofcourse they perform the best, but the tradeoff is that a lot of people also write them off for good reason, as you need to be pretty far into gram counting to be able to justify the pricing for those. Not to mention that then the first paragraphs of the review and half of the comment section will be just about the price of the bike.

If I didn't already have a Tallboy and was in the market for a downcountry-ish 29er, I'd never look at the Sworks Epic Evo, but the Comp model would be really interesting. Super smart spec with plenty of value for the money - they even specced SLX 4 piston brakes and the X-fusion seatpost which is pretty much the epitome of value.

I'm pretty sure that for most riders, the Comp would offer 95% of the performance of the Sworks-model, with way under half the price (4100 dollars vs 11500 dollars). Spend some money on a really good second wheelset and the difference between comp and sworks would be even narrower.
  • 6 8
 The S-Works is mainly there to fool all buyers of an Epic Evo Comp that their aluminum frame with NX and REBA is just as good (or nearly).
  • 8 0
 @Rusettipasta: I buy the Comp models from Specialized and then build them to my spec. A better deal than buying the SWorks for sure.
  • 15 0
 @cxfahrer: there is no aluminum frame, or NX version, or Reba Spec in the entire line.
  • 7 0
 @Rusettipasta: Basically their budget models sell like hot cakes. They need zero advertising the price point of entry level sells itself.

However, when somebody has disposable income and makes the odd decision to spend 5-10k on a bike they are still probably gonna say "I want the BEST of the BEST for my money" while doing so... And this is where industry media comes in.

You'll also notice every bike basically gets a good review (as they should at these prices), in order to not alienate any company from participating and benefiting. You'll also notice the winner of the comparisons just happens to be the over built over priced Sworks, which ensures that the other options stay relevant as more affordable options.

Luckily, PinkBike DOES do budget reviews such as the 2k bikes field test but it's not quite as useful because those bikes are often VERY similar (bare bones) and people don't need as much convincing to commit to them.

So yeah, if I was sitting on cash to burn and willing to put ~10k on a bike, I'd want to hear in this review that my 10k is truly getting me the best bike money can buy. Echo chambers are so hot right now lol
  • 8 0
 @xvxbg: He is right, though. The whole point of the 12k S-works model is to make the 5k model look like value despite it being specced with components usually found on 3k bikes.
  • 4 1
 @lepigpen: an objective review site would require (1) the site buy all bikes and
parts tested (no loaners), and (2) the site not accept advertising from bike brands. That would make it very hard to be profitable. But you are right, absent those controls, Pinkbike is essentially just an extension of bike brand marketing departments even though they like to think otherwise. But hey I still come here and eat all this shit up. I just can’t help myself.
  • 5 0
 @Bikerburt: Absolutely, another way to look at it is these articles are a funding mechanism for whatever PB content you prefer be it Grim Donut experiments or Privateer projects or even just the forums and social aspects as well.

Also PinkBike is fairly grass roots in its design, especially in 2020. Thank god they haven't plastered energy drink logos over everything and dumb down the website to appeal to corporate cleanliness. PB is more or less what we all want from a hobbyist outlet
  • 31 11
 Where's the vs Grim Donut Levy!!!?
  • 12 0
 On his shirt.
  • 3 6
 We want the Donut, we demand the Donut... Give us the Donut.
  • 9 0
 This isn't helping. Think dating back in high school. Just ignore the Donut and pretend we aren't interested at all. Then he'll stop being so coy and we'll get the review!
  • 1 0
 I bought the goddam t shirt, but no bike in reality? Refunds are in order.
  • 17 0
 Hey Levy, "unofficially" how do you think a Norco Revolver or Kona Hei Hei would've stacked up?
  • 8 0
 second on the hei hei. 2020 and the new 2021
  • 3 0
 This. If I want the spirit of the spur, slightly more xc competent, local bike shop support and the mid level 4500 price tag how does the Kona compare? Plus two bottles
  • 9 0
 Third request on comparing on the Hei Hei 20/21. Would love to know how the Kona and Ripley stand in this descending v.s climbing vs. agility hierarchy.
  • 1 1
 @Kanyoni: add the Spot Ryve to that list
  • 5 0
 I was surprised and disappointed that the Hei Hei wasn't included in the shootout.
  • 5 0
 Curious about the Hei hei, too
  • 5 0
 I would like to know too please
  • 3 0
 @nodata2000: I read that when it came out thanks.

Looking to see how Hei Hei and Revolver compare.
  • 2 0
 @Kanyoni: Someone somewhere on the interwebs must have a nice spreadsheet going , Piecing together the professional reviews
  • 1 1
 I'm in on the 2021 comparison/ranking too. As I age, I tend to hoon much less when I don't have pads on. That makes bikes in this category very appealing to me. Something I can pedal for 4 hours but won't toss me on a descent.

Three or four years ago I rode a Salsa Spearfish at a demo and was blown away by how it rode. A genuine 'climbed like a goat' on the ups, and totally decent on the downs. Really surprised me. Looking forward to more comparisons in this category.
  • 2 0
 @mikealive: darn thumbs - meant to upvote you
  • 1 0
 @WoodenCrow: haha, no worries bud! Happy trails Smile
  • 3 0
 VitalMTB's long term test of the 2020 Kona Hei Hei CR/DL, with considerations of 2021 upgrades is quite glowing.

www.vitalmtb.com/product/guide/Bikes,3/Kona/Hei-Hei-CR-DL,29866#product-reviews/3893/expand

I'd also like a @mikelevy comparison.
  • 7 0
 @mikelevy first off awesome field test of the All Country bikes (and @sarahmoore the XC rippers) they really are taking on a personality of their own and great to see the diversity and different approaches the manufacturers are bringing to this newish category... secondly during testing of the Sid suspension there were the Ultimate and Select+ versions of the fork and shock, did you notice an appreciable difference between the two? While I appreciate the intended use of the Race Day Damper, I am leaning more towards the select+ platform for general trail riding duties on more relaxed geo bikes such as the Spur and Ranger and would like to know how the two dampers compare?
  • 1 0
 I think the biggest difference is the 190g (0.4lb) weight penalty on the Select+.
  • 6 0
 Nice set of reviews; to both Levy and Sarah.

It's kind of touched on but I still want to know what is the best backcountry epic bike. What makes you want to organize big 6-8k climbing days and range way out there? At least for the rocky mountain area where terrain can get really rocky and hence technical, I keep coming back to the Spur because it seems to be built durably enough to not get destroyed and also because it is well priced for the XO1 spec (IMO). The Revel might be rad but would need to demo. The EVO is rad too but I feel like I'm in between sizes and no longer like "oversizing".
  • 11 1
 Transition bikes don't deserve lycra
  • 28 0
 You got that backwards
  • 9 0
 I hate Transition bikes for being so cool while sold out for 4+ months
  • 16 11
 Before everyone comments on the price difference between the “winner” and the rest, remember that it’s really the frame and suspension that’s being tested. If you like the sound of the Epic Evo but not the price, I’m sure the lower end builds would have gotten essentially the same review.
  • 31 1
 But you can't judge that in a vacuum...

Part of what makes a bike climb well is the weight...along with suspension kinematic, geo, and other stuff. And, with the EVO, you only get that weight with the S-Works model....which you can only get by shelling out $11K (or a frame).

The non-Sworks are around 24-25#. I'm sure they're great b/c the geo is good (if it fits you) and the suspension seems solid...but I would be willing to bet that adding 2-3# has an effect on its turbo-boost. Especially b/c, as others have noted, a big part of the weight savings is the super blingy wheels...and their corresponding loss of spinny weight (it's an industry term).

I think it's fair to comment on the price, when you have to pay that to get the bike that was reviewed and the lower models, I believe, while similar, will be muted from the SWorks.
  • 12 0
 Not really. Components affect the ride as well. Take your bike and put heavy wheels on it then try it with light wheels. Tell me you won't notice a difference in the ride.

If it was just the frame and suspension being tested and components didn't matter, why the control tires?
  • 3 0
 It would mean doing another lap, but swapping the heaviest wheels off another test bike (assuming they aren't the AI Cannondale) and even adding some additional "ballast" to the water bottle mount could approximate the feel of the cheaper builds.

I guess they aren't the same size, but it would have been cool to have Levy take a lap on one of the pure XC bikes Sarah tested and have Sarah take a lap on a downcounty bike to see how the the times compared.
  • 2 0
 @smartyiak: do we know what the Expert model weighs? I’d be really curious. I haven’t seen any claimed or actual weights for it listed anywhere. At 1/2 the price, it gets carbon wheels, and you could put an X01 cassette on it. I bet it would still be pretty light. Not 22#, but I imagine you could keep it under 24#, right?
  • 6 1
 @smartyiak: I could build a lighter bike than the S-Works EVO for $8k or less, using the S-Works EVO frame.
  • 2 0
 @Hayek: My LBS weighed a large comp at 26 lb 15 oz so basically 27lbs. The expert was hanging up on the wall so didn't get to see the weight. Doing some math with estimated component weights, that puts the expert around 25-26 lbs and the pro around 23-24 lbs. Pretty unbelievably light.
  • 2 0
 @smartyiak: I've seen other sources claim a 24# weight for the Evo Pro and 25# for the Expert model.
  • 5 0
 @ksanman: it makes you wonder about the Spur in a medium compared to the Evo Expert. Weights start getting pretty close at that point. I wonder if they would have been more comparable climbing in those configurations.
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: especially if the lower spec has cheaper suspension bolted to it. I upgrade my shock and it was a world of difference in how it rode. I don't know if the levels of RS shock are huge differences or just more knobs.
  • 2 1
 @LeDuke: Not saying you (or anyone) can't. If it was $8K..certainly some people would say "outrageous" and others would say "entire reasonable considering specs"...I was merely commenting that I think it's fair to comment on the price difference when part of getting the attributes of the package is paying the fare.

Your $8k example does bring up the weird pricing structure...where you're penalized for buying a complete bike. (I know Speshy isn't the only brand doing, but it's still odd to me).
  • 5 0
 @smartyiak: Yeah. I was looking at the price of the S-Works, the costs of the various components and it just doesn't add up. I get it, it's a nice, top shelf bike. But the bike costs a hell of a lot more than the sum of the parts, or the sum of comparable parts.
  • 1 0
 This would be true if it was literally the frame and the suspension being tested with all equal components across the bikes. But sadly, that is not the case. Maybe they should do that in their next group test. Set up all bikes with equal components, not just the tires. That would be a lot of work but it would be the best review ever.
  • 1 0
 Except they aren't. You can only get the Luxe Ultimate and SID Ultimate on the S-works build for the EVO. Having the low end damper will definitely effect the feel of the frame. I agree regarding everything else, like the drivetrain, but it would be nice to be able to get the top level dampers that the other bikes come with even at their lower price on the XO1 equipped Evo Expert at $6k that would have been price-wise comparable with the rest of the bikes in the test, but would have been behind on suspension feel.
  • 1 0
 @smartyiak: Yes... if you could buy the non Sworks frame, you could build it cheaper paying retail for the exact same parts.

Of course this is the case for the Sworks… buy the frame and build the same bike for $8-9k.
  • 1 0
 @Baller7756: I know...it’s literally what I typed.
  • 10 1
 Where is the huck to flat video goddammit!!!!!
  • 8 2
 I built up a Ranger to about 25lbs and raced the Telluride 100 on it.... 3 days later won a local enduro on the same bike with different wheels.... super versatile and fun as hell!
  • 3 0
 Hi, what size frame did you use for that weight? Would you mind sharing your build? I'm interested in a Ranger but hoping I can get it close to 24lbs. Thanks
  • 3 0
 25lbs? With XC carbon wheels and tires? Without pedals?
  • 5 1
 I have this one question from the beginning of this reviews, what's the real diference between the downcountry bikes vs a real trail bike? they are faster? I don´t know but I will lve to see some real comparison between this 2 kind of bikes.

And last but not least, by the way I saw the reviews I think the sb100 needed a place here in the comparisons, what will be the conclussions of the same test if we change the SB115 by a sb100?
  • 11 0
 Yeah, as an SB100 owner, I sometimes wish for a more aggressive geo, and sometimes for a lighter, snappier bike. Never have I thought, “this bike needs a burlier fork and more rear travel!” The SB115 doesn’t make any sense to me.
  • 5 0
 Seems like the SB115 is just like the updated version of the SB4.5. I would classify the SB115 into the same category with Ibis ripley (I had a gen one before), Evil the Following, the Trek Fuel Ex and the previous gen Sant Cruz Tallboy. These XCish short-travel trail bikes are pretty relexing to ride, more forgiving than a pure XC bike or a DC bike (with lots more tractions), and less aggressive than a morden enduro bike, but they are just not fast, netiehr uphill nor downhill.
  • 1 0
 @pkuyeti: The SB100 was already in that category, it was just a little short on travel compared to those bikes, but was supposed to make it up by having "higher quality" travel. I thought it was behind even then, but the pivot play issues definitely kept me away. The SI link does work awesome though, almost a magic carpet type ride.
  • 3 0
 @TucsonDon: Why not just build a SB115 with a 120mm SID or SC fork? Would have the same geo as the SB100... but with 115mm in the rear... probably a pound lighter.
  • 1 0
 Marketing is the difference
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: is there timing results somewhere? Kinda interested in the gravel road efficiency test.

Did you guys just hold a steady wattage for all bikes and see where they end up?

Handling is subjective & all, but efficiency and then geo that matches the riders style/preference is a magic combo.

So if your gonna wear lycra you might as well build a spreadsheet.
  • 7 0
 How would the Trek Top Fuel fair in this shootout?
  • 2 0
 I ride one since 2 months and I have not touched my Transition Sentinel since then. Its so versatile, super quick uphill and on the straights and super fun und jumptrails. Just rocky, rooty stuff shows you that you are on a short travel bike.
  • 3 0
 What I like about epic, they have 4k model with same geo, for people who do not want to spent 12 k on bike; Also you can buy frame and build your own bike, so definitely win win + warranty across multiple countries - you can ride bike park on this and claim to S If something went wrong
  • 3 1
 Of all 5 bikes I wonder which one bike or ranking of bikes has the better suspension in regards to balancing (small/big) bump compliance, traction, and pedal efficiency - I know Mike mentioned the SB 115 has an impressive suspension and I would agree because I currently own a SB 100 and SB5. Just ordered a Revel Ranger Yesterday but looks like ETA will be in Mid- Oct. I was considering the Epic Evo Frame but I can't see why the frame alone cost over $3,500 - especially considering how the Yeti Sb 115 frame and Revel Ranger frame have more complexity of parts and both are boutique brands.
  • 2 0
 One thing that is interesting to note is that at $5.5K less money for the Spur than the Epic Evo tested here, it would appear to be pretty easy to get parity on weight. In fact the less expensive Evo's are floating around the weight of the Spur.
When considering these 2 bikes (as I am) I'm trying to decide that once price/ weight is equalized, what performance differences remain for XC/ trail considerations?
Trying to recall the frame weights of these 2 models.
  • 3 0
 There is a 800g weight difference in frame alone between the Epic evo and Spur, so weight parity will never be possible.
  • 3 0
 @eagalbraith: Good to know, thanks.

That said (I'm shopping for a race bike for my daughter) it looks like geo is more comparable once you drop from one comparable size in the Spur which will save some weight. For instance, Small Spur versus Medium Epic Evo. Furthermore standover height is a major factor for these bikes, nearly 5" less on the Spur!
  • 2 0
 @eagalbraith: Just seeking clarification: isn't the 800g related to the S-Works version? So add 200-2g for the non S-Works? (I'm having a heck of a time finding the non-Sworks frame weight).
  • 2 0
 @smartyiak: I believe I read in another review that it's 100g heavier for the non s works 1750 vs 1650
  • 4 0
 All the reviews this week and Levy hasn't commented on a single one! What gives? Much more enjoyable when the reviewer participates some in the discussion.
  • 4 0
 He’s hiding in shame because he never did anything with the grim donut.
  • 5 1
 They took so long to release all of these reviews that @mikelevy is now retired.
  • 1 0
 Great work on these review.
The question I have is where issues like issues with a fork are raised how much are they likely to be bike specific and how much just a generic issue? I know there are custom tunes but are some of these observations more an issue with the components than related to the bikes?
  • 3 0
 Does anyone know the weight of the other Epic EVO builds?
Oh, and a big thank you to Specialized for still not putting that piece of info in the spec sheet...
  • 2 0
 My XL Epic Expert Evo built up to about 25.4lbs stock, with the tires setup tubeless, but without pedals. Carbon bars and cranks got it just under 25lbs.
  • 1 0
 @DevoMTB: The Evo Expert specs claim the bike comes with an X1 Eagle crankset, which I thought was made of carbon.
  • 2 0
 @rlsedition: No the stock crank is aluminum. Technically I don't even see such a thing as "X1 Eagle" in SRAM's lineup, so I'm thinking it's just a rebranded OEM version of the GX Eagle aluminum crank. I bought a lightly used X01 Eagle carbon crank and it was 104g lighter than the aluminum crank I took off. (472g vs. 576g)
  • 1 0
 @DevoMTB: X1 is OEM only and if I remember right is a rebranded Truvativ Descendant carbon crank, I have a set and they are about 70gr heavier than X01 cranks
  • 1 0
 Epic Evo Expert size L is 11.2 kg / 24.6 lbs on my scale without pedals. Completely stock parts, tubeless. With crank socks and SWAT bottle cage but without the SWAT multi tool.

The cranks are indeed the cheaper alu X1. Cassette and chain are GX Eagle and the inhouse stem and (narrow) alu bar are probably the other sources of slight excess weight.
  • 1 0
 @Eviljarv: The "X1" crank I took off my Expert was definitely aluminum, and weighed 104g more than the X01 carbon crank I replaced it with per my scale.
  • 1 0
 @DevoMTB: so weird, the X1 cranks I had were definitely carbon, same as this set for sale here www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2734955
  • 1 0
 @Eviljarv: Weird. Those actually look exactly like the ones I bought to replace the stock cranks on my Expert Evo. Maybe they're the GX carbon cranks rebranded for OEM?
  • 1 0
 @DevoMTB: yeah, it's strange, I was told that the 2018-19 X1 were Descendants rebranded as sram and when I weighted my set they were exactly same weight as what Truvativ list theirs, there was no GX carbon last year if I remember right. Sram she's weird stuff when it comes to OEM components. I switched my bikes to X01
  • 4 0
 So how does the Spec Epic Evo compare to the Trek Top Fuel? Which one does Levy pick in that match up?
  • 1 0
 Just can't decide which one would best replace an AM hardtail...EVO Epic seems to offer the versatility but Ranger offers the cool kid factor. Would go with the Spur if I wasn't tempted to race. But maybe I should just not race.
  • 3 0
 Hey @mikelevy. Where would you slot the Mondraker Podium DC into this list? It Still seems like it has the most progressive geo of the bikes that came from XC roots.
  • 1 0
 I too want to know this. I can't get an Epic EVO until March.
  • 1 0
 Nice work @sarahmoore & @mikelevy.

Mike- Can you take some of your older fave DC bikes like your Rocky Mtn and Proces111 and ride em on the same test tracks? Kinda in line with the used bike testing theme others have been requesting.

Also I wonder if you would have enjoyed the SB115 more if you were on a size Medium...
  • 1 0
 What’s the durability like on these kind of bikes? I’m interested in buying a down-country bike, but I’m worried the lightweight frame won’t last very long. Will the frame explode after one crash? What about long term durability, how many seasons can I get out of a lightweight frame? I’ve heard some horror stories about XC race bikes pretty much being work out after a single season.
  • 4 1
 @mikelevy Why didn't you compare these 5 bikes to every other bike with under 120mm of travel you've ever ridden in your entire life? Seems journalistically unsound to me.
  • 3 0
 I just picked up a medium Expert yesterday. After taking out the tubes, adding pedals, swapping out to a lighter/wider carbon bar it weighs just under 25lbs
  • 2 0
 That is better than respectable.
  • 4 3
 My Giant Trance Pro1 with proper fork that doesn't get worn out bushings after few rides, proper DPX2 shock and not some inline trash which overheats after prolonged descent, fast rolling but still decently tough trail tires (hans dampf/rock razor) and few other upgrades weighs 11.5kg (25lbs) and cost me less than 1/3rd of that Epic and it's still trouble free after 1 year of riding.
Bike rides like a dream and doesn't flinch at drops out rough terrain. The frame might be free hundred grams heavier but at least I have a peace of mind
  • 1 0
 How many people are going to use these bikes as trail bikes. For trekking long distance. Perfect for long distance trail rides. BC bike race? I would want a more durable bike. For XC racing these bikes would help fight off fatigue.
Would like any of of these for long distance trekking.
  • 3 0
 Spur wins on geo and price/weight ratio... The Revel looks nice though too!
  • 3 0
 You really should add wheel base to you stat boxes since that seemed to play a big factor.
  • 1 1
 @mikelevy if you lived in the Texas Arkansas area and wanted a bike that you could do the occasional 10-15 mile Xc race and do the occasional enduro (being a Texas Arkansas enduro where the trails are intermediate with the sprinkling of a few drops no BME’s here) which bike would you choose. Also this is gonna be your only bike.
  • 4 2
 What Specialized did here with there $12k bike is called "price anchoring." Now all of the sudden, there $8k or $6k models appear affordable to the suckers...
  • 2 0
 I haven’t heard that term since business school.
  • 1 0
 Trek Top Fuel? My trails, skills and nerve do not warrant a go fast downhill oriented trail or even DC bike. Where does Trek's Top Fuel fit with the Epic EVO and Scalpel SE?
  • 2 0
 Great review. Yes, as ANY review , it might not be perfect or for everybody's taste, but great review nonetheless. Keep up the good work PB and keep the FT's coming!
  • 8 9
 I love Pinkbike content, I really do. But I wish they'd mix up their testing locations a bit more frequently. I get that it would require serious $ and logistics, but like Squamish is a pretty unique place, and a unique kind of riding that 95% of mountain bikers don't have access to. Like, I bet the SB115 would make a whole lot more sense ridden on janky, tight east coast trails.
  • 9 0
 Janky east coast is like Squamish without the vertical relief...
  • 31 0
 Ya, they should come to Indiana. It’s basically a mountain bike Mecca. And by Mecca, I mean it’s not.
  • 7 0
 They did do a similar test of bikes in Arizona last year.
  • 25 10
 Dude.... it's a pandemic with travel restrictions. What do you want???


Edit: Look at which country the guy who wants them to do other locations is from during a pandemic. Classic.
  • 8 5
 @j-t-g: Ha, there goes the Canadian reputation for politeness and comity.

So clarify something for me, does Canada only have trails in BC eh? Because looking at the map...it seems like a pretty big country with a wide variety of terrain. Also too, Kazimer is stateside and so is Daniel Sapp.

But whatever, my point is, there's value to be gained from testing bikes in different types of terrains/settings. Even before the pandemic, Pinkbike being so focused on their home turf, while understandable, also fails to serve a wide variety of readers who live in different settings. And even some of the reviewers have mentioned that bikes that the loved on their home turf, didn't work as well in Whistler or Squamish or whatever.
  • 4 6
 @roma258: Not only that, but you never said it had to be right now. It was just a suggestion that they can consider for another time. Not sure why my man has to bring nationalities into it. I have my theories why, but far be it for me to assume motivations.
  • 3 0
 I'm not sure what you mean by "janky, tight east coast trails". There are janky trails everywhere, including in Squamish.
  • 2 0
 @roma258: Not to mean as throwing shade, but but if a bike slays in Squamish, it will be damn fine for my local trails or if I venture to NC or WV I also know that it can handle the terrain there.
  • 2 1
 Given that this is a group test, it would be nice if there were more reviewers test riding the bikes and offering their opinions. I'm happy to offer my services.
  • 3 0
 Damn, there goes my chance to get a Spur until summer of 2021.
  • 3 0
 The Spur looks amazing but minimum 4+ months waitlist? Urgh!
  • 2 0
 Should have put the Sniper and Ripley in the shootout. Those are the two bikes that get great reviews
  • 2 0
 This field test is a great series, we'll done PB and keep up the good work!
  • 4 0
 Spur got robbed!
  • 2 0
 Does anyone have thoughts about how the YT Izzo compares to these? (Since that's closer to what my budget will allow.)
  • 2 0
 More of a trail bike IMO... 130/130mm. Probably compares to a Ripley or Tallboy... or maybe this SB115 that doesn't fit in this category.

YT gets the weight down with some XC tires, but you would have to take them up a notch or two for DC or Trail riding.
  • 2 0
 so, the scalpel climbs well?
  • 2 0
 I’ve ridden it and the previous generation Scalpel SE. Haven’t ridden the other bikes in test yet, but the new Scalpel has insane grip in technical climbing stuff. Way better than the previous generation which felt far more “XC” and efficient.

You can just easily pedal it up rocky, ledge stuff that would’ve hung up other bikes in the same category.
  • 1 0
 Probably one of my favorite field tests. I read and watched all the content and you guys did a great job on all of it.
  • 2 1
 But you can build an SWorks of any model cheaper and lighter of you do it yourself. Spesh are ace at price gouging!
  • 1 0
 Epic Evo VS Mach 4 SL? Also surprised the Sniper wasnt thrown into the mix in comparison to the Spur...
  • 1 0
 Sniper trail geo is almost identical to the evo in size xl
  • 1 0
 Great series!! Keep it up! Up Country, Enduro Cross, Trailasaurus. Bring it!
  • 1 0
 Another 5 bikes to add to the other 5 bikes that are just as good and ride too similar to notice any huge differences.
  • 2 0
 will there be a comparison of times laps with a hardtail and grim donut?
  • 2 0
 How did this year’s winner compare to the 2020 winner - Top Fuel...?
  • 1 0
 Just cant get the Spesh in the UK. Want one in XL but apparently there are none in the UK!!!
  • 1 0
 Late to the party but how did these bikes compare to the top fuel from last year...?
  • 1 0
 While the table is down d-country goes round
  • 1 0
 ha ha what a face on Levy when he shut Kaz off ha ha ha ha funny
  • 1 0
 Don't care get me the Grim Donut Levy..
  • 1 0
 Why didn't you include the Pivot Mach 4SL in this shootout?
  • 2 1
 @Yeti SB115: Dentists must be gutted Wink
  • 1 0
 new category for 2021 Up-Country DH now to see about that Spur
  • 1 0
 Those prices make me feel poor
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy... Ripley V4 anyone?
  • 1 0
 I'm just amazed I saw Jason Lucas in lycra and clips...
  • 1 0
 Was the Kona Hei Hei CR/DL discussed as an additional test rig?
  • 2 1
 The Spur looks sick with those flowing top tube and chain stay lines!
  • 1 0
 ok, I approve Wink
  • 1 0
 Shvy-buh
  • 1 0
 No resi, no care.
  • 2 3
 i'm just a hater but i'm glad the yeti didn't get a mention.
  • 2 2
 Evil Following
  • 1 3
 That weight for the spur is for the XX1 groupset, not the X01
  • 4 0
 Pretty sure that's their measured weight with control tires
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