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Field Test Review: 2023 Unno Burn - You Know You're Curious

Oct 23, 2023
by Henry Quinney  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST REVIEW

Unno Burn



Words by Henry Quinney; photography by Tom Richards


Unno is a brand whose reputation precedes them. As a mountain biker, I seem to know a lot about the brand, whether it's their inception under the leadership of designer Cesar Rojo, their initial forays into domestic carbon fiber production or their boutique bikes that seem to have little regard for convention.

Quite honestly, it was an exciting prospect to ride one of these sought-after machines. Unno says they "started again from zero" to update their enduro platform, and the Burn is nothing if not out there. To look at it, there seems to be elegance mixed with brutish features, pragmatism mixed with absurdity.
Unno Burn Details

• Travel: 160mm rear, 170mm front
• Carbon frame
• Mixed wheels
• 64° head-tube angle
• 76.5° seat-tube angle
• Reach: 470mm (S2)
• Chainstay length: 445mm
• Weight: 33.4 lb / 15.1 kg
• $8,897 USD
• More info: unno.com

The Burn features its own novel suspension layout and it's not just radical in its looks - Unno suggests running this at around 30 to 40% sag. They can do this because the bike has a very progressive kinematic curve.

This level of progressivity will ensure that there are no harsh bottom-outs. Although much of the progression happens in the beginning portion of the stroke (one of the reasons for the Burn's sensitive initial travel), a kinematic like this can make it difficult to use full travel other than during very large impacts. This might not be a bad thing if you demand lots of initial activity and want to save the rest of the travel for a rainy day, but there is a reason why most bikes don't offer this level of change throughout the stroke.

Our test bike, which was a size S2, was the Race model and retails for just less than $9,000 USD. There are frame-only options, plus an entry point Elite and Factory model to sit on either side of the Race in their pricing. Our bike featured an SRAM GX AXS drivetrain, Formula Cura 4 brakes, Fox Factory suspension, alloy Crankbrothers Synthesis e-bike wheels, and a Duex enduro one-piece bar. The bar itself is an interesting prospect. Despite it looking quite wild, dimensionally it's nothing too out-there. Its flat shape obscured its actual rise, which is achieved by the sleeve of the stem extending quite a long way down the steerer. The bike features in-frame storage, a universal derailleur hanger, and through-the-headset cable routing.

photo

The geometry of the S2 impressed us with its sheer balance. Its high stack, middling-to-short 470mm reach, and 445mm stays all played their role in this. Although the reach might not be in the same vein as other bikes meant for those around 175 to 185cm in height, which might typically have 480-485 mm of reach, it proved a hit with us. There was one significant outlier though - the seatpost and seat tube.

At 460mm the seat tube is very long. This in itself isn't the end of the world, and you can get it low enough to give enough clearance. The plot thickens, though, because the seat tube sits directly above the shock - it's not only very high but also with a short insertion depth. This means that while the post is high, you also can't fit in a long dropper (our test bike had a 150mm post when something over 200mm would have been preferred). With the saddle dropped it was too high, and if you lowered the seat post itself to an appropriate length for a descent it would then be too low for pedaling when at full extension. It's further exacerbated by the fact that it doesn't use a seat tube collar but rather a wedge to clamp against the post.



photo
photo

Climbing

The Unno offers a great platform for climbing. Due to the fact that it's so happy to get into its stroke its tracking is very good, and, even with anti-squat values of around 120 to 90% depending on where in the sag range of 30 to 40% you are, the grip is good and there is a great degree of composure in terms of how the rear wheel handles the terrain. It's very happy to follow the contours of the ground and also give a decent degree of efficiency. It's also the joint lightest bike on test.

The 76.5-degree seat angle isn't the steepest, but the climbing position itself was comfortable and upright, thanks to the high stack. On the steepest climbs the tall front end did occasionally make the front end feel a bit light, but otherwise the Unno was a capable, efficient climber, as well as being one of the lightest bikes in this roundup.



photo

photo
photo

Descending


The Burn looks fast, and in the right situations (steep, rough tracks) it comes to life. The squat links that connect the front triangle to the swing arm are neat and provide a taut, stiff platform to really drive the bike. The geometry plays in that too. It made for a bike that had lots of the rider's weight going through their feet, and it meant that you could focus on applying weight with your hands when you want to initiate a turn or pump the bike, rather than ever being pulled forward or having large amounts of weight in your hands by default.

The geometry cuts a sensible balance, and one that feels like it's been honed in on during real-world riding and years of reflection. It's interesting to see something so balanced with a suspension system so extreme. There are other examples of both virtues and vices juxtaposing one another. For instance, the frame storage sits beneath a panel that holds the water bottle. It works well and is both simple and effective. Yet, it leaves the bottle rattling on the underside of the top tube. The suspension gives a feeling that thrives on sleep-slow tech, but then the seat tube is so long, with such short insertion depth, that it means you'll struggle to get the saddle out of the way for the very trails the bike was meant for.

It's a fascinating bike and they've clearly compromised some elements or dimensions to grant the real estate to make their own suspension platform, and it poses a question right at the heart of the issue - is any suspension platform good enough for these compromises? Probably not. Is this suspension system a game-changingly wonderful take? I wouldn't say so.

It's okay in certain situations, such as the steeper technical trails, but it also struggles because while you may never hit bottom out, you do often hit that wall of support. During my testing, I experimented between 140-210 psi, which is a huge swing and didn't get bottom out in either. In fact, the 210 psi felt better if only because it gave more initial support, and I just learned to accept that I would largely be using less than full travel.

All these problems, and the intense ramp-up, mean that on flat-out fast trails, this bike can be fatiguing. You're not bouncing off the bottom out, but you may as well be. It can also lead to a hanging-up sensation in some instances that will not only punish mistakes but also your wheels. After our test period, the rear was in a sorry state.


photo

Technical Report
Finishing Kit: The bike isn't cheap, so it's frustrating that you'd want to immediately explore options in terms of low-stack seat posts. Plus, if it were my bike, I would take the bars and grips off too. They're just a kook too far for me. That's not even to mention the E13 cassette and YBN chain in a combination that didn't offer as good a shift as I have come to expect from a full complement of SRAM parts.

Formula Brakes: The Foruma Cura 4 Brakes offered good power, even if the feel didn't give as much bite as I would personally like. That said, there was plenty of modulation and adjustment on offer, although sadly the latter wasn't tool-free.



Pros

+ Good grip offered at slower speeds
+ Solid, balanced geometry
+ Climbs well in terms of suspension performance


Cons

- Water bottle rattles on underside of top tube
- Odd finishing kit
- Seat tube is too long and seatpost too short
- Arguably too progressive









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The 2023 Enduro Field Test is presented Bluegrass



Author Info:
henryquinney avatar

Member since Jun 3, 2014
341 articles

354 Comments
  • 390 6
 You wish Quinney understood that you can't expect to have it all with a sub-$10k bargain bike like this.
  • 217 2
 When will I learn?
  • 20 0
 @henryquinney: If you're a bike company the hope is "never".
  • 3 0
 @henryquinney: would be great for you to give an overall comparison of these bikes with your loved Spire (which I also rode)!? Would you trade it for any of these?
  • 15 9
 Who cares about having it all when you can tell everyone your bike is hand-made in “Barthelona”
  • 1 1
 If the bike had it all how else would they convince you to spend another 10k on their other model
  • 8 1
 @WRCDH: Good luck trying to impress a Catalan with that joke.
  • 3 0
 @WRCDH: That would be great if you could tell everyone that without lying, but it's made in Asia.
  • 2 3
 @mi-bike: Catalans are usually just impressed that I don’t butcher “Ibiza” like the Brits butcher Ibiza: “Eye-bee-thuh” and “Eye-bee-thur” =P
  • 3 0
 @bananowy: Good info...I’m both sad and happy to hear they’re not making the new frames in-house now. I sat in on the layup of a few frames at Cero / Unno and saw all the other steps too. Rewarding and incredible attention to detail, but very involved. Outsourcing has its headaches too, just different types of headaches.
  • 5 2
 @WRCDH: Yo no comprendo. Fyi, Catalans do not use the "th" sound to say Barcelona. I believe it is only Spaniards from outside the region (as well as look-at-me-I'm-smart package holiday-ers) who pronounce it thus.
  • 3 1
 @mi-bike: Yeah, in my experience, it’s mostly fancy elitist non-Spanish jet-setters who say Barthelona...but several born-and-raised Barcelonians I know say the “th.” Maybe some hardcore Catalans say the “s.” I also know some people from Madrid who pronounce the “th.”

But Ibiza is “Ee-bee-thu” in most of Barcelona and most parts of Spain, from what I’ve heard...but a few families I’ve talked to on Ibiza who have lived there for several generations insist it’s “Ee-bee-suh.” I say Ee-bee-suh on the island and outside of Spain, and Ee-bee-thuh in the rest of Spain...it seems to not upset anyone there yet, unlike Eye-bee-thur =P
  • 2 1
 @mi-bike: And yeah, it seems Barcelona is quite cosmopolitan with lots of non-Catalonian Spaniards, hence the frequent “th” I’ve heard there. And there was/is some palpable societal tension regarding secession (and some scary protests when I was last there!)...maybe some people are digging in on the Spanish “th”(?). 90-minutes north in Palafrugell in Catalonia, they definitely pronounced it as an “s” not as “th”
  • 1 0
 This IS the bike Roskopp has wood for.
  • 1 1
 @shredddr: They really should’ve named it the Unno “Big Pine” or some other wood name. I like Unno “EVergreen” more than Mith as well =P
  • 4 0
 @WRCDH: eye beefa
  • 1 1
 @jaame: Eye-beefa, LOL, I forgot about that one! “Holy cow” that brings back memories with drunken Brits on the sunset strip some mid-August in the 00’s. I still wish I understood what that one guy from Liverpool speaking Scouse was saying all night...I didn’t catch one single word, but got partial translations from his English buddies. But I could sure tell that he liked the bikini-clad fire dancers...no translation necessary on that one =P
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: Problem is, this one is not.
  • 1 0
 @WRCDH: An American trying to promote correct overseas placename pronunciation... That's rich...!
  • 1 0
 @Obidog: Dude, you don't even say potato correctly.
  • 1 0
 @Obidog: Idk man, as much as everyone likes to make fun of American education, Brits 100% take the cake for mispronouncing non-English place names, people's names etc. I'm sometimes positively bamboozled at how really easy ones still get butchered.
  • 185 9
 Stop reading after I found out I’d have to run 40% sag after paying ten grand because it’s not been designed very well.
  • 32 0
 the numero unno burning question is....
  • 8 0
 How much progression does it have? Review didn't gave charts
  • 5 0
 @mattg95: about 45%
  • 38 0
 @Adam1987: Cascade Components will be along to up the progression a bit more in a jiffy!

PS. Truthfully, I love their products.
  • 12 1
 I had a conversation about something similar with a guy a few years ago trying to sell me on a different bike. Can't remember which one. He was saying that "Just because a bike needs higher sag to feel right doesn't make it worse than another bike, just different".

Yeah, sure, if the entire bike is designed around it. But if I'm running 40% sag that's going to influence my HTA and most importantly my BB height. Maybe not such a big deal on a DH bike. But I dunno about you, I buy enduro bikes to pedal up the hill too. And at 40% sag that usually results in a mighty-low BB height.
  • 4 3
 Then completely fill the air can with orange plastic.
  • 32 1
 So what's the target group? Good income, working a lot, not hitting the trails to often, therefore slower. Wanting an eccentric looking bike w/ a lotta gold. Good small ´bump sensitivity - not hitting the rough stuff anyways. Plus a good support on steep tech, just in case. Good, upright climber, too.
Ticks all the boxes.
  • 12 2
 SAG % means absolutely nothing without taking the leverage rate into consideration.

This bike is actually pretty low leverage from sag to bottom out if you look at the chart. Sure it’s highly progressive from 0 to sag but that’s pretty meaningless when your weight is on the bike.

Also if it’s designed around 35% sag (40% isn’t what unno lists from what I saw online) then the geometry (BB, HTA etc) will be correct at recommended sag.
  • 12 0
 @cueTIP: You can say this about any bike with very high progression. And most folks get wet when they hear that bike is super progressive, this just sounds good, whereas linear bikes are discarded from the start. No wonder manufacturers want to catch up. What is much more important is the spring rate change, I came back from coil to air and It's mind blowing how different the feel is, traditional air spring has so little midstroke support, this compared with high progression end up with a bike which either rides is 60+% of the travel all the time, or you never reach full travel. I would definitely try this one with coil or 3-chamber air.
  • 2 0
 doublepost, sorry.
  • 10 1
 @SunsPSD:

new product opportunity for cascade -> links that decrease progression, lols.
  • 4 1
 The Intense 951 has entered the chat.
  • 4 0
 @loudv8noises: It's true that most of the progression is pre-sag and that the change in leverage from 30-100% is a much better metric for bottom-out resistance. But still, there's 26% progression from 30-100% which is still on the high side.
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: it depends how well the bike susp pairs with the air spring. For example first gen banshee legend leverage rate was designed around Fox Rc4 (the 2010) so a progressive shock and good air shocks like CCBD Air didn't sit low in their travel on it.

Though I agree the progressive hype is dumb.
  • 1 0
 @mattg95: also the review doesn't gives times anymore... is it faster despite this compromise?.... probably YES
  • 2 1
 @seb-stott: 26% of a relatively low leverage rate. I’m sorry but the idea this bike is going to hit some mid stroke wall of support is kinda absurd imo.

At 35% sag This bike has ~42mm of shock stroke for ~105mm of wheel travel. (65mm stroke, 160mm)

At sag a SC megatower 2 (62.5mm stroke, 170mm) has ~43mm of shock stroke remaining for 120mm of wheel travel.

The Santa Cruz is far more likely to hit a “wall of support” than this Unno based on the numbers I see?

*fyi I picked the megatower out of thin air it could be that it’s also extremely progressive for an enduro bike but seem to remember positive reviews for that bike on both coil and air.
  • 2 0
 @loudv8noises: I didn’t read the charts, but if your math on those two leverage ratios is right, your conclusion is flipped.

The Unno wheel has LESS leverage against the shock / will have a harder time compressing it.
  • 2 0
 @Stumpclumper: this is true but it wasn’t the point I was trying to make.

I was trying to show that despite the high sag % the leverage from 35% to 100% is actually pretty normal for an enduro bike.

The downside of the burn, from what I can see, is that, because it’s so progressive near SAG, it’s going to be very sensitive to dialing in the correct spring rate (air pressure or coil spring #).

The fact they suggest a range of 30% to 40% sag is too large of a range imo.
  • 2 4
 too bad pinkbike has no fucking idea of what they're talking about..
  • 1 0
 @lkubica: Yes, coil on bikes this progressive. I had a 2nd gen Capra that I couldn't get right with its air shock. Put a DHX2 on and it was one of the best rear ends I've ridden.
  • 126 1
 "Good grip offered at slower speeds" Big Grin

Priceless reviewer-speak! That's like Alonso saying the updated Aston is just fine if you go slow.
  • 7 0
 Can't even go slow properly with that brake failure in the Sprint lol.
  • 2 0
 Maybe they meant slow like the speed it travels as decoration on someone's wall.
  • 20 0
 “Flys through slow tech”
  • 2 0
 That's how you know they ran out of good things to say
  • 100 1
 This review was a bit of a burn
  • 1 1
 the guy speaking on the back of the video seems so bored
  • 70 0
 A triumph of design over function. Let's have a unique freestanding seat tube and paint it bright orange and not think about why.
  • 6 0
 Nobody else has done it, we’re on to something BIG
  • 1 0
 it should have been the opposite... paint some cool bright lines elsewhere and please hide that dick under your ass...
  • 79 28
 I didn't realize Women Specific frames were still a thing. Looks like it would work well with a nice floral dress.

(The Cura 4 brakes probably came with the stock organic pads. Power is certainly better with the metal ones. More bite than Code RSC for instance)
  • 51 0
 lol, aint nothing wrong with a step-thru 170mm enduro bike.
  • 57 7
 I’ll upvote you because people don’t have a sense of humor anymore. It looks like an old step-thru frame. Plain to see. Add a basket with a little terrier in it and pedal to the market.
  • 3 0
 Looks perfect for us with dedicated with dad bods and achy joints for us to get on and off!
  • 49 0
 Looks like they're tried to reinvent the wheel and created loads of annoying foibles which would be a nightmare to live with. Hard pass on this one, even at half the price.
  • 8 0
 I wonder how many people will ignore this review and rationalize a purchase of this bike anyway. I mean, someone is going to buy this bike, right? Who? Why?
  • 10 0
 @TheR: somewhere in the world is the world’s worst doctor and someone has an appointment with them in the morning. Yes, someone will buy this bike!
  • 6 1
 @TheR: Architects. And designers.
  • 1 0
 @Tigergoosebumps: George Carlin…
  • 3 0
 @TheR: "good grip offered at slower speeds"

They know the target market is the people with too much money but can't ride for sh8 lol
  • 3 0
 @apokolokyntosis: maybe some product designers and fashion bloggers. Architects are definitely more into steel or ti frames these days
  • 3 0
 @TheR: This bike's target customers won't have to actively ignore this review because they will never see it. They have no idea pinkbike even exists.
  • 2 0
 @bananowy: I’m not sure that’s a bad thing… not knowing Pinkbike exists.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Yup, nothing wrong with that.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: I saw one in the lift line at Vail. Wasn't surprised.
  • 37 0
 had me at $8,897 USD with a gx build
  • 56 0
 Shoulda kept reading - gets worse. Not even full gx…
  • 2 0
 Ridiculous tiered product lines are why bikes are so expensive.
  • 14 0
 I love how they described it as "over $8k" instead of "$9k". Haha.
  • 5 0
 @PHX77: "for less than $10k.."
  • 2 0
 YBN chain, I had one of those wear out in 100 miles of dry riding, absolutely unacceptable.
  • 4 0
 They had me at cable tourism. Wait.
  • 2 0
 @mick06: basically 4900$ premium vs YT Capra Uncaged 9 from last year for the frame alone which is mad and that YT was on Ohlins.
  • 2 0
 @spaced: I know right, the capra uncaged 12 with xo transmission and full sram flight attendant suspension is still $2,527.97 cheaper than this, while the uncaged 11 with similar gx drivetrain but ohlins suspension is a full 3k cheaper.

bike pricing be wildin
  • 35 0
 It reminds me of a shaving razor that went one razor too far.
  • 16 0
 Fusion Ocho
  • 2 0
 @BrambleLee: I wish all websites would include as much advertising as the onion.
  • 28 0
 @henryquinney: in the future are we able to sprinkle in some photos about the more interesting aspects of the review like the aforementioned bar/stem combo or seatpost wedge? Would be great to help understand better. Thanks for the review!
  • 28 0
 I bet Unno wishes they could throw down a reverse card after reading this review.
  • 1 0
 Ha; love this comment! Smile
  • 28 0
 Skip card then?
  • 22 0
 Draw four. That's $36k...
  • 5 0
 I see what you did there
  • 1 0
 Their next model needs to be the Skipbo
  • 1 0
 @ultimatist: Change to what colour
  • 23 0
 Oh good, an enduro bike that offers *only* 160mm of rear travel, but feels like it has less than that, and which can only accommodate a 150mm dropper.

Thank goodness it has a so-so build kit for $9k.
  • 21 0
 This is the perfect all the gear, no idea bike: It looks a million dollars, costs a fortune, it's good at going very slowly in the tech stuff, it wants you to set the suspension up much too softly and your saddle will be in the perfect place to rest the paunch when hanging way too far over the rear wheel. I'm ordering two.
  • 18 0
 If you can't fit bigger than 150mm dropper on a large sized bike, the bike essentially useless as an enduro bike, let's just start with that. The rest of the review is well-written (thanks Henry) but meaningless given that fact.
  • 7 1
 And take it a step further with brands not putting 200mm+ ones from the get-go on larges. Why is it so hard to offer an enduro bike with a proper length post as stock?
  • 2 0
 @NWBasser: 100% agree
  • 1 5
flag pmhobson (Oct 23, 2023 at 14:21) (Below Threshold)
 “Useless”? Hardly.
  • 1 0
 Yeah I wish they wouldn’t have included this bike, the whole review was basically “as you probably thought when you first saw images of this bike, the seat tube is ridiculous and basically makes the bike unusable for it intended purpose”
  • 3 0
 Spot on. On my medium sized XC bike with a 440 seat tube length I can just fit a 150mm dropper when slammed. With a 460mm seat tube I'd probably have to run a ~125mm post, maybe even 100mm. Its basically just a long travel gravel bike at that point...
  • 3 0
 @NWBasser: why? Slow changes in the bike industry, caused by lazy designers and tradition addicted users.

In 2014 I had my first bike with a dropper, 125mm. Between big ups and downs, I still used the seatclamp as well, and calculated that 200-250mm drop would be nice.
"You shouldn't need that much"
"Learn to ride first", was all I heard at the time.

Same as we first had to resist Mondraker, Pole and Geometron geos until we tasted it, and concluded ok, this is actually good
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: your username really got me Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @NWBasser: the German market … supposedly
  • 24 5
 Finally, a bike for my Amish Girlfriend to ride with her dress on!
  • 3 9
flag vapidoscar FL (Oct 23, 2023 at 9:55) (Below Threshold)
 Fun fact: Amish aren't allowed to use pedals/gears. They ride scooters.
  • 12 0
 @vapidoscar: this is fake news. Growing up in central WI, you'd see both Amish and Mennonite women ride bikes quite often, especially on Sundays...
  • 11 1
 @vapidoscar: I knew a guy named Floyd that bought his mountain bikes from the Amish community. He ended up drinking too much whiskey and lost the Tour de France.
  • 3 0
 @formerbmxguy: It varies by sect, I guess.
  • 2 0
 @SpeedMountain: and then twenty years later he's the czar of a massive dope network that employes the Amish and Mennonite communities to grow his hemp crop.
  • 1 0
 Mennonites are better at riding
  • 1 0
 @formerbmxguy: The Amish communities in central PA do not ride bikes either. Scooters only.
  • 6 0
 I once saw an Amish man riding an ebike, what am I supposed to call my non-electric bike now?
  • 1 0
 @Tigergoosebumps: Wow. I moved out of central PA a while ago so I guess things are changing. Even back then, some of the fancier Amish buggies had car batteries with serious stereo setups.
  • 3 1
 @vapidoscar: fun fact: some Amish communities are rocking that full suspension, disk break equipped horse drawn carriage. Pull up!

Marshawn Lynch approved.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=QwGBErzcN5Q
  • 13 1
 okay Pinkbike reviewers, you got your wish - short reach and long chainstays. Are you happy?
  • 13 1
 That title is perfect. "Yes, Yes I am..." *Click
  • 11 1
 Water Bottle Rattle on top tube? LOL Not so genius design. All that effort to be different and it's now just annoying to ride.
  • 5 3
 Like every medium Norco made in the last 4 years, or a small Firebird. Not sure why companies do this.
  • 5 0
 @BrianColes: medium Norco Fluid owner, no bottle rattle
  • 4 0
 @BrianColes: range and range VLT owner here. No bottle rattle. Maybe you’re doing it wrong?
  • 3 0
 @BrianColes: Maybe try a better bottle cage?
  • 3 0
 @andrewbikeguide: and a bottle that fits it well
  • 9 1
 I just want to mention that Barbora Vojta won the 2023 Megaavalanche on this bike, and ended in top 10 Enduro World Cup overall in her first season. So maybe the bike is not so bad at all..

Now some good intended critique of the review:

The editors' complaints about rattling bottle is not fair IMO. The bike is sold without bottle cage, and if you buy a cage that does not hold your bottle properly, buy a better one. It is not a fault in bike design. Same with the Commencal Meta SX review..

Regarding the seatpost length - this one has 460mm, while for example that Commencal Meta SX they tested before has 447mm in size L. So just 13mm difference..

..And the dropper post - yes 150mm travel seems a bit too short, although it is debatable (I am 6feet tall and ride 150mm with no issues). However, when I look at the cheapest model on Unno website, it has a 170mm OneUp post, so in fact it IS possible to use a longer than 150mm one with this frame!
  • 3 1
 found the unno owner
  • 1 0
 @dtheio: doesn’t have the cheapest model either
  • 11 0
 Now Unno Pinkbike doesn't like it
  • 8 0
 Something that is not mentioned in the review (or I missed it) is the lack of Bashguard compatibility, no ISCG tabs or any custom bashguard to install
Though someone could install a “chainring type bashguard”
  • 8 0
 If you want kook level of boutique, just get an Antidote. lol. Suspension that is sorted, jaw dropping looks, and best of all, a seat that gets out of your way!
  • 7 2
 I know people find the looks divisive at best, but I love it! It's just like this amazing concept car that you know will never make it to production, only this bike made it. Unfortunately the seat tube situation and the very restricted shock access cancel all the visual appeal. Have seen this and the e-bike version in the wild.
  • 2 1
 Where do you live where you have seen 2 of these things!? Is that the flag of Monaco?
  • 2 0
 @SunsPSD: you came close…. It is Greece, and I think we have a handful number of Unnos around, I have seen the 2 mentioned, actually I have build up the burn. So 5 bikes for a 10.000.000 population country, you don’t call us Monaco…
And it is as expensive as an S-Works or a any other boutique brand…..
  • 2 0
 If mountain biking was about building something I might have doodled when I was 12, you're right. It looks dumb, because the design isn't functional.
  • 8 0
 I d’unno, but it burns my eyes.
  • 9 0
 Not curious anymore haha
  • 5 1
 So the cable routing is not negative? WOW, I thought this is crap to replace anything and also kills the headset faster.
I could play around this bike and the cable guard on the headset looks so cheap and so big. Its more then ugly and unnecessary , its hideous. With the mate plastic that make it look super cheap.
  • 13 1
 I think there were so many other things wrong with the bike, they forgot to mention it.
  • 4 0
 I can't fathom why it took so long in the comments for someone to point it out. Yep. Between that and the high seatpost, this is not a bike that I would ever consider. Those two things are near the top of my list to not have.
  • 1 0
 @NWBasser: It is really worse then you think if you have this bike in front of you. The seat tube is really massive but the bike looks tiny.
For me its the seat tube length, angle and the internal routing that is done this way.
  • 1 0
 @evehmeyer: Ran out of space in the negatives box.
  • 5 0
 slightly off topic Maxxis related question: why are some hot patches LARGE (see the Assegai) and some are less in your face (@DHRII)
  • 3 0
 I believe that the larger patch is the current size and small patch would mean tire is from an older batch.
  • 1 0
 I think those would be the same size, maybe it's just optics? 2.4-2.5" tires are going to use a similar hot patch. 2.6-2.8 use the obnoxiously large one.

Either way, that yellow blur means you're riding the best.
  • 1 0
 @GTscoob: Not optics, it's a 2.5" assguy in the bike pic above. I've got the same 2.5" DD assguy on my bike and it is also obnoxiously large compared to my DH 2.4" DHRII
  • 7 0
 So....design over function.
(And obviously not cheap)
  • 3 0
 "This might not be a bad thing if you demand lots of initial activity and want to save the rest of the travel for a rainy day, but there is a reason why most bikes don't offer this level of change throughout the stroke."
Thank you! Too many bikes have come out in the past few years trying to sell ridiculous progression and excessive sag numbers as the next big thing.
  • 3 0
 How is it "arguably" too progressive when you never found the bottom after trying an insanely broad range of pressure and clearly didn't like the rear suspension for anything other than technical climbing. If you read the pros and cons it sounds like a reasonable set of trade-offs but in the full text, it sounds like a terrible bike.
  • 10 1
 they want to continue to receive bikes. the "argument" must never be settled, weasel words rule here.
  • 7 0
 Get excited for field test ‘24 where six bikes will be anonymously purchased, no industry deal, no preproduction frames, and rated. Best bike stays on as the benchmark to compare five new bikes in ‘25 Big Grin so pumped
  • 35 1
 Hi, great question. There are elements of it being just the way I speak and my writing style but also whereas I do think the seatpost is a mess, the suspension feel of a bike is more subjective to a person's taste, and I wanted my review to reflect that. I'm not afraid to be adamant about things but I do think that a degree of pragmatism is sometimes warranted. These reviews, like you alluded to, are important to brands. It's not that I care whether they like what I have to say - but I do care that it's fair and even-handed.
  • 5 8
 @henryquinney: I mean, of course these reviews are important to brands. But how much deference do/should you owe that in how you write the review?

You know, I generally think that the PB comment section is full of people who want to complain that:
1) Everything is magnitudes of order too expensive; and,
2) Everything but the hot shit du jour sucks; and,
3) Reviews are basically long form paid advertisements.

And I think it's ridiculous. The comment section is 95% full of shit, and how more of y'all don't see that is totally mystifying to me.

Same time, I mean—I just don't think fair and even-handed is even remotely the same thing as pulling punches when a product doesn't even come close to meeting it's design or performance goals, as seems to be the case here. It's not y'alls job to keep these brands in business.
  • 20 1
 @BrambleLee: it’s not often I get accused of pulling punches. Cantankerous little shitbag is often considered more apt. I assure you, no punches were pulled. It is arguably too progressive but if you ride slower, steeper tech - and these places do exist - you could well get on with it… if it wasn’t for the seat tube. But I covered that in length too.
  • 7 0
 @henryquinney @BrambleLee

Maybe we interpret it differently, but the opening paragraph for the Descending topic made my eyebrows shoot up. It's a pretty decisive knock against the Burn and, IMO really settles how Henry felt about this bike. If that's pulling punches...

"Descending the Unno should be an enticing proposition but for some test riders the initial excitement soon blurred into confusion and then deflation."

Quinney you gotta start cussing I guess
  • 1 2
 @henryquinney: Yeah, fair. I mean, this certainly wasn't a glowing review. I guess I was just surprised by the idea that reviews being important to the brands has any bearing on how you write the reviews. You may not have meant it that way, and I may be reading too much into it, but on the page, it sure reads in a way that could sure give fodder to the reviews-are-quid-pro-quo-for-advertising-dollars conspiracists.
  • 11 0
 @BrambleLee: Sorry, just to get to the nuts and bolts of it, is this the sentence that surprised you? "These reviews, like you alluded to, are important to brands. It's not that I care whether they like what I have to say - but I do care that it's fair and even-handed."? I don't want to sound like I've completely lost the plot or I think too highly of myself or Pinkbike, but we are professionals (ish) and we do take it somewhat seriously. Brands want to have their bikes reviewed by us because we give them a fair shake, but that cuts both ways. Fairness is just that - fair. Not sensationalist. Not clickbait. Not a hit piece. Just what we genuinely felt, and how that would most likely intersect with our readers' (plural, not just one) potential experience. I don't think shitting all over something that we know deep down will be liked by a subsect of mountain bikers with a certain type of trail on their doorstep would be fair - at all. Do you feel my attitude in this is reasonable? (Genuine question, not being facetious).

@PeakHopper I'll be effing and jeffing in no time.
  • 5 0
 @henryquinney: Yes, that’s the sentence I was referring to, and yes, I feel your attitude in this is eminently reasonable. I think I read too much into it and came in a little hot.

Thanks for expounding a bit, and thanks for the dialogue!
  • 11 0
 @BrambleLee: Thanks for the feedback - genuinely. I really want my reviews to deliver for the PB audience and mountain bikers everywhere and I really appreciate the audience taking the time to have bigger, broader conversations. Cheers
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: effing and jeffing is the most british term ever.

I feel like most readers got the memo, and the review had room to be fair to Unno. It's quite the win-win situation, brilliant work really. From business dealings to diplomacy, you achieve more when you forgo the full antagonistic angle. Pinkbike stays in business, readers get more memos, however they're phrased.

Fun fact, my relatively well to do country with few trails, no mountains and a decent number of bike lovers do mean that this is a bike that has a target demographic here (read: fancy, blingest bike for light, mostly low speed riding) and this review can help.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: I wonder how the pro enduro riders for Unno (Gilles Frank, Barca Vojta, Bruno Andreu) make do with such a bike? Is theirs different from the comercial bike?
  • 4 0
 @BrambleLee: For what it's worth I think you're far more likely to encounter moderately intelligent conversation in the pinkbike comments section than you are in many other places.

Sure there are the smack talkers who only every complain about price and outside magazine but by and large the comments section here is lightyears better than most others.
  • 3 0
 @BrambleLee: @henryquinney. Well I never! A reasonable discussion on PB where one person explains their position and another listens and accepts that other person's rationale.

I hope this sets a trend
  • 2 0
 And yet, many long travel enduro bikes spec a 125 dropper in size small frames, and have a kink in the seat tube which doesn’t allow for a longer dropper posts. Glad to see these design choices being challenged so openly. Bring this to more bikes!
  • 1 0
 150mm is the absolute min for a size small these days. With current enduro/trail geometry (long reach, short ETT, STA in the 77-80 degree realm) you need an even longer dropper than before as the seat ends up right under you butt when dropped. I'm 163cm/5'4", ride a small frame with 79 deg STA and can luckily fit a 170mm. It feels like a 150mm felt on my previous bike with much slacker seat tube. On the Unno Burn I'd be able to run something between 100-130mm, which is a major drawback for the kind of riding this bike is intended.
  • 1 0
 Small sized bikes have had short dropper for years. Only when a modern size large has a short dropper is that newsworthy.
  • 6 2
 gauche
/ɡōSH/
adjective
lacking ease or grace; unsophisticated and socially awkward.
"a shy and gauche teenager"

@henryquinney Nice.
  • 3 0
 The good-conventional geometry. The bad-long dropper won't fit AND it's a pogo stick masquerading as a mountain bike. This is Exhibit: A for "design" instead of engineering. Yay-it looks different??
  • 2 0
 besides the obvious flaws like seat tube and E13 I get a feeling the long post with no stiffening bar may end up with fracture syndrome it is a big hit bike after all and with the LOOONG seat tube I expect big hits while seated will take place. .....also it is 10K CDN and it looks hideous along with the paint colours
  • 3 0
 This seems like the manufacturer was more concerned with the (goofy) looks than performance and/or functionality…and on the goofy looks tip, this looks like a bike for people in Dubai who think supercars look cool.
  • 2 0
 Is tool-less brake adjustment important for regular riders or only for reviewers (and people on new bikes)? By brakes are pretty old so I'm not really experiment anymore, but I'd say most people don't really experiment much once they've had their brakes for a while, don't they? Other components like a handlebar (and the position of brake levers, shifters etc bolted to it) also require tools for you to adjust them until you're happy. Yes you may like to adjust the brake for different courses, but so would you adjust the stem (one 5mm spacer up or down), brake and shifter orientation etc.
  • 1 0
 I change my reach adjust very regularly (only adjustment I have) and am very glad I don’t have to pull out a tool to do so
  • 1 0
 @loosegoat: Thanks for your input. I've got some brakes with tool-less adjustment (2007 and 2008 Magura Louise brakes with bite point adjustment) but I just set it all the way out (earliest bite point) and never cared to set it anywhere else. The other adjustment is reach but I just set it where I liked it and left it there. Alright, I've also got some hydraulic rim brakes of theirs (HS11 on the commuter, HS33 on the mountain unicycle) where you don't need tools to adjust for pad wear but for open hydraulic disc brakes I think this doesn't count. Closed hydraulic brakes (Brake Force One is the only modern one I can think of now but maybe the trails people have more) obviously need tool-less pad adjustment.
  • 2 0
 Looks interesting, then you notice how weird the seatpost looks, Then you see they had to do something like that because the rear shock is in a weird place. No matter how pretty the frame is, it looks like a series of compromises to get the shock where it is, Surely there was a better way to get that result?
  • 3 1
 Come on - all this talking about insertion depth and all this talking about it's progressive suspension - and then there is no diagram showing the leverage ratio and no percentage clearly specifing how progressive it is?
And you honestly do not give an actual number on how deep the seatpost can be inserted? WTF.

Btw, the bike looks really small under the rider on the pictures. Would have been convenient to see a geometry table here.

Fyi, a 460mm seat tube is 15mm longer than a typical 445mm seat tube on frames size large. It is to long - yes, esp. for short legged riders (like me). But it isn't as dramatic as put here.
  • 2 0
 I feel like the frame was unfairly reviewed based on a poor dropper choice. Looking at the max insertion depth you should be able to slam a 180mm dropper in an s2 or a 210 oneup with very little protruding. A 150mm dropper should never be specced on a L/XL bike but the frame can handle more..... he mast is ugly but not so sure its an Achilles heal. It has more insertion depth than some other bikes out there for the same seat tube length.
  • 2 0
 This may be the unpopular opinion in this thread, but I ride a Dash and LOVE it. The Dash is the trail version with 150/140. The bike climbs well, descends well, and is fast becoming one of my favorite rides.
  • 1 0
 This seat tube thing feels like a red herring to me, especially if you say its 5cm longer than others. Did you take into consideration that the toptube is so much lower than on other bikes? Did maybe the visuals influence your perception? The split in the frame for the shock is not unique either, mondraker superfoxy or canyon sender are offering the same rear suspension under seattube tunnel, or are we saying all of them are too long?
Am not saying it as a theory, it is one of my actual custom builds and cant say that bb to seat tube top it would actually be longer than other bikes I rode, but the toptube is definitely the lowest I ve ever had.
  • 4 0
 I can't see how that giant phallus is there for anything other than to be provocative.
  • 2 0
 not that it excuses it, but I think they would have minimum insertion depth issues with the dropper post if they made it a normal height
  • 3 0
 This thing reminds me of Mr. Garrison's IT from southpark.
  • 1 0
 Seat tube is a clear fail, but I think the question around progression is a more interesting one. There seems to be a lot of personal preference around progression. Different shocks and different terrain could be a factor in what works well too. I've personally liked bikes with a bit more progression in the linkage, but more in the mid to high 20% range and I don't really know all the details of the shape of the curves and leverage ratios for those bikes. Would be interesting to hear different designers explain their philosophy.
  • 1 0
 quite the opposite of the review in german website 'Enduro'.
They also mention the seat tube (which in my opinion is no big deal since I'm well served with 170mm), but that's all the reviews have in common. Is mostly praise in theirs.
  • 1 1
 I am shocked -shocked - to hear that the Euro-centric Enduro magazine has showered a European bike with praise.
  • 2 1
 @drbino: I just saw Enduro's North American bike brands shootout today and was surprised that they criticized the Lowdown and the Arrival 170 as being poor climbers. Are the Euros just smashing out massive watts or maybe they just have smoother less techy climbs?
  • 2 0
 @CaMKii:Here (slovenia) we mostly have asphalt, gravel or logging roads. While they can be steep as balls there is usually plenty of grip. Single track climbs with roots and stuff are quite uncommon.
This may explain why a stable climbing platform is more important than outright grip.
  • 1 0
 @CaMKii: [...] maybe they just have smoother less techy climbs?

I like techy climbs but whenever a trail is techy/rooty/rocky, most people prefer to ride it downhill and you don't want to be the one being hit by someone going in the opposite direction. So most of the technical single tracks I would pedal on are pretty much flat or rolling hills rather than proper climbs.
  • 1 0
 @drbino: but is usually german brands the ones that can do no wrong, tho
  • 2 0
 Unno. Will Burn a big hole in your savings Dos. Not allow for a proper dropper Tres. To be totally different but isn't really any better Quatro....nothing puns with quattro and nothing rhymes with orange.
  • 1 0
 I do not get it, they only review 8 bikes, why include this one (and a few of the other choices)? What % of your readers are interested in it, even if it had a good review? These bikes are so "niche" it makes little sense to include them.
Heck run a separate review for cool, different, interest bikes like this. Compound the lack of interest with a pretty poor review, and this thing is DOA.
  • 2 0
 I’m interested, because I think it looks good and is obviously doing something different.

It’s really interesting, to me, to see what compromises have happened because of the looks. The dropper restrictions, rattly water bottle and suspension limitations are really well explained, and to me, make for an interesting story, not least for the implications of why most mountain bikes look pretty similar.
  • 1 0
 i dont even understand why they bothered in the first place putting this into production. it is so flatly compromised from the get go, its almost like they were just trying to create a capital loss for some other nefarious scheme
  • 1 0
 Hypotenuse for the Large Unno is 802mm @470mm reach and for a Large MetaSX 798mm @480 reach. Please start including Stack in your "Details" section, as Reach alone is only half the equation for estimating standing bike fit. My current bike has 10mm less reach but over 20mil more stack than my previous frame and feels much bigger.
  • 2 1
 Which is because reach is measured at stack height. Measure reach on your new bike at stack height of your old bike an you'll find out it in fact is around 10mm longer than your old bike.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-daniel: this is exactly the point I'm trying to make
  • 1 0
 "For instance, the frame storage sits beneath a panel that holds the water bottle. It works well and is both simple and effective. Yet, it leaves the bottle rattling on the underside of the top tube."

The frame storage causes the rattle? Or is it that the bottle _cage_ allows the rattle?

If it _is_ the storage panel, then that means it both doesn't work well and is not effective, at holding a water bottle specifically, one solid half of it's job.
  • 4 0
 Has anyone ever actually seen one of these in the wild?
  • 4 0
 I saw one this summer in Loudenvielle and was intrigued enough to have a look at it. For sure, this is an alien machine and some details are catching the eye, but this said, I'm not into that sort of ultra designed kind of stuff. Personal taste though...
  • 9 0
 A buddy of mine had one of the previous gen ones. Ironically it got burned up in a fire.
  • 3 0
 @danstonQ: If that Unno was silver it was one from the Unno team. Yes those bikes are on the trails,not like an Enduro or Megatower number but are real bikes.
We made our base camp in Loudenville 20 meters away from the Skyvall lift a week early of the DH WC. It was a very nice place!
  • 5 0
 Coincidentally we saw another one in Whistler while getting laps on the test bike.
  • 4 0
 @homerjm: Ha ha!!! For sure it was one on these! I saw it at the bottom after its shower. Impressive beast indeed... and yes: Loudenvielle is a very nice spot to ride. Glad you appreciated it. ¡¡¡Salud!!!
  • 5 1
 @dariodigiulio: Did you ask the rider their thoughts? Were they disappointed or gushing? Somewhere in-between?

I'd assume that after you've spent big money on such a unique bike, your brain would be totally unable to dislike anything about it, and would be in full-on threat level midnight self-justification mode, haha.
  • 2 0
 My local bikeshop has a few of them and some Ebikes also. The headset thing really is SO much worse when you have it right in front of you. Maybe I should test ride that thing after it got this review, haha...
  • 1 0
 @dariodigiulio: I took an Antidote to whistler for a week and never saw another one. lol. Thats exactly what I am shooting for when I ride the thing!
  • 1 0
 @Serpentras: I do not like the headset either. the original IS52 is nicer. They had a clever idea of splitting the top and bottom cable routing halves so that its easier to assemble/disassemble, but the parts feel cheap.
  • 16 16
 Granted they probably could have made the seat tube much shorter than it is, but is having a 200 mm+ dropper post really necessary for riders between 5'9 and 6'1 or taller for that matter? What's wrong with a 170? Why does the seat need to be absolutely slammed whenever we go down hill now? Is that inch really preventing you from riding what you want to?
  • 27 0
 Do I need over 200mm of drop to enjoy riding my MTB? Of course not. I also don't need my mountain bike to enjoy trails in the woods but it sure is nice to have.
  • 12 0
 I wouldn't say you need a 200mm dropper, but with steep seat tube angles it's very nice. The 180mm dropper on my bike means I have a saddle that occasionally whacks my inner thighs pretty hard. The steeper the trails you ride, the more you notice it.
  • 8 1
 There’s 240mm dropper outs now and frame designers should keep that in mind. Ideally you can have your dropper fully extend to the correct climbing height and then be able to slam it to the seat collar.
  • 10 1
 Agreed, i've never seen or owned a dh bike in which the seat had to be that low, maybe it's because i'm short but i never understood pinkbikes obsesion with ultralong droppers, maybe its because I got used to it but I would never want my seat to be below my knees when standing on the pedals.
Wouldn't be the first time wrong about setup anyway, but looks to me like a "this ulrawide and ultraflat handlebar will make you faster" situation all over again
  • 2 0
 If this thing somehow blew everyone away with how it rides, then the little compromises it makes to achieve its out-there design would seem worthwhile. But since it apparently doesn't really do much that's better than the mainstream competition that requires all those compromises (balanced feel between front/rear triangle is available in a number of other bikes that don't resort to this sort of form-over-function BS), things like 'doesn't accommodate the long droppers people tend to like", 'water bottle rattles against top tube', and of course 'too progressive to not feel like dogshit on rough tracks' are all valid criticisms.

It's nice to see people thinking out of the box. But if that just leads to sub-par performance for a premium price, it's kind of hard to get excited about that.
  • 7 2
 yes, yes it prevents me from riding what I want to. 210mm still feels like not enough on some of the super steeps we ride. Now if I was pedaling around populated trail head trails that are inherently mellow, 170 would be fine. Just because YOU don't need it, doesn't mean there isn't a need for it...
  • 3 0
 It really depends on your terrain. I ride an enduo bike that can really only fit a 175-190mm dropper because of shock placement - fortunately, this is more than enough for me and where I live.

But I have been to places (ahem, Whistler, Squamish) where trails can be extremely steep. In these settings, its very nice to get that seat as low as possible. This can be the difference between an OTB crash or not, and broken wrists, arms and collarbones are a major bummer.
  • 4 11
flag eae903 FL (Oct 23, 2023 at 9:46) (Below Threshold)
 @RobKong: is this an admission of lack of skill?
  • 10 3
 @AddisonEverett: no, just you not knowing what you don't even know.
  • 2 0
 @BadIdeasGreatExecution I guess they make sense if you have relatively long legs. I dont and can only just get a 170mm dropper in on any of my bikes. If I had 165mm cranks the it would be too much drop
  • 1 0
 @addisoneverett That's like asking if raising you center if gravity (your hips) by 50mm has any impact on handling. It's more than enough to send you out the front door on steep rock rolls. I'm 5'9" with a 30" inseam and for the trails I ride, I wouldn't throw a leg over a bike with less than 180mm, 200mm preferred.
  • 3 0
 @Wing-nut: The extra-long 240mm droppers are especially handy for taller guys switching to shorter cranks. You get the clearance benefits without sacrificing drop and full mobility on the bike.
  • 2 0
 i'm 5'11" but with longer torso shorter legs and have always run a 150mm dropper and has never once felt like it was too high or in my way, so yeah I don't get it either, but maybe an extra inch or two of leg length/height makes all the difference.
  • 2 7
flag eae903 FL (Oct 23, 2023 at 11:27) (Below Threshold)
 @fentoncrackshell: Do people just squat down over their saddles now when they are riding steep terrain and not move their weight back over the rear wheel anymore? In steep terrain your hips won't be over the saddle, they will be back behind it, not only that but physiologically, the center of gravity on a man is slightly above the bellybutton, not at the hips (for women it is closer to the hips) and so the saddle being slightly higher while descending won't make a difference unless you are putting your stomach on the saddle.
  • 1 0
 @fentoncrackshell: Totally agree. I have a 180mm dropper on my frame with a quick release and usually slam the post for longer or steeper descents. I really wish my large frame was designed to accommodate a 210 or 240 One Up.
  • 3 1
 @fentoncrackshell: counterpoint. Remember actually getting behind the saddle? If you're short with a short inseam, a longer dropper is harder to use.

Steeper STAs make it easier to get behind the saddle.
  • 1 1
 @texag: so the seat banging off you knees is better then off your thighs?
  • 2 0
 @tiffe: my thighs are larger in diameter than my knees, and usually further back than my knees are in situations where my thighs are getting hit. Not getting hit by my seat IS preferable to getting hit by my seat.
  • 2 4
 @RobKong: Fun how you assume that I don't know what I don't know when you don't know what I do and don't know nor where your knowledge crosses over with mine, and to what extent it may or may not cross. We can safely assume that both of us know nothing about the other, yet here you are knowing what I know and don't know.
  • 3 0
 Modern bikes have a different riding position because of the geometry which puts you more centered on the bike (over the saddle) vs over the rear wheel when descending. So when you combine a modern geo bike and then limit the dropper length it really does make a difference. If you rode a modern geo bike off the back like you used to have to do with bikes that had short reaches and long stems then you would compromise the advantages of modern geo and lose front wheel grip and control. So when a fancy and expensive modern bike has a limited dropper post insertion compared to other bikes in the same class then yes it's a valid criticism.
  • 3 0
 It's a pretty great thing to have 200+ on my local trails. I suppose if your trails are flatter or don't have steep switchbacks, then it might not matter so much.
  • 1 0
 @preston67: Yep, terrain and leg length are the critical factors. I'm your height but have pretty long legs and a 200mm works great for me.
  • 2 0
 @jessemeyers: I completely agree with this. With modern bikes, you can get far better control on steep terrain by staying centered and then you have room to move back if the trail really dives down or something.
  • 1 1
 @preston67: I am 5′ 10″ and it does. I wont ride a bike with 150 droper, only if the geo is also old that I know I must take this differently.
even 180 is something I am not comfortable with . 200 would be the sweet spot for me.


@AddisonEverett
I recommend everyone who dont know why long droppers are nice to race the mega avalanche. Tell me how you liked it with no room and got eaten by their own bike when the snow is to mushy to ride but it is how it is.
  • 4 0
 I am with you....I am 6'2" and run a 185mm dropper. its gods plenty. in fact, there is such thing as too much dropper post! if it drops below your knees in attack position, you cannot use the saddle to steer the bike in the air!

if anyone doubts this, take the entire saddle and post out of your bike for a shuttle lap where you do not ever need to sit. now go try and ride it....it will f*cking suck. you subconciously use that saddle as a brace a lot descending!
  • 3 0
 @Mtbdialed: Unless you have extremely long legs for someone that is 6'2" the seat will not drop below your knees when using a longer post. I am also 6'2" and my post is 213mm and is fully above my knees. To get it actually below my knees it would need to be something like 350mm which wouldn't fit in any frame.
  • 1 0
 @jessemeyers: depends on the frame really. tons of DH frames you can get the saddle below my knees without the tire hitting it. I see people set DH bikes up all the time so its as low as possible with zero consideration for having the saddle at a useful height.


and no, I dont have super long legs, I am built the other way....all torso and arms. lol. but my Mondraker Foxy has a comparitively long seat tube for an enduro, and I *can* get a 200mm dropper in it....tried it and found the saddle too low when all the way down. went back to the 185mm post. It has never once been "in the way on a descent" at 185mm
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: I thought we were talking about droppers being too long. Not about DH bikes with fixed seat posts. I don’t think you can get a dropper so long that at the correct height for climbing it would be below your knees for riding. There’s a lot of personal preference but a modern well designed bike would allow for that preference, not restrict it so that only short droppers work.
  • 2 1
 @jessemeyers: correct, but my point is that everyone is clamoriring for increasingly longer and longer droppers, and I am saying, there is such thing as too much dropper.


The DH bike thing is just an example if the saddle being too low, which now can very much be the case with enduros.
  • 2 0
 @Mtbdialed: give an example, first you talk about DH bikes and droppers, then about how it is depending on the frame.

If you know that why do you even say 185 is enough? So your Bike also got 80° seat angle? And all the other geo that is the same?

Just stop that and let everyone buy what they want. High seat tubes are not necessary.
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: maybe in theory but in practice that just isn’t happening.
  • 1 0
 Given the price they are asking is that too much to ask for?
  • 1 1
 @Serpentras: no one said high seat tubes are necessary, just that it CAN be too low. Is that a point you would like to argue? lol
  • 2 1
 @Mtbdialed: I really hope that you realize that you don't have to drop the post all the way down. Just drop it to your preferred height and have an inch or two available for when things get really hairy.
  • 1 1
 @NWBasser: lol. yeah, because that's how people use droppers.....what, do you have a calibrated ass? "just drop this here seat down 5.3321"....nailed it!"

I really hope that you realize everyone just drops the post til it hits bottom....
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: It might be hard to believe, but there are a lot of talented riders who can drop it down to some level that's not all the way down and let's them do what they want to at an intermediate drop without taking out a measuring tape. If you can understand only two dropper positions, then I don't know what to tell you.
  • 10 10
 Honestly don't get the requirement of a 400mm seat tube. At 175cm tall my last two enduro bikes have had 460mm seat tubes and 175mm droppers with no issues. My downhill bike has the seat even higher (for tyre clearance at full travel) but it still rides fine. There's even riders like Bruni intentionally setting there seats higher www.pinkbike.com/news/bike-check-loic-brunis-nonstandard-specialized-demo.html
  • 17 0
 Loic doesn't need to awkwardly get off his bike because he just dropped into something too steep and scary
  • 8 0
 I think its also about insertion depth (I mean, isn't it always?).

If you can make a longer dropper fit without running into the shock, a long-ish seat tube will work for some.
  • 4 0
 I'm not sure why you got some many downvotes, I thought the same thing. I'm 6':2", my XL Switchblade has a seat tube height of 470, and has a 175mm dropper. I think I have room for 200mm dropper, but never really noticed the seat in the way on the descents so I haven't bothered swapping it out for something longer.
  • 2 0
 @charmingbob: I think here they are complaining about the seat tube length vs seat tube insertion. On my L Firebird (also 6,2") I manage to slam a 240mm dropper. it has been game changer for the steeps. Feels like I did not realize what I was missing until a got a super long dropper post fitted.
  • 2 0
 You got longer legs than me I am also 175cm and with a 460 seat tube most 150 droppers would not fit for my saddle height. Short seat tunes does not take anything away but it gives the option for those that want longer droppers.
  • 2 0
 Well that depends on you inseam.
Im 179cm and inseam of 81cm. I currently have a 430cm seattube and a slammed 170mm seatpost and that's just enough to get the saddle away when going down a gnarly trail. Would rather have a 410 seattube and 190mm dropper.
So for me a short seatpost and a long dropper is a must.
So why in earth would you design a long seatpost when you can make a short one and then just add a long dropper?
Then the bike could fit way more riders.
  • 1 0
 @Twr: Because the damper restricts insertion depth any way. Long droppers need like 30cm of insertion depth.

I got the same inseam like you. My first concern when considering a new frame is insertion depth. Yet this number is rarely given.

Depending on rear wheel size, travel, pivot locations, saddle position and chain stay length it is quite possible that your rear wheel hits your lowered saddle at bottom out if you need it that deep like we short legged riders do.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-daniel: you can insert 26cm in (measured) which comfortably gets you a 200mm. Also, the height of the top lip of the seat tube is the same height as a ex. mondraker. Its only the top tube which is extremely low.
  • 1 0
 @kkxaq: Unno burn in S2 (L size) size is 460mm and can insert 250+mm in. I think it is going to be 20mm shorter for M size which would fit 175mm.
  • 1 0
 @jrsfield: Which 175 post do you see that have a inserted length of between 230-250? Oneup 180 is 267mm, PNW loam is 260 for a 170 dropper.

On my current frame that have a seat tube length of 410 (in a medium with 452mm reach) with a 180 oneupdropper I have around 28mm of dropper showing. For a frame with 440 seat tube that would limit my choice to only one brand and my absolute max drop would be 170. But with the quoted insertions depth of 230? then even with a oneup dropper then a shimmed down 180 (to 160) still does not fit.
  • 5 4
 Seems like the bike was designed to run a coil shock, and coil shock only with that level of progression. I know that its 100% not in the spirit of these reviews, but it should be done.
  • 6 0
 agreed. but then again they spec it with an air shock... weird decisions abound
  • 6 0
 If it was designed to run a coil... you'd think they would spec it with one, no?
  • 3 2
 @islandforlife: it's dangerous to assume rational decisions are made at all points in the design process.
  • 3 1
 @islandforlife: I believe they spent all their money on those deluxe GX components instead...
  • 4 3
 It’s really only highly leveraged from 0 to SAG but from sag to bottom out it’s pretty a pretty typical leverage rate imo.

SC megatower 2 for example has a leverage ratio of 2.8 at SAG and uses a 62.5mm stroke shock for 170mm of travel. The Burn uses a 65mm stroke shock for only 160mm and leverage ratio at SAG (35%) is 2.5
  • 3 0
 How do you make any adjustments to the rear shock with it being that buried inside the frame / linkage?
  • 2 1
 You can't. You need to start unbolting things for even the most basic adjustments. Weird that this didn't get mentioned as it would put many people off.
  • 5 0
 @justwan-naride @scottcornwalis : You can access all the of the adjustments with the normal allen keys. That said, fitting the shock pump is tricky and accessing the rebound dial at the base of the shock isn't that easy - but that's not uncommon.
  • 2 0
 Unno really missed the mark on this one. That said a OneUp dropper combined with the SQLabs saddle would probably get you in a 180mm dropper.
  • 3 0
 Nice step through frame. At least I'll be able to wear a skirt while I ride it.
  • 2 1
 Hot. Post pics.
  • 1 0
 The YBN chains dont seem to shift very well on any cassettes Ive tried them on. For the many cassettes Ive installed, the e*13 seems to shift as well as SRAM, as long as you use a GX or higher level SRAM chain on them.
  • 2 0
 The seat tube is not too long, is it? If the saddle is all the way down, there is not much distance to the tire when the rear triangle fully compressed ?
  • 1 0
 Any bike that has both rear stays so close together, or in this case, seatstay even non existent, has me worried. Wondering if in the future you could do a back wheel lateral wiggle test in slow motion?
  • 2 0
 As soon as I see that seat mast mess, you reckon that will hold up ?
I dont reckon, come back in a year or two of regular riding
  • 8 9
 I think it’s one of the best looking bikes out there!
Even if the look would be too flashy for myself - I like the way it looks! It’s like a sports car, here again it’s too flashy for myself, but damn, looks like a rocket. And we all like the feeling of a brutal acceleration. And that’s how the bike looks.
(Not thinking about the perfomance - too long seapost would be a dealbreaker).
  • 2 4
 I'm with you on that, I think it's stunning and guessing it looked even better IRL. I can understand why others prefer simple lines but this thing is so out there it comes back around to being cool looking.
  • 2 3
 Feeling a bit conflicted here. On one hand I want to applaud any "new/crazy" design out there that could be a breakthrough in current technology (think droppers many years ago) but on the other hand this bike just doesn't seem to cut it.
  • 3 0
 "Why not both?"

We can give praise where its applicable, just like we can take a steaming load on it's follies like the headset routing.
  • 14 0
 how do you applaud on only one hand?
  • 1 0
 >I want to applaud any "new/crazy" design out there that could be a breakthrough in current technology

There is no more innovation that is to be done with linkages. If you go to a multi link suspension, i.e not a single pivot, all you are doing is getting the ability to tune the anti squat curve, progressivity, and wheel path. The more linkages in the middle, the finer control of the curve that you have. And there isn't a right setting for each one of those things, the more you gain in one area the more you give up in another.

Generally most people would be absolutely fine on a single pivot bike, even with direct shock drive. If someone big like Specialized came out with a new single pivot Enduro that had some fancy design to make it look cool, and they did all the setup correctly with the pivot location, shock selection, and geometry, it would get great reviews and people would be lining up to buy one.
  • 2 2
 Alright PB this is one of the most divisive bikes in terms of it's looks, which as we know is the most important aspect of any bike.

What is it, Pretty or Ugly in your mind's eye?
  • 5 0
 Pretty ugly
  • 4 1
 The bike no one asked for.
  • 2 0
 I dUnno about this bike as I can’t get past that boat sail looking seat post.
  • 3 1
 Don't confuse effort with results, what a failure. Seat tube writes the whole bike off.
  • 1 1
 This thing looks like those blue bikes everyone used to yeet into the Yarra River. At least those were priced right and came with a free helmet. Sounds like they might have ridden a touch better too.
  • 3 1
 the suspension design is the classic "windshield wiper" linkage from dynamics lol
  • 4 1
 Wow the worst of all worlds. Good thing it's expensive.
  • 1 0
 Riding any bike with a crazy long unsupported seatpost just gives me fears of that thing snapping off. Maybe not likely but still.....
  • 1 0
 Wait until you learn about handlebars.
  • 3 0
 Now the hapsburgs have showed up in my mountain bike reviews.
  • 2 0
 looks don´t match the ride?
  • 4 1
 The XC enduro bike..
  • 2 0
 How much progression does the frame have?
  • 19 0
 All of them
  • 5 0
 @mashrv1: all of your progression are belong to us
  • 3 0
 BURNed and roasted
  • 2 0
 Thanks for putting my mini water bottle into perspective with this one
  • 1 0
 Lets make our signature seat mast super tall so it really stands out! Dropper lengths be damned! Great idea boys!
  • 1 1
 Im 6’2” and i get asked if im on too small of bike with an XL. This would make it look like im on a really tiny bike.

Needs less standover…
  • 3 1
 no pics of the suspension, moving on.
  • 2 0
 Man, I wish it had a longer seat tube!
  • 2 0
 Hate to say it but this was a waste field a test spot. 150 dropper... smh
  • 1 0
 Yes and no. There is value in testing bikes that suck and letting people know they suck. Especially hyped, expensive bikes that might be hard to get hold of for a test ride before buying. Could save someone from making a big mistake.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: provided they really suck
  • 1 0
 @jrsfield: I mean, if they don't that's even better, no? I don't think PB would say that a bike sucks when it doesn't. There have been field tests in the past that were almost boring because all bikes were generally good and that's great news for the riders. All I'm saying is if some bikes in a given test batch do indeed suck, it's not necessarily a waste of the testers' and readers' time to learn that they suck and why.
  • 1 0
 Who buys this? All the old dudes who spend crazy amounts of money on bikes that are flashy have moved on to E-bikes.
  • 1 0
 its 4 grand for the frame only, that is not more than some other brands like specialized or Santa Cruz. You could build yourself a basic of any of the three for under 7k or make it fully spec-ed for 17k.
  • 2 0
 Thanks I think I will just keep riding my arrival :@)
  • 1 0
 unnecessarily low top tube creates the water bottle rubbing the frame problem. What a rubbish design overall.
  • 2 0
 coming soon to and Insolvency Post near you.
  • 2 0
 Expensive Ugly Poor performance Pick 3!
  • 1 0
 And to think orevious model Unno frames looked awesome, and this is ugly as fook
  • 1 0
 That would look sensational hanging on my living room wall, I'd keep my Transition Sentinel for riding.
  • 1 0
 So how many of these rolling compromises do they think they're going to sell exactly??
  • 1 0
 Why roskopp would leave sc for this? How bad can it have been? Certainly not as bad as this bike I would imagine?
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney did you ever consider to put some air in the poor fork for once?
  • 1 0
 I dunno, I't pretty damn ugly.
  • 2 0
 Ohno thank you
  • 1 0
 interesting they chose to highlight the worst part of the bike
  • 1 0
 I was wondering about that too. I would love to know how it jumps or how fast it is compared to others.
  • 2 2
 >The water bottle cage rattles

Who drinks water anymore? Take that junk off!
  • 1 1
 There isn't even 8 minutes of stuff to say about this bike. Already repetitive a few minutes in. Seems like Unno has changed
  • 2 0
 Austin, it IS shit!
  • 1 0
 You could say that I am bikecurious
  • 1 0
 Well its hideous. Its got that going for it.
  • 1 0
 It looks nice! I wonder if has disk brakes?
  • 1 0
 Rather go to Spain for the food.
  • 1 0
 Price is a bit steep for a dutch omafiet if you ask me.
  • 1 0
 I was curious. I had a look. I'll be heading out now....
  • 1 0
 Beautiful piece of low pivot garbage....
  • 1 0
 More 10k hot garbage from the Mtb world !
  • 1 0
 No thanks!
  • 1 0
 Not wangy.
  • 2 1
 Burn baby burn
  • 1 0
 Looks like a...Pole
  • 2 0
 more like a bike share city bike.
  • 1 0
 cons: FUGLY
  • 1 1
 Oops!
  • 4 5
 Needs coil shock, and retest please
  • 4 1
 It looks nice. I'll probably see a dude in full race Spandex riding one of these on tarmac to get a coffee. And I'll be like dude, nice bike. And he will mutter something under his breath like riff-raff and ride off.
  • 2 0
 @henryquinney - do you think that would make a difference? Any feedback from Unno on that topic? Genuinely curious.
  • 1 0
 @DaveRobinson81: Potentially. It is interesting to note that Unno sell this frame with several different kits and as a frame only, yet none of them are built with a coil. Perhaps it could be said that because of this while it could well be interesting, it might not be that relevant to the bikes that people are buying from Unno.
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: Coil shock with a flipped progressive spring?
  • 2 0
 @iridedj: I’m not sure if you’re joking or not?
  • 1 0
 @henryquinney: Quite strange based on your feedback! Would be interesting to hear from the bike designers then.
  • 8 10
 Unno- are you buying or just curious...


Unno buyer- Let's say "I'm Bi-curious"
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