Field Trip: Calibre's $1,400 Bossnut - The Boss of Low Cost

Mar 30, 2020
by Mike Levy  


PINKBIKE FIELD TRIP

CALIBRE BOSSNUT

The Boss of Low Cost



Words by Mike Levy, Photography by Anthony Smith



Calibre is a direct-to-consumer British brand focused on relatively inexpensive mountain bikes that, according to them, can still be ridden hard. How inexpensive? The Bossnut costs just 1,100 pounds, or around $1,400 USD, depending on the inevitable taxes and duties. Some perspective: You get an entire 130mm-travel trail bike for around $600 less than the last drivetrain I reviewed.

Like the majority of bikes in the price range, Calibre has used SRAM’s 12-speed SX drivetrain, along with a set of Level T brakes (with a 180mm front rotor) to slow you down. Can you spot what's missing? A dropper post, of course, so you’ll need to factor in another $200-ish dollars if you want to unlock the 'nut. The not-tubeless-friendly WTB tires also refused to seal up, so add another $100-ish, too.

Bossnut Details

Travel: 130mm
Fork travel: 130mm
Wheel size: 27.5"
Frame construction: aluminum
Head angle: 66-degrees
Chainstay length: 436mm
Reach: 460mm (lrg)
Sizes: Sm, med, lrg (tested), xlrg
Weight: 33.4 lb / 15.1 kg
Price: $1,400 USD (depending on duties, taxes)
More info: www.calibrebicycles.com
You might expect some sketchy geometry at this price, but that’s not the case. I’m 5’10” on a good day, putting me on a large-sized Bossnut with a modest 460mm reach, 66 and 74.5-degree head and seat angles, and 436mm chainstays. Those numbers are relatively contemporary and wouldn’t be out of place on something much pricer, so the Bossnut won't need retiring as an entry-level rider progresses their skills to mid-level status. Buuuuut anymore than that might require some re-thinking. More on that later.

The suspension design is a single-pivot, linkage activated system that drives a RockShox Monarch R shock, paired with a 130mm-travel Recon RL on the front of the bike. That’s hung off a fairly basic aluminum frame; it uses steel pivot hardware and simple tube shapes, but you’ll also see things like ISCG tabs, a (non-Boost) thru-axle, and while it doesn’t come with a dropper post because you can't have everything at this price, goddamnit, it does have the frame holes to accept one. Speaking of holes, the only place to carry water is on the underside of the Bossnut's down tube.




Calibre Bossnut review photo by Anthony Smith
Calibre Bossnut review photo by Anthony Smith


Climbing

The Bossnut is the lone 27.5" wheeled bike in our Field Trip group test, along with also being the least expensive full-suspension bike by $400, so I mistakenly assumed that it'd be the worst climber of the bunch to boot. Okay, it wouldn't be my first choice (that's the Vitus) or my last (shoutout to the Giant Stance), but the Bossnut does a remarkable job of hiding its low-cost price tag on the climbs, trucking along just as well as bikes costing more than twice as much.

The 130mm-travel single-pivot rear-suspension doesn't feel like it wastes any watts, which is nice given that I don't have any to waste and the shock doesn't have a pedal-assist switch. It's efficient, but its real forte is on the tight, technical climbs where it makes short work of those low-speed tests of balance. Not even the fast-rolling, low-traction rear tire could stymie the 'nut, although it sure did its best on the dusty, loose Sedona singletrack. With plenty of pep, a compact feeling cockpit, and a head angle that I would have guessed to be a full degree steeper than it actually is, the Calibre has that darty personality that can make technical climbs fun.

Speaking of fun, heatstroke, and cactus, here's a spoiler alert: The 27.5" wheeled Calibre was the underdog of the Impossible Climb pseudo-science test (yes, there's a video coming) but ended up surprising everyone. Out of the eight value bikes, how do you think the Bossnut fared?


Calibre Bossnut review photo by Anthony Smith

Calibre Bossnut review photo by Anthony Smith
Calibre Bossnut review photo by Anthony Smith


Descending

With my expectations set to a medium-low level, a few extra psi in each tire to keep me from pinching on the first rock, and the seat lowered via the trick quick-release lever, it took all of three or four rough corners for me to realize that the Bossnut is the real deal. Then again, geometry is what matters most and the Calibre's numbers suit its trail bike intentions well.

In fact, the Bossnut could take a new rider to their next level, and it's probably more than enough bike for a lot of shit talkers out there, and their trails.

It has a zippy personality to it through the tight, slow-speed stuff which, much like the climbing, is where it seems to excel the most. The small wheels and modern but short-ish reach help, no doubt, and unlike some longer machines, this is a bike that will dance if you know the moves.

Those slow and medium speed descents also ask less of the Bossnut's fork than faster trails where the Recon feels overwhelmed. This fork's damper proved to be consistent (it wasn't on the Hightower), but its very linear air spring needs to be over-pressurized by around 30 psi.

On smoother terrain, the Bossnut has no problems hanging with the likes of the Commencal Meta, YT's Jeffsy, and the other bikes that cost twice as much. But put it on a chunky, fast trail and it doesn't offer the same planted and predictable ride of pricier machines.

Timed Testing

Our timed lap for the trail bikes was around 11 minutes long and split into three distinct sectors. First, a smooth, twisty singletrack climb topped out along a technical traverse that tested the bike's slow-speed handling and traction. After that, we dropped into a fast descent that began with rough, suspension-testing corners before some fast berms, flat corners, and a few fun-sized jumps. Nothing too rowdy, but representative of the terrain these trails bikes were intended to see.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Kazimer: "I had my second fastest climbing time, fifth fastest descending time, and my fifth fastest overall time"

Levy: "I had my fourth quickest climbing time, third quickest descent time, and was fifth over the entire loop.''

At the other end of the bike, the Bossnut's 130mm of travel and little Monarch R shock gave us nothing to moan about. The suspension sensitivity is just as good as its competition, and there's both support and ramp-up to run 30-percent sag and still hit all of the trail bike-appropriate lines without worry. Sure, push it hard and you'll find the difference between it and the back of the Vitus - it could feel noticeably choppier over repeated high-speed impacts - but what do you want from your $1,400 trail bike?

Onto the cage match, and this time it's the Bossnut going up against the $1,800 Giant Stance and the $2,000 Vitus Mythique 29 VRX. The Bossnut makes short work of the Stance - pushing the Giant on rough (but appropriate) terrain feels a bit like trying to push a rope; it's an over-cooked noodle of a frame that's still using a quick-release rear-end. If we're talking Stance versus Bossnut, choose the 'nut and spend the difference on a dropper post and tubeless-ready rubber.

The $2,000 Vitus is an entirely different beast, and it walks all over the Stance and Bossnut anytime it's fast and rough.


Calibre Bossnut review photo by Anthony Smith





Pros

+ Impressive rear-suspension
+ Best at slow speeds, smoother terrain
+ Great climber

Cons

- Pivot hardware rattle loose multiple times
- Fork can't keep up
- Limited availability outside the UK





The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible by support from: Smith, 7mesh, and Over The Edge Sedona.




Photos: Anthony Smith
Additional footage: Lear Miller


Regions in Article
Sedona


275 Comments

  • 252 0
 "and it's probably more than enough bike for a lot of shit talkers out there, and their trails."--that is pure gold Levy!
  • 118 7
 I do 3 feet drops daily, no kashima no ride.
  • 64 1
 @DuelingBanjos: 3 foot drops? Go rigid or go home.
  • 16 0
 he's not wrong
  • 9 29
flag JohanG (Mar 30, 2020 at 8:20) (Below Threshold)
 It would be good enough for me if it had boost or room for a water bottle.
  • 9 35
flag alexisfire (Mar 30, 2020 at 8:47) (Below Threshold)
 @JohanG: Boost would be key imo for a bike like this. No boost rules it out.
  • 40 1
 @alexisfire: The key for a budget bike is to get it right on the things that are free (geo, hub spacing, water bottle, other standards) so the enthusiast can throw an upgrade on there as time goes on. I'm not really complaining, this is a great bike. But fortunately in the PB comments section, manufactureres can hear my wisdom and take heed. If it gets downvoted, it just makes my comment more enticing to open.
  • 14 0
 no water bottle. pinkbikers only ride with tshirt pants and full commando.
  • 15 24
flag oldfaith (Mar 30, 2020 at 10:43) (Below Threshold)
 People believe they need a boost rear end like they believe a virus is about to kill them, I choose to ride 12 thru 142 out back.btw, Mikes are so cute together! I really like this content
  • 4 16
flag NinetySixBikes (Mar 30, 2020 at 10:53) (Below Threshold)
 That is one way to talk about the people who keep him out of getting an actual job. Not that I don't agree with him though, just that thing about biting the hand that feeds kinda deal...
  • 32 1
 @NinetySixBikes: I am unemployable at this point, so you're not wrong. Sorry everyone :0
  • 11 0
 @oldfaith: That's the same thing I tell @mikekazimer
  • 11 1
 @NinetySixBikes: @NinetySixBikes: It's fine. People can take a joke at their own expense. Mostly.

Interesting to hear everyone's take on boost here. It seems like the only thing I've read about it for the last 8 years or so is how it's part of an industry-wide conspiracy to constantly change standards unnecessarily.
  • 1 10
flag mudmandhbrazil (Mar 30, 2020 at 12:14) (Below Threshold)
 @mikelevy: like some shitty people that say an entry level Kona cost 15000 dollars?
  • 13 0
 @alexisfire: Of all the potential game changers, why on earth chose this infestimal improvement as your #1 item?
Recently bought a non-boost Debonair Lyrik for a song. I literally could not feel any difference in stiffness from the boost version and it was *$500* cheaper.
  • 2 0
 @chyu: Look at the little guy go..........he's straight shirt-cocking it.
  • 1 3
 @chyu: I seriously do not own a single pair of underwear. Seriously.
  • 5 0
 @alexisfire: Really? I'd genuinely love to know if anyone could tell the difference in a side by side test. Having switched from non boost frames, to boost frames and back and forth....I honestly can't tell the difference. And I'd call bullshit on anyone that things they can.

Wheelbuild and tyre choice is a far greater variable. Poor wheel build on a boost frame vs good wheel build on non boost. I know which I'd choose
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: you're mistaken if you think that stuff is free. In all likeliness, this is probably a catalogue frame onto which Calibre have done an incredible job with design and components whilst still keeping it at the £1,100 price point in the UK (which is actually amazing considering you can buy it in actual shops).

Once you start requesting those other changes there are extra design and manufacturing charges, if they can even be done. A slight increase in cost/unit for the frame and then the retail price needs to go up by £2-300. And when the number one criterion is price/value, all of a sudden those changes are off the table.

By the way, a great HKT podcast if you wanted to find out more:
thehktpodcast.libsyn.com/needs-doing
  • 1 0
 @chyu: “con los huevos colgando”
  • 1 0
 @DuelingBanjos: LOL! What you mean to tyoe is "I do three foot drops, daily. No Kashima; no ride"
  • 1 0
 @50percentsure: probably not because of performance, but because of some insurance that parts can still be found in a couple of years. Like 26" where 650B didn't improve performance much, but made a bike more futureproof.
  • 128 18
 the SX drivetrain is the biggest joke to come out of Sram since Elixirs... I'd happily take a 10 speed deore over it.
  • 18 0
 Please tell. I'm on Shimano 10 speed and quite like it.
  • 39 0
 @fartymarty: I love my SLX 11 speed
  • 29 0
 @bikeboy100: i ride a XT/SLX 1x11 full groupset on my bike, and honestly will be kind of sad when I can longer fit it to a bike. It shifts well, it stops well, it’s cheap to replace parts, I love it.
  • 46 5
 @BoneDog, at the risk of starting a comment fire, what issues have you had with SX? We didn’t have any trouble with it at all during the Field Trip, so I’m curious what you’ve experienced. Yes, it’s heavy, and the shifter feel isn’t amazing, but it got the job done.
  • 40 8
 Hmm, besides the non-Matchmaker mount that doesn't help the ergos, what issues have you had? It's obviously not XX1 quality, but it shifts when you ask it to and functions well.
  • 87 4
 @mikekazimer: HOW DARE YOU QUESTION THE CONSESUS OF THE MOB RULE!?
  • 29 2
 @mikekazimer: We received several fat bikes in the fall and none of these derailleurs could be set up without ghost shifting. Your asking way to much precision from a plastic derailleur. They lack durability as the shift quality goes downhill once they start to wear. I don't know how many SX derailleurs we swapped out now.
  • 12 1
 @aks2017: same here. Shimano 11 speed is great.
  • 17 1
 @mikekazimer: My experience has been that the low end SRAM drivetrains punch well above their price tag... until they suddenly don't. I was determined to make the NX work that came on my Ripmo (didn't care too much about the weight, and definitely wasn't going to pay extra for bling). It shifted beautifully for 6 months of hard riding, until it literally blew up on the trail. A pulley ejected while pedaling. Ok, well, that's a bummer. Bought a new rear derailleur, loctite-d the pulley bolts before ever using the derailleur, and rode for another few months before the same damn thing happened. I gave up and bought 12 speed SLX. My Chameleon still has NX, though, and I'll keep running it until it eventually SRAMs me over mid-ride.
  • 5 0
 @BoneDog: I’ve even found the high end Eagle derailleurs go out of adjustment. As in, the adjustment screws actually vibrate loose over time. It’s a known issue, and one the other S brand doesn’t have.
  • 6 1
 @mikekazimer: my shifter went out after 10 rides, dry weather, nothing special, just poor quality.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: @mikekazimer:

What the hell, I tried to neg rep you two and it added positives? We must bury your practical comments.
  • 27 1
 @mikekazimer:
I've warrantied several SX derailleur that didn't work properly right out of the box on a brand new bike. SX eagle is cheap shit, I'll take 10sp deore any day of the week.
  • 13 1
 @mikekazimer: Speaking from some shop experience - the derailleurs fall apart within a month of consistent riding. A Shimano SLX 11 speed - which can be bought for ~ $30 cheaper than an SX eagle derailleur brand new doesn't do that, and will last much longer. Also coming from a perspective where I've helped many starters find cheap bikes, people buying their first entry level full suspension bike aren't going to be utilizing the range of the 12 speed like company's think they will.
  • 3 1
 @notthatfast: I use 28t and deore 9 speed on my hardtail, I do run out of steam on long fire road climbs, but most of the trails in 40 miles away don't require it. I have nx eagle on the big bike, and climb so much better on my hardtail. big bike only rides park.
  • 1 1
 @peleton7: Specialized? Session?
/s
  • 2 0
 @ Bonedog ... Exactly - Field Test vs Reality !
  • 9 0
 I would also argue that while Sram’s GX does a decent job for its cost (aftermarket). On the OEM Side of the spectrum it does not match the price/performance of the bikes manufacturers are spec’ing it on; GX does’t feel like it should belong on a bike over $6000cnd.
When 11-spd was the latest and greatest GX was marketed as the budget/entry level drivetrain with X1 bridging the gap between GX & XO. Then when 12spd was introduced they dropped X1, added NX as the “new” budget drivetrain (before SX was introduced) which bumped up GX to a mid-level option even though, as far as I can tell Sram never made any improvements to other than making it 12-spd.
That being said I wish they kept X1 in the line up with a 12spd option. It’s been the most reliable, trouble free drivetrain I’ve ever had.It’s been on my bike for over 5 years, replaced the pulleys and cables a few times but haven’t adjusted the derailleur once, and still somehow shifts flawlessly to this day.
  • 5 1
 I would rather have low/middle of the road 11 speed than an ultra low poverty spec 12 speed set up if the price was the same. The 12 speed will weigh a lot more, not be as good performance when new and will wear out quicker which at the end of the day would put me off that brand products and even the sport itself. I would say there is a difference between a 1x set up than 2x set up for a new rider as well.
  • 1 1
 @Ajorda: “people aren't going to be utilizing the range of the 12 speed like company's think they will.”

FTFY
  • 5 0
 @brycepiwek: the 11 spd gx was really good build quality, almost the same as x1. Sram is just pushing more plastic for dough, shame that they’re diluting quality. My 11 spd gx works flawlessly till this day with pulley swaps, 4 yrs and running. Might put an xt 11-46 cassette
  • 4 0
 @mattvanders: Agreed. Although going up a gruppo, my last bike came with GX 12, the shop swapped it for the almost-redundant XO 11spd for free (to use the GX for parts, which is inevitable). More reliable and much lighter for $0? I'm laughing. And still haven't found any trail I can't clear that I could with the 50t on the previous bikes with Eagle.
  • 4 0
 @airdonut41: So, we may be on to something here - same thing happened to me and one of the other guys I ride with. Flawless shifting for 6mos, no issues at all, albeit dealing with NX being a bit heavier than the GX system I was used to. Then, one day riding on a gravel path to the trailhead, the pulley system just exploded and it fried the entire derailleur. No reason. I maintained that thing like a maniac, too, because I didn't want to upgrade, and now, here I am, back with GX. And resentful that it's still a SRAM, but happy that it has made it past the 6mo mark.
  • 4 0
 @airdonut41: Your experience with NX is my experience with everything SRAM in the past. Granted I haven't given anything SRAM touches as a company much of a shot in 10 years now, but working in a shop and hearing everyone gush about how good their warranty was and then experiencing it myself with 6 warranties for one groupset I owned.... yeah no thanks.

When people rave about the customer service and warranty department now all I hear is "it breaks a lot"
  • 1 0
 @housem8d: absolutely agree. My GX 11spd is now 3.5 years on my bike and shifts perfectly.
  • 3 0
 SX... Hmm... Having wrenched on an entire rental fleet of entry level stumpjumpers that came equipped with SX I must say it's not worth the money. Yeah, the selling point is eagle, but of you want to drop down off that gigantic cog you need to throw down for a GX rear derailleur. I have seen NX suffering from the same issue. That and the ghost shifting... Horrible drivetrain.
  • 1 0
 @housem8d : I recently fitted a Sunrace 10-46 cassette with my GX 11-speed and it's only semi-compatible. Had a shop mech try to tune it and it's ok going up the gears 11>1 but takes 2 clicks to drop 1>2 then skips a cog around 5 or 6. Workable but not great.
  • 2 0
 @brycepiwek: I can't agree with you more. My X1 set up had been the best drivetrain of any set up I've ever had. It blows my XT drivetrain out of the water.
  • 1 0
 @ColquhounerHooner: If you saw the trail system in Ottawa you would have a completely new appreciation for fat biking, its not a complete replacement for the thrill you get from a summer ride, but it can be pretty epic. You can ride the frozen top layer of the snow and ride some steep chutes you wouldn't even consider in the summer cause all the rocks and vegetation. its actually hilarious.
  • 1 0
 @brycepiwek: Regarding X1, I've got 11-sp X1 and it's been my first foray into SRAM drivetrains, and I've been more than happy with it. It's still trouble free, now going into it's 4th year (and on it's 2nd bike). And I still didn't have to replace the pulleys, even though I don't clean them far enough than I should.

I have friends that have been on 12-sp GX, that have replaced mechs and triggers (cassettes seem to fair alright), in far less time, than I've had the X1 setup.

Full disclosure though, I've replaced the cassette with a Garbaruk 10-50 11-sp at the beginning of 2018, but that's also still just trucking along.
X1 seems to have hit a sweetspot, which probably didn't make SRAM enough money, so they scrapped it. But at this point I'm afraid of buying SRAM again, as I'll have to go X01 to get the same durability, but at a significantly higher cost.
  • 2 0
 @SkipSkovhugger: interested in the garbaruk cassette (as a 10-46 set up), any different in shifting compared to sram set up?
  • 1 0
 @mattvanders: Well, to be honest, I didn't notice a change in shifting (but a large one in range, naturally), which actually surprised me.
It's on par with the SRAM cassette that was on there before, as well as the XT M8000 cassette I've had in another bike.

It's also MASSIVELY lighter.
At this point, I'm only interested in 12-sp Shimano, due to the shifting under power thing. If that doesn't really work as advertised, I will have no qualms buying Garbaruk again.
  • 3 0
 @airdonut41: @airdonut41: When my NX eagle derailler blew it's pulley I replaced it with an SLX 11 speed derailler without changing any other components. I.e. NX 12 speed shifter and cassette, SLX 11 speed derailler. It shifts better than the NX ever did from new (which admittedly is faint praise) and the derailler is cheaper and more reliable.
The future is Sramano SLNX 12 speed.
  • 1 0
 @jacks0n0: good to know
  • 1 0
 @WishIWazFaster: hmm cool thx for the heads up
  • 76 2
 Why did bike manufacturers stop using 1x11? Why got crappy 12 when you can get a cheaper xt or slx 11-42 and spec a 30t int he front? About as much for climbing as you'll need on this bike and you can spend the extra money on a cheap dropper
  • 24 1
 Because this is the bike industry...
  • 73 1
 Because the spec sheet MUST SAY 12-SPEED C'MON!!! But yeah, that's why.
  • 10 0
 Very good question. I'm suspecting the general consumer is not ready to admit a 30 tooth chainring (or even a 2Cool is acceptable. Not many would actually notice, but if they did they may feel like they have a "weak" drivetrain. Plus the industry doesnt want people to realize that dinner plate sized cassettes aren't necessary.
  • 33 0
 @mikelevy: Arguably it should say dropper before it says 12 speed Wink
  • 19 1
 @JDFF: I'm not proud. SLX 11spd 11-46 hardtail...and have just acquired my oval 28t ring. I have a weak pilot, drivetrain is fine.
  • 11 0
 @iammarkstewart: 1x11 XT 11-46 and it's been great. No issues at all.
  • 6 0
 Product Management is about spec'ing your company's bike line such that you will maximize revenue. Generally this means offering a wide range of prices but if you believe there will be a sharp decline in sales because there is no 1x12 despite being proportionally cheaper, as a PM you will decide to include the 1x12. It's a vicous cycle though because when bike companies do this, it signals to consumers that only 1x12 is acceptable, strengthening the demand for 1x12 and making the PM more likely to spec all their bikes w/ 1x12.
  • 3 0
 I am guessing they are all using SX instead of 1x11 because Sram is selling it cheaper than anything else available.

If they could save $5 a bike, and still make it appealing to MOST, they probably would. As a guy who rides a bike many, many times more expensive than a $2000 bike, SX isn't appealing. But, I am not the customer, the newbie is.
  • 6 6
 I've been saying this to my wife (who DOES know what parts are better than others).

Also this whole "Field Trip" budget needs some tweaking.

Put the direct to consumer brands (YT, Commencal etc) in their own category and instead of experienced riders on the staff, find people who are beginner/novices and see what they think of the inexpensive bikes.
  • 5 0
 Because 12 is a higher number than 11.

[Napoleon Dynamite] Gahhh idiot
  • 8 0
 @superfrodaddy: I definitely like the feedback from the Mikes, but it would be interesting to get feedback on the same 8 bikes from intermediate level average jane/joes.
  • 1 0
 @gunners1: Wish I was as well engineered and as looked after as my SLX drivetrain. I agree, Shimano = bombproof for me. I'd go back to 1x10 (Shimano) if everything exploded but don't see that happening.

#28tforlife
  • 2 1
 You can get 11-40 8 speed cassettes, they've gone to 12 to sell you next year's shit, just like with 9,10 and 11 speed.
  • 2 1
 @iammarkstewart: exactly. And you are likely riding trails not the pavement to the corner store.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: thats what i was trying to explain. Thanks for a realistic and simple explination.
  • 1 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: 11-40 8 speed? Do tell. I'm all for less gears but the same range.
  • 5 0
 I'm building up a new rocky slayer frame. I have my 10 year old mango orange king hubs that were converted to 142, and now have boost adapters. I have an 11s XT M8000. I was going to upgrade to 12 speed, then I was like holy shit, new drivetrain + new micro spline driveshell./ new hubs.... stick with 11s and save 1000$.... f*ck it
  • 2 0
 @BoneDog: I would spend the $1000 on a Storia instead and stick with 11 anyday.
  • 3 0
 @fartymarty: Sunrace do wide ratio cassettes in 8,9 and 10 speed. I've been using 10spd ones with a Wolftooth Goatlink for a couple of years now and they're fine. The 8-9 speed ones are a bit harder to get running smoothly without a clutch mech but I have the 8spd on my commuter and it works too 1x8 11-40. I had to file down the B-tension stop a little bit to get the top pulley to clear the 40t.
  • 1 0
 @Fix-the-Spade: Good to know.
  • 1 0
 @JSTootell: Hmmm... I doubt now matter how much bulk they buy, that it would be cheaper to by SX 12speed than SLX11 speed, SLX is still being manufactured and eliminating a gear makes it less intimidating for someone coming into the sport when shit hits the fan, if I just dropped my hard earned money on this bike and was just starting to ride, I'd be devastated if my new SX derailleur hit a rock because as new rider I might not know much about SRAM but even walmart sells bikes with Shimano so its not as intimidating of a name
  • 1 0
 @IllestT: These go to Elev - Twelve. Spinal Tap
  • 80 13
 Sounds like a bike Dick Pound would swing a leg over
  • 23 1
 "Here comes Dick Pound riding his Boss Nut"
  • 11 0
 Downvoted by Dick Pound cronies
  • 36 1
 It’s hard to critique it for not having boost spacing when the target buyer of this bike likely isn’t dropping a grand on a set of fancy new hoops anyways. Plenty of non-boost budget replacement wheels are available in the case of a taco.
  • 31 1
 Yeah, good point. It certainly doesn't hurt it performance-wise.
  • 3 0
 Or, like, Hope. For instance. Or really decent second hand wheels. Made by Hope.
  • 15 0
 For budget bikes, you could almost argue an advantage to non-boost is availability of nice wheelsets at a good price as people upgrade their older bikes and sell their spare wheelsets. Kind of like when I built my dirt jumper and found some great hoops for super cheap, because - you know - 26!
  • 2 0
 @gomeeker: yeah exactly.
  • 7 0
 My non-boost carbon Rovals still work great. Non-current equipment still works a dream and it's just cheaper not to be caught up to new standards.
  • 34 3
 The poor Giant Stance...nobody loves it
  • 23 1
 I just don't know why people wouldn't spend the extra few hundred bucks and get the trance 3....it appears to to twice the bike of the stance.
  • 4 0
 @greener1: My brother has the trance 3 and its quite good
  • 9 0
 I just can't love a cheap aluminum flex stay design. Something about that is wrong. You have a material with poor fatigue properties, and put it on a cheap bike, where cost cutting is a priority. What did they cut in their engineering or production? If they are using an inferior material, they need better engineering and quality control to ensure it lasts.
  • 1 0
 @greener1: because "few hundred bucks" maybe. And trance is quite a big bike compared to stance.
  • 7 1
 @JohanG: Probably because most cheap-ish MTBs like the Stance don't get ridden much. Even less on actual bike trails.
  • 15 1
 @greener1: Stance, Trance, Dance, Pants.
  • 5 0
 My neighbor who I ride with every once in awhile owns a Stance 2. @greener1 He's right, just spend the extra 300$ and get the Trance 3. The bike is flexy as hell and doesn't stand a chance against the trails in Southern Colorado. We grow rocks down here. Your better off riding this on the road and the frame will just flex to any pot holes you hit. Thanks for coming to my TED Talk.
  • 3 0
 @greener1: I bought the 2019 Trance 3 at the end of last season. Was debating between the Trance and Stance. Really glad I spent the extra money!
  • 9 0
 @JohanG: next time you fly, get a window seat by the wing...then tell us flexing aluminum is an issue.

( I get it might not be soon, unfortunately)
  • 6 0
 @ReformedRoadie: I am sitting here reading this, working at a factory building 787 parts...

Yes, still building.
  • 2 0
 @JSTootell: that/s good. but the amount of flights now have dropper way off, no?

The point was that the alu. plane wing flexes like crazy,,,and to my knowledge, they don't really catastrophically fail as a result.
  • 3 0
 @ReformedRoadie: The airplane is an example of a high level of engineering and materials control. I have seen it and I'm not concerned. Another factor is that a flex-stay bike is going to take damage in crashes, so that S-N curve is now thrown out the window after it's first rock gouge.

At any rate, I am not completely against them. I would just need to be convinced.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: so is every frame made out of anything. do you think an aluminum frame that is crashed is more compromised than a carbon one? designed to flex or not? And we're only talking a very small degree for flex.
It's similar to pivots that hardly rotate and whether a bearing or a bushing is a better solution.
  • 2 0
 @fracasnoxteam: Not sure what you mean by the Trance being a "big bike" compared to the Stance. They have the same travel (Stance is 120/130, Trance 29 is 115/130), and the geometry isn't that different. The Trance is a degree slacker, has a 12mm longer reach (but with a 10mm shorter stem, at least in the small/medium) and has about 20mm more wheelbase. Obviously it's larger, but I wouldn't say that the difference is big enough to put it into a different category.
  • 2 0
 @ChristophColombo: trance 29 is a 29. So 27,5 or 29, they're bigger than the Stance anyways. But more seriously, I had a stance and a trance at the same time in my garage for 2 years, so believe me, trance is bigger.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: dunno, I know one that was regularly sent over 40ft doubles and flipped n shit.
  • 2 0
 @fracasnoxteam: The Stance they reviewed is a 29 too though - it's got the same 120/130 travel as the 27.5 version. The 27.5 Trance is absolutely a bigger bike than the 27.5 Stance at 140/150 vs 120/130, but the same is not true of the 29er Trance.
  • 1 0
 @ChristophColombo: my bad for the wheel size, I know the 27'5 ones.
  • 19 0
 Does anyone else wish that companies would put a Shimano SLX 11 speed or something instead of SX Eagle? The derailleurs are pieces of plastic garbage that barely last a month.
  • 7 0
 yup...heck even GX11 or maybe even NX11 over this SX crap...SX is only like $35 cheaper then NX for the whole groupset...i Just don't get it.
  • 7 0
 I'd take Deore 10spd over SX you can get an 11-42 and just put a 28 or 30 tooth ring on it and that will cover just about anything a entry level rider will encounter. You can get the whole drivetrain for $99 on eBay so I'm sure it is a pretty good price for the OEM's.
  • 2 0
 I think SLX is much more expensive than SX Eagle. Maybe SX/NX is a good way to get your foot in the door before upgrading to SLX when the SRAM bits fail. I do really wish that Shimano showed up more in the OEM market though.
  • 3 0
 @MeloBikeCO: I'm not so sure. I think the OEMs get seriously cheap drivetrain deals from SRAM when they also spec their suspension parts. FWIW, I'd certainly take Deore over NX/SX.
  • 2 0
 @NWBasser: I agree that the OEM's likely get a very low price, but I'm just saying that if Deore is available to the consumer(via grey market) for $99 then I don't know how much cheaper it would be to spec SX shifter, see, cassette and chain. I mean it has to cost something.
  • 3 0
 @MeloBikeCO: It might just come down to marketing; "look, we're giving you 12 speeds!" sounds better to the uninformed consumer than a 10-speed Deore, even if it's much better quality.
  • 2 0
 @NWBasser:
That is the real reason for sure.

I can't remember how many times I have tried to convince a customer what the best course of action was, but they reject the advice because it isn't the same tire model on the front and back, or because something that they heard from a buddy. I mean a lot of people do take the advice as well, but the product managers have to play the numbers game.
  • 15 0
 Nobody paid attention to this?
"International Delivery
Currently unavailable"
  • 1 0
 Yeah I was hoping this was a cool way to announce they are finally doing international shipping. But without mentioning anything, not even sure why they included the bike in this test in ARIZONA if you can't even get one shipped to Arizona...
  • 12 0
 Their upgraded limited edition is currently only £935. Its a lot of bike for the money - www.gooutdoors.co.uk/15985702/15985702-calibre-bossnut-mountain-bike-black
  • 2 0
 What is upgraded on it? Looks to be the exact same spec but just in a more stealthy black colourway.

I'd have liked to see the Sentry in this competition to be honest.
  • 1 0
 To be honest it's a good point - that for customer direct brands, you should be talking about the price they're actually listed for - because its not like other shops are selling at a different price.
Another example is the Vitus model, which actually sells for $1800 from its only vendor (CRC/Wiggle - same shop)
  • 19 5
 $1400-$1600 can get you a lot of bike in the Buy/Sell section.
  • 4 1
 Got a $1,700 bike for $925
  • 11 9
 with a lot of cracks potentially
  • 18 1
 @usmbc-co-uk: Nah, just non-boost. Which some people consider worse than a crack.
  • 3 4
 It was a one year old hardtail
  • 20 0
 It sure can. We have a Field Trip video coming up where we talk about exactly that, and go over what to look for and what to look out for.
  • 1 0
 And 3k even better one !!
  • 2 0
 And if good bikes are available for $1400 new in a year or two $800 will get you a lot of bike in the buy sell.

Some people prefer the confidence of a warranty.
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: It'd be pretty rad to see a video where you buy and review some bikes from your Buy/Sell section. I know I've personally had to talk myself out of buying several bikes here because they were steals almost too tempting to pass up.
  • 8 1
 @Patrick9-32: I'd rather ride a $3200 bike that I paid $1500 for with no warranty than ride a $1400 bike that I'll need a warranty for.
  • 28 0
 @mikelevy: I think you guys should each get $1500 and see what you will actually purchase in the buy sell. Then within two weeks of purchase have you all do your fast lap thing (with timed climbing included)

Winner gets 50 timbits.

All done at appropriate social distancing of course.
  • 33 1
 @onemind123: Something along those lines will likely happen in 2020 Smile
  • 3 0
 @chriskneeland: When I look at the buy sell the $3200 bike selling for $1500 is like 8 years old. If you can find a deal or end of season sale I think new is almost cheaper and you don't have to worry your bike has been totally my ted and rebuilt with frakenparts.
  • 1 0
 Not to mention the fact you can bargain with the seller which typically lowers the price a couple hundred dollars
  • 3 0
 @chriskneeland new and used is kinda apples to oranges. Personally I think used makes the most sense in two cases:

- at an even lower price point, low enough to truly make it impossible to get a decent new bike;
- when you need something very specific like a DH/ bike or XC race bike and are on a budget.

When you need a "daily" trailbike and get to this price level where you can get something like the Vitus from this test brand new, that's a bike that isn't lacking anything and won't hold a lot of people back in reality (if it will, you're either that guy who needs a used DH/FR bike or you're probably not looking in this price range). I'm saying Vitus because getting good rubber and dropper for the Bossnut will bring it a bit closer to that 2k, as will buying a used bike for the Bossnut's price and making it usable (service, swap broken/worn parts and the frame's integrity is still a lottery). I'd be hard pressed to find any used trailbike appealing over that Vitus.

@bikeboy100 Nah, not really dude. You got a $925 bike for $925. $1700 was its MSRP (i.e. not the real purchase price) when it was new, with warranty, fresh tyres, drivetrain, pads and discs, straight wheels, smooth bearings without play and fork not needing service. To be clear I'm not slating your purchase. I'm sure it's a lot of bike for $925 and it fits my point above about price points where buying new/capable gets tricky. But let's not pretend the first owner didn't get value out of spending more on new.

That being said, since your ride is a hardtail, this costs £764 or $945 at today's exchange rate: www.chainreactioncycles.com/vitus-sentier-27-bike-deore-1x10-2020/rp-prod181499
Is that used bike going to blow it out of the water on the trail in the real world and how much did it need in service/spares? Put a dropper on this Sentier (the cheapest on CRC is £99/$122) and for $1067 it can easily hang with the $1499 Honzo, it even has better tyres. If below £1000 was my budget for a full sus, I'd 100% go used but for a hardtail I'm not sure.
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: No, I'm not saying it's typical, but they're occasionally out there. You have to be patient, watching all the time, and ready to pull the trigger immediately. I built my Insurgent from the ground up with the highest spec available, only to find one three seasons later with top spec in damn near new condition for almost $5k less. It was a sad day knowing I'll never get the return I expected on my investment.
  • 5 0
 @chriskneeland: lol bikes are a great emotional investment, but a horrific financial one!
  • 3 0
 @onemind123: My wife reminds me of this daily.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Just as fun may be to do a build on a budget competition. Where would you spend the $$? Where to spend for new vs. used, etc. Might help answer some of these questions on the low-end component choices too.
  • 10 1
 @mikelevy & @mikekazimer ya'll gotta quick talking about 27.5 like its outdated trash! half of us riders are to short to ever aggressively ride a 29er
  • 7 3
 Yeah I couldn't agree more. Nobody i ride with has a 29er and as far as I know, nobody wants one.
  • 3 0
 @BedsideCabinet: I have a 27.5 and a 29, both were bought because they were crazy good deals local used and both absolutely met the stereotype and i choose what to ride based on the mood im in. 2016 29 Spesh enduro is a "dumb" bike, runs over things, have to think less, like to keep a lie up and downhill, choice for enduro races, days i dont want to think too much, or when i go somewhere new since the rollover on big rocks makes first line much easier. 2015 27.5 Spesh Stumpy = absolute blast to ride, pops all over the places, jumps with confidence, much more precise and rewards an active rider.

If i didnt try new places often (or was more confident) or race i would ride 27.5 all the time, its just more fun.
  • 1 0
 @Snowrydr01: Sick set of rides you have, I find it curious that you run the opposite setup I do.
My 29er is my 135mm light/fast trailbike, and my 27.5 170mm "enduro" bike is so much fun at the bikepark or pedaling up fire roads to ride more DH style trails.

I think the beauty is we have so many different types of bikes out there available to ride for different terrains or riding styles. Sucks for the wallet, but those who really notice the difference probably will make the sacrifices to afford multiple bikes.
  • 1 1
 Honestly and arguably, height has little to do with wheel size.
  • 1 1
 @Snowrydr01: yeah but try taking your stumpy on some proper DH courses at race speeds and see what happens. I’m not saying it’s wheel size, but you are comparing two bikes with very different disciplines. Try a short travel 29, or even the stumpy 29 then comment.
  • 6 0
 It might not actually have bottle cage mounts, but at least it looks like you could sneak an SKS anywhere cage between the top tube and the shock, unlike some fancy unnecessarily swoopy hydroformed frames. And at that price, it would be hard not to recommend to any beginner friend.
  • 3 0
 Great idea - I'd be doing that if this were my bike.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: that's how I run my Mega - I can just get a side entry cage and 550ml bottle up between the head tube and shock
  • 9 3
 Love that bikes in this range are finally getting really good. They even look good. I remember when $1800 looked really corny. If it were me I'd stay home from the pub a few weeks and get the Ibis Ripmo AF at $3k.
  • 41 6
 You’re American, don’t call it a pub.
  • 17 1
 @nyles: Maybe he exclusively goes to a local Irish Pub
  • 23 1
 @nyles: what do you call it? A trailer?
  • 6 0
 @rrolly: We call them bars
  • 18 0
 @wmoody54: Up here bars are where you go to drink and dance, not eat. Pubs are where you go to sit, drink, and eat.
Trailers are to be avoided.
  • 3 1
 @rrolly: Here in Southeast USA clubs are where you go to drink and dance, and bars are where you go to sit, drink and eat.

Trailers can be a rowdy, redneck, good time.
  • 11 0
 @rrolly: yuo stay outta ths canadia
  • 2 1
 @bwgemmil: said no one ever - lol!
  • 2 0
 @wmoody54: I like pub better as a word. I'll also take lorry. But they can keep bonnet, boot, and tyre. The "i" is easier to type than the "y" so tire is the superior word, and a woody sort of word to boot.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: which use of fanny? Cause I use a fanny pack, but aint trying to be sexist or homophobic when I call it that. It typically rests on my glutes. English needs to get its sht together. 1english.org
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: I tire of you. The last time I looked, the "i" and "y" keys were the same size, why would one be easier than the other?!
  • 3 0
 @Braindrain: You have to reach a bit for the y. But the i is just right there, ripe, enticing, irrepressible, irresistible.
  • 1 0
 @nyles: America! Our colours don't run!
  • 2 0
 You're an American, call it whatever you want.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: Your lexical preferences are on point.
  • 1 0
 @jeremiahwas: kovfefe! Sorry, couldnt resist.
  • 2 1
 @nyles: America is full of pubs. You dont know what you're talking about.
  • 1 2
 @RonSauce: right over yer head!
  • 1 1
 @nyles: sure was, that humor was way to deep for me, so many levels I dont even know where I got lost.
  • 1 0
 @RonSauce: deep indeed, many levels indeed. Guess where?
  • 6 0
 Can someone help me better understand the logic that modern geometry should = a more costly product? Is it something to do with the production costs? I just... don't get it. But then again, I'm an idiot.
  • 1 0
 It shouldn't equal a more costly product. There are quite a few bike companies that have that figured out, and some that haven't for whatever reason.
  • 1 0
 If you're starting from scratch, geometry costs nothing. But if you have a legacy frame, it costs a lot to change it. Especially if you have to get custom tube lengths made, such as a longer butted down tube.
  • 7 0
 This bike is cheaper than the Kona hardtail and has the same spec... Something's not right...
  • 2 0
 Direct to consumer VS go directly to your bike shop Smile
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: Not direct to consumer in the uk!
  • 4 0
 I only went in to my local Go Outdoors for some protein bars and stout walking boots and I ended up with this bicycle
  • 1 1
 @BedsideCabinet: yes, like halfords these are direct to consumer, they are only sold in GO Outdoors shops, the bikes are made by go outdoors, no 3rd party bike shop in the middle. The shop people are minimum wage and minimum training, they might be passionate and knowledgeable about bikes, but they also might be some idiot who doesn't give a sh't.
  • 3 0
 @Braindrain: You buy them from a shop not just a web site. You can go to the shop to test the size/fit. You have a shop to go back to if you have any problems. Not just email or phone calls. The shops are all over the country. To me this is not "direct to customer ".
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: it's the equivalent of supermarket own brand ketchup - Asda (Walmart) ketchup is cheaper than Heinz.
  • 6 0
 Bikes and reviews like this are a great way to get people into mountain biking. The more expensive brands could be thanking Calibre 3 years down the road.
  • 2 0
 Except they arent sold outside of UK since GoOutdoors switched sites. I bought their DJ for 550$ and it has a better spec than Spesh p.slope. I can't get any shipped anymore tho. Nice bikes and the company seems cool to deal with too. Hopefully they figure something out.
  • 1 2
 @Svinyard: Okay, allow me to make that more precise, just for you:
The more expensive brands may be thanking Calibre as well as other makers of "bikes like this" 3 years down the road.
  • 4 0
 Not even, from my shop experience we've sold so many $1200-2000 (Canadian) bikes only to sell 4k+ bikes to the same person 9 to 18 months down the road. Once it bites, it hits hard.

I remember spending $650 on my first hard tail myself in March, and by the end of August of the same year I was rolling out the shop on a $3600 dollar NS Soda Air.
  • 1 0
 @Ian713: Yeah I wasn't disagreeing. I bought my wife a cheap bike to see if she was into it and now we are looking to upgrade. But its fine, we'll sell her bike used for an ok price (market is pretty big for cheaper bike) and get her a proper steed. I'm just disappointed that Calibre can't be bought in US anymore.

Now I think these cheap bikes are REALLY about to be good tho (1 to 2yrs). The geometry is catching up fast and the only thing missing is a decent fork. The Vitus is a nice value...I think we could see 1500$ versions of that after some trickle down. Particularly of interest will be Giant once they put out their OEM fork. I'm guessing it'll be a heck of a lot nicer than that crappy Recon. If they do that and make a proper frame...those cheap bikes just might stick around and not need that 2nd purchase. YT just put out a kids bike that's nicer than all of these for 1899$. Sick McLeod custom shock and Manitou fork with same damper/spring as 800$+ as their forks...plus sweet wheels\bars\pedals\stem\geo\tires. It could be done for adults too once the OEMs ditch the garbage forks (hopefully wheels too).
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: I know, I know, but you did have a good point about the wording of the second sentence, that's why I upvoted you Smile I appreciate your pedantry towards semantics.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Their are other great budget full squish bikes available in NA. Marin have the Hawk Hill and Rift Zone which are good value
  • 2 0
 Don't sleep on the Norco fluid either
  • 3 0
 @mikelevy: "You might expect some sketchy geometry at this price, but that’s not the case." What is the relationship (direct or otherwise) between retail price and good (or bad) geometry numbers? Does good geometry cost a bunch of extra money in and of itself, or is it a reflection of top-end engineering (and therefore added cost) or is it something else? Essentially, why can't $1400 bikes have the same great functional geometry as a $8400 bike? Cheers.
  • 1 0
 In theory it could and should.

If a bike brand can make more money by marketing their nice new shiny $8k bike - it has new geo which will make you more confident on the trails, faster, you'll be a superstar!

or we also offer these other bikes from $1-4k the geos not as good but you'll do ok....just not as good as if you spend that extra money on the new geo.

Basically its all about getting as much money out of the consumer as possible.
  • 1 0
 They can, unless yoh are doing handmade bike, all alu/ carbon are being manufactured on factories where they have already molds in place or something mew that you need to buy in appropriate batch to make it fully custom;

For a 1400 this is hellot of the bike
  • 4 2
 Can I just mention that when the brand and the retailer is the same thing, there is no "recommended" retail price (RRP).
It's just "the price".

Like I don't normally "recommend" things to myself, I just do them.

In the case of this bike, "the price" is actually £935
  • 6 1
 Yeah, well, that's just, like, your recommendation, man.
  • 1 0
 True story, its a funny thing because that is really the standard price at the only store that sells them. Its been that way for years...you are always getting a "sale" price on these. To list them at a full 1400$ instead of 1150$ isn't reality. Its not the same as the other bikes...its more like buying guitar equipment...its always on sale lol. This is a mountain of a bike for 1150$ if you can get one. Someday these cheap bikes will have a decent fork on them...that will be sick.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: any chance we could get a suspension platform review for efficiency/climbing, and grip/forward momentum.

Imagine if you throw a powermeter on and keep watts at like 200 or so on the climbs, then no pedals on descents it could take out a ton of subjective factors. We could basically say X platform puts more watts to forward momentum and Y platform keeps forward momentum better than Z platform.

Im not smart. Could be dumb idea.
  • 3 0
 I'm not smart either, but I like that idea. Everything feels pretty dang good, to be honest.
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: Great...now I can only hear Forrest Gump saying "I am not a smart man..."
  • 2 1
 I like budget bike reviews a lot more than superbike reviews. A lot more interesting to see how different companies hit the budget number. I have a 142 bike and a 148 bike. You can feel the difference if you want, but it's really pretty minor on the trail. The big problem is that 142 is virtually unsupported now - so you'd have fairly limited options to replace the wheels on that bike, at least compared to something with boost spacing. Man I'd like to get out of the house and ride.
  • 6 0
 I am legitimately interested in why people think 142 isn't supported anymore. When I look for budget hubs it is a lot cheaper and there are more options in 142. 142 just became the standard road bike through axle standard, so I expect support and hubs to keep up production well into the future. The only place where it seems that there maybe a lack of inventory, is on hand options at your local bike shop, as they are more likely to be just bringing in boost options, so that they don't get stuck with inventory down the road. The parts and pre-builts are still available however and so the LBS can just order them up and have whatever you want in a few days to a week however.
  • 1 0
 I ran those level T's for almost 3 years, just upgraded. They're a great entry-level, price-conscious spec. As I've gotten into the steep, techy double blacks they've finally worn out their welcome. But for the vast majority of my riding? Just fine.
  • 1 0
 nice bike, don't get why they supply with shitty sram rather then 11 sp Shimano?
as an entry point bike it is probably does not matter since users will not differentiate them.

For all comments that giant is epencivke and have worth set up, you are forgetting that giant have huge network of distributors which is super important when you are choosing 1 MTB;

Buying online requires you to know at. least some basics and have experience;
  • 1 0
 I told you that "fork" is piece of shit. For the tubes check this out: endurorider.pl/oko-x-treme It really works great so you don't have to change tires immediately after purchase. It's a pity that producer didn't put some brand-x dropper on the bike, as it would be great starting package for that bike.
  • 1 0
 Maybe someone can explain this to me. Why do some inexpensive bikes go with a single pivot (modified to be sure) rather than making it a Horst Link? It seems that there would be the same amount of welding and machining. Other than that, I really like this bike and its price especially since it is a 27.5.
  • 1 0
 It would be cool so see you guys test and review the calibre sentry their enduro bike I just picked one up brand new for £1600 and I'm impressed with it but I have been off the bike for a few years and my last bike was a trek session
  • 1 1
 I would wager that the Actual Seat Tube Angle on the Bossnut is a lot steeper than many of the other bikes' advertised "Seat Tube Angle". This gets important for us taller guys that have to run the saddle higher than the seemingly random point at which they the measurement for the geo chart. Once you go above that point on some bikes, you start losing "steepness" in a hurry. Kudos to Calibre for building a decent value bike.
  • 1 0
 Thank you tall guy.

Sincerely,
A tall guy

(we need a standard for this...)
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Amen. I just bought a new bike and agonized over sizing because of the huge disparity (60+mm) in Reach measurement yet the VTT length was within 13mm. Reach as a Standard is problematic for identifying what the seated position will be like when STA is such a flexible measurement. IMO STA should be measured from BB to the intersection of the seat post level with the top of the HT.
  • 2 0
 It would be nice to see if a high-end bike was thrown in to the mix. Exactly how much is someone losing with the Vitus compared to an S-Works or high-end Yeti/SantaCruz...
  • 1 0
 Could someone please explain why the recon forks need to be over pressurized? I have the Salsa version of this price point (sx and recon) and have yet to use it (mud season), so I'm curious what the issue is. Thanks.
  • 11 7
 Bossnut > dick pound
  • 3 0
 @10:10 hahahahaha! That face made the entire video worth it!
  • 1 0
 Anyone else look at this bike and in their mind see that scene from the original planet of the apes with the ape saying: "...but your so damned ugly." No? Just me? Okay...
  • 1 0
 I set my bossnut up tubeless no problem with stock tyres and gorilla tape along the rims, and some Muc-off tubeless sealant and valves no problem.
  • 2 0
 Looks good, straight lines.
  • 1 0
 Levy did you said 52 cog at around the 3 min mark?? Is that an unreleased cassette by Sram?? slip of the tongue heh ?
  • 2 0
 50 tooth
  • 2 0
 not a session though is it
  • 2 0
 Can we talk about Level T brakes? Trash
  • 2 0
 Mmmm, looks like a session
  • 1 0
 interesting how it climbs so well considering that 33lb weight.... that's darn heavy in my book
  • 2 0
 Pushing rope huh?
  • 1 0
 Nice catch in physics exams
  • 1 0
 I think the infeasiblity of pushing a rope is the root of the metaphor.
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: It's a dick joke...
  • 1 0
 it's at least nice that there are pricepoints like this...
  • 4 0
 and there will be a lot more of this price point coming soon.......
  • 1 0
 Anniversary present to your significant other - here
is a “Boss Nut”!
  • 1 0
 Are the rims tubeless ready?
  • 4 2
 The rims aren't the sticking point - tubeless tape will do that part - it's the WTB tires Frown
  • 4 0
 Yep they are WTB tubeless ready rims.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: I personally feel like rims which aren't designed to be tubeless usually should be ran with tubes. That's why I was asking. If they dont have the flat bead shelf design of a TL ready rim-and instead have an older style rounded shelf-you wont be able to trust them even if you tape them and get them to seal...or at least not at low tire pressure which is the main advantage of tubeless. MeloBikeCo gave me the answer I was looking for. Tires can be easily swapped, they will wear out. Rims are a bit more expensive and tedious to replace. So TL ready rims, even if not setup that way initially, has a lot of value it in.
  • 1 0
 Get a couple of these. And talk about thrashing your nuts all the time.
  • 2 1
 I'd be going used instead of this route.
  • 1 0
 Does it come with all those headset spacers?!?!
  • 1 0
 Usually, my post drops AFTER I unlock the "nut"
  • 2 5
 One talking point that may be informative for those newer to the sport who aren’t bike nerds... yet:

Although it is 142mm spacing, one thing to keep in mind is the bike is 27.5. Yes, there would be gains in regards to stiffness/strength if it were boost, but it is less concerning than if the bike was 29.

With that being said, I’d hate to have a Bossnut on an epic ride only to be stopped by a weak spoke due to a bracing angle that wasn’t optimal...
  • 2 1
 The Bossnut that wont cost-a-nut
  • 1 0
 A lot of sram haters out there.
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 At 4:12, how is he going forward but his tire is turning backward?
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 It appears to be turning forward on my screen. Maybe your frame rate is different, creating the illusion.
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 @JohanG: interesting. So now I had to see how it looked on my phone. On my phone the illusion isn't as obvious.
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 Why not to buy Dartmoor Blackbird or bluebird instead of that thing?
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 That chain at 6:06. :o
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