Field Trip: Polygon's $2,369 Siskiu Fools You Into Thinking It's Pricier

May 4, 2021
by Sarah Moore  


PINKBIKE FIELD TRIP

POLYGON SISKIU T8

Fools you into thinking it's pricier.



Words by Sarah Moore, Photography by Tom Richards



We're kicking off the full-suspension bikes in the Field Trip value bike series with Polygon's Siskiu T8. It has an aluminum frame fitted with either 27.5" or 29" wheels. Our 29er came with 135mm of rear travel and a 140mm fork.

The Polygon uses a linkage-driven single-pivot suspension layout that creates enough room for a bottle underneath the shock, while the one-piece rocker link helps rigidity. There are sealed bearings from end to end, with aluminum pivot hardware holding everything together. Frame details include a threaded bottom bracket, and internal cable routing that pops out through larger ports at the head tube that are finished with rubber grommets. There’s also a thick chainstay pad that comes pre-installed.
Polygon Siskiu T8

Travel: 135mm (rear) 140mm (fork)
Wheel size: 27.5" & 29"
Frame construction: aluminum
Head angle: 65.5 degrees
Chainstay length: 430mm
Reach: 460mm (medium, 29)
Sizes: S-XL
Weight: 34.3 lb / 15.5 kg
Price: $2,369 USD
More info: www.polygonbikes.com

This is an all-new frame for 2021, giving Polygon a chance to update the geometry to the latest acceptable numbers. For this 135mm-travel trail bike, that means a 65.5-degree head angle and 76.5-degree effective seat angle, and a 460mm reach for the medium and 480mm for the large. All sizes get relatively short 425mm chainstays as well. The medium gets a short 400mm seat tube, while the large is just 415mm, leaving plenty of room for a long-travel dropper post.

We’re testing the T8 model that goes for $2,369 USD, including the Fox Rythym fork, an SLX drivetrain, and a set of Tektro 4-piston brakes. If you have less to spend on a bike, you can get the less expensive T7 for just $1,959, or a frame/shock combo for $999 USD.




Polygon Siskiu T8. Pinkbike Value Bikes Field Trip 2021. Photo Tom Richards
Polygon Siskiu T8. Pinkbike Value Bikes Field Trip 2021. Photo Tom Richards


Climbing

The Polygon is an interesting bike as it only has 135mm, but it’s a very active 135mm - enough that you can look down and see the shock gently cycling through its stroke while you’re working hard. The high-volume air can and light shock tune are likely a factor in that. If you're facing a long gravel road climb on the Siskiu you'll likely want to reach for the pedal-assist switch and firm the bike up. More so on big, out of the saddle efforts, of course.

The flip side to that is good traction over wet roots and slippery spots. If your climbs are a tangled mess of tricky roots and rocks, you’ll want to stay in the seat, turn the pedals over, and claw your way up the trail. On the handling front, it’s a bike that can fit into tight spots and it felt more at home in twisty singletrack than either the Giant or Devinci, although it can’t match the Ibis’ enthusiasm or suspension efficiency. While the Siskiu isn't what you would call it an exceptional climber, especially as it does rely on that pedal assist switch, it’ll do what you ask of it. Just don’t rush…


Polygon Siskiu T8. Pinkbike Value Bikes Field Trip 2021. Photo Tom Richards

Polygon Siskiu T8. Pinkbike Value Bikes Field Trip 2021. Photo Tom Richards
Polygon Siskiu T8. Pinkbike Value Bikes Field Trip 2021. Photo Tom Richards


Descending


On the way back down, the Polygon proved to be a fun, capable bike that provides more forgiveness than you might expect. That supple suspension is surely a big part of this, with the bike doing a better job of filtering out all the small stuff than most of the bikes on test, although the shock seems to get to the end of its travel a bit quickly when you’re pushing hard. There isn’t a ton of support there, either, which probably keeps the Polygon from feeling as playful as some others.

Mike Levy and I preferred a bit firmer setup for the rear-suspension, 25-percent sag rather than 30, and that really added more life to the bike, while still allowing the bike to suck up all the little things that you’re not paying attention to until they put you on the ground. The handling is certainly more all-around fun than all-out speed, which is a good theme for a bike like this.

The Siskiu is probably the best looking bike on test, but this isn’t a beauty pageant. Rather than being a speedy trail bike, the Polygon offers a more forgiving, active ride that’s best suited to rough ground and riders who aren’t looking to add KOMs to their trophy case on every ride. It’ll make an excellent an all-rounder for someone that loves rough terrain.

Polygon Siskiu T8. Value Bikes Field Trip 2021. Photo by Tom Richards





Pros

+ Tons of traction from the rear end
+ Versatile - going to work in a lot of places

Cons

- Have to use the pedal-assist switch on the climbs
- Brakes are lacking initial bite and overall power
















The 2021 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with support from Toyota.




Video: Jason Lucas, Max Barron
Editing: Max Barron



157 Comments

  • 131 6
 I feel like this is the bike that 99% of us actually need
  • 229 3
 I'm in that 1% that needs more, just like 99% of us.
  • 7 26
flag CircusMaximus (May 4, 2021 at 8:30) (Below Threshold)
 You’re feelings are strange.
  • 16 3
 You think 99% of us ride a medium???!!!! Sheesh, think these things through! hehe.
  • 7 25
flag CircusMaximus (May 4, 2021 at 9:18) (Below Threshold)
 @Boych12: auto correct. Never had a typo eh?
  • 13 4
 You don't need carbon that's for sure!
  • 5 3
 @MattP76: I need carbon. Lol.
  • 12 6
 @tacklingdummy: No one needs carbon... People just want it.
  • 4 2
 @cyclebean I hope you mean 99% of us who live in places where there are no mountains.
  • 6 0
 @MattP76: I just checked. Still need Carbon. And titanium. And CNC. Need it....
  • 2 0
 we don't need carbon
  • 4 0
 @maianhkha15091981: as a carbon based life form I disagree.
  • 126 4
 " Have to use the pedal-assist switch on the climbs" ....spent a minute trying to find a motor on it
  • 3 2
 Came here to say the same thing lol
  • 7 0
 I don't even get how thats a "con" when thats what the switch is for in the first place. In my opinion its a con if you get a bike with a climb switch and don't have to use it on climbs because there wouldn't even be a point of having a climb switch in the first place so why spec the bike with it?
  • 1 0
 Slap the switch to climb and it locks out all the way, climb all day. Great platform! The antisquat on this frame is nuts.
  • 88 3
 Why is having to use the pedal assist lever a bad thing? It's there for a reason right? If flipping the switch makes it pedal how you want for long leg burning climbs, but leaving it off makes it more active for the chunky zero traction climbs, isn't that pretty much the ideal situation? At the very least, if the active suspension is in the "pro" column, having a simple lever to tune that activeness out shouldn't be considered a "con".
  • 8 0
 This!
  • 14 0
 Well, it was reviewed by Levy m.pinkbike.com/news/opinion-lockout-levers-make-for-worse-bikes.html

It will be a pro if it was reviewed by Matt Wragg m.pinkbike.com/news/opinions-we-need-lockouts.html
  • 5 0
 Totally agree, shouldn't be in the con column.
I love pedal assist, or better yet, lock outs on rear suspension. I don't think it was meant to dis pedal assist levers, though. More to question the tuning of the shock.
I think this is the kind of bike that is suited to pretty smooth or fire road ups, where you have the pedal assist engaged, and then chunkier downs, or rides where the climb, or whole ride is predominately chundery .
Sounds like the shock is tuned for larger bump compliance, not smoothness.
"...if you ride totally smooth trails, this isn't the best bike for that"
  • 14 6
 Levy is infamous for only liking mechanical "pedal assist" on bikes vs hydraulic damping. What he doesn't realize is that when you design a linkage solely around pedaling efficiency on smooth surfaces, you get a bike that is hindered in other areas. You can't flip a switch and instantly change linkages like you can change damping. Those "efficient" types of suspension linkages exhibit great out-of-the-saddle acceleration, but they also throw the most pedal kickback at the rider on flatter descents and feel hung-up when the rider lays the power down over square-edged hits. The Siskiu is not a featherweight, but the suspension is well-designed and balanced in order to offer a comfortable, high-traction ride up and down the trail. That is the only point that should be emphasized. The cons are just the result of personal bias.
  • 35 8
 @grizzlyatom: What makes you think I don't realize the drawbacks of a more efficient suspension system? Everything has its pros and cons, including the stuff I prefer. Having ridden five zillion bikes, I'm pretty well versed in how the different approaches perform on the trail Wink
  • 10 1
 Where I ride (in PA) we have hills not mountains, you descent for a minute and then you climb the next. I really don't like the lock-out switch for that, I'd rather have a bike with more efficient suspension.
  • 3 1
 @grizzlyatom: I used to think this way but my Santa Cruz pedals very well without flipping the switch and works equally as well on the descents. If you want to go a bit further into it anti-squat changes as you move through the travel and is also different depending on what gear you're in. I think there is a sweet spot where you can have enough anti-squat in your biggest climbing gear to not need to flip a climb switch, but still have the suspension be supple as you get into a higher (physically smaller) gear. Having a ton of pedal bob and having to lock out the shock kinda sucks. And if you're experiencing pedal kickback just go faster!
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: vacation is over?

Mike, have you ever ridden the old Siskiu T that was reviewed by RC back in 2018? The old one was said to be more snappy and efficient (even with no lock out), but out of its comfort zone in chunky, chundery and chattery part of the trail. m.pinkbike.com/news/review-polygon-siskiu-t8.html
  • 5 1
 @mikelevy: now now don't go getting all sensible , it is pinkbike comments after all.
  • 1 1
 I think there are levels of "needs the lever to climb". It's not just about the anti squat though. If the seatpost angle is too slack, weight will be over the rear wheel causing the suspension to be deeper into the travel, where anti squat tends to fall away on most designs, bobbing more the steeper the climb. Also, if there's plenty of progression or low speed damping, that can reduce the tendency to bob. And if course pedaling in circles, not smashing... So it's not all about the (virtual) pivot position.
Personally, I've chosen bikes that don't pedal so well as a trade-off for traction and comfort. I think we all know Levy's preferences and most of us will make our own choice. Or just b!tch about it in the comments...
  • 2 1
 @mikelevy: I'm actually curious as to why you find a feature thats needed as a con? Makes us question whether we should listen to you at all lol. I've never heard you put the climb switch as a con when you didn't need it which in my opinion would be way more of a con then a bike that needs it and actually uses it.
  • 2 1
 @mikelevy: I don't mean any hate, and everyone has their preferences. I think it's fine to give your personal opinions and the reasoning behind them in a review. I don't think, however, that it make sense to penalize a bike in a synoptic "Cons" list over a personal preference. It's incomplete to simply lump bikes into a "climber" or "non-climber" category. The Rift Zone has nearly the exact the same main pivot placement as the Siskiu, yet the Zone "pedals like an XC bike". In other words, there's much more to the picture than just the base suspension design causing the perceived climbing deficiency. It's more about what the bike is intended to do well. This bike was clearly designed to utilize a damper with a solid pedal platform, and I can't see that as a drawback, especially when it means that the bike can descend more capably than its competitors.
  • 2 1
 @friendlyfoe: I've owned a Hightower, Hightower LT, and spent time on a Megatower, a Pivot, and various Ibis bikes. I fully understand how mechanical antisquat (and the associated pedal kickback) change throughout travel and gear ratios. I recently purchase a Horst link bike, and now a single pivot, and I can tell you there is a marked difference in how they descend vs. my old bikes. It isn't solely pedal kickback that I'm referring to, so I guess I over-simplified that argument a bit. There is a very perceivable difference between how short-link and long-link bikes descend over rough surfaces, especially through consecutive hits. The friction in a system, kinematics, axle path, anti-rise values, geometry, and chain forces all effect the feel of a bike. Due to their sensitivity to mass transfer, I will concede that there is a slight efficiency loss with a single pivot bike when riding/climbing smooth terrain, but their traction/descending prowess is simply unmatched. That is why I have no problem using a climb switch to compensate for that loss during non-technical climbing.
  • 2 1
 @chrsei: I think your argument totally makes sense. There are terrains and riding styles that favor one or the other type of suspension platform. However, that doesn't make a particular trait an objective pro or a con. I ride trails that are rough and go straight up and then straight down, so I don't mind having a pedal switch, as a long as my bike rips faster than your efficient bike on the way down. Wink I think reviewers should be the first to point that out and explain what terrain and rider each bike might be well-suited for, rather than just saying "this is good, and that is bad."
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy: "All sizes get relatively short 425mm chainstays as well."

425mm only for S & M (27,5) sizes.

430mm for M (29) and up.

Also you might wanna updated the cons after the efficiency test.
  • 1 0
 @Beskyd: well that efficiency test was more like about the rear tire than the suspension system. Bikes that comes with harder compound or less knobby rear tire scored better.
  • 31 1
 Had mine since September and love it. Definitely needs better brakes, and the Hans Dampf tires didn’t work well for my terrain though. I also didn’t see any mention that it comes with some burly ass 35mm wheels. Which is a plus(robustness) or minus(more weight than needed for a trail bike) depending on your outlook.

Also- I live in the land of dentists, and I get way more compliments and conversations started about this bike than my friends on their $8k bikes.
  • 2 0
 The tektros are that bad? I have a Torrent A2 coming that has the HD-745s also and am thinking of just swapping to some 6120s out of the gate.
  • 4 0
 @rowdyhonzo: assuming you are talking abt deore m6120, i will strongly recommend, i run them and they are just as good as xt, just without the wandering bite point. ive only used the HD-745s once, and a few others, and its def worth the upgrade to deore or slx
  • 6 1
 @ltharris: correct, I have the SLX 4p on my Stumpy Evo and love them (big fan of shimano over sram brakes), have heard the Deore are basically the same minus the adjustable levers
  • 20 0
 You must have nice teeth
  • 3 0
 @rowdyhonzo: The Tektros are that bad. Lever is made for like 3 fingers. The only positive is that they have decent modulation, but that's just because they don't actually stop you! They might be better with upgraded pads/rotors, but I decided to use that money and just put it toward new brakes. I don't regret it at all.
  • 2 0
 @rtiEDGE: Gotcha. That's what I noticed test riding the torrent, the lever seemed super bulky and cheap. Will 100% be swapping in that case, cheers.
  • 2 0
 @rowdyhonzo: yes the only difference is slx has tooless reach adjust, but deore uses a 3mmm (i think 3, maybe 2) allen
  • 3 0
 @rowdyhonzo: it's even less of a difference : there's lever blade adjustment on the deore , it's done with an allen key instead of being tool less. Also not sure if the SLX has a cotter pin for pad retention but deore do
  • 2 0
 @ltharris: The caliper is different, the brake hose exit angle can not be adjusted, the brake pads are held in with a clip that has to be bend open with a plier, rather than a screw and I also believe the pistons are not ceramic.

.. really don't like the clip for the pads, makes it difficult to change pads on the trail. I have contaminated pads quite a bit.
  • 2 0
 @chrsei: i was mostly talking in terms of power and lever adjustability, as that's arguably what matters most. you are correct in saying the angle isn't adjustable and the deore uses a cotter pin versus slx which uses a bolt. however both deore and slx use ceramic pistons.
  • 2 0
 @rowdyhonzo: yup, it's not shimano. Had my experience in the first ride almost hit a boulder. Came to the downhill section too fast as 29 er coming straight from a 26er, i thought i could brake at the same spot. But it didn't happen, have to press both brakes so hard and skid to avoid the boulder. Lesson learned i have to look further down the trail with the tektro. But for me i lose the fun time of going fast. So i changed to deore 4 pots to get that safety feeling again.
  • 1 0
 Ditto! Everyone here loves the bike. The rims are hella wide, havent seen this width since 2006.
  • 28 0
 1:09 have a look at the right crank...
  • 3 0
 omg the twist.
  • 2 0
 oh my!
  • 1 0
 ok now i have to look at all the HT slow mo to see if other cranks twist like that.
  • 1 1
 ....definitely the crank arm. Crazy that you can see the whole bottom of the pedal by the end of the slow-mo. The Growler has the same crank arms (I believe) but the flex doesn't seem as extreme in its huck to flat vid ...could be play in the suspension linkage contributing to the twist
  • 2 0
 @SATN-XC: Or a harder huck to flat due to FS vs HT????
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: possibly, would make sense. I'll be interested to see if it shows up on the other FS value bike huck to flat clips.
  • 1 0
 @SATN-XC: I used to have a Meile road bike that I would derail the front chainrings if i really powered for a sprint due to the whole BB twisting in the frame.
  • 2 0
 @fabwizard: Yeah, Square taper BB's were not known for being stiff. Good riddance!
  • 15 1
 How they decided pricing:

"Guys we need something that will really stand out"

"I'm going to walk out on the street and ask someone to say a random number between $2000 and $3000"

Returns 5 minutes later: "I think $2,369 sounds great"
  • 19 0
 "whatever price they tell,it needs to have 69"
  • 3 0
 Do you guys remember Trek 69er. It was before we knew the idea of rocking the mullet. It has 29 in front and 26 in the rear. I never rode and I thought they should of called it the 96er, but I guess Trek had a kink for mutual fellatio.
  • 1 0
 @trollhunter: Didn't some boutique brand (Carver?) make a similar bike the called the 96er?
  • 4 0
 And the names are Scrabble rejects?

Xquadrone, Bromo, Siskiu, Syncline, Xtrada, Premier, Cascade, Trid .. sounds more like toothpaste than bikes.
  • 1 0
 They're actually $2499.00 from bikesonline.
  • 1 0
 @mongoose85: Hmmmm increasing that middleman then.
  • 1 0
 @TrekXCFactoryRacing: Some ones gotta pay to get the Endevor out of holding.
  • 1 0
 @mongoose85: If people will pay it, I've got no problem with them charging it!
  • 1 0
 @chrsei: Some of the names are quite thoughtful. XquareOne was named like that because the designer want to create a completely new suspension design that behave unlike any other so they go back to "square one". Though I admit, substituting S for X feels kinda cringy.

Trid is reverse for dirt, quite fitting for a DJ bike. Bromo is even better, it is a famous big mountain on Polygon's backyard.

Can't say the same for other names, though.
  • 15 0
 when levy’s review is posted, but not by levy. where is this man
  • 4 4
 he's taking PTO (personnal time off)
  • 34 0
 @Elgaucher: PAAA (pointless acronyms are annoying)
  • 9 0
 @cedric-eveleigh: yeah acronyms dont save much time if you need to spell it out.
  • 1 0
 He posted further up in these comments already...
  • 15 0
 sup
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: welcome back
  • 11 0
 Tips for the Tektro brakes: put Shimano levers on them, much better bite and better power/pull ratio too.
  • 1 0
 Wait really? I could try this.
  • 9 0
 My solution to any Tektro brakes I've had in the past was replacing them ASAP. I know they're a budget brand but Jesus some of their stuff is downright dangerous to have on a bike on certain trails.
  • 1 0
 @Peally: Their mechanical discs are the scariest brakes I've ever ridden. They're like trying to stop with rim brakes that have had WD-40 sprayed directly on the rim. The hydraulic discs are much an improvement, however.
  • 5 0
 @Peally: 'Tektro' is their budget/low end brand. Their TRP line is what should be on any 'real' mtb for sure.
  • 1 0
 @bman33: This. The TRP brakes are really good - better modulation than Shimano. No comparison to the tektro.
  • 1 0
 @TrekXCFactoryRacing: to be honest their only okay mech set is their Aires or above, although they very greatly, because I’ve had a couple pairs and some were okay, but others weren’t as good
  • 2 0
 @Peally: Tektro and TRP are the same company. On my Fury and Force 2019 I had the TRP Slate T4 which were underwhelming but since I always have some spare shimano levers lying around you've got nothing to loose by trying it. It worked pretty well and saved me some money for not having to get new brakes for my bikes. Pads are also terrible but I also always have Saint pads in my tool case so that was another easy fix. Currently I have some Tektro M745 which are identical to the Slate T4 aside from a banjo fitting on the caliper and tool free lever reach adjustment. Did the same than in 2019 and it works just fine. It is not on par with my Saints but it is good enough to not bother replacing them.
  • 1 0
 Some one sticky this post.
  • 6 0
 I got this bike as my very first fs bike and rode it for about a month.

Cons:
Shitty brakes...usable but annoying. I'm gonna see if I can get used to it after half a year.
Heavy ass wheelset....super burly though. I am keeping it as a spare even though I ordered a lighter wheelset.
Chain drops easily when I backpedal at low gears...maybe because of KMC chain?
The paint job looks really nice but not so durable.

Pros:
Everything else.

Even after I swap brakes, wheelset, and some other parts by my personal preference, the overall cost will be still about the same as the price of comparable bikes, if not lower.
  • 2 0
 If the chain drops when pedaling backwards you likely have an issue with your chain line. You may need a different offset front chainring
  • 2 0
 As for brakes if you have (or a budy) some spare shimano levers then do the lever swap and see if it fix it. Would be a cheap enough fix.
For the wheels there is no way around it but finding a bike with light and strong wheelset is usually 2k€ more expensive than this bike while you can build your own and do the swap for 5/600€. And still have a spare wheelset to sell or keep for bike park, mud tires or whatever.
  • 1 0
 @Balgaroth: Wow, can you tell me which lever you used for that? I am interested trying it!

For the wheels, I found even 4k dollars bikes often have a mediocre stock wheelsets. So I went down the path you just said lol.
  • 1 0
 @Donikimi: I got decent results with Shimano XT back in 2019, I'd say the never levers are even better.
  • 1 0
 I would try a Shimano chain. You're not only one with that issue using a KMC chain.
  • 1 0
 I noticed this about the paint too, RideWrapped the thing in clear but, thats Aluminum frames for ya. You really feel the brakes are shit? I was skeptical of them because Tektro but... I can't fault them for trail TBH... anything burlier ya for sure.
  • 1 0
 I had the same issue on my siskiu n7. It was fixed by setting the b screw in the proper position. There's a line on the derailleur that you want to lone up with the largest cog. It totally worked for me. I did also switch the chain to an XT and it runs smoother with less cogging
  • 8 0
 looks like a jeffsy.
  • 2 0
 Or a salsa, or a calibre.
  • 1 0
 @rifu: does polygon make salsa too? Calibre is made in Polygon's factory.
  • 2 0
 @rtiEDGE: not that I know of. Aside from alloy, the new Blackthorn which has similar lines with Siskiu is also made from carbon. Last time I checked, Polygon's Sidoarjo factory doesn't have carbon frame manufacturing capability (yet).

Yes, Calibre is made in Sidoarjo. Polygon even released special edition Vanders which I think are canceled and then rebadged Sentry and Bossnut. Other well known brands is/was also manufactured in Sidoarjo, such as M****, S******, K***.
  • 3 0
 Just remembered, Specialized Status also has similar lines. Status and Jeffsy both even use Horst link. Polygon Siskiu is a linkage driven single pivot, while Salsa Blackthorn uses Dave Weagle's Split Pivot.
  • 3 0
 It is interesting to read about changes in reviewed suspension behavior between 2021 model vs 2018 one. On first glance, it looks the same. Was it simply because of the larger volume air can or some minute changes on pivot locations and/or linkage length? I own the 2021 T7 model, but haven't had more time riding it to really compare the suspension behavior to the 2018 T7 one (which I already sold).

Geometry wise, even though the reach has grown by a whooping 30 mm on paper (size large, citing geometry chart from Polygon's website), on-trail handling feel between both of them are quite similar that one run is all it took for me to adapt to the new one. Some first time 29er siskiu user will find it a bit too large/cumbersome though.

2018 version reviewed by RC m.pinkbike.com/news/review-polygon-siskiu-t8.html
2018 geo chart www.polygonbikes.com/id/sepeda/sepeda-gunung/siskiu-t7/#tab-geometry
2021 geo chart www.polygonbikes.com/id/sepeda/sepeda-gunung/siskiu-t7-2/#tab-geometry

On another note, I just found out from the article that Polygon also offer it in frame only for 999USD!?! The 2021 T7 frame+shock kit that I bought was priced a little less than 700USD (in like-new condition) at Indonesian local second-hand market (which almost always void the 5 year warranty). Oh well, better be sorry for buying it rather than sorry for not buying it, to quote what people said. For comparison, I sold the 2018 T7 one for a little less than 500USD.
  • 1 0
 One thing I love on the new one. Bottle cage mount! One thing I hate on the new one. Internal brake hose routing. Aargh, damn you Quinney!
  • 1 0
 It feels great, to finnaly try the new wheel size Smile
First i doubt it could rail the Tamiya wall ride, after the first run it made me smile, a big wide smile.
  • 1 0
 @zulki-fly: nice! Did you manage to buzz your rear tire on the first few drop as well?
  • 1 0
 @rifu: nope, the L size keep me centered in the bike, sort of Big Grin
  • 7 1
 Good looking, good value trail bike. Nice
  • 3 1
 Hey, those numbers look awfully close to the current gen Process 134 I ride. Fun bike - the short chainstays/long front triangle work well for someone with a longer torso for their height (I'm pretty ape-y, rather than gazelle-y). It's good spec for the money - but sounds like the suspension isn't as progressive as the 134 (I'm 230# and don't need a pedal platform lever despite running mine at 30% sag - and it's plenty poppy off little side hits).
  • 5 0
 A Hans Damp with the relatively hard blue label compound on the front???
  • 4 0
 Either stock shortages to blame, or they are actively trying to injure their customers.
  • 1 0
 Front and rear. Front slid out on me on some hardpack/decomposed granite my first ride out with the bike. Not how I wanted to start my relationship with this bike...
  • 3 0
 @chakaping: definitely stock shortages. Lower tiered T7 was inconsistently specced either with Hans Dampf or WTB Trail Boss, IIRC.

On the plus side, install a Minion 3C upfront and now you have a spare tire for the rear.
  • 1 0
 @rtiEDGE: Ditto. Swapped out to an Assagi in the front and a SS Minion on the back. Bangin setup! Get over the front more too, these things ride like a Wilson.
  • 2 0
 Look closely at those brakes - possibly 180mm rotors with 185mm adapters. See the wear line on the rotors, sitting a bit high and pads aren't making full contact. Can't be sure from sneaking a look at a vid, but hmmmm.
  • 3 0
 All sizes get 425mm chainstays...chainstay length: 430mm. At least M.L. finally looks comfortable on a test bike. Oh, it's a Medium
  • 1 0
 I ordered one of these back in January and just got it. FANTASTIC bike! Not sure what they mean by its no speed demon, it goes like a raped ape. Tires suck for PNW tho and the bars are weird. Lockout on the back is so stiff its like a hard tail and able to get 5K vert a day no problem. I'm coming from a Devinci Spartan RC XL and while I wouldn't hit Dirt Merch with it, its bang on for BlackRock/Duthie/Spokane riding.
  • 1 0
 I have a size large 29er pre-ordered. I'm 28 yrs old and it'll be my first new bike purchase after years of riding hand-me-downs. I think it'll be quite a step up from my current bike, a Haro X6 from '06 or '07. Ordered April 9th, estimated ship date June 16th.
  • 5 1
 I'm loving the colors on that frame
  • 1 0
 I was in the market for one not long ago but ultimately didnt get it because there seems to be no dealer anywhere near me. Settled for a cannondale habit 3 instead and so far im not regretting it!
  • 3 1
 With the advent of Deore and SLX 12 speed, there are some pretty nice bikes to be had-eventually.
  • 1 1
 Interesting, 21/23 PSI seems kind of low. I typically run around 25/30 PSI on my 29er Enduro and on my 27.5 Demo 8 and don't feel like I'd want to risk going lower than that and raise the chances of flats out on the trails.
  • 1 0
 While it is certainly good bike, and website provide awesome and fast shipping, can’t complain about anything except of out of stock products
  • 4 1
 seems like a deal!
  • 3 1
 I love my 2018 T8. Upgrade the brakes and let'r rip!
  • 4 1
 And....out of stock
  • 1 0
 awowkwkwkw
  • 2 2
 It's a good review on a bike that's completely out of stock everywhere. Hell all of the entry level bikes are out of stock, and it seems to be getting worse.
  • 8 0
 If we forced media to only review bikes that were actually available to buy, well, we wouldn't be reading many bike reviews. If any.
  • 1 0
 You can pre order a large frame at www.bikesonline.com in the US
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: I was disappointed that they are already sold out in the size my wife needs, but sadly not surprised. My local shop still has some high end bikes, but nothing in the beginner level. Looks I'm waiting till either the fall or or beginning of next year.
  • 1 0
 @retrofred: Give the bikesonline customer service folks a call to see when they're getting new stock. They told me a couple of weeks ago that the mediums will ship June 24th so I pulled the trigger and preordered.
  • 1 0
 @retrofred: my wife ended up buying literally, the only bike in town, her size, spec’d real nice because yeah, it was the only bike in town. Went over budget but she doesn’t think about it when she’s enjoying a new bike. Might just want to pull the trigger. Or wait and cross your fingers later. This is just the state of.....well, everything now.
  • 1 0
 Looks like this is not too dissimilar to the marin in terms of single pivot and price also. Comparison??
  • 1 0
 They ship in a month and a half instead of next year! Hell, I’m considering buying one as an investment bike!
  • 2 0
 $2400 gets you chromag wide angle Fox factory 34 and parts.
  • 1 0
 "Fools you into thinking it's pricier" because of the faux-carbon sticker on the downtube???
  • 1 0
 Finally! An honest, measured review, free of ego and hyperbole - this is great writing! More of this, please PB.
  • 3 2
 Is there any way it can fool your SO into thinking it's cheaper?
  • 4 0
 Just find it in a color that's a similar color as a bike you own. Worked for my boss. I'm pretty sure he's still married.
  • 6 1
 @DaFreerider44: yea I could buy multiple bikes and my wife would probably never tell as long as they were all the same colour
  • 2 0
 @DaFreerider44: that’s why all my bikes are black!
  • 1 0
 @DaFreerider44: Also, you can buy the lowest spec on a nice frame and upgrade the components...
  • 1 0
 I would assume the pricing is actually because of exchange rates?
  • 2 2
 Damn, nice job Polygon! If that weight could be brought down to 30lbs I’d be all about it!
  • 6 0
 Then it would be an $8000 carbon bike.
  • 1 0
 That's for the XL. I have one right here. Throw some DT Hoops on it, make it tubeless and carbon bars, drops the XL to 30lbs.
  • 1 0
 They spelled Siskiyou wrong...
  • 1 0
 Linkage-driven single-pivot? Is that he same what used to be faux-bar?
  • 2 1
 My thumb will get oh so sore from flipping that climbing switch...
  • 1 0
 can you only review bikes that are in stock? lol
  • 1 0
 I couldn't tell from the review, is more dogs worse or better?
  • 1 0
 Where is the leverage ratio?
  • 1 4
 So it's a "rebadged" Specialized Camber for slightly less money. Whoop-dee-do!
  • 1 0
 its not rebadged boss its a completely different frame
  • 1 0
 @mrman123: Yes I understand that, but it LOOKS like it could just be a rebadged Specialized Camber. If you ask me, they reinvented the wheel here, so to speak.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2021. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv42 0.023935
Mobile Version of Website