Field Trip: Ripley vs Trance X vs Siskiu vs Marshall vs Rift Zone - Value Full-Suspension Roundtable

May 12, 2021
by Sarah Moore  

PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

Value Full-Suspension Round Table



The five bikes that ended up in full-suspension category of our latest Value Bikes Field Trip had between 120 and 135mm of rear travel and cost between $2,300 and $3,000 USD, but were very different bikes out on the trail.

The Devinci Marshall was the least expensive full-suspension bike on test at $2,369 USD and is a great choice for someone who wants an aluminum full suspension bike that won’t break the bank but that’s still capable enough to get you into some rougher terrain. The Marshall's efficient pedalling platform won't hold you back on the climbs and the frame has excellent geometry so it’s a great option for someone who wants to buy a less expensive bike and then slowly upgrade parts as you go along.

The $2,369 USD Polygon Siskiu T8 is probably the best looking bike on test, but this isn’t a beauty pageant. Rather than being a speedy trail bike, the Polygon offers a more forgiving, active ride that’s best suited to rough ground and riders who aren’t looking to add KOMs to their trophy case on every ride. It’s got tons of traction on the climbs, but you won't be winning any uphill contests. It does however make an excellent an all-rounder for someone that loves rough terrain. The Siskiu T8 was the most capable on the fast, rough descent on our test lap, and felt incredibly solid.

Right in the middle of the pack is the $2,500 USD Giant Trance X. It's best suited to someone who values traction and forgiveness over efficiency and all out speed and who doesn’t mind reaching for the pedal assist switch when they're heading uphill. It's a good option for a rider who faces rough, rocky terrain that can beat you up over a long day in the saddle.

The Marin Rift Zone 3 retails for $2,849 USD and, while its roots are in XC and it feels quick and poppy, it's more capable than a traditional XC bike. When you get into rolling terrain and have a series of short climbs followed by short descents, you can really pump into the downhill and accelerate up the next climb. It's not the best bike of the bunch for rough terrain, but if you don't have rough terrain, you're going to be riding a whole lot faster on the Rift Zone than on a more active bike that prioritizes absorbing all of the chatter in the trail over quickness.

The most expensive bike on test, the $2,999 USD Ibis Ripley AF was the most enjoyable bike to climb, feeling like a value-minded rocket ship when you point it uphill. It was no slouch on the descents either. The Ripley AF isn’t the kind of bike that you go straight through the rocks and chunder with. Instead, it's a bike that comes into its own if you ride it with precision. It only has 120mm of travel and in no way does it feel like more than that, but it offers a good mix of suppleness, support, and enough ramp-up for most riders on the descents. It makes a great partner for a rider who wants to cover a lot of ground, possibly while pedalling hard, and have a hoot on the way back down. What more do you want from your trail bike?

That's it for the video reviews, but stay tuned for the Impossible Climb, the Efficiency Test and, of course, the Huck to Flat.


Devinci Marshall
• Travel: 130mm (rear) / 140mm (fork)
• Wheel size: 27.5" (XS-S) / 29" (M-XL)
• Frame construction: aluminum
• Head angle: 66.5 degrees
• Chainstay length: 435mm
• Reach: 460mm (medium)
• Sizes: XS-XL
• Weight: 34.8 lbs / 15.8 kg
• Price: $2,299 USD
• More info: www.devinci.com
Polygon Siskiu T8
• Travel: 135mm (rear) 140mm (fork)
• Wheel size: 27.5" & 29"
• Frame construction: aluminum
• Head angle: 65.5 degrees
• Chainstay length: 430mm
• Reach: 460mm (medium, 29)
• Sizes: S-XL
• Weight: 34.3 lb / 15.5 kg
• Price: $2,369 USD
• More info: www.polygonbikes.com

Giant Trance X
• Travel: 135mm (rear) / 150mm (fork)
• Wheel size: 29"
• Frame construction: aluminum
• Head angle: 65.5 degrees (Low) / 66.2 degrees (High)
• Chainstay length: 438mm (L) / 435mm (H)
• Reach: 456mm (L) / 464mm (H)
• Sizes: S-XL
• Weight: 33.1 lbs / 15.1 kg
• Price: $2,500USD
• More info: www.giant-bicycles.com
Marin Rift Zone 3
• Travel: 125mm (rear) / 130mm (fork)
• Wheel size: 29"
• Frame construction: aluminum
• Head angle: 65.5 degrees
• Chainstay length: 425mm
• Reach: 455mm (medium)
• Sizes: S-XL
• Weight: 33.3 lbs / 15.1 kg
• Price: $2,849 USD
• More info: www.marinbikes.com

Ibis Ripley AF
• Travel: 120mm (rear) / 130mm (fork)
• Wheel size: 29"
• Frame construction: aluminum
• Head angle: 65.5 degrees
• Chainstay length: 432mm
• Reach: 475mm (large)
• Sizes: S-XL
• Weight: 32.6lb / 14.8kg
• Price: $2,999 USD
• More info: www.ibiscycles.com

Which of these five bikes would you most like to try?








The 2021 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible with support from Toyota.




Author Info:
sarahmoore avatar

Member since Mar 30, 2011
1,339 articles

178 Comments
  • 153 3
 I don't care which bike is better, I care about which one is in stock.
  • 23 1
 Polygon's are about to ship out May 30 - June 16th I think. By far the best value for a sweet bike here too and one of the cheapest.
  • 14 1
 None of them. None of them are in stock.
  • 4 0
 Stock may be limited even longer. Reportedly, there is a shortage of aluminum among many other things right now.
  • 2 0
 As you said, at this point, it doesn't really matter which bike offers the most value, but the one that is available in a reasonable time.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: mine's about to arrive !!
  • 96 7
 Sleep with the Siskiu, Marry the Marshall and Kill the Trance
  • 1 1
 that makes too much sens loll
  • 11 3
 Have you seen the Ibis Ripley in the Pond Scum Green? I don't care what it costs over the others, that's a beautiful bike. www.ibiscycles.com/bikes/ripley-af
  • 1 0
 @SATN-XC: I agree.
  • 72 10
 The Ibis is the first choice in that group even if it has Shimano brakes that the people of Pinkbike can't get to work.
  • 71 53
 My SLX brakes levers wander like my ex girlfriend and the pads sound like dying raccoon when they are wet. Yeah, must be the people at Pinkbike's fault...
  • 46 0
 @Dtwillow: You can't have a variable bite point if you never release your brakes. Just drag them all the time, problem solved.
  • 89 0
 @Dtwillow: Hopefully your ex has a variable bite point, too.
  • 7 1
 @kcy4130: Do people not drag the brakes all the time already? I thought that was how you were supposed to ride. Braking makes you faster after all according to youtube.
  • 45 0
 @AFunFox: No - ideal technique is to come in as fast as you can ride, then panic brake 2 feet before the apex, then make up for it by blowing yourself up pedaling out of the corner from zero.
  • 8 0
 @scvkurt03: Ohhhhh that must be how all the strava addicts get their KOMs.
  • 18 0
 @Dtwillow: maybe she couldn't get along with your seat tube angle?
  • 26 0
 @bishopsmike: Apparently head angle was too slack.... Smile
  • 2 1
 @Dtwillow: you win the internet. Just hope people can get a visual image when they read your comment. It's deserving of the podium spot!!!
  • 2 0
 @Dtwillow: The brakes on the $3200 Ripley AF are just "deore" whereas the SLX model is $4100.
Are the cheaper brakes the same or worse?
  • 25 0
 It's funny that Levy and Sarah keep complaining that the brakes are not powerful enough and would benefit from upgrading to metallic pads/rotors. All the while they never acknowledge that the Devinci already has metallic compatible rotors and brakes. All you need to do is swap the pads for the D02S pads which do cost about 30 bucks.

Seems a bit unfair to constantly complain about an issue and not give credit when someone provides an easy solution to the problem.
  • 7 1
 @J-Sheridan: not sure power was the issue in the FS tests (though it was discussed in the HT tests), I think their issue was simply bite points. Sure, they can likely be addressed by a proper break bleed/flush, but I think Levy's point was that for someone spending 3k on a bike (which is likely their upper price limit...and what that person would consider a very nice bike), the bike shouldn't have to go immediately back to the LBS for a bleed/flush when coming right out of the box. I personally don't think its an issue (I have it in my XT brakes) but I get his point. Its not so much a knock on the quality of the product, its a knock on the assembly process.
  • 3 2
 Google "M8100 brake test" - it's not only pink bike having this problem.
  • 26 8
 @J-Sheridan: No, I disagree. The bikes should come with metallic brake pads and just work as soon as you buy them. The Marshall might have been closer to being good to go, but it still needs to be upgraded to get the most out of the brakes.
  • 6 2
 @Dtwillow: I get how the bite point thing could bug people (it has never bothered me much on my last three sets of shimano brakes - though it has been present in all cases), but the noise issue is a new one to me. Out of all the brakes I've used and my riding buddies have used, the Shimanos have always been the quietest. I'm not saying they're completely silent, but when I think of noise, I think of wet maguras or Srams in any condition. Though to be clear, I'm not trying to suggest those brakes suck either. They just tend to make a bit more noise in my experience.
  • 26 4
 @Dlakusta - The bike itself is great, despite the wandering bite points. And no, it's not just us and not just these bikes. It's almost like I've ridden dozens and dozens of bikes over the last few years, if not more, that have all had this issue... but hey, I guess we shouldn't mention it?
  • 1 0
 @scvkurt03: I wrote the book on that. Please send your royalty fees asap.
  • 4 1
 @Dtwillow: I have the SLX, no problem at all, best brakes i have had in awhile and my other bike has HOPEs.
  • 10 2
 @big-red: Your last three sets of Shimano brakes had wandering bite points?! Crazy.
  • 3 4
 @big-red: shimano rotors never stfu. Every icetech rotor ive used gives that big loud honking noise at slow speeds even when dry and broken in correctly. i don't understand how everyone thinks sram is louder. Sram brakes always just make that sloshy noise when braking. once they're broken in theyre pretty dang quiet
  • 8 0
 @mikelevy: Keep mentioning it, and hammering on Shimano to work on rectifying if there's a problem.
  • 27 0
 @J-Sheridan: Glad some people are noticing the work behind spec choice to facilitate further improvement if needed without breaking the bank. Thanks for sharing!
  • 21 3
 @mikelevy: Hey Mike, no that's fine if you mention it as it is repeated in many reviews done on this website. It's just many normal mortals don't have a problem with shimano bite points and they work just fine. If you guys repeated every time guides are reviewed that they feel spongy and lack power it would also be a valid point.
  • 4 0
 @mikelevy: I can't believe this is still an issue, I had the previous gen XTs and they were terrible.

I think the issue is the modulation changes with the bite point so you have no idea what effort to put in each time you apply the brakes, and that gets in your head. I just never fully trusted the brakes and I found it hard to let go and ride fast.
  • 2 0
 On the first or second ride on a new bike (deore) I had wandering bite point a couple times then it went away and hasn't returned (going on 6 months). Has this happened to anyone else?
  • 3 1
 @cyclesdevinci: How much more do the semi metallic pads cost to spec from the supplier? Personally, I can wear through resin pads in 2 weeks riding here on the wet coast, so factoring in $60-80 for new pads IS a medium deal (not quite a big deal). If a salesperson pointed out that a bike is spec'ed with metallic pads, that is a HUGE selling factor if I know what I'm talking about, and if I'm new to the sport, it means I don't have to come back to the shop and have them replace the pads at a fairly high expense with probable downtime. (FWIW, I rode my Devinci to work today, as I have for the past 17 years, so I love the bikes, so not hatin', just curious.)
  • 6 0
 @mikelevy: The organic pads work fine for me here in Ontario and last at least 1 season riding maybe 50-80 km a week, April -Nov. Plenty of power, not too loud, fairly consistent. I've only bought a few bikes in my life, but do high-end bikes or some manufactures come with metallic pads preinstalled?

I have missed your presence on a few of the podcasts this spring and am glad you are back Mike. You and Timmy Ho's make my commute home on Fridays the best drive of the week!!! When you host the show its always entertaining. I REALLY enjoyed the value bike field trip series the past 2 years and your efforts are a big part of that Levy. Your technical knowledge delivered in a non-pretentious, approachable manner are appreciated by myself and many more.
  • 1 0
 @Dtwillow: your girlfriend has pads? no wonder she can't walk
  • 1 0
 @cyclesdevinci: I am really enjoying my Marshall so far this season and appreciate the care that has gone into the frame and spec choices. For the price, I feel like I got more than I paid for, so thanks!

In the few dealings I have had with Devinci staff I have always been impressed. In fact I spoke to Samuel (via phone and email) at your headquarters this week about a spare derailleur hanger and he was super helpful. Only issue is there is no dealer for about 60 km from where I live in Barrie ON. You need a central Ontario dealer.
  • 2 0
 @Dlakusta: consistency of operation ALWAYS trumps performance. Imagine a bike where the head tube angle kept changing drastically and unpredictably as you rode... it would be worth mentioning because it is way worse than a bike that simply was too steep (as an example). For the record I have XT's that work flawlessly.
  • 7 1
 @Dtwillow: 4 bikes in the garage, all full Shimano, 0 problem.
  • 6 0
 @J-Sheridan: Thanks for the kind words! Stoked you're into them Smile
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: metallic pads need warming up to work optimally. If you're in a relatively flat area or ride easier trails, organic or semi-metallic pads might be better. Most people that ride more vertical and technical trails immediately jump to 160mm+ enduro bikes these days. I therefore understand the choice of organic pads. Also, Shimano metallic pads have the 'lose power after sitting unused for a couple of weeks' problem for a lot of people.
But not getting what the big deal is. Organic pads are easily worn down and cheaply replaced when riding trails that necessitate metallic pads.
  • 3 0
 @AFunFox: no, you just keep riding the same segment over and over, until strava barfs out some anomalous result! I mean, OF COURSE you averaged 78.9mph over that .5mi segment of rough af single track!!!!!11!
  • 1 0
 @timeOday: i have both . i can’t tell any difference. even my xts 8120s feeel the same , there all good compared to sram .
  • 1 0
 @J-Sheridan: Total Sports in Midland (a bit of a drive from Barrie) carries Devinci.
  • 2 1
 I had a problem with wandering bite point. Then I heard the JRA podcast talking about this. I think it was Andrea talking about how important it is to get the torque right on the connection bolt. An open torque wrench is not what most people have, so I understand the problem. But since I got the torque right, the brake is perfect. You wouldn't think a small thing like that makes such a weird problem. But I think in most cases it's this! Thanks JRA!
  • 1 0
 @SpecializedFTW: Thanks for the head's up on a shop. That's almost exactly 60km away and still likely the closest Devinci dealer to me.
  • 1 0
 @conoat: Did you not see my strava yesterday? I warm up at 80mph jeez catch up homie Big Grin
  • 32 0
 Big thank you to PB for putting this all together. Some of these may be impossible to find right now due to supply issues but its nice to know what is out there and that you could theoretically get a very capable trail bike in the $2,300-$3,100 range without the need to drop $7k-$10k. [I say this coming from an XC/Hardtail background after purchasing my first FS bike in January 2020].
  • 10 58
flag DoubleCrownAddict (May 12, 2021 at 8:23) (Below Threshold)
 A comparison test like this for e bikes is long overdue.
  • 5 1
 @DoubleCrownAddict: I think it isn't possible anymore, I bought a well specced ebike for 4k in 2018, sameish model is now 6k with worse components. There basically arn't any decent value ebikes any longer.
  • 16 4
 @DoubleCrownAddict:
They call it Pink Bike, not Pink ebike....
  • 1 0
 @DoubleCrownAddict: hm, www.youtube.com/watch?v=mB2-QJXAenk&t=1130s
and you can also find the individual reviews on their channel as well
  • 3 0
 @Lemmyschild: pinky bike
  • 4 0
 @Lemmyschild: I believe those reviews are up over on pinkmoped.com...
  • 2 3
 So stoked to shred my “theoretical” trail bike on my local “theoretical” single track. So “theoretically” stoked. Throwing “theoretical” shakas. \m/

How about adapting content to new realities, not just replicating old templates in a new paradigm. How about a PB Blue Light Special kind review on stuff that’s in stock. Get it while you can. On scene correspondents. That would be fun. Like Black Friday brawls but only gnarlier
  • 14 0
 I'm not gonna look it up, but in this category, I'd be interested in: warranty.

I mean, if I'm buying a ~$2500 bike, I'm probably not the rider who gets a new bike every year or two. If I'm keeping it for 5+ years, warranty might actually matter...unless they all have lifetime...then it doesn't matter.
  • 11 0
 Ibis is 7 years on the frame.
  • 3 0
 good point...may come down to which one your local bike ship carries. Easier to push your LBS on warranty issues than having to call/email a rep. that's on the other side of the world.
  • 2 0
 @mammal: and lifetime on the bottom bushings, they got that wrong.
  • 4 0
 Giant has a lifetime warranty on the frame.
  • 4 2
 @Grealdo: You'll need it. Have had two friends that love Giants and they have 3 broken frames between the two of them. 2017 & 2018 Trance and 2018 Defy.
  • 5 0
 @Dlakusta: Both the Lower Link bushings and the Clevis Bushings (as well as the O-rings) are covered for life.

"Ibis will replace your worn cle­vis or low­er piv­ot bush­ings free of charge to the orig­i­nal own­er for the life of the prod­uct. Bush­ings and o-rings are cov­ered under this war­ran­ty."
  • 15 0
 carried Marin at the last shop I was at. Covid might have changed things but their warranty program was....shocking to say the least. Guy came in with a frame, second hand owner mind you, that he had clearly snapped from casing his jump into a trash compacter or something bc the bike was destroyed. Marin sent him a new frame. Like immediately. I still have mad respect for their rider support.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: that's good on them, as they at least acknowledge the fact that the clevis is the weak link(not sorry) in the design. Any clevis driven bike has this issue. I rode a Pivot that ate clevis bearings and shock bushings like nobody's business. at ~$40 ever 4-5mo. it gets old...
  • 1 0
 @zarban: I rode my 2007 Reign until 2013, then rode my 2013 Trance Advanced until 2020. Both bikes saw plenty of riding in that time. Aside from regular shock bushing replacement being needed on the Reign, I never had a single problem with either bike. Replaced the pivot bearings once on the trance after more than 6 years of riding it - my main riding buddy needed four full pivot bearing replacements on his SC Tallboy within the same period despite buying his bike 6 months later.
  • 1 0
 @zarban: Worked for Giant for 5 years. Something doesn't sound quite right there....
  • 16 0
 I came away disappointed; there was no round table in this round table discussion, whatsoever.
  • 2 3
 I'm not sure an ultimate winner was the point of the Field Tests. They tested bikes, gave their opinion on feel, geo, components, capabilities and its up to the commentators/readers (like us) to decide what is best based on what you actually ride/need.
  • 2 2
 nm...just watched the video, they did give an overall winner and an all around winner.
  • 5 0
 Totally agree! Couldn't find anything round other than the wheels.
  • 5 0
 @woofer2609 - It worked out that way this time around, but it's not always the case Smile
  • 11 0
 @SATN-XC: That is most definitely a rectangular table that they are sitting at. I have been mislead.
  • 7 0
 @woofer2609: maybe it's just so big you can't see the curvature
  • 9 0
 Round tables are on back order due to supply chain issues. Expected Summer 2022
  • 10 0
 Having Ibis on a "value bike" test is such a pleasent surprise! Seeing such a high end brand looking down towards the more common riders is truly a bold decision/statement which doesn't happen often enough in our sport. I take my hat off to them.
  • 3 0
 I have no data, but suspect Ibis’s branding gamble with the Ripmo AF and now Ripley AF have gone VERY well for them!
  • 9 0
 Since supply chain issues may be a problem for the next year and commentators say they want a similar Field Test with mid tier bikes (me included), it could be interesting to have the next Field Test based on build-outs instead of complete bikes . Select 5-8 FS frame sets and show what kind of build can be done for $5k (could include both carbon and aluminum).
  • 4 0
 Get on it Levy! That doesnt sound complicated and fraught with bs, at all.
Now....where'd I leave my flow chart and spreadsheet maker?
  • 3 0
 @Lemmyschild: I think that's part of the enjoyment from the reader's perspective. Alternatively, you could choose 1 frame and leave component choices to a vote; power train options, front suspension, etc.,p so the end product comes out around $5k.
...typing this out I'm realizing the monstrosity that would likely be created if component choices are decided by a online vote. ....probably not the best idea.
  • 2 0
 @SATN-XC: im a simple guy, I like simple stuff....i don't do well with infinite possibilities. That sounded like a nightmarish task to me. I'd like to read the results though!
  • 2 0
 @SATN-XC: I really like where you're going with this. Control wheels/tires, control suspension, control drivetrain, control cockpit. The only variance is frame/geometry/fit. Control rear shock would be kind of tough with all the sizes, but not impossible. I would dig a comparison like this so much. Many riders that have been at this for a while have a drivetrain, brake, tire, wheel, and even suspension preference, removing those factors from a test and getting pure feedback on the frame would be rad.

At the end of the day I don't really care to hear about how bad Shimano's brakes are due to a wandering bite point, I've known that since 2014 when my M615s started doing it. And it sounds like it ruined the experience of a few of these bikes for Mike and Sarah. Give the testers their specs of choice and let them rip!
  • 2 0
 @ruggedmaine: how's Maine these days?
  • 2 0
 @ruggedmaine: I think you better articulated/simplified what I was trying to get at....PB could even keep costs down by repurposing parts across frame comparisons.
  • 1 0
 @Lemmyschild: Great! Gaining lots of new trail each year in many places. And we still get all 4 seasons here so I can't complain Smile
  • 2 0
 @ruggedmaine: ha must be southern Maine. I grew up in Old Town and learned to mtb on the power lines around portland when i was at usm. 25 years in Oregon. Still like to visit Me. in the spring and fall.
  • 2 0
 @Lemmyschild: I'm in Gorham where USM is just outside of Portland. 50+ miles of trail in town here now and another 100+ in Greater Portland. Most of the powerline stuff is unused now. Sounds like we nearly overlapped...i lived in Old Town from 2000-2006 while I was at UMaine, some good stuff developing up there even near the campus and town forests. Highland MTB park in NH has really kicked things up around here IMO.
  • 2 0
 @ruggedmaine: cool, yeah I am a Huskie, from 93. Grew up in Alton, just north of Old Town. Pops was a prof and intern President at UM for a while around your time. Spent a lot of time riding a Raleigh Sports three speed from Alton to Bangor in my youth. Glad to hear its taking off back there!
  • 10 0
 This was a great field test. Looking forward to value kings category test ($3.5k — $4.5k)
  • 8 1
 @mikelevy - First off, great work covering the key differences and personalities of these bikes, along with spec highlights and lowlights.

I have an idea related to the ongoing shimano brake issues, which could both benefit riders and take some heat off of PB for mentioning an issue that many will find unacceptable...

How about bringing in a few pro mechanics to try to ‘fix’ the issue, and providing their feedback on best practices to get the most out of these brakes if that’s possible?

There are users here who claim that a ‘proper’ fresh bleed will solve the issue. Why not put that to the test? If a consistent fix can be found, a lot of riders with these brakes will thank you (and Shimano should sponsor your Tim Hortons consumption for a year at least).

If no fix can be found, you can double down on your criticisms with the backing of several well respected mechanics.
  • 5 0
 Would love to get thoughts & opinions on the Polygon Siskiu T7 vs T8. There's a $500 difference in price, and my knowledge of components is pretty limited so it's hard for me to interpret whether the extra $500 is a killer deal.
  • 5 0
 The upgraded fork and drivetrain is worth the extra $500, but you could probably end up close to the same value if you went with the t7 and did thoughtful upgrades over time. I haven't been a big fan of wtb tires either, so if you don't get along with them on the t7 then the $500 for 3 upgrades becomes a bargain. Assuming something like the Schwalbe works better for you. It's pretty rare that mid range bike doesn't offer a better value. The ibis ripley af or ripmo af deore build might be the only example I can think of. Not paying $900usd to jump up one level from deore to slx.
  • 3 0
 In USD there's only a $410 difference per their website, making it that much more of a deal to go with the T8. I agree with JayUpNorth, you would be just fine with a T7, especially if you are a newer rider/not familiar with components--you could just upgrade over time as you sort out what works well for you. But to answer the question in simple terms, yes, easily worth the price difference imo.

I don't know what the RS Recon fork rides like these days, but last I had the chance to compare the two (4 years ago) there was a big difference in ride quality moving to the Fox Rhythm. Looks like 4 piston brakes on the T8 as well. Deore vs SLX is a whisper on a stream in my opinion, but is yet another step up for the price difference. If it were me buying one, I would take the fork off as soon as I purchased it and replace it with something nicer (and sell the take-off fork as new and unused) and then I would just ride the wheels off the thing! These look like great bikes for the money.
  • 2 0
 @JayUpNorth @mikealive - I took the plunge and ordered the T8 ... now, I wait .....

I've taken down your names, in case it sucks and I need to blame someone ! Smile
  • 2 0
 @MuddyBrit: Haha, I was only following Jay's lead! Wink

That's awesome news. Hope they get it to you in a timely manner so you can get some good riding in this season. Congrats on the new bike!
  • 3 0
 @MuddyBrit: Fair enough. I'd order either model in a heartbeat if I could get it at the currency conversion. Just paid about $700usd more for 10/5mm more travel and equivalent specs. Edit. If the damn thing even shows up....
  • 10 3
 The IBIS should be removed from this comparison. Ibis raised there pricing from $2999 to $3399 for base Shimano Deore build. This Ripmo AF is no longer a budget bike.
  • 8 0
 seeing $3199 on Ibis's site for the Deore build.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I hate they did that. Hate they don’t have any in stock even more.
  • 3 0
 Now considering the epic evo. But with nothing in stock so not choosing really.
  • 7 2
 If I'm buying a 33+lb, value-oriented bike, it's going to be for it's descending/all-around performance on technical terrain. If I want a bike that feels like a "rocket ship" on the uphill and gets nervous on the downs, I'll buy a 24lb hardtail for the same price. No 33 lb bike feels like a rocket while climbing steep trails (which is perfectly acceptable in this category), so why are these superlatives being used in value bike reviews? Especially when that particular bike is $700 more than the best descending bike in this group.
  • 16 0
 The Ibis felt like a rocket on the climbs compared to the Giant and Polygon. There's a notable difference between the bikes' personalities, regardless of how much they cost, but I do agree that intended use seems to converge when you're looking at so-called value bikes.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: would the ripley with a 140 fox 36 be THE all round bike?
  • 5 0
 @ShortJeffsyOwner: I think that's the route a lot of Ripley owners take!
  • 7 0
 @ShortJeffsyOwner: an easy $30 air spring mod from Fox gets to 140mm on the stock 34. A no-brainer.
  • 3 0
 @Paleboy: the 34 is pretty noodly if you are over 170lbs or push it even medium hard. the 36 is like 100% more stout. I know, becuase I have a 140mm 34 on my chameleon and it's uninspiring when you push it down steep or chundery stuff. I am 6'2" 185. as soon as I can get my hands on a Fox or Ohlins 36, I am swapping
  • 1 0
 @ShortJeffsyOwner: I have a 140mm DVO Sapphire and DVO Topaz T3 on my Ripley V4. Much more capable on the downs once I got rid of the Fox 34 and DPS.
  • 1 0
 @FrankS29: Hmm that's interesting and not a cheap swap by any means. I've got a 140mm Fox 34 and DPS on my Trek Fuel. The 34 gets no love but overall I'm happy with it. I've always had a thing for the Ripley and not sure why people rip on it's looks.

The last gen Trance - www.pinkbike.com/photo/16064285

Now that's an ugly bike
  • 2 0
 @Paleboy: Not a cheap swap, but I really like the Ripley V4 platform and I plan on keeping it around for some time. So worth it for me.

The Sapphire swap was night and day difference over the Fox 34. I kept reading about swapping to the Grip2 damper and Luftkappe upgrades to make the 34 better. But I decided to stop throwing money at a product that should have just worked right out of the box and swapped to DVO. Setup was quick and easy with DVO suggestions being pretty much bang on.

The Topaz starts to show off when hitting drops and chunk. Really composed and amazing bottom out resistance. I also love being able to set my entire spring rate and mess with volume spacers to dial it in. Once again, DVO suggested settings were pretty bang on.

To my eyes, the Ripley is damn good looking!
  • 6 1
 I'd not have any of those, I'd take the Vitus Escarpe CR. $2700 gets you the same deore components, decent entry level suspension, AND a carbon frame.

It's not in stock, but then neither are the others.
  • 1 1
 Still 33lbs with the carbon frame. Jeez
  • 11 0
 I don't know if it's the contrarian in me, but I am a bigger fan of aluminum than carbon. Often they weigh the same, the aluminum is COMPLETELY and easily recyclable, and I'd rather spend the additional cost for the carbon frame on upgrades to the suspension or drivetrain. Mind you, I also just purchased white enamel kitchen appliances because I think stainless steel is pretentious, so take my comment with a shaker of salt.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, although prices have gone up, I'm still convinced vitus offers the ultimate affordable full suspension, and hardtail, compared to any other brand. Got a mythique VRS last February right before pinkbike did their review of it and others. Freaking $1440 since they had a sale going. Immediately sold out after the PB review and now it's going for $2k. Climbs excellently, I don't bother with lockouts, and descends even better!
  • 2 1
 @woofer2609: Who is recycling frames? People just keep selling their old bike down the line until it cracks and someone throws it in the wrong bin. Even if they put it in the recycling bin, are municipal plants equipped to recycle bike frames?
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Preach!
  • 6 0
 @cogsci: Municipal metal at the transfer station here gets sorted and recycled accordingly at the scrap yards, with a percentage going to the municipality. The number of bike frames at the transfer station is huge, I almost always see 4 or 5 there each time I go, same with scrap yards. Yes, they are getting recycled. Heck, over 80% of beverage containers here are returned for recycling (there's a deposit on all beverage containers, though.)
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Keep that shaker of salt away from your enamel kitchen appliances or they'll go rusty. Just threw out an expensive enamelled kettle that was nearly rusted through in only 3 years. SS FTW for appliances and cookware every time.
  • 5 0
 @mikelevy You rode the Orbea Occam in a previous test, but the H30 retails for 2799 which slots in nicely with these value bikes. How would you say that bike would fare in this test?
  • 8 1
 Ripley AF is on there 2 times.
  • 8 0
 Ripley AF is on there AF
  • 3 0
 Only issue with the Ripley-Ripmo costs about the same, weighs about the same, pedals about the same and has a waaaay broader performance spectrum.

If you live where the trails aren’t burly, I get that a big bike might be overkill, but anywhere there are big descents with drops, gaps, rock gardens etc. the Ripmo would be the best “budget” bike.......if/when it’s available.
  • 7 1
 Wait so what makes the Ripley a "precision weapon" and the Marin a glorified XC bike?
  • 2 0
 I think it might have been their polite way of saying they didn't like the Marin but didn't really want to bad mouth it. Just my thought.
  • 4 0
 That Polygon appears to have Shimano "resin only" rotors with the Tektro Orion's. Seems like a different rotor or resin pads would fix the issue?
  • 3 0
 Yup, different rotors and pads would do it.
  • 5 0
 love these kinds of shoot out reviews, thanks PB!
  • 2 0
 Any word on how this year's top picks compare with last year's? The Mythique seemed like a well rounded bike with no obvious shortcomings, and is still made at the low end of the price range.
  • 1 0
 Also worth knowing is the warranty on the frames:
Polygon = 10y
Ibis = 7y
Giant = 10y?? Not sure though, their site is not very clear
Marin = ?? The word warranty does not show up on their site.....
Devinci = Lifetime

Overall pretty good imo. However you'll only know how good when you need to make use of it......
  • 5 1
 Status 140 or 160 for the win. C'mon PB. #statusmtb
  • 1 0
 This isn't meant as a critique of Pinkbike, but it's super frustrating that availability of bikes affects the reviews to this extent, and that the reviews come out so long after the bikes have sold out.
  • 5 2
 Has anybody notices the lack of Waki comments recently?
  • 7 1
 Shhhh... Let sleeping dogs lie
  • 4 0
 Waki's return was like white dog poop from the 70's.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=3IjTtmcXyDs
  • 2 1
 @kcy4130
People who appreciate Silverman will not appreciate Waki.
And vice versa...
  • 2 1
 @IntoTheEverflow: IDK, I can see the value in both.
  • 1 1
 @IntoTheEverflow: I appreciate both...
  • 3 0
 I thought I missed Waki, until he returned.
  • 2 2
 Whatever you think of Waki, the constant downvoting on every single post he made, even when they were completely rational and reasonable, was totally lame. That sort of bullying drives people to self harm, and I for one was disappointed never to see the mods call out the frequent offenders. Yeah, he posted a lot of crazy stuff and did his fair share of trolling, but a lot of good stuff as well.
  • 2 0
 If I'm not mistaken, the Siskiu is the same frame as the Calibre Bossnut from the previous value field test
  • 6 0
 Nope, different frame but similar basic suspension layout Smile
  • 5 0
 It's the Polygon's limited edition vander T7 that has the similarish frame to the bossnut (probably because they're made in the same factory) and the suspension design on both (vander and bossnut) is an open sourced design. Siskiu's suspension layout is similar but seems to be Polygon's own recipe
  • 5 0
 @ShortJeffsyOwner: (older) Siskiu D is even more similar to Bossnut. www.polygonbikes.com/id/sepeda/sepeda-gunung/siskiu-d7-3

@Thebluelion: IMO, they are not only similar, but actually the same. I might be wrong, but I think the limited Vander series are actually Bossnut and Sentry frames which are already ordered but then canceled by Calibre. The frames are then rebadged into Polygon Vanders.
  • 4 2
 The Marshall is now $2,599. Third most expensive with worst fork.
  • 1 0
 Still $2,299 with SX drivetrain and SRAM brakes
  • 1 0
 @imnotdanny: not the bike they tested though.
  • 3 0
 @imnotdanny: Take my $300.00!
  • 2 0
 @vapidoscar: yeah I'm guessing that Devinci raised the price while PB was testing it
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: a worthy upgrade for sure, shimano > sram
  • 4 0
 These reviews and others recently really highlight some of the problems with SRAM/RockShox low end offerings. The SX and even NX drive-trains leave a lot to be desired and I think when SRAM had the wide range 12sp eagle monopoly it enabled these sub-par components to proliferate but now they are just unacceptable.

Similarly the low end rockshox dampers including turnkey, motion control, and even charger 1 are sub par performing compared to fox grip rhythm/marzocchi z1/z2 forks as well as offerings from many other companies. With a charger1 or grip fork on the devinci even at 3-400$ increase from 2599 I suspect the bike would have been much higher in the review.

I wonder if covid parts availability played a factor in the low end fork spec on this bike as many suspension components are some of the most negatively impacted in terms of availability.
  • 3 0
 @imnotdanny: Yup, we had a few price changes mid-review.
  • 2 0
 Third cheapest too
  • 1 0
 really good test guys. exited to see a diverse range of trail and all mountain bikes that aren’t crazy expensive!
  • 2 0
 Let my Ibis do the job (face plant). #FF120
  • 2 1
 Wish you guys would have tested the alloy Stumpjumper EVO for $2400. Wonder where it would have landed.
  • 1 0
 nice reviews! would love to see a bike comparison on more mid tier bikes too.
  • 1 0
 About stock or not ... when Europe and the Americas come back to build things themselves it will always be too late!
  • 1 0
 How can Devinci hand-make a frame in Canada, and still produce a less expensive bike than the others?
  • 1 0
 I love that Ibis Ripley AF bike. it can ride most types of terrain. I'll ride it someday.
  • 1 0
 you could buy literally all of these for the price of that big S ebike, give them away and have a gang to ride with
  • 1 0
 FYI The Devinci video is missing, you linked the Ripley twice
  • 1 0
 Got the Ibis video in there twice guys instead of the Devinci
  • 1 0
 nevermind, fixed it already,
  • 2 1
 There should be a Whyte T140 in this test. These Frames look all the same.
  • 1 0
 Rotors for resin pads.? Is that a thing? I thought rotors were rotors
  • 1 0
 They exist but they're meant to go on hybrids not MTBs...

They're made from a lower grade of steel that wears out more quickly with metallic pads. They still work though.
  • 1 0
 @boozed: I got some cheap and put them on my commuter - what could go wrong using them with metal pads, I thought?

Until I wore those pads out, I never needed a bell, wet or dry they would screech like a freight train slamming on the emergency brake even with a light pull on the lever!
  • 2 1
 I just wanna let my Ibis do the job
  • 1 4
 A GT Sensor Comp woulda wiped the floor with all these bikes.............
  • 2 1
 Ew gt sucks in my opinion, their hard tails have terrible geo
Below threshold threads are hidden







Copyright © 2000 - 2024. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.054683
Mobile Version of Website