Field Trip: YT's $2,299 Jeffsy Base 29 - A Value Packed All-Rounder

Apr 11, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  


PINKBIKE FIELD TEST

YT Jeffsy Base 29



Words by Mike Kazimer, photography by Anthony Smith



YT's base model, aluminum-framed Jeffsy received an update earlier this year, and it now has the same geometry as its more expensive carbon siblings, as well as an updated frame shape. From a distance, and even up close, there's nothing about this bike that scream 'budget' – it has the appearance of a much more expensive machine.

The 29” version we tested has 150mm of rear travel that's paired with a 150mm fork, which gives it a 66-degree head angle. There is a flip chip that can be used to steepen that number by half a degree, but I'd imagine the vast majority of riders will stick it in that low setting and call it good. Other key geometry numbers include a 77-degree seat tube angle, a 470mm reach for a size large, and 435mm chainstays (the XL and XXL models have 440mm chainstays.

YT Jeffsy Base 29 Details

• Travel: 150mm rear / 150mm fork
• Aluminum frame
• Wheel size: 29" (27.5" model available)
• Head Angle: 66° (geometry)
• Seat Tube Angle: 77°
• Reach: 480mm (L)
• Chainstay length: 435mm (size L)
• Sizes: S, M, L (tested), XL, XXL
• Weight: 34.4 lb / 15.6 kg
• Price: $2,299 USD
www.yt-industries.com

YT's consumer direct business model helps them keep their prices down, and for $2,299 the AL Base model is quite the deal. Component highlights include a RockShox Yari RC fork and a Deluxe Select shock, Guide T four-piston brakes, a SRAM SX 12-speed drivetrain, Maxxis Minion DHR II tires, and there's even a Race Face bar / stem combo with ODI lock-on grips.



YT Jeffsy AL Base review
YT Jeffsy AL Base review

Climbing

The Jeffsy hits the mark as far as how a trail bike should feel – it has a comfortable pedaling position for spinning along on those long dirt road grinds, and there's a satisfying level of zippiness to its handling on tighter, more technical singletrack. Mike Levy and I both settled on running 25% sag independently of each other – that number makes the bike sit a little higher in its travel, and provides a level of support that worked well on the climbs and descents.

At 34.4 pounds the Jeffsy Base isn't a flyweight, but it's one of those bikes that rides lighter than what the scale says. A good part of that has to do with the geometry – it's not a super long, super slack sled, and the quicker handling makes it easy to forget that it's packing a few extra pounds compared to higher end models.

YT Jeffsy AL Base review

YT Jeffsy AL Base review
YT Jeffsy AL Base review

Descending


Compared to the Santa Cruz Hightower and the Commencal Meta TR, the Jeffsy has a more nimble, lively feel to it on the trail. The geometry numbers are quite similar between those three bikes, but the Jeffsy felt most at home zigging and zagging down the trail and popping off of sandstone outcroppings whenever possible rather than bombing straight ahead.

YT have created a very balanced and versatile trail bike, and as Mike Levy said, “It handles itself well on the rough descents, it handles itself well on the tight slow descents and in the berms; it's just an overall really good, easy to live with geometry package.”

The geometry is right on target for the Jeffsy's intended purpose, and for the most part the parts selection leaves little to be desired. There were a few small gripes, though. One of them has to do with the Fidlock water bottle. While it's great that the Jeffsy can carry a bottle at all, grabbing that bottle on the fly is a challenge. It takes a well timed twist and pull, and the positioning means that you'll be hunched over and reaching pretty far down while trying to accomplish all of the necessary movements.
Timed Testing


Our timed lap for the trail bikes was around 11 minutes long and split into three distinct sectors. First, a smooth, twisty singletrack climb topped out along a technical traverse that tested the bike's slow-speed handling and traction. After that, we dropped into a fast descent that began with rough, suspension-testing corners before some fast berms, flat corners, and a few fun-sized jumps. Nothing too rowdy, but representative of the terrain these trails bikes were intended to see.

Don't forget that timing is just one of many ways to judge a bike, and fast doesn't always mean it's the best for everyone.


Mike Kazimer: "For me, the Jeffsy fell right in the middle. I got my fourth fastest time out of the eight bikes we had on test. My climbing time was 7th out of eight, and that descending time was my second fastest."

Mike Levy: "It was a little different story for me when the clock was ticking. I had my slowest loop time, my slowest downhill time, but I did have my second fastest climb time for what it's worth."

It'd also be nice if that SRAM SX shifter was Matchmaker compatible, a recurring theme on the bikes equipped with this shifter, and I personally didn't get along with the SDG saddle, but otherwise it's dialed in and ready to roll right out of the box. Speaking of boxes, the Jeffsy comes with a nice box of tools to help facilitate the build. There's a shock pump, an 8mm allen, and even a T-handle torque wrench.




YT Jeffsy AL Base review


Pros

+ Price vs. performance ratio is hard to beat
+ Neutral, easy handling works well on wide range of terrain
+ Most of the tools to build it up are included in the box

Cons

- Fidlock bottle is hard to reach while riding
- SRAM SX shifter isn't Matchmaker compatible, which makes it harder to achieve the perfect positioning.






The 2020 Pinkbike Field Test was made possible by support from: Smith, 7mesh, and Over The Edge Sedona.




Photos: Anthony Smith
Additional footage: Lear Miller



236 Comments

  • 174 0
 These value bike reviews have been just about perfect. Good job, pinkbike.
  • 81 1
 The funny thing about it that so many people exhibit Stockholm Syndrom here. People fed for years with carbon and super light stuff BS simply cannot believe that a heavy bike with simple parts may perform so well. The truth is that bike industry is currently all about marginal gains for thousands of $$.
So seeing such test from a mainstream bike media is really promising. Thank you PB.
  • 14 1
 @lkubica: Couldn't agree more. Geometry, tires, suspension quality are the main performance drivers. Many other $$$ optimizations fall victim to the law of diminishing returns when it comes to actual performance.
It's great to see value-priced options now that modern geo has become the standard.
  • 30 34
flag WAKIdesigns (Apr 11, 2020 at 11:01) (Below Threshold)
 @chrod: suspension on these things isn't top notch, wheels and tires aren't either. You don't need to buy anything carbon, just improving suspension will put you 1k back if you are shopping on second hand market. But if someone wants to really improve their bike, a fresh set of luxurious tires for 120-150$ for a pair is hard to beat. I cheap out on lots of stuff, but not on tires... when they shows first signs of wear, I replace them. Difference between a fresh DHF 3C Maxxgrip on front and 2yr old Dual compound is night and day.
  • 32 0
 @WAKIdesigns: u change your tyres on the first signs of wear!!!?
  • 15 4
 @lkubica: I think we are seeing a shift in the mtb industry as the sport grows. The obsession with weight is just a carry over from road riding. I think as time goes on, consumer tastes will shift towards reliability and durability. IMO a lot of this may be driven by more younger riders getting involved, as a guy in his early twenties such as myself can't afford to replace ripped tires and tacoed rims all the time.
  • 21 11
 @Smokey79: as soon as I see the inside get round, cracks at the base of the knob, I move it to the rear and get a new front tire. Last year I kept the front a bit longer than usual and changed to a new one and difference was evident. I buy used forks, wheels, seat posts, but I won't ride worn tires on my Enduro rig.
  • 6 10
flag Marius22 (Apr 11, 2020 at 11:28) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: dual comp last much longer, grip is more than enough (for non professionals).
  • 28 12
 @4thflowkage: it doesn't matter how old you are, what the state of your wallet is. Staying away from carbon always makes sense. But you can also overpay by paying too little. There is zero point in getting NX instead of GX components or Deore rear mech instead of XT. Same with shifter. Cassette, makes little sense to invest in anything above Deore. Many cheap components are getting worn out quickly so you are not saving much. So what DT ex471 rim costs 65€ and one can buy some WTB piece of crap for 35? DT will outlast it many times. some cheap components like Deore brakes, are pretty much as good as top tiers, but some like NX derailleur are not worth even half of what they cost.
  • 17 8
 @Marius22: dal compound - have it on the rear for most of the time. But for the ront, treat yourself. Get maxx grip. it is hard to find another thing on the bike that matters so much.
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Agree... Going for the top shelf on front tires is the most difference you can make for your bike's performance (best bang4buck). And, FWIW, I notice the ride quality drop the second the outer knobs get their corners worn off. I've tended to ride a different rear tire but might give your approach of rotating a semi worn front to the back to get a few more miles out of them (DHF).
  • 1 7
flag RoadStain (Apr 11, 2020 at 13:27) (Below Threshold)
 @chrod: just today, on my Al Camber I had some SWorks drivers pretty upset and winded....thought it was impossoble..... ????
  • 1 0
 All in a sudden. All these new frames make Banshee the lightest aluminium bikes in the market.
  • 9 0
 @WAKIdesigns: “But you can also overpay by paying too little.”
Who tf are you? Yogi Berra?
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: This is exactly what I do, not too hard on the wallet, but you get to enjoy terrific grip on the front end.
  • 5 2
 @lkubica: more like bike tech has come so far that budget builds are now simply more capable. Budget bikes from all brands even just five years ago stunk. There is now an endless list of 2.5-3k bikes that have everything the average rider needs.

That said, anyone who is trying to say that an aluminum 35lb jeffsy in 2020 rides anywhere near as well as the carbon version with higher end components is full of crap.
  • 3 0
 @lkubica:

Interestingly the least expensive full suspension bike in test is the lightest and I suspect their overall favorite as well: the Vitus Mythique at just $1800.
  • 5 1
 @powderturns: In the sense that you spend money on NX - it breaks imminently and then you have to shell out more money for XT like you should have done in the first place.
  • 2 0
 @mtb1201: From my experience light alloy full suspension bikes are flexy. Would take that SC or Commencal any day. Used to own a trail bike with 2700g frame in a large, boy, this was a noodle. But I was happy with it back then. Then I bought a 3200g frame in large and I could make much tighter corners. BUT, but my technique in that time was simply weak. And looking back that noodle frame was not really holding me back. Still would prefer a stiffer frame now.
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: 33 lbs isn't light.

Even if does flex a bit more, 90%+ of people buying the bike will never notice.

Both reviewers were pretty adamant that the "goodly" Vitus was their bike of choice.
  • 4 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Fark that shit dude! I love my carbon! And i aint cheaping out on shit!
  • 1 3
 @jl1984: you kinda sound like a wine snob. Most only know what they are told, simply, sheeple. Plus, "better" can mean almost anything on a bike.
  • 2 0
 @Clarkeh: @powderturns: In the sense that you spend money on NX - it breaks imminently and then you have to shell out more money for XT like you should have done in the first place.

And then Microshift came out with Advent X, saving all these unfortunates from the bull shit that is SRAM NX/SX group sets. That alone would drop the weight of this bike by half a pound!
  • 4 1
 @4thflowkage: I’m afraid you might be telling yourself a bit of a story if you think lighter weight, high-end bikes and components are less durable. Sure there must be some exceptions, and I’m not convinced the gains always outweigh the cost, but you’re paying the premium for lightweight along with durability and reliability. The days of “carbon is lighter but it’s going to break” are a ways in the rear view mirror. For example I highly doubt the stock wheel set on a bike like the one reviewed here is more durable and reliable than say a set of Santa Cruz Reserve wheels.

There is clearly an exponential increase in cost versus a marginal increase in performance. But at the end of the day, if you can afford it, that marginal performance increase is there. The great thing is how far tech has trickled down such that lower-end bikes are pretty great these days. I personally find midrange (GX, maybe X01 builds) to give me a good balance of bang for the buck.
  • 1 1
 @lkubica: or a lot of people make more money than you?
  • 5 1
 @lkubica: I appreciate these tests for more affordable bikes too, but I’m curious where your data comes from about all these people who can’t believe a lower-end alloy bike can perform well? Take for example a Transition Patrol. I know the NX alloy version performs just as well as the carbon, particularly while descending. I owned one. But if you can get your hands on the carbon X01 version, you’re looking at a 5 pound difference, significantly increasing how many miles you can comfortably climb, no matter how tough your legs are.

I guess the cool thing to me is that modern high-end, lightweight bikes really do allow you to “climb like an XC bike” and “descend like a DH bike.” Yesterday I climbed 2500 feet over about 4 miles on a carbon Patrol, then descended the same. The climb was hard but tolerable and the descent was a riot. Ya, prices are pretty nuts. But bikes are so capable these days!

There will always be those willing to pay a premium for marginal gains, whether they’re racing or whatever. Nothing wrong with that. Without those people, the tech may never be developed that trickles down to affordable bikes like this. “Expensive” is relative to income, and frankly anyone who can afford anything reviewed on Pinkbike is living a privileged life. Literally none of it is a need.
  • 1 2
 @BiNARYBiKE: While none is a need, I also do understand that it is a personal choice. Simply, some other riders' finances are not my problem. More so when it comes to buying a bike. The performance gains of weight would simply only matter to someone who is racing. That is about 1% or less of total riders. Most of the budget bikes will be ridden a few times a season at best. Well, then there are the bikes that we on this site ride - for me, I can count on two hands the number of days this year that I did NOT ride a bike (oh, and trails closed? Lets quote Easy E...F the police).
  • 4 1
 @RoadStain: I agree, except the claim that the performance gains only matter to racers. Like you said, it’s personal choice, and those gains matter to anyone who wants to go their farthest and fastest and has the money to pay for them. Heck they even matter to someone who just wants to impress people at the trailhead. Those reasons might not be legit to us, but they are to some people. There are also tons of riders out there who work in the industry, buy clearance, overstock, direct to consumer, or used, and are happy to get a more reasonable price on these higher end bikes.
  • 5 2
 @Yetimike2019: Definitely there are lots of people who make more money. But I make enough money to buy a brand new $6k bike every 2-3 years with not much strain on my budget. Simply choose not to. There is something seriously wrong with our mentality. I mean, $3k is also a lot of money for just having fun.You guys in Murica take wealth for granted. I, on the other hand, remember times when you could not buy meat in shops (in mid 80's in Poland). Current civilisation is based on greed and waste of resources. Buying pricey carbon bikes is good for economy in this form, but this is economy of waste. I wonder when we will get punished for this.
  • 2 2
 @lkubica: I have a watch that costs three times more than my bike, a car that costs more than a median home in the US....so what. Plus, cant take money with when we die.....
  • 3 3
 @lkubica: punished for this? That’s just echo of catholic upbringing. Take it easy, enjoy life. And if you were concerned you should realize that Buying a new bike is the case, what it is made of has much less relevance.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: When it came to DH racing on the cheap I had 2 back wheels,1 for practice, 1 for race and 1 front wheel. The front tire would become practice rear at the end of season. Race rear would be toasted by the end of a 5-7 race season. Going into the following season I only had to buy 2 new tires instead of 3. Nothing more confidence inspiring then grippy tires on a dialed bike. Trust in your grip and you become quicker just through how you weight the bike with confidence and not hesitation. Damn it I miss racing!
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Personally I live in an area where a simple GX DH setup is perfect ????. Affordable, lightweight and built for DH but works just fine for trail riding. Unless you absolutely need a pie plate in the rear then why carry around the extra weight. I do live where there are only good size hills and no real Mt. I'm also a single speed DJ'er for over 20+ years who uses one bike to do it all so I'm a little conditioned to suffer fests at this point.
  • 5 0
 @MikeGruhler: What I mean is that compared to Deore/SLX/Zee, GX makes zero sense. It is more expensive than Shimano and worse quality. SLX rear mech, XT shifter, SLX cassette, Deore crankset - a combo that is very hard to beat.
  • 40 0
 Why get this when you can spend another thousand dollars and get a hard tail from Norco that weighs the same.
  • 1 0
 OMG, so funny. Gave me a good Easter Sunday morning chuckle. Thank you.
  • 36 1
 Im beginning to think that the timed laps mean less and less in this field test.....
  • 19 0
 Agreed - how are you logging your slowest DH time on a modern 150mm full-suspension, as compared to a couple of hardtails?
  • 18 0
 Should post how many beers they had the night before each testing day.
  • 8 0
 @KJP1230: I haven’t been watching the videos but I’m guessing some of these slower laps might be either the first run of the day or later in the day when the rider is tired. I imagine doing timed results for bike testing is very difficult because it’s so reliant on how well the rider is doing not necessarily on how well the equipment is preforming.
  • 5 1
 @KJP1230: Could be the trail? My FS destroys my hardtail in most descents, except the trails with a lot of pumping and pedaling.
  • 4 0
 In order for the times to actually make sense the process would have to be much more complicated, with several timed testing for each bike, carefully picked riding order, and etc
  • 6 0
 I love the timed tests: scientific results without all the structured methodology, randomization, blinding and general PITA that goes into actual science!!!
  • 37 4
 Cons are not cons at all
  • 55 6
 SX
  • 12 1
 @hamncheez: wear and tear part always changeable with something else
  • 14 2
 Agree. People get so hung up on SX and it is bad and it’s stupid companies can’t spend $30 more and put NX on but it’s fully compatible with the rest of Eagle and can cheaply be upgraded piece by peice
  • 3 12
flag just6979 (Apr 11, 2020 at 8:48) (Below Threshold)
 @hamncheez: SX itself it not in the cons list. Only the non-matchmaker part is in the cons list, and even that shouldn't be on the list, because separate clamps actually give more position options.
  • 4 1
 @Noeserd: The whole bike is wear and tear 'part'. Just like any other.
  • 6 0
 Ya gotta put something in the cons though. I wouldve said weight.
  • 2 0
 @C0yotekid: not much, i generally sell them
  • 2 0
 @bmied31: mostly correct, however if you wanna go beyond NX you need the XD freehub body (but you can run Shimano, so it may or may not be bad thing)
  • 2 0
 @wowbagger: microshift! Box 9!
  • 2 0
 @wowbagger: They're talking about the shifter, not the cassette.
  • 13 4
 @hamncheez:

SX on any other Brand: This is horrible, low-end componentry that should be banished to the 7th circle of Hell. What a bunch of cheapskates these companies are for including it in these builds and charging these prices. To the scrap heap with this garbage!

SX on YT: This is a perfectly acceptable level of componentry! Just ride it until you wear it out then replace it. Haha! Nothing to see here!
  • 9 1
 @TheR: guess you missed the price tag on this. SX smuggled on bikes with a 3,5-4,500 usd price tag is shameful
  • 5 0
 @mate1998: Yeah, they just reviewed a whole field of bikes around the same price (or less) with SX specs. I guess you missed that? No lack of outrage until this one.
  • 7 0
 Cons You couldn't spend all your allocated budget It doesn't bottoms out your credit card limit. Not suitable for rich people with Ferraris.
  • 4 0
 @chyu: Sir, there is no F in Yeti.
  • 9 0
 SX is an awful groupset
  • 4 0
 NX is pretty meh, but SX is a big NO.
  • 1 0
 @C0yotekid: The funny thing is shifters have been the most broken thing on my bike. Have snapped 2 SLX shifters even with the right torque. The brake lever and shifter moves but the shifter still breaks. Upgraded to an xt one which is properly designed so you can loosen a bolt and it moves freely in a crash. Not to mention that an upgraded shifter feels so much better than a stock mushy one. I reckon that its the same story with a Sram NX or GX shifter feeling better than an SX one.
  • 2 3
 @bmied31: Agree. People get so hung up on SX and it is bad and it’s stupid companies can’t spend $30 more and put NX on but it’s fully compatible with the rest of Eagle and can cheaply be upgraded piece by peice

That isn't it at all. NX/SX group set are a screw over to anyone who want's any kind of real drive train on their bike. Uneducated, new riders hear wide range from their buddies, see it on the new bike and figure they have that check box covered. Only to find out they are stuck with the out dated Shimano HG spline.

Thankfully Microshift came out with their wide range 10 speed. A welcome remedy to every consumer who got boned by SRAM and manufacturers with this garbage.
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: Two days ago I was riding a trail, picked up a small stick and destroyed my rear der. (www.pinkbike.com/photo/18500244 )

It was "just" a GX Eagle. Well, I was asked yesterday by some guys at the trails why I did not replace it with an XX1 unit. By all accounts, the only thing that makes XX1 more desirable is lower weight, not in any way performance. So, being as this is my fourth rear der. in some period of time (all GX), why on earth would I want to spend $200 more on an XX1, not get better performance and then get upset if and when it gets broken?

I can not speak to the performance of GX over NX, but, is it really that much of a variable?
  • 6 0
 @mate1998: guess you missed the price tag on this. SX smuggled on bikes with a 3,5-4,500 usd price tag is shameful

I can't thumb up this enough. I'd say it puts a firm, if not final, nail in the arguments had here and other places about industry mark up/gouging. A quick look up shows that manufacturers know exactly how crap this is and try to hide it.

Santa Cruz Bronson. They show the cassette as SRAM PG1230. Funny how when it goes up to Eagle, they proudly display the GX and higher naming. That is a $3,500 bicycle. A couple of years ago that would have come with a GX drive train. And don't even get me started on those cheap bastards at Kona.
  • 1 0
 @bmied31: yes but nx is the most second most hopeless thing, bar sx
  • 2 0
 Let's all go back to 11spd Shimano, I beg of you bike gods!!
  • 21 3
 I've got the first gen CF1 Jeffsy. It was an amazing value when I bought it (HALF the price of equivalent hightower), the customer support was excellent, component spec was spot on and in terms of build quality, it completely outclassed the Trek Fuel I had before. But the positives end there. The overall package just feels like a completely flawed concept.

I bought it without test riding it (I had a go at 1st gen capra and there was no chance to try the jeffsy) and I don't think I would have got if I had tested it beforehand. It just feels weird, it's a 140mm 29er which seems to feel the best on smooth flow trails with berms and jumps. In that setting it's great (altough why would you buy a 140mm 29er for jump trails?!) but for rocky natural trails (those I enjoy the most) it just feels like it has about 100mm of very stiff travel. It's skittish and nervous. Depending on what sag I'm running it either feels really harsh and climbs well or feels more comfortable but dead and climbs like crap. The combination of short reach, very progressive rear end and quite linear Pike up front creates this weird imbalance where you just feel like the bike is constantly trying to flick you over the handlebars whenever you ride something steeper ... I tried playing with the suspension setting which helped but not a lot. To be honest, I always feel perched high on top of it which doesn't add confidence when riding some steep sections of the trail. This is probably partially caused by the combination of short 425mm reach and 5'9" rider.

It's not a bad climber for long sustained climbs on fire-roads (something I try to avoid like a plague) but when climbing technical trails it is difficult to accelerate quickly before technical features (I know, inertia of 29" wheels) and it always wants to sit deep in the travel.

For me, it was a let down. Probably the geo just doesn't fit me and I'm using it in places where it cannot shine. I'm really curious how it compares to the 2nd generation. Based on the reviews, it seems like they fixed a lot of the things I don't like on my 1st gen. I'm due for a new bike and I was super impressed with the YT customer service but I'm not sure I wan't to make the same mistake again ...
  • 9 1
 I had that bike, albeit aluminium, i'm 5"10 and rode the M due to the long seattube (one of the major flaws). I liked it a lot.

I can confirm that it was indeed a stiff, skittish beast in its stock setup and this is partly the reason why other manufacturers ask a higher price: they work with the suspension partner to tune it to work well. And YT is an outlet for suspension (and other) parts, hence the mk1 Jeffsy having non boost fork but boost rear.

That being said: once i had a different suspension setup as well as a higher rise bar and some better wheels going it was really, really good (and all in all still way cheaper than any bike in its class). Yes, it's still firm due to the very high progressiveness in the kinematics, but it can take a proper beating and it's just so damn lively. Some say only a coil shock releases its true potential but i never got around to try that.
Yes, it has flaws but for me it's still one of the best trail bikes i've ever ridden.
  • 12 0
 This is a good reminder for me to demo as many bikes as I can before I finally buy a new one. Thanks
  • 4 2
 @PetrC I owned that bike for 2500 miles. In stock, yes it's mediocre. Do the following:

Get a Dvo Topaz.
Get Offset Bushings
Get a Vorsprung Luftkappe
Run the fork at 150mm

This whole treatment will run you about $400 if you get used parts. It will completely transform the bike.
  • 10 0
 @zsandstrom: But one of the advantages of YT is supposedly the price. If you add $400 to it, might as well go to the shop and buy something else.
  • 8 4
 @TheR: I don't think that's how being $400 cheaper works bud.

If you went and bought something else you'd still have the same stock bike.
  • 3 0
 @TheR:

‘Base’
  • 4 1
 @miff: But maybe one that works better with the stock suspension? One that you can ride before you buy? One with maybe slightly better spec?
  • 5 0
 Maybe what I wrote was a bit harsh. To be fair, I've had the bike for 3 years, have done thousands of miles and took it all over Europe and enjoyed riding it. It just always felt like it was designed for something other than what I wanted. On certain trails it is such a fun machine it's just in places where I thought a mid travel 29er would excel it wasn't great. I took it down some world cup enduro stages at one point and it really felt out of its element there but that is understandable.

In terms of value, it was off the scale good at the time. It allowed me to sample some top end components and I have better idea what is and what isn't important for me (I like good brakes and suspension and I'm really not bothered about drivetrain as long as it works). To be honest, if I had added about 300EUR on top of what I paid I could have got an aluminium Trek with components 2 levels below of what I got from YT. Now the big question is if I would have been better served with a bike which didn't have great components but was better fit for my body and my stile of riding. Maybe yes, who knows ...

But yeah, it definitely though me a lesson about testing before buying. One of my mates is a testing maniac and out of tens of bikes he tested he picked a one that didn't look all that good on the paper but it just felt great for him, he fell in love with it and that was that. I guess I just need to think less about value for money and just try few bikes and find the one I will enjoy ... I just really hope I won't find in love with a Yeti, my credit card would have me for that :-D
  • 5 0
 @PetrC: Can totally relate. Been there, done that. Your story matches one of my experiences, but with another brand — all the way down to the short reach. People telling me the same thing — upgrade the shock! Use a coil! The bike was excellent, and in the hands of the right person, they would love it, but just doesn’t match what I’m looking for. Won’t happen again. Always test before buying.

So I feel ya, man. If it makes you feel any better, I did test a Yeti a couple years back, and wasn’t overly impressed, so your wallet might not need to worry!
  • 3 0
 @PetrC: what was the bike that your mate got in the end?
  • 3 0
 I feel like the frame is the most important component and I think a lot of people would agree, at least in theory. However, when it comes time to buy so many people are hung up on what drivetrain, brakes or tires the bike has. Those aren't unimportant but there's no way I'm riding a frame I don't love just because it comes with a NX derailleur instead of SX.
  • 2 0
 @PetrC: thanks man that was one of the best reviews right there
  • 3 0
 First Gen CF 1 29er had some geometry flaws that have been addressed (old school reach, tall seat tube at least on size large frames). Newer models are a bit less progressive in the rear suspension. If the Pike is too linear, install volume spacers.

I bought a new, 28lb first generation CF1 27.5 for $3000 (end of year sale knocked $600 off the MSRP). The 1st gen. 27.7 models had modern geometry, longer reach and the seat tube isn't too high at least on the size medium frames).

I rode the bike stock for a season and found the overall concept to be spot on for everything from slow grinding tech trails to high speed enduro tracks and everything in between (but not the right bike for true DH terrain, clearly). Then I up graded with a Topaz and installed a 160mm air spring in the fork to make the bike even more capable for tech riding. I found 30% sag to be perfect for high speed tech and 25% sag for lower speed XC type trails and jump/berms.

A pro level bike for $3500 bucks. Best bike related purchase I ever made.
Oh, and the frame may not be the best in class, but a proven Horst link performs well (many riders prefer more progression, that's why volume spacers front and rear are so common). And the linkages are very easy to service at home with basic tools. That will save the average rider cash over time as they won't need to pay somebody else to service the linkages.

Last thing, the saddle weight under 240 grams. Its no less comfortable than most other light saddles. Works fine for me with the nose tipped slightly down.

Overall a great review by PB. One question though, was the bike tested with tubes installed? Did the Meta TR come tubeless? This would explain the weight difference, otherwise the added heft is a drawback, but the Meta TR comes with a Revelation Fork (a motion control Pike), vs the burlier Yari on the Jeffsey (a motion control Lyric). Apparently the party is in the rear on the Meta (burlier frame linkages, but unacceptably short travel IMO) while the party is in the front on the Jeffsey (and you can drop a Charger damper into the Yari later).
  • 1 0
 @mountaincross: This is one of the reasons I went with the 1st gen Jeffsy 27.5 over the 29. The geo was updated from the 29er. I read a lot of folks complaining about the handling of the 29. I was moving from 26 and undecided on wheel size but knew I wanted the Jeffsy.

I have one of those non-boost pike front ends. Really, I could care less. I'm not so hard on my bike that I'm tacoing wheels, and I am perfectly happy with the performance of the Pike (after I added a volume spacer). The bike climbs well for what it is (it could use a shock with a lockout on long climbs), handles well enough, and takes anything I throw at it. My only complaint is that the bottom bracket is a bit low for my local trails. Even with the chip in high position I still pedal strike roots more than I'd like. Probably need to reduce my sag a bit I guess.

As for the above build. Another great value from YT with the exception of the SX/NX combo. Suuuuch bull. I don't care if you are direct to consumer or Santa Cruz, this garbage belongs on department store bikes, not high end equipment. Tack on another $167 for the microshift setup and you have a winner. But, then your price goes up.
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: I also swapped out the stock cranks for a 170mm pair I used on my previous bike. No pedal strikes unless I run sag at ~35%, and it pedals very inefficiently this deep into the sag, so you would never want to run this way anyway.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: not one with a DVO Topaz and Vorsprung Luftkappe.
  • 21 1
 Look Fox ! 2299US$ vs. 2299€. This is how it converts.
  • 2 0
 You have to add VAT in US
  • 3 0
 @dh-corn: There is still quite a difference even with VAT.
  • 2 1
 @dh-corn: not usually, unless you live in a state where they have a warehouse. This year I paid for bike, pedals and shipping, no taxes. The US is way behind in collecting taxes for online purchases.
  • 2 0
 1. There is importation taxes for non euro stuff coming from TW or US for 4.7% of stuff prices + shipping fees + VAT, so roughly +25 % difference with US wholesale prices just entering euro zone. Sure, US customers have to pay sale taxes, but it still 10% average less than 25%.

2. Fox US is not fox germany or fox france.
Fox US SELL its products to euro distributors, who sell it to shops. Distributors have to make a liitle benefit even if they should make money on sales volume, not on the product itself.

If FOX sold directly to euro shop, prices will lower a bit due to no distributors, but unless they build their stuff in Europe, prices will still be higher in Europe.

Conversely, euro stuff is overpriced too in US for same reasons. Just ask the price for a DT 240s hub in USA and you will get a stroke.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: thank goodness I live in a state with no sales tax either way
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny tucks extra cash under mattress...
  • 14 1
 "SRAM SX shifter isn't Matchmaker compatible, which makes it harder to achieve the perfect positioning."

Hmm, while Matchmaker is great (I've used it on last 3 bikes, even finagling adapters for Hope brakes), it definitely has less positions available than separate clamps.
  • 5 0
 Exactly what I thought when I read it!
  • 5 0
 Yep, these guys always gripe about no matchmaker. Not sure about other people but I definitely don’t like having to move my shifters along with my brake lever. I prefer them in different places. When I had a more budget minded bike with NX it was great.. then I got a bike with GX and was not as happy with the shifter placement. Next bike on the way will have X01, so we’ll see, but assuming it’s the same.

Can I buy a different clamp separately?
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: same with me, i ditched the matchmaker thingy on my new rig as it totally limited the positioning to my likings... it may look clean but it may also result in clumsy finger movements...
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: Matchmaker does have some adjustments, so the shifter isn't completely locked to the brake lever, but yeah some people won't be able to find the best spot unless they go to separate clamps. Which is why that point in the cons list makes no sense.

Yes the clamp is available separately if your bike came with Matchmaker. In fact, I think wolf tooth or pnw components or someone makes a sram-compatible split clamp so you don't even need to remove your grips.
  • 12 1
 I have the Cf comp 29r and it’s honestly been the best bike I’ve ever had and came in so much cheaper than an equivalent bike at my local store. Was looking at the norco sight but man the build kits are nowhere near the level you get for the same price. I would of had to get the A1 version for it to be comparable.
  • 4 0
 That's interesting, I'd have thought Norco would be good value in Canada. It's the opposite in New Zealand. The Jeffsy base is $4200 NZD, for $300 more you can get a Sight A2 with Fox 36 and X2, Code brakes, and NX drivetrain.
  • 3 0
 @C0yotekid: True, silly me for thinking a brand would offer good deals to its local supporters
  • 2 2
 @C0yotekid: Huh? Things are worth what the market is willing to pay, that's it.
  • 1 0
 @PetrolHead209: $4200 and you STILL get shafted with NX drive train.

I feel a bumper sticker coming on: Just Say No to SRAM NX! Or, a circle with the cross through it and NX in the center.
  • 11 0
 I think the elephant in the room here was not addressed @mikekazimer the Jeffsy Comp 29 has a carbon front triangle, Fox 36 DPX2 Performance, Guide Rs, and drops almost 2 pounds from the base while still coming in at 2999 bones.
  • 7 1
 The timed laps are utterly confusing. You're trying to tell me that somehow you got slower downhill times on modern, well equipped 150mm travel bikes than you did on hardtails?
  • 3 0
 *** timed laps disclaimer... again.***
  • 3 0
 @islandforlife: No, I get the disclaimer. I am just trying to fathom a circumstance in which a 150mm, modern full suspension is in any way shape or form slower than a hard tail on a descent in rocky/desert conditions. Even if you descent is only 2-3 minutes, I still have trouble thinking of how this might happen.
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230:

Spoiler: It’s aaaaaaall the rider.
  • 1 1
 @KJP1230: it's entirely possible. The Jeffsy is like riding a Lazyboy but the HTs be like a scalpel.
  • 10 2
 Pretty weak CONS @PinkBike
  • 11 1
 That means it’s a good bike!
  • 11 15
flag preach (Apr 11, 2020 at 9:56) (Below Threshold)
 No doubt
Also
It’s 2020 ditch the water bottle altogether
  • 6 1
 Near 35 lbs weight is a con.
  • 4 1
 @preach: I know you are joking but I've use a flexible Hydrapak bottle for 2 years stuffed into my frame bag. No need for a traditional water bottle any more.
  • 2 1
 @tremeer023: yep yep when I hear the water bottle whiners I automatically assume they don’t ride hard enough to warrant being able to keep riding and drink at the same time
  • 4 0
 @mtb1101: Shhhh,heavy bikes it's where it's at. If you think differently, you're a weightweenie roadie.
  • 3 2
 @preach: Also
It’s 2020 ditch the water bottle altogether

THIS! I'm shaking my head reading about effing with a water bottle while riding. I just reach for my tube, hanging from the strap of my backpack, while riding and not missing a beat, take a drink and literally let it go. I know it isn't popular here, but I feel the same way about bro packs. You still have to screw with getting water while on the move or even stopped.
  • 2 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: Not to mention the taste of dirt and mud each time you fumble for a drink, been there, don't want to go back. I'll stick with my backpack, just works better for me.
  • 7 3
 Bought my wife, who is my height(Yay), a Jeffsy this year. It’s a carbon pro race and it’s amazing. The finish is a step up from my Capra and so much more fun to ride. It’s super lively and is a great climber. It makes me laugh whenever I see the prices on the big box brands.
  • 2 0
 Hehehe. Same. I paid $1,950 delivered for my Jeffsy on close out. Makes me smile every time I ride.
  • 9 3
 "Price vs. performance ratio is hard to beat" more like Impossible to beat. Someone show me a better bang for your buck than YT please.
  • 6 13
flag tacos4me (Apr 11, 2020 at 8:26) (Below Threshold)
 Giant, The Trance 29 2 destroys this bike on spec for the same price, Or Reign 29 2 gets you a better bike for less.
  • 4 1
 @tacos4me: Trance 29 is a different category. 115mm rear travel vs 150mm. And the trance 29 2 is $2900...
  • 9 3
 @smeyer648: Not in Canada, all these bikes are $3500 in Canada. So compare it to a Reign 2 then. Also Giant has one of the best warranties in the industry, where I have never heard a good warranty story about YT.
  • 4 7
 @tacos4me: I have had terrible experiences with giant bikes. I had a trance 27 that absolutely suked a$$.
  • 28 0
 @Shafferd912: That's funny, And I quote the first line in you sales ad for said Trance "This bike is awesome."
  • 4 2
 These articles only compare spec and performance. Warranty and customer service is a big one too and that's where YT drops the ball. Commencal is slightly more expensive but their customer service is unbearable for a direct to consumer brand
  • 9 1
 Unbeatable not unbearable lol
  • 1 16
flag Shafferd912 (Apr 11, 2020 at 9:34) (Below Threshold)
 @tacos4me: gotta sell it somehow man. Its not for me.
  • 1 12
flag Shafferd912 (Apr 11, 2020 at 9:35) (Below Threshold)
 @tacos4me: Why do you think I sold it.
  • 3 7
flag Shafferd912 (Apr 11, 2020 at 9:40) (Below Threshold)
 @tacos4me: Some reasons that the bike was not good. Firstly, the suspension design is not appropriate for that kind of bike. No matter how you set up the suspension, the shock bottomed out. Second, Giant spec'd FREAKING XC RIMS on their 150mm trail bike. Bad move on their part. Third, the axle design on the rear isn't strong enough/isn't set deep enough into the frame. I snapped mine, and had to replace the axle and axle housing, and also damaged my hub. Now tell me Giant is better than YT. No hard feelings though Smile
  • 11 4
 @Shafferd912: Sounds like I struck a nerve. First off you a terrible person with no integrity, willing to be so full of bs just to pass along a problem. Second you have never owned a YT therefore you are not qualified to to make that comparison.
  • 1 1
 Hahaha did I just see Giant oh my
  • 2 2
 @ThunderChunk: especially if you live in Canada. The stories I keep hearing coming from dealing with the one guy in a home office in Kelowna are laughable. Multiple month long waits... no response for weeks, etc, etc. To be fair, it seems like usually it all gets sorted, just super long waits.
  • 3 1
 You’re all going to be so sad when they pick the Commencal as best in class.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: I love Commencal great bikes great people
  • 1 0
 Buysell
  • 2 0
 @Shafferd912: Mostly legit complaints. Giant bikes are great value but come with garbage wheels. My 2014 trance came with a basic float shock that didn't work properly until I put a medium sized spacer in. Was actually disappointed the shop didn't mention this to me right off the bat. No idea why you had an issue with the rear end. Realistically if you're sending big stuff you need better wheels and have probably converted from skewer to a proper axle anyway.

Still loving my 2014 trance. Planning on getting another year or two out of it before pushing it off a cliff. I've replaced everything except the cranks. It doesn't have the best pedaling platform but my rides are pedal up and ride down, so flipping the shock to trail for the way up isn't an issue for me.
  • 2 1
 Eh, take à look at Propain. The cheepest bikes mat be morr expensive but once you look at their performance builds Yt is far behind With their ethirteen crap. And Propain quality level is far better.
  • 2 0
 @Endurip: yea as soon as they start selling in the US I'll switch from my Jeffsy.
  • 3 0
 @ThunderChunk: Maybe in Canada but in the US YT customer service is outstanding. Ive had nothing but good experiences when I needed help.
  • 2 0
 @tacos4me: you been lacing those tacos with tequila again?
  • 1 0
 @islandforlife: Amazing that this is still a problem. Here in the US, I bought mine and had it delivered 2 weeks later. No fuss.
  • 3 0
 @friendlyfoe: So... you are blaming poor setup knowledge on the shock? Sounds to me like it was working fine but needed to be tuned to your liking.
  • 1 2
 @friendlyfoe: Yeah, I put all different spacers in the rear, it changed nothing. Maybe a different shock would have worked, but I'm not sure. As for the axle, it was a 12x148 rear through axle. The frame was the problem. But yeah, the wheels were a disappointment.
  • 1 2
 @tacos4me: 2 of my riding buddies have Capras, and 4 of them have Jeffseys. I've taken all of them on rides. I can definitely make that comparison.
(oh and BTW, I fixed my ad) Wink
  • 1 1
 @TheR: Oh look, they just did. Big Grin
  • 3 0
 @Shafferd912: you're a shitty person
  • 1 1
 @thegoodflow: Idk if there is any way to PM or DM on this website, but id really like to explain the situation. If you don't mind? Im actually not that bad. Smile
  • 1 0
 @Shafferd912: Yep. Knew it was coming. Not sure why you got downvoted for that one. A fact’s a fact.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Knew what was coming? (sorry, ive said so much on this thread. ((probably too much)) )
  • 1 0
 @Shafferd912: That they would pick The Commencal as the best bike in this class.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Ah yes. I wasn't expecting anything less. Actually, I was expecting the hightower to be a fav, but was pleasantly surprised.
  • 9 2
 A riding buddy got this with the blue paint, I reckon it is one of the best looking bikes out there.
  • 6 3
 I've helped build at least one Jeffsy before and don't remember missing any tools - so i'd be curious to know which tools were missing !? Also - the fact you guys got very different results riding I believe goes miles to show instead of us adapting to the bike, it should be the other way around. . . .
  • 8 5
 That dumb water bottle and space down there would take this bike out of my choices. I ride in Alberta and BC and that water bottle set up is for a Bear cozy that holds my bear spray for easy access if I ever need to get to it quick. For many in areas that don't need to carry bear spray that wouldn't be an issue.
  • 5 0
 Do you have a bell on your bike as well?? I don,t carry spray but have a bear bell on the bike.
  • 20 0
 Pah! Bears! In Scotland we have to carry midge spray.
  • 2 0
 @nickism: cmon now... you know it’s a full flagon of whiskey! ;-)
  • 3 0
 @cheetamike: yes I do, a Timber bell.
  • 2 0
 @nickism: we have three bloodsuckers in my country.
But down where I live I only have to deal with midges and mozzies.
And thankfully they don't bother me to much.
But if you're truly pestered by midges I recommend something called "Djungelolja", or "indianpiss" as my dad called it.
The best insect reppellant I've ever used.
It was standard equipment in every anglers gear bag up north. (Our northern mozzies are truly horrible, and according to the northerners the size of a small attack helicopter).
  • 1 0
 @cheetamike: ive had a few mountain folks tell me bear bells are more like dinner bells.
  • 1 0
 @cheetamike: Do you have a bell on your bike as well?? I don,t carry spray but have a bear bell on the bike.

I carry both here in the PNW. We have bears AND mountain lions.
  • 1 0
 @chrod: OMG! The picture of the porch light with inches of them inside!
  • 1 0
 @jaycubzz: Maybe with Grizzlies , but the local stuff. They hear a bell , think dogs and run.
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: Yes , attached to my handle bars. Just a cheapy.

www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/bear-bell-0765671p.html
  • 7 0
 What do you hate more: quarantine or Eagle SX?
  • 1 3
 Did you mean NX?
  • 2 1
 Sorry but I really didn't feel like that was a good review. For a bike that is going to be very high up on the list of potential next bikes for a huge amount of people, I feel that they glossed over it very quickly. Rather than giving the bike its own time and commentary during the review, they went straight into talking about other bikes that they were comparing it against. Also while I enjoy the casual humor and banter that goes with the two presenters, having Levy finish a section by just saying 'yeah' loads of times, doesn't give us any useful information. It also seemed like they were really tired while filming this, which is understandable after riding non stop for however many weeks, but it would be nice to see more energy and thought put in for a bike that, like I said earlier, is going to be one of the options for a lot of people.
  • 4 0
 Cannot deny, that's a good price.
  • 3 0
 Can’t understand why SRAM doesn’t want to be compatible with it self? Matchmaker can’t be that expensive?
  • 1 0
 I believe MM and case material are the only differences between the SX and NX shifters. I honestly don’t know why SRAM even makes both. The difference in price between two is probably a dollar.
  • 4 0
 @mungbean: Profit margins. SX is sold to OEMs at probably pretty close to cost, so tiny margins for SRAM, but it gets the SRAM name on more bikes. NX costs the OEMs more and makes SRAM slightly more profit, and so on up the line.

And splitting the clamp off is actually a decent cost thing, because you know need to ensure that the two parts align correctly and that's a bit of extra machine work. At the manufacturing cost levels that SX is made with, a separate clamp would either often not fit correctly because of crap tolerances, or would be very fragile because they saved cost in materials or testing the design.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: And at the end of the day, they are both crap.
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: better than nothing, and if you only have $1200 for a bike, it's nice that NX eagle is there so you don't end up with a 2x9 acera dumpster fire or something
  • 1 0
 @just6979: fair point. But at these prices it should be better vs either sticking with the heavy cheap stuff or changing out your hub to upgrade.
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: Well, you only need to change the hub only if you upgrade the cassette by two levels within the SRAM line. Everything else (shifter, mech, rings, chain) is compatible with the rest of the Eagle line. And there are at least a few options for HG-splined 12-speed cassettes outside of SRAM, as well. Which is why it's such an easy choice for OEMs. Increase their thin margins, but not hold back upgrades.
  • 14 13
 At 34.4 pounds the Jeffsy Base isn't a flyweight, but it's one of those bikes that rides lighter than what the scale says. 

JUST SAY, IT'S REALLY HEAVY.
  • 8 3
 it's not though
  • 7 7
 It’s fat, overweight. Don’t be afraid to call people fat or there bikes.
  • 6 0
 Most base model 29ers are going to be a little heavy.
  • 2 0
 @imbiker: Plus, if it comes with tubes, you can drop half a pound by converting. And another half pound by securing your boat with the rear cassette...
  • 2 0
 This to me is a ready to go bike that is more than upgrade worthy when the time comes.
  • 2 0
 Why do you spec reach but not the stack? It is impossible to campare bike geo using reach only.
  • 1 1
 The specs they choose to list are almost useless. Reach and chainstay for large, except chainstay usually doesn't change through the line. No stack, no front center, no indication of the seat height for the listed effective seat tube angle. No effective top tube (could be used to compute the previously mentioned effective seat tube angle), etc.
  • 2 0
 @lkubica, click the link that says “geometry” and you’ll see the full chart.
  • 3 0
 Cannot wait for mine to show up!
  • 2 1
 I got this one last year in carbon (pro race 29) - such a great bike. Super nimble while on the descents it still feels burly (guess the chunky e13 tires and Fox 36 help).
  • 3 0
 Ugggghhh that top tube looks like I could break it with my hands.
  • 1 0
 Would literally probably buy it otherwise.
  • 1 2
 @Kramz: Top tube doesn't need to be burly. Unless you crash in a really weird way, the top tube should never be in vertical compression, It's job is tension.
  • 2 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: that's not right at all. Square edged hits at speed: top tube in tension. Drops to flat: top tube in compression.
  • 1 2
 @thegoodflow: At no point is the top tube in vertical compression. The stresses either compress or pull along the length of the tube, imparted by the steer tube and seat tube. Id it wasn't the case, thin walled tapered aluminum wouldn't be a thing on bicycles.
  • 1 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: ok, I'll bite. What is "vertical compression"?
  • 3 0
 no mention of a dropper in 2020 that used to be a deal breaker!
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer
The Jeffsy is available in xxl. Would you please update the size list?
  • 1 0
 Yari, sx, 35lbs? Junk 29 inch wheels with tubes? Go up a size for more reach, Do you have to hire a pilot to dock that battleship?
  • 3 1
 Waiting for the Pb masses to show up to bitch about the price!
  • 5 1
 Naw this ones fine
  • 8 5
 No, the YT fan boi cult is strong on Pinkbike, making the brand oddly immune to negative criticism of any kind in this site.
  • 4 1
 Let my downvoted serve as proof.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: Naw, its the vanilla gorilla gravity acolytes who go apeshit if their bikes are criticized.
  • 2 1
 @TheR: "People disagreeing with me means I'm right!"
  • 4 5
 @boozed: Meh. Downvotes are chicken shit. If they disagree, tell me why.

I stand by it. For whatever reason, the company has generated much goodwill among the bro’s and brah’s here. Look at any YT test or product release, and they come out of the woodwork to praise and defend the brand, and downvote anyone who says anything negative about their bikes rattling apart or their customer service. Check any YT content and compare it to similar Specialized (THeY sUe!) or Yeti (dENtiSt!) content.

It’s cool though — if you are into marketing, you can definitely learn a thing or two from YT. They know their customers and have really sold the image that they are looking out for “young talent.” People have definitely gobbled it up.
  • 3 0
 @TheR: U nailed it man!
  • 12 10
 I wouldn’t buy one because of that crappy bottle mount.
  • 3 1
 Now that is a sexy bike Wink
  • 1 0
 Could you run a longer dropper and insert it further? Looks like a ton of post sticking out.
  • 2 0
 Yes I have a OneUp v2 210 dropper fully slammed and it sticks out maybe an inch out of my frame
  • 1 0
 How is the sizing on these? Do they still run small? I know people were sizing up in the old ones.
  • 2 0
 Jeffsy for $2999 or ripmo af for $2999?
  • 1 0
 The critique on the Fidlock-system.... was this only related to this frame? Or a general problem with this bottle?!
  • 1 0
 Love the article. Love all the articles, actually. One question on the Jeffsy: Threaded or press-fit bottom bracket?
  • 1 1
 Unless they have changed it, press fit. A lot of folks complained about poor quality of the PF bottom bracket on the early YTs. Race Face. Bad durability, etc. I slather the inside and ouside bearing faces on mine and have never had an issue. Keeps the water out and also traps dirt that would otherwise get in to the bearing internals.
  • 1 0
 Ditch the reviews and just have the Kaz' n Lev' show! They are like an old married couple or the old guys in the Muppets!
  • 2 0
 nothing compare to ibis RIPMO AF
  • 1 0
 the pictures in these articles have actually been really nice, good on ya!
  • 1 0
 Will this Yari need the new debonair upgrade?
  • 1 0
 Let's start a pinkbike comments protest about the SX groupsets
  • 2 4
 The seat is only there so it doesn't rain into the dropper post. That thing needs changing. Guide T also needs to go. Yari upgrade as mentioned, then you can rip it.
  • 10 2
 its a radar STG saddle lol, it's great for some, doesn't work for everybody. load of princesses on this site
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.041410
Mobile Version of Website