First Look: 2015 Shimano XTR – Eleven Speed Cassette - Choose Your Drivetrain

Apr 11, 2014
by Richard Cunningham  

Shimano XTR 2015
- Shimano photo

The long-awaited debut of Shimano’s premier component ensemble was staged at its new cycling division across the street from its North American headquarters in Irvine, California. Before getting down to business, visitors were given a tour of Shimano’s living museum and of its new automated shipping facility, from where the 2015 XTR components will be sent to bike dealers later this year. There are actually two XTR groups: “Race” and “Trail” and in Shimano tradition, each gets a stimulating numerical designation. The 2015 XTR Race ensemble is M9000 and XTR Trail is M9020. In case you missed it, that is one zero added to last year’s XTR. The new group looks impressive, with innovations and improvements that run from mild to wild - a new crankset that features a bonded aluminum crank arm and a hollow chainring, bonded from aluminum and carbon fiber; a side-swing front derailleur with a rotary cable actuator; reconfigured shift levers; and lots of titanium and carbon bits. The elephant in the room at Shimano’s big show, however, was how it planned to respond to SRAM’s one-by-eleven revolution.

Shimano USA 2014
  Guests were given a tour of Shimano USA's recently expanded warehousing facility to watch its automated sorting and packing system in action. A plaque in the foyer of the Shimano's living museum honors Shozaburo Shimano, the founder of the family owned corporation, and the single-cog freewheel which was its first product. The museum is also used as a learning center to demonstrate Shimano's cycling, rowing, fishing and snow-sports products. - Greg Lambert photo


Without entirely ruining the surprise, Shimano’s team of engineers, pro athletes and test riders wrestled with gear ratios and chainring combinations to achieve best-possible gearing for World Cup XC racers and also for elite trail riders. The result was a “democratic” solution called “Rhythm and Range” that is based on the notion that smaller, more even steps between shifts, combined with the widest possible gearing range is a better way to pedal a bicycle off road. Shimano’s solution utilizes smaller chain rings with new-but-not-narrow-wide tooth profiles, an 11 by 40, eleven-speed cassette, and choose-what-is-best-for-you crankset options that offer elite XC racers a one-by drivetrain; hard-core trail riders a two-by crankset, and for chubby dentists, there is a triple crankset option with a generously low, 22 by 40-tooth granny gear.

Original Shimano XTR Fat Chance 2014
  The first XTR rear derailleur, mounted to a vintage Fat Chance, was on display in the foyer of the Shimano museum. - Greg Lambert photo


Shimano’s Shifting Philosophy

We were given a fresh explanation of Shimano’s drivetrain philosophy at the launch, which actually made sense. Shimano divides all available gear ratios into two groups: “Driving gears” and “Challenge gears.” Driving gears, in the case of a two-by or three-by transmission, are in the middle range of the cassette when the rider is in the big chainring. Challenge gears are for the steepest climbs, when the rider is forced to select the smaller chainrings and to use the larger three cogs of the cassette. In the case of a one-by drivetrain, Driving gears are the first eight cogs on the right-side of the cassette.


A ptototype XTR M9000 rear derailleur fixed to a direct-
mount derailleur hanger. The aluminum cage will be carbon in
production. Nine of the cassette's eleven cogs are titanium.
The new cassettes will fit any Shimano ten-speed spline body.

- Greg lambert photo

Shimano professes that the smooth, 10-RPM jumps between shifts generated by its Rhythm Step, 11 by 40-tooth cassette, optimize the efficiency of the driving gears that we use most often for both climbing and pedaling on the flats. While the closer gear ratios of Shimano’s XTR cassette provide smaller steps between most of the gearing range, they cannot attain the higher top and bottom gears of SRAM’s XX1 10 by 42 cassette. To achieve a competitive spread, Shimano “strongly suggests” that XTR customers choose its two-chainring option. Before you whip out your calculators, the closest comparison that a Shimano XTR M9000 two-by drivetrain has to SRAM’s one-by is:


Shimano 28 x 38-tooth chainrings, two-by drivetrain: Lowest gear 28/40 = 1.42:1 ratio. Highest gear 38/11 = 1:3.45 ratio. (22 gear selections)

SRAM 30-tooth chainring, one-by drivetrain: Lowest gear 30/42 = 1.4:1 ratio. Highest gear 30/10 = 1:3 ratio. (11 gear selections)


What the above chart demonstrates is how Shimano’s close-ratio two-by option provides a nearly identical gearing spread when compared to a SRAM XX1 one-by drivetrain. By switching to a 28-tooth chainring, the SRAM one-by drivetrain can also match Shimano’s 26 by 36 option, but Shimano also offers a third, 26 by 36 option for its two-by crankset that provides XTR customers a lower granny gear than SRAM can match (Shimano: Lowest gear 24/40 = 1.66:1 vs SRAM: Lowest gear 28/42 – 1.5:1). The bottom
line is that Shimano’s choice for trail gearing is a two-by transmission, and it competes directly with SRAM’s one-by offerings. The customer’s choice is: “Do I want 22 shifts and a front derailleur, or do I want 11 shifts and no front derailleur?”


What about Shimano’s One-By XTR Option?

One-by customers can choose XTR chainrings between 30 and 36 teeth, but the narrower gearing spread of the 11 x 40, eleven-speed cassette means that riders may need to keep a couple of chainrings in their toolbox to match their gearing to the task at hand. Calculating out Shimano XTR’s lowest-available, 30-tooth-chainring option fetches a low gear of 1.33:1 and a high of 1: 2.73. Compare those figures with the options from SRAM and Shimano that we covered earlier in this segment, and they indicate that hills will be harder to climb, or you will probably be spun out on the flats. Shimano’s one-by gearing options are clearly intended for racers and stronger riders who will probably choose the biggest chainring that they can comfortably push and then suffer with whatever low gear is left when the big climbs arrive.

Shimano XTR 2015
  Shimano's M9000 crankset in the two-chainring version has a three piece big chainring that is bonded and riveted together. The teeth are machined from a slim ring of titanium and, for its one-by sprockets, profiled to keep the chain from derailing. - Shimano photo


Two Cranksets

Shimano reasons that there are two schools of riding that are addressed by its most expensive component group, so it divided XTR into “Rider Tuned product families.” The divider is primarily the crankset design with the Race crank getting the royal treatment and the Trail model designed with last year’s technology. Both the M9000 and M9200 can be configured as single or double-ring cranksets, while only the M9200 Trail model can be converted to a triple crankset.

FC M9000 Race crankset: The all-new XTR Race crank has a very narrow 158-millimeter Q-factor, presumably to more closely emulate the narrower Q-factors of the road-bikes that most XC racers train on. The non-drive-side arm of the M9000 crank is bonded instead of hollow forged to eliminate more material without affecting its strength or stiffness. The M9000 Race crankset can be configured with a single or double-chainring only. The new XTR bolt circle is non-standard, with a 70-degree, four-bolt pattern that can accept single-sprockets from 30 to 36 teeth and 24 x 34, 26 x 36 and 28 x 38-tooth double-ring combinations. Weight is stated to be 650 grams in the two-chainring, 24 by 34-tooth option.

Hollow glide Chainring: The XTR FC 9000 double-ring configuration features a radical-looking big-sprocket called “HollowGlide” that has a ramped carbon fiber plate to facilitate instant shifting, a bonded, hollow aluminum reinforcement to add stiffness, and a thin ring of long-wearing titanium teeth riveted to its circumference. The chainring is a hallmark of Shimano engineering. No prices have been set for the new XTR, but simply looking at the complexity of the HollowGlide sprocket evokes nightmares of a fatal rock strike, followed by a desperate internet search for an affordable replacement.

Shimano XTR 2015
  (From left) Shimano's rideable XTR prototypes were crude looking, but functionally, they rode quite well. notice the 70-degree-offset, four-bolt chainring pattern. Mockups of the triple chainring combination show what lengths Shimano will go to in the quest for quick shifting. A 3D printed M9000 crankset (right) reveals the actual shape of the new XTR arms and spider assembly. - Greg Lambert photo


FC M9020 Trail crankset: XTR Trail cranks are cold forged like last year’s and lack the bonded left-side crank-arm of its cross-country brother. The Q-factor is ten millimeters wider (168mm) than the Race cranks. XTR M9020 Trail cranks are configurable in one, two or three-by chainring combinations, with gearing ranges limited to 30, 32, 34 and 36 teeth for a single-ring option; 24 x 34, 26 x 36 and 28 x 38 for the two-ring option; and the triple-ring option will only be available in 22 x 30 x 40-tooth combination. Weights were not given, but we expect the 2015 Trail crankset to come in about the same as last year’s XTR with similar chainring configurations.

New tooth profile: Shimano bucks the narrow-wide tooth-profile trend that has become the go-to for single-ring drivetrains for a “proprietary” tooth profile that is said to eliminate the need for a chain-retention device. The new sprocket teeth are taller and appear to have a slightly hooked area near the base of each tooth. This marks the first dedicated single-ring sprocket to carry the XTR name. Shimano stubbornly adheres to the notion that one-by drivetrains are for racers, or for riders with above-average fitness. The lowest gearing range available for a one-by eleven XTR drivetrain is 30 by 40. Compare that to SRAM’s significantly lower 28 by 42 gearing option and it becomes clear that Camp Japan has a different vision of the one-by customer than Camp Chicago does.



- Shimano photo

Eleven-Speed Cassette

Shimano’s 2015 XTR ensemble hinges upon its long-awaited CS M9000 eleven-speed cassette. The jumps between each gear were carefully selected to be close to ten RPM – a feature that Shimano calls “Rhythm Step” gearing. The actual cog numbers are: 11-13-15-17-19-21-24-27-31-35-40 teeth. Shimano makes the 40-tooth cog from aluminum and the rest of the cassette cogs are made of titanium. The cogs are grouped on aluminum spiders in similar fashion to previous XTR cassettes. If you want a preview on how the gearing is spaced, the first seven steps are the same as Shimano’s ten-speed 11 by 36 cassettes, with the addition of the final 27, 31, 35 and 40 tooth sprockets. Great news for all is that CS M9000 eleven-speed cassettes will retrofit to all ten-speed Shimano-compatible freehubs. Previous XTR rear derailleurs, chains and right-hand shift levers, however, will not work with the new M9000.

Chains Required

Of course, M9000 requires a special, eleven-speed chain and like its predecessors, the links are profiled asymmetrically to boost shifting performance. Sil-Tec, a slippery nickel plating, is used to keep the chain running smoothly in all weather and beyond its microscopically thinner width, the HG-11 chain is further lightened by hollow pins, similar to Shimano’s Dura-Ace road racing chain.

Shimano XTR Front derailleur 2015
  Shimano will offer the M9000 front derailleur in a high and low clamp-style mount, as well as high and low direct-mount configurations. The high clamp and low direct-mount options are shown. - Shimano photos


New Front Derailleur Design

Shimano has consistently made the best shifting front derailleurs, to the point where we wonder if the front mech can be significantly improved. Well, evidently, it can be. Shimano took advantage of the new XTR’s smaller chainring options and shortened the length of the front derailleur cage, then developed a top-mounted “Side Swing” mechanism that eliminates the old-school derailleur’s bird’s nest of cables and lever arms that crowded the area behind the seat tube. Both improvements address nagging tire clearance issues that 29er designers faced when attempting to shorten the bike’s chainstays. Shimano says that shifting performance is boosted by 100-percent in the case of its FD M9000 triple-chainring option and by 50 percent with the FD M9020 double-chainring drivetrain.

Shimano XTR Front derailleur 2015
  Two views of the M9000 XTR prototypes show how massively stiff the cages are made. The front-load cable routing will be a challenge for some bike makers. - Greg Lambert photo


Unlike previous Shimano front changers, the new XTR cage has fewer tricky bends and twists to coax the chain from sprocket to sprocket, relying more on brute stiffness to get the job done, and the cage is also designed to compensate for three degrees of rear suspension travel. Two separate derailleurs are offered, one for two-by and another for three-by chainring configurations, and both clamp type and direct mount options are available. For 2015, only the FD 9025 model changer will offer a conventional cable routing. The new FD 9000 XTR changer will be easy to spot because it requires a novel downtube-routed housing that feeds to the front side of the mechanism. Expect to see some zip ties on bikes that were designed before XTR M9000 components were released to bike makers.

Shimano XTR rear derailleur 2015
  XTR M9000 rear derailleurs are completely new, with the front pulley's pivot moved well forward of the cassette to increase the chain wrap around the cogs. Clutch tension is now externally adjustable and the parallelogram is canted less, than last year's changer, and is paired with an offset upper pulley that work together to better match the angle of the wide-rage cassette. - Shimano, Greg Lambert photo


Improved Rear Mech’

Changes in nearly all aspects of the 2015 XTR rear derailleur essentially make it an entirely new model. The parallelogram slant is reduced and the cage and upper pulley are offset so the derailleur will better track the steeper angle formed by the wide-range 11-speed cassette cogs. Quicker shifting (if that can be done) is made possible by extending the derailleur’s body about 10-millimeters farther forward, so the upper pulley leads the chain into the next shift. The Shadow Plus clutch has been reconfigured with an external Allen key adjustment, and the cage will be carbon fiber. Adjustments have extended ranges to make the new derailleur more adaptable to various frame designs and, presumably, to allow it to adapt to future 11-speed cassettes with different gear ratios. RD M9000 derailleurs will operated best with direct mount type hangers, but they will also be configured for standard dropout hangers. Shimano says that the new mech’ requires a lighter pull from the shift levers.

Shimano XTR 2015
- Shimano photo



Larger shift paddles feel more like Saint.
Shift Levers

Shimano redesigned XTR shifters with a longer cable take-up lever and a broader cable release lever that resemble Saint levers. The release lever can double shift if necessary – a feature that was added to facilitate faster shifting for one-by drivetrains. The internals are improved to offer a more crisp feel and more shift feedback – features that Shimano refers to as “Vivid indexing” action. Cosmetically, the New XTR shifters appear somewhat similar to last year’s when they are on the bike, except for the addition of a textured carbon fiber release lever, and like previous XTR, they are I-Spec II compatible, so they can be directly mounted to the brake levers. Internally, Shimano says that more of the mechanisms ride on ball bearings, so M9000’s smooth shifting action will remain so as time takes its toll.


More Versatile Brake Levers

While XTR M9000 Race and M9020 Trail brakes are unchanged in the mechanical sense, the lever perches are raised and slimmed near the grip area to save some real estate there. No reasons were given beyond that description at the presentation, but one could imagine that, with Shimano’s recent domination of the braking market, it would make sense for them to leave room for GripShift twist shifters for OE bike manufacturers who cross-pollinate their bike spec. On the subject of brakes, Shimano will offer its ICE rotors in all rotor diameters for XTR, from 140 to 200 millimeters.

Shimano XTR m9000 2015
  The brake levers feel exactly the same as previous XTR levers, but the perches are redesigned to provide much more clearance around the grip area - presumably for twist type shifters. - Shimano and Greg Lambert photos



XTR 2015 First Impressions:

Shimano had final-generation prototype XTR M9000 derailleurs, shift levers and cranksets available for test rides at the launch, as well as 3D-printed photo samples of the actual 2015 products which were hung on show bikes to give us examples of the finished look. As such, we were not allowed to rip Shimano's local trail network aboard the test bikes and instead, were relegated to cruising the parking lot to get a feel of how M9000 components will function. Compressed to such a limited measure of riding experience, we could only judge the potential of Shimano's pride and joy.


- Greg Lambert photo

Shimano's new front derailleur was the standout performer, with quick shifting action that rivaled that of the rear derailleur's. How could that be? Because rear shifts can only occur at specific 'gates' where the chain's rollers line up with the teeth of the next cog in line. Most cassette cogs have two, maybe three gates, while Shimano's wildly manipulated large chainrings have four to six gates available with each turn of the crank. Add that action to M9000's super stiff front derailleur, and the fact that it is shifting between only two chainrings, and you get unrivaled front shifting performance - which Shimano hopes will translate into two-by XTR drivetrain sales.

The shifting action of Shimano's 11-speed rear M9000 rear derailleur and cassette felt about the same as the previous version - and that is a good thing. Traditionally, shifting performance has suffered whenever Shimano has added an extra cog. The feel and action of Shimano's shift levers are more defined, but while the architecture of the tension and release levers were correct, without a side-by-side comparison of the production items, we could not determine any ergonomic advantages that the new design may bring to the table.

Perhaps the most important news was that Shimano's gearing selections. As promised, the best way to ride the M9000 two-by drivetrain was to keep it in the big ring for most selections on the 11-speed cassette and then drop to the small chainring before continuing on to the the big 35 and 40-tooth cogs. The ten-tooth spacing between the two chainrings feels like slightly more of a jump than one shift of the rear derailleur at the cassette, so there is no need to double shift at the levers most of the time - just whittle up or down the cassette with the right shift lever until you get close to one end or the other, and then flick the left lever to transition to the last few cogs. If you shift in this fashion, you will be utilizing only 17 gear selections, which is probably all the non-duplicated options that are available.

Overall, Shimano's 2015 XTR M9000 is what we expected: precision engineering in every corner of every component and each part, an improvement over its predecessor. But a four-piece chainring, bonded from aluminum, carbon fiber and capped with titanium teeth? Where does stuff like that come from? How Shimano's engineers can throw their hearts and souls into eking incremental performance improvements from already near-perfect mechanisms is beyond us, but with the liberal application of Shimano's sweat and your money, you will soon be able to ride the mountain bike drivetrain equivalent of a Rolex watch. Do we need that level of complexity? Do we need a front mech? Do we need to set aside one or two paychecks to experience such wonders? Probably not, but those judgments do not apply to XTR. Mechanical perfection is what fuels Shimano's soul - they would probably do XTR for free. - RC


275 Comments

  • 238 45
 Hideous cranks, ugly proprietary chain rings, a narrower range for 1x11 than you can get with 1x10 and an adapter. Sorry Shimano, too little, too late. Two years to match XX1 and you've fallen a mile short.
  • 58 18
 Agreed, this is a complete waste of time. Worst part is shimano engineers have wasted time on this, so they probably will not have a real 1x10 or 1x11 wide range system available for another year. SRAM must be delighted as they still dont need to release the x09 or x07 affordable version of their 1x11 system, even tho they probably have them designed since last year!
  • 36 5
 I think the point of this is to undercut SRAMs XX1/XO1 price point and get these set ups on a lot of bikes as OEM in a hurry. Besides if you hate the chainring/crank combo I'd just go RaceFace Next with a direct mount Narrow Wide anyway.
  • 13 0
 Couldn't agree more.
  • 28 23
 Not all products have to be exactly the same... If you want the very fashionable 1X thing, just go Sram. THis offering by Shimano looks to be a very nice (aesthetics aside) option for a trail/XC rider or racer.
  • 17 6
 If you read this, you'll see what they're going for:
Shimano’s team of engineers, pro athletes and test riders wrestled with gear ratios and chainring combinations to achieve best-possible gearing for World Cup XC racers and also for elite trail riders. The result was a “democratic” solution called “Rhythm and Range” that is based on the notion that smaller, more even steps between shifts, combined with the widest possible gearing range is a better way to pedal a bicycle off road
  • 19 6
 So basically the new XTR is just a refinement of the old, but more expensive & using more exotic materials, then trying to convince us its what we actually want despite everybody hating front derailleurs and more cassette gears equalling less reliability... none of Srams clever innovations like the X-Horizon and X-sync jockey wheels... It looks like sales of aftermarket thick/thin chainrings and 40T rear sprockets are going to skyrocket - why hasn't a company just made a thin/thin chain yet? save eveyone buying new chainrings!!!
  • 15 1
 Yeah, the 2x/3x options are a little bit nicer (with your eyes closed) than before, and tha chain retention will be a nice bonus (when you're not paying to replace the rings)

But I (and I suspect a lot of folks on here) were hoping Shimano's 1x11 XTR would be something a bit special, which this isn't.

SRAM have supposedly sold 8 times as many XX1 groupsets as they expected. Shimano aren't getting that market share back with this.
  • 9 2
 I'm baffled that shimano didn't get the driving gears down to a 9 tooth cog.
  • 13 2
 Yeah, that's a fugly looking crank! Sorry Shimano!
  • 17 0
 one appealing aspect however is that there is no need to change your freehub body, which would explain the lack of 9T cog
  • 10 11
 This stuff is hideous. Looks like their upmarket fishing reels. Ti, carbon, glue, cast alu. Bling and flawed functionality by comitee. That is why I don't buy Shimano.
  • 8 2
 Yeah, they did fall short and those cranks are ugly, but the fact that the cassette doesn't require a XD driver is a nice step forward. Now I just need it to make it to the SLX level. I'm bummed, as I'm a Shimano guy and was really looking forward to their new stuff.
  • 5 1
 You're right bro.My first thought, when reading about the gear ratio allowed by the 11-40, was that Shimano made a mistake but it's a good mistake. At least no need for a new freehub body right?

I'm glad that Shimano haven't done the same mistake they have done with their all new dura-ace 11sp groupset after all Smile
  • 41 8
 Shimano isn't innovative at all anymore, and is completely losing the upper end of the market.

SRAM develops 2x10 drivetrains, then designs a wider range 1x11 setup that is valid a option to a much larger group of people. They also developed a system that is lighter, quieter, simpler, and really really good.

Shimano responds by telling the public that 1x drivetrains are only for 'elite athletes', and instead selling us on the spacing between cogs. EPIC FAIL.

SRAM makes crank sets with removable spiders, so consumers can switch between 3x, 2x, and 1x setups without buying new cranks, while also making it possible to run direct mount chainrings (which absolutely rule). Race Face follows suit, and produces the most beautiful crankset in human history (Next SL). Companies like MRP, Wolf Tooth, Hope, Absolute Black, and others build on that technology, including cheaper options that are compatible with SRAMs stuff.

Shimano makes a new crankset with no notable new technology, except for a new bolt pattern (why???) and what is surely going to be incredibly expensive proprietary chain rings. WRONG!

The only part of XTR that is really exceptional are the brakes. They didn't change them at all, giving SRAM a chance to offer something of equal quality over the next few years (if the new Guide brakes aren't already there).

Shimano just isn't innovative anymore. Instead of pushing technology, they just issue half-measure responses to the really cool stuff that SRAM develops, then tells the market that they don't really understand what they should be buying.

Shimano's stuff works great. If you get a bike with SLX/XT/Zee components, it will work fine and last a while. But why would anyone pay for XTR anymore? Its not cutting edge.
  • 9 3
 Oh come on. Shimano did develop the clutch FD first. I do get a vibe of trying to woo us with exotic materials and complicated engineering instead of features tho. The only good part is the FD really.
  • 9 3
 Clutch _RD_ Smile
  • 5 4
 uzurpator,

Shadow+ and Type II were released so close together that is difficult to know which one was in development first. But you are correct that it was a good idea.

However, that technology was just a small improvement over what was already out until SRAM developed narrow/wide chainrings. If you have a front derailleur, Shadow+ isn't that much of an upgrade. SRAM took that technology and integrated it into a system that really took advantage of its benefits.

I don't blame Shimano for extreme conservatism. The last time they tried to develop something really new - Dual Control - they shit the bed so badly that it let SRAM get a foothold in the market. Shimano can still do just fine copying SRAM and selling a lot of mid-range stuff.

....and they are really innovative in the fishing reel industry.
  • 7 7
 Well - a full year and some change before Type 2 is not "close together" Smile

I am also sure that SRAM had a clutch mech in the works way before Shimano presented its own. Heck - I had one in the works ( I just tried to use RC car damper, but that is irrelevant ).

You seem to forget that at the time of Dual Control shimano also introduced outboard BBs, which spread like wildfire. Besides - Dual Control is awesome. I recently built a bike with it and I cannot believe I got trolled for so long into not using that.
  • 8 3
 Ignoring your customers needs/wants? bold move shimano, best of luck with that. I am starting to think that someday I will be telling my grandchildren "back in my day shimano used to make more that just brakes"
  • 5 2
 The new "organic" design with the bonded carbon / metal rings looks like they tried to take the road group and apply that technology to mountain. Sorry, it's not working. The futuristic aero aesthetics of road bikes does not translate to the functionality needed for mountain biking. XX1 gives users a wide range with the ease of swapping chainrings to tune it to your fitness level. I know a few guys with multiple chainrings for this purpose. Chain retention is also a major selling point for XX1 / XO1. From what I see here, I would have more confidence with a RF narrow / wide ring on my old XT cranks.

It's good to see a wider range cassette, and a rear derailleur designed to match it. But, it's falling short of the benefits of other systems. Overall, I bet my 1 x10 works better. Just maybe not as exotic or light.
  • 6 0
 "If you have a front derailleur, Shadow+ isn't that much of an upgrade."

That's just crazy talk. You made some valid points but you don't have to talk crap about the one thing you give Shimano credit for. Shadow Plus is amazing regardless of the amount of rings you have in front. Never before could you ride a bike and just hear the magical sound of rubber on the dirt.
  • 10 2
 What ? a front Mech ! is shimano still using windows98...
  • 4 5
 reading a few comments, my 2 (european) cents.

2x with chain guide and FD, chains still come off, even brand new xt drive chains.
narrow wide is the way to go (keep you 22/24 for when you get the knock or a liaison stage, use you fingers no need for FD ;o)
front shifters are a pain in the ass.
paying more than 80 bucks for a RD is a no no for a trash-able item.
paying more than 80 bucks for a cassette is a no no.
paying more than 30 bucks for a chain is a no no.
sram RD's are easier to hit (too easy).
11-40 is loads when your near to spinning out you will (should) be generating more momentum by pumping your bike.

and heres the important one for all you guys out there with 30/32t 1x 160mm bikes... rear suspensions bikes are designed around mid thirties chainrings, so your 30t are limiting the performance of your bikes and yes it makes a difference.
  • 3 0
 i think they will still sell once they release the Di2 version did anyone else see the "spy" pics of the di2? electronic shifting really appeals to the "dentist, lawyer,doctor" crowd. and after riding a Di2 bike i can say confidently I've never experienced a better shifting bike especially the front der
  • 5 0
 Funny. I just thought that there is absolutely now reason anymore to buy SRAM's 1x11. With Shimano I can get a cassette that will fit on my existing hub, I'm sure the cassette will not be more expensive than the one from SRAM, but last much longer (as will the chain etc. if past experience with components from both manufacturers is any indicator).

And it will be easy to switch from 1x11 to 2x11 (not possible with SRAM). And I will not have those huge steps between gears, I tried SRAM's XX1 on a cross country bike and can't imagine anybody racing that who doesn't get paid to do so...

The SRAM stuff does look better though.
  • 2 2
 "And it will be easy to switch from 1x11 to 2x11 (not possible with SRAM)."

Yeah, if you consider buying a whole new crankset easy. SRAMs removable spider makes that switch easy. Isn't 1x11 compatible with a normal 2x crank? Don't know why it wouldn't be. But why bother anyhow? Unless you spend too much time going up and down steep fire roads, that range isn't worth the added complexity, IMHO.

The switch between gears is all marketing BS. They needed something to say about a group that is dull. SRAMs gaps between gearing isn't that different than older systems.

Shimano makes awesome brakes and pedals. I wouldn't use anything else. Other than that.....yawn.

I'm sure it will work well, but in a refined, traditional, boring way.
  • 4 1
 "SRAMs removable spider makes that switch easy. Isn't 1x11 compatible with a normal 2x crank? Don't know why it wouldn't be."
It wouldn't work (at least not very well) since SRAM doesn't make a front derailleur for their narrow 11 speed chain.

"The switch between gears is all marketing BS."
Some people may not notice, for me some of the steps on the SRAM cassette made it unusable for cross country racing.
  • 2 1
 I've used a normal 10speed chain with xx1 stuff, as well as an xx1 chain with a 10 speed rd/cassette, and vouldnt tell the difference. I think a lot of this stuff is just marketing hype to sell everyone new stuff as a package.
  • 2 0
 Wait for the electronic shifters.
That is what Shimano has up the sleeves.
According to Shimano the new front derailer shifts twice as well as the current one.
You'll be able to program the derailers/gearing and shifters as you like i.e. left shifts up, right down.
Then just forget about the front detailers.
I personally like my bike analog... but electronic shifting, exp the front works much better.
  • 2 0
 MojoMaujer I agree. i love my Di2 road bike. i can switch around buttons change the shift speed how many gears i want it to shift if i just hold the button and even add an extra climbing shifter to the top of the bar if i want. Also i know someone who has some missing fingers and needs to access the shifting all from 1 side of the bike. he can now easily set that up with Di2. plus auto trim front der is awsome
  • 2 0
 I had wondered whether they would go electronic as well. Seems inevitable. However, to me the technology seems like it is just scratching the surface. As soon as they make it wireless, I'm in. That technology exists in other applications, they just need to adapt it for bikes. In a 1x11 setup, you would need two batteries, but I'd think the shifter battery could be tiny. Plus....if they wanted to get extremely tech....develop a rear mech that uses a pulley to charge itself. It would likely be a bit bulky at first, but you'd expect that type of thing could be easily miniaturized over a few generations. Eliminating cables would be cool.
  • 98 7
 Nah, I'm going to wait for 15 speed.
  • 7 1
 Why wait for 15 speed when you can wait for a 16 speed!!!?

Stick with your 9 speed or 10 speed, and when the climb gets tough, just walk it.
With a gear ratio of 1.42:1, we can definitely walk up the hill faster than we can pedal.
  • 5 2
 Abzillah, that's a terrible idea. When you can't pedal up a climb, get off, put your bike on your shoulders and RUN, run like a Twilight Fan just asked you on a date, run like Old Spice Guy just threatened to give you hug, run like you're at a vindaloo party and there's only one toilet left, run! . You'll be pedaling up vertical surfaces in no time.
  • 4 0
 What the hell is a vindaloo party? Is it indian food?
  • 5 1
 en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vindaloo

It's the Indian food other Indian foods don't like to talk about.
  • 51 6
 "hills will be harder to climb, or you will probably be spun out on the flats"... Yeah, no thanks. In a world excited not to have a front derailleur, Shimano expects us to run a front derailleur in order to have the same range as Sram's 11 speed. Sorry, but this is flop for me.
  • 1 4
 Can't you just run a Sram (42-10) cassette in the back and still have everything else XTR? Or do you also need another hub for that Sram cassette?

Edit: and a narrow-wide chainring up front, but I'm guessing the XTR has a special size so it won't fit?
  • 28 2
 Yea spin out - Jared Graves rode 38t chainring and 11t rear cog in PMB which is the fastest race track in the world of all MTB disciplines, and they say that average riders will spin out on flat... Therefore they supposedly need double or even tripple chainsets with 40-44t large ring... what a load of crap...
  • 15 0
 Bah, ride a singlespeed for any length of time and you'll soon feel pampered by 11-40 Wink 11-36 1 by is more than manageable so 11-40 is only easier and better. The tiny difference from 11-40 to my 10-42 XX1 would be barely worth bothering about. Perfectly viable 1x option from XTR IMO despite what this article might suggest... and no need to modify the freehub which is a massive bonus!
  • 6 1
 This is losing range at both ends - the 10 at the other end makes a difference too.
  • 11 3
 honourablegeorge - yes if you believe that you need that range. Again: top dhillers rarely use more than 36t. I am unable to spin out 36t, and I can ride up almost anything on 1:1. Right now I ride 34t to 11-36 cassette. If I come upon a climb that is too steep and long enough for 1:1 it means that I would get worn out even on 22t granny, but maybe 5 minutes later. Furthermore traction comes to place. You just can't uphill too steep and too loose stuff on low gear as you will spin out and stop. Harder gear distributes power over larger distance thus you get more traction. So steepness argument is a myth as well. Only long climbs speak for lower gears. But I also have a trouble to stay on the rear of a average commuter on road bike on the way from work, but I smoke him senslessly on the uphill, the steeper it is the better for me. So maybe it's my muscle structure...
  • 8 1
 That's a big disappointment for me. I still hoped they were hiding something more interesting than this 11-40 cassette. It's no step forward for me, like plenty i ride a 10s 11-42 so a wider range than what Shimano proposes. The lower gap between gears? I couldn't care less. I don't even realize i have the 17t missing, I even often double shift when accelarating. Some will be happy as it's obviously not enduro specific! Indeed, that seems very xc specific. Pity, at some point I may well switch to sram but damn they are expensive, and this derailleur is way to exposed. Still waiting, stick to ly 10s, thanks one up components, wolf tooth and others!
  • 6 1
 Waki has got it. The spinning out stuff in the article and comments is nonsense. Give people 22-40 and they'll insist on spinning up a hill with that too.... oh wait Wink Hills are hard end of story. The gear just determines how fast you go and how much pain you'll be in the next day. In fact the only reason I went from 11-36 to 10-42 was to save my legs for successive days of rides with large amounts of climbing... which I suspect most people don't do, in fact it is pretty rare for me too and not really required to have the range of XX1. A few teeth off either end of the cassette is neither here nor there IMO
  • 7 4
 So many delusional idiots here. Just because something is there does not mean you need it! Waki is very right on this one. I laugh at the claim that the average rider will spin out on the flat. I am considerably above average in terms of riding ability and I have never spun out a 11 tooth with a 34 tooth ring and have also easily been able to push it up long hills at a decent pace. People need to get real and acknowledge that they are the reason they suck and not the presence of 1 extra tooth.

MTB marketers must have a field day. And I wonder how many people complaining about this also decry the arrival of 650b? So many hypocrites.
  • 1 0
 Before I switched to my 1x10 Zee setup (32t up front), I was running a 2x9 (22/33 up front, 11-34 cassette). The only time I spun out the 33x11 was bombing out of canyons here in Salt Lake, so steep and paved. On the dirt or flats, nope, not even close. I was okay giving up that paved road top end when I switched to the 32t. We'll see, I'll probably end up with a 30t and a 36t to use in various situations. At least changing out my ring is a 2 minute thing now!
  • 4 0
 Regardless of the "spin out" debate going on, it is obvious that Shimano have not come up with anything significantly better in the 11-speed arena. Shimano wants us to keep the front derailleur, which is honestly counter to what many mountain bikers want. Have they made a better front/rear derailleur set up? Sure, great. But that was a battle 5 years ago. The industry has moved on and will leave Shimano in the dust after this. Which is honestly a bummer because I was expecting more from them. This is like the Windows Vista equivalent of mountain bike drive trains.
  • 1 0
 Spinning out on flats with these settings is indeed a joke. Last year I was running a 33x11-36 and spun out on some races (in dh sections obviously). Sure it's not what made me be so far from a podium no... But even at a low level, you just try to do your best. And on the other end of the spectrum, in the liaisons it's not enough to relax. This year I switched to 34x11-42. Finally rather relaxing in the uphills but still sometimes spin out. So I'm one of those who'd be happy with this extra gear but to be fully honest it's still not really enough, especially if you prefer avoiding swapping your front chainring often.
  • 8 0
 I can spin out a 36t front ring with an 11t rear cog, but not on anything that is all that fun to ride (DH on fireroads, jeep trails, paved DH or flats, etc.). On real trails I'm not sure I have EVER used the 11t cog with a 36t or bigger chainring... at least not on my trail bike.
  • 1 0
 ka-brap, what would you like to see significantly better in the 11 speed area as you put it? A better engineered XX1 will do me and this XTR release is only 2 teeth at the top and 1 tooth at the bottom of cassette away from this which is such a minor issue. When Di2 XTR inevitably comes out soon that will be a completely different offering unlike anything on the market... so criticism is somewhat harsh although this initial release is a bit bleurgh on first impressions
  • 1 0
 1 tooth up and 2 down. I let you calculate, it's like you would have 1.5 more gears, almost 2 with Shimano's narrow gap. That's actually a lot.
It's actually weird they don't yet mention Di2 cause it's basically ready.
Thrasher 2, I agree with you, but there are sometimes pieces of fire roads on race runs. Even XO1/XX1 would be a compromise for us, a little less for the pros and their strong legs.
  • 4 1
 Not to fall into extremism, I think that Enduro Maniac is right on the thing that you may want to have a chill out Liaison stage in enduro race, and for that running 40t rear with 34-36 front may help. Another thing where 42t comes along is 29ers. They need lower gears up front and such monstrosity as Spec Enduro 29 which basicaly is a downhill bike, may require larger cog, particularly when dressed up in stiffer wheels and beefier tyres. Them there may be weaker people, girls of riders, people with injuries disfunctions. But still, a healthy bloke should be able push it. Then why go 11speed when 10sp systems work great with such a vast choice of spare large cogs for 10sp cassettes? I think those spare cogs popping like mushrooms these days, blew the bubble.
  • 10 0
 11-40 is actually just one gear different in range.

If you run a 36T with the 11-40 to have the same top end speed as a 32T and 10-42 then you are basically giving away one gear on the climbs (equivalent to 32/36). Stick a 34T on XTR and 32T on XX1 and the differences at either end average out and you lose roughly half a gear at each end. In terms of speed, this means 0.5mph quicker (or cadence has to reduce) at 80rpm climbing on XTR vs XX1 and 0.8 mph quicker at the top end on XX1 at 100rpm vs XTR. Minimal differences IMO.
  • 2 0
 @beardlessmarinrider:

Good that you made the calculations. That really isn't much difference.
But, when you buy XTR you spend an insane ammount of money to get the best of the best. And if you already spend that much, why would you accept receiving less?

If it was for their XT range or lower it would be all good, but for XTR people want the best of the best.
  • 1 0
 Because "the best" isn't purely judged by range but the quality of the shifts and durability of the drivetrain which is where xtr beats xx1(assuming 11 speed dye keeps the same feel and quality as 10 speed)

Shimano also typically gets heavily reduced on rrp compared to sram so after the initial release xtr usually works out far cheaper. Cassette was 60% the price of the comparable xx on crc for example
  • 1 0
 This is step one to getting what i want, a cheap shimano build wide range cassette. As BeardlessMarinRider explains, I'd be complete happy with the range on a 11-40 cassette with a 34 up front (bc, like Thrasher 2 says, i almost never spin out my max 11 36 on a real trail).

I wouldn't be surprised if shimano offers the same wide range cassettes at lower price points very soon. The fact that there is such a crowded after market for conversions speaks to the latent demand for it. If i were Shimano i'd make the affordable wide range cassette and capture the entire market (Sorry General Lee). Still I'm surprised/annoyed with how long its taking them.
  • 2 0
 Think of one word, or maybe two, to describe the subject:
- older XTR - beautiful and functional.
- 2015 XTR - complicated, unnecessary, ugly ... ups! one too many Smile

Personally I'm disgusted. I'm also a grumpy, old git that still loves his M970 Wink
  • 2 0
 Also agree on the trickling down point. Shimano seem to do this very well and we don't normally have to wait for XT to basically be XTR but half the price and a few g's extra. Deore is bloomin' amazing and not that far off XTR with many components! SRAM on the other hand release XX1... then XO1 which is virtually identical and only about £30 cheaper across the whole group. Lots of advantages to Shimano if you look at the bigger picture.
  • 3 0
 SRAM did great thing introducing 1x drivetrain, but I think 10t cog is BullShit, because it makes tangible power loss due to small cog size and poor chainline. So the 2x10 affair seems reasonable. Also, as it was mentioned above, XTR in 1x setup looses 0.5-1 gear compared to XX1, but you can keep your standard freehub, and that's a good deal.
  • 52 5
 So basically, they are admitting that Sram is ahead of them...I would´ve preferred a wide range 10 speed.
  • 36 2
 They could have really hit the market hard with a SLX and XT 10spd 11-40. SLX ~$50-60 / XT ~ $60-80
  • 18 13
 No Shimano just properly engineers and tests products through several prototype phases BEFORE releasing to market.
  • 5 1
 Smokey, you my friend are 100% correct.
  • 8 10
 Shimano has been playing catch up for the past 10+ years. TBH I think those cranks look cheap. No carbon crank arms?
  • 22 9
 How is making parts that don't break as much as sram "playing catch up"?
  • 13 5
 Not going back to SRAM any time soon. Shimano has been better in every way. Brakes, cranks, drivetrain. My type 2 SRAM derailleur was shit
  • 9 5
 Well...My X9 derailleur has not broken in very harsh riding conditions and after a loong time on my bike. My Avid Code brakes are the Shiiizney. I think Shimano brakes are great too don't get me wrong, that lever is perfect. Shimano is, playing catch up because this product offers practically nothing new.
  • 7 1
 I 100% agree with you Diego, I am not interested in this product. It seems they missed the target market completely.

Target market IMO: People with perfectly fine working 10 speed setups who dont want/dont need to spend 1k on a drive train when they it could be achieved by other means. (OneUp, Wolftooth, etc)

Hell, make an SLX 10 speed 11-40 and sell it for $100 (SLX 11-36 are about $50). That would generate more profit than selling fewer, expensive drivetrains where there is already a competitor. No one makes a specific 11-40 10 speed cassette.

I love shimano but yes, they are too late for this one.
  • 6 0
 Shimano rarely offers something new. They just offer something better. Admittedly Shimano caters to a different clientele. They are not trying to one up SRAM. Shimano components have a refined feel and aesthetic that I am partial to. I'm currently running 1x10 32 11-36 and rarely desire anything lower but for those moments this would be a great solution. In fact if I had a 40t I'd be inclined to run a 34 on the front.
  • 8 1
 @Diego, you live in texas. We probably have different definitions of "harsh" to a state that closes schools when the roads are icy. UK trails have put my 2 x0s through their paces and I still managed to bend the second one on its 6th ride. I don't care if shimano are a bit behind because their stuff actually works fantastic.
  • 8 0
 @the-mountainbart-experience - Im with you here. Ireland and Britain probably have THE harshest riding conditions year round and SRAM stuff simply is not up to it. Ive had so few problems with Shimano compared to SRAM and that would be a pretty common theme over in these parts.
  • 5 0
 "a state that closes schools when the roads are icy."
That is a hilarious and true statement. God Bless the South
  • 2 0
 YMMV but I have a 9-speed X0 rear derailleur with an X9 shifter that I have been trashing for almost 5 years! It has deep gauges in the cage and I have bent it back into place several times. It is on its 3rd set of pulleys. I have been wanting to change to 2x10 and now 1x11 for several years, but I cant justify tossing a perfectly functioning unit. Maybe the next rock will finish it off... Long story short, I have found SRAM shifting components to work great and be very tough. However, I do love my shimano brakes.
  • 34 8
 Very cool. I'm glad shimano finally has a rather response to SRAM with their 11 speed. However, if SRAM brings the 11 speed pricepoint down to x-9 levels soon, shimano is going to have some problems in the aftermarket I think...
  • 8 3
 Shimano will just bring 11speed down to SLX/XT during their next update cycle. Then Deore will get it a year or so later. Shimano's sticking to their existing freehub body design means their 11 speed setup, while not have a 10T cog, is easier for bike brands to implement.
  • 4 0
 Also not needing a special free hub like XX1 will be much cheaper no? It will be interesting to find out what the cassette/RD/shifter combo pricing will be. Titanium ain't free but neither is SRAMs XX1 cassette.
  • 5 0
 After dealing with the horrible disappointment of the "X01" drivetrain not actually being in any way "affordable", I was left thinking I'll be on Shimano for a while. My hope was that they would bring back the "mega-range" cassette somehow to get people into a 1x drivetrain for less than buying the entire SRAM system, but STILL insisting on 2x with a front mech? A lot of bikes now don't even have the ability to run a front mech. Looks like I'll still be twiddling my thumbs until SRAM finally releases a truly "affordable" 1x drivetrain (as in under $1,000) because I'm not going to dish out a couple grand for another 2x drivetrain, regardless of how awesome it's engineered.
  • 1 0
 I mean technically speaking you are dealing with tech that has only really been around for 2 years. I don't think many people were worried about 1x11 in say... 2010. But we all were riding then just fine. Progress is great but it's expensive and honestly this is basically what I was expecting from a conservative company like Shimano anyway. It's a bit more toned down. Are you REALLY going to notice the 3 tooth difference?
  • 5 0
 Last year I bought myself a set of shimano zee cranks, an 11-36 cassette and a zee mech and shifter, I got the lot for about £200 and it's done me really well. It may not be a wide ratio as the SRAM systems, but I found that as my gearing runs out so does my climbing ability, and for descending the 36 tooth ring that comes on the zee's is absolutely fine. It may not be a super lightweight drive train but it's a damn good 1x10 alternative.
  • 25 2
 A wide range cassette which isn't as wide so you need a front mech... which won't fit your bike. XTR isn't for me this year.
  • 2 1
 How wide a range do you need? 11-40 is not enough? Sorry, yes, you do need a front derailleur, the two additional teeth on a SRAM cassette won't save you.
  • 24 1
 XTR9000 - I want terminator music to the promo vid...
  • 1 0
 hahaha
  • 21 3
 dear SHIMANO, people don't want to be using front derailleurs anymore, k tnx by x
  • 4 4
 SOME people don't. And they don't have to, there is an 1x11 option. Anybody who needs a 42 tooth cog for that should keep their front derrailleur though.
  • 2 2
 Dear Shimano, SRAM marketing department is way better than yours. I am a 25 y.o. DH-pump track cool geezer and I buy whatever it is cool on the internet. i never figure how to properly use a front derailer, my sram x7 did not work so well. Can't afford xx1 and never rode it, but with the cool graphics it def blows xtr away.
  • 18 1
 Ahh, yes....the very important picture of the" Old man in a parking lot test"
  • 4 0
 Yes, that always adds credit to the testing department procedures.
  • 15 0
 HAHA! ^^^I wanted to make it clear that we didn't get to test XTR in a real-world environment...and although it was explained clearly in the text, a picture is worth.....
RC
  • 4 0
 Good, glad you have some humor about itSmile
  • 13 0
 Sorry, but I don't get it... they made a wide range cassette, but the range isn't wide enough to run 1x11, so in the end you'll have to run 2x11 which is like 2x10 but with more unsprung weight... Ok, the unsprung weight factor probably isn't too bad, but it's still completely useless!
  • 1 2
 Why is the range not wide enough?
  • 14 1
 3x11, XTR only, Probably the ugliest cranks the world has ever seen and still in prototype status / not ready for sale yet. Shimano - wtf did you do the last two years???
There are enough options to change a SLX or XT System to 1x10 with a 11-42 Casette these days. For 1/4 of the price.
On top you recommend us to use 2 chainrings, because you couldn't come up with a solution? Worst product launch I've seen. Period.
  • 12 2
 That crankset is appalling! The last two gen XTR cranks were beautiful, what happened?!
  • 2 0
 It looks like a shitty fsa afterburner. The old xtr cranks were the bomb
  • 1 0
 ^^^ Check out Dura-Ace cranks, very much the same look and technology.
  • 1 0
 meh, I'm just going to buy XT 2x10 anyhow like most customers that go into bike shops
  • 2 0
 Dear Shimano,
To appeal to kids nowadays do this:

- No more XTR. Name it XTR RACE (XTRR)
- Huge sticker, white and red (RIP Suntour) XTRR on the outer arm, RACE on the inner arm. Race X could be cool too.
- Make it black so after 6 rides I look like a real rider w fcuk up cranks and in a couple of years I need a new one cuz its is fugly now!
- Did I say LIFESTYLE? Ok, dear Shimano. You need to google that.
- Forget electronic shifting and be able to program everything so you don't need to touch the front derailer cuz it auto shift. What is cool now is 1X11 w poor shifting!!!!
- Inform all your sponsored riders that is not ok to run a chain guide. I know the chain come off in mud... but shhhhh! BTW IF the guy happen to have a rainbow jersey and races XCO is OK to have a very small and hidden chain guide!

But keep in mind: LIFESTYLE!
Shimano you are too old school!
Nowdays kids buy everything on the internet! They do not need to try it! Just tell them it is cool and new and bang!
  • 9 1
 fail. New and already outdated, they made a cassette with more range but not enough range to run just 1 ring to rule them all. 1 ring opens so many doors in framedesign, just sad
  • 6 0
 I wouldn't worry about the gear range too much, I have run a 36 tooth up front with a 1x9 setup before and that was definitely difficult at first but give it a month or 2 and you get used to it. 30 tooth up front with a 40 may not be quite as low as XX1 but if you really need gearing much easier than that a one by drivetrain is probably not the best choice anyhow. Just a thought.
  • 3 0
 Exactly. You can either just buy improvement or you can actually work hard and get stronger. I still run a 36 1x9 on one of my bikes, and a 32 11-36 1x10 on my other bike. If I can't climb it on a 32-36 I am just not strong enough.
  • 10 0
 even Pepperidge farm doesn't remember 3x11
  • 5 0
 That was funny
  • 12 4
 the crank spider looks like a cheap alloy wheel youd put on your first car...... not nice shimano!
  • 5 0
 Have been waiting for a Shimano 1x11. Disappointed with this. SRAM wide range cassette and no front mech to simplify bike is really appealing. seems like Shimano missed that for a lot of trail riders. gonna go XO1 with Race Face cranks. Have always had Shimano parts but gonna switch now. Shimano, I'll check back in a couple years...
  • 1 0
 Just don't ditch their brakes - you won't like SRAM brakes after being on shimano ones.
  • 1 0
 Oh yeah, least amount of SRAM stuff I can. Going with XT brakes.
  • 8 0
 I have a box full of front derrailluers, cassette tapes, and flip phones somewhere deep in the basement. Good job Shimano.
  • 6 0
 Hideous expensive FAIL. Nobody wants to pay hundreds of dollars to replace a chainring. Gearing range is inferior to SRAM and customized drive trains. All in all it is a bunch of over-indulgent crap that nobody asked for.
  • 4 0
 I am very disappointed with shimano, a cassette 11 to 40, is this a joke because sorry but it's not funny at all. I done that, just simply buy the 40t-rex from hope components, this is the same thing, the only difference is you don't loose the 17t sprocket. I always was a big fun of Shimano but this time they really got it wrong, in my eye's the only thing they are trying to do is to keep us on their 2X drive systems.
  • 4 0
 One rock hit and those chain rings are toast, I hope you like to cyclocross your rig with that crankset... and then a triple???? LAME! I'll stick with my XX1 for now, I was really hoping for a winner from the boys at Shimano, too bad they tripped out of the gate two years too late.

11-40....really Shimano?! ONE-UP has got you beat!
  • 4 0
 I love Shimano, but this is a huge fail. Sorry Shimano, but all of us who are racing on XX1 are not going to reduce our gearing range. For endurance races (50 to 100 mile), the XX1 is typically just enough range. Now that I'm used to 10-42, 11-40 isn't gonna cut it for me (to the person who says "get stronger" I'll say that I'm not a pro, but am typically a top-10-overall non-pro contender in events such as the Whiskey 50). I'm _never_ going to use a front derailleur again on a MTB either!
  • 4 0
 I think you guys hating the "no XTR x1" are kind of missing the point.

Shimano = OEM. Aftermarket is just a minority of their sales. 20, maybe 30%. OEMs want triples and doubles. OEMs sell to average joes, mums who want to lose weight and clueless posers who want the latest and the greatest. All those "useless" options are for them. 22-40 low gear sells a 29'er to a 300lb clyde just as efficiently as 1x11 sells an "enduro" bike to many of you.

All those "useless" options are for selling.

Having that out of the way.

This incarnation of XTR is kind of a letdown really. Cranks are overengineered and, arguably, hideous. The cassette is kind of 'meh' because it is 11 speed, this forcing an upgrade to get that extra cog. If it was a 10 speed, then it would be all-my-dix-want-nao for a sizable part of the market.

There is an innovative part there however.

It is the "direct route" FD. This device not only simplifies the cable routing and increases the clearance for the tyre. It also makes pretty good deal of bikes become FD compatible. All you need now is an e-type plate mounted to an ISCG and you now can mount and FD to your Trek Session. Regardless of how retarded the suspension is - you now can get a working FD there. Great piece of kit - sadly, in all the 1by craze it is going to be overlooked Frown
  • 4 0
 I haven't read all the comments so I might be repeating someone here. Ugliness aside, I feel we are ignoring the biggest issue. Why would I want to move my thumb 22 times to achieve the EXACT same ratio I can get from moving my thumb 11 times? Not to mention, between my reverb and remote CTD on my shock, I was excited to finally drop the front shifter off my handlebar.

I was a die hard Shimano guy for 15+ years before XX1 finally converted me last year. I was really hoping Shimano would do something to win me back. Sadly, this won't do it. They say the new XTR is perfect for elite athletes and riders with above average fitness. Well, I might not be elite, but I do have above average fitness and I'm certainly not sold. Being in good shape doesn't mean I want to sacrifice the range or add unnecessary components to my bike (ie: FD). This is a very anti-climactic and disappointing launch from a company that is clearly behind the times in MTB drive trains ... (I do love their brakes though) ...
  • 11 4
 What is a front derailleur?
  • 4 0
 i literally yelled at my computer when i saw the FD.. 'WHAT THE HELL IS A FRONT DERAILLEUR DOING WITH 11 SPEED STUFF'
  • 1 1
 Wait for the electronic shifters. That is what Shimano has up the sleeves.
According to Shimano the new front derailer shifts twice as well as the current one.
You'll be able to program the detailers/gearing and shifters as you like i.e. left shifts up, right down.
Then just forget about the you have a front detailers.
  • 4 1
 I wonder if the new chainring design will shed mud very well compared to the NW chainrings from SRAM and everyone else. As much as I love the narrow-wide design, riding in mud is such a pain because it just sticks on the chainrings tooth profiles.
  • 1 0
 Completely agree and have been looking forward to this kind of tooth design for sometime. FSA promised something similar ages ago with their "Megatooth" design although I'm yet to see that in shops
  • 3 0
 Aesthetics aside this is just bad. I have always admired Shimano's components as they have usually been well thought out and they are generally ahead of the curve. This is a half-assed attempt that lack some serious details. Single ring setups are where the MTB industry has been going for years, like it or not. I guess maybe they should shift their focus from the road market for a minute.
  • 3 0
 Race Face 32x42 cog=1.31 and 12x32=2.67 in a 1x10 that probably cost about 1/5 of what this costs. Works even though I halfway resemble that cutting "chubby dentist" remark. That said, I have a 16 year-old XTR derailleur that still works great.
  • 3 0
 I used to be a long time Shimano fan, but about 4 years ago switched to Sram and never looked back. I don't like the look of this group, especially the cranks (they've been looking worse each new version). They look like they belong on a Walmart bike and the logos or finish on the other parts makes them look cheap too. I do like the raw - no logo look of the prototypes.... and of course the vintage XTR on the Fat Chance. I appreciate the materials being used, but aesthetically you need to step it up. Can't see any reason to choose this group over XX1 or XO1. Sram has much better customer support after the sale than Shimano, another reason gotta go with Sram!
  • 3 0
 I want to love this new system but my first impression is I don't. I have been a Shimano guy for 20+ years and was hoping for more. I run a Shimano 1x10 w/ a 42T conversion ring and it is a no looking back, hands down better solution for me. I was hoping for Shimano direct competition to SRAM 1x11 (which is superior to my current set-up). I don't want a 2x system ever again or a reduced 1x 11. Biggest positive.. I could use the new rear derailleur (maybe). Are you listening Shimano?
  • 3 0
 Dear Shimano, I love your parts. I love the durability, the function, and the way my LBS will warranty anything no questions asked. But I want 11 speeds and a single chainring up front and no chainguide. I am not alone. Please listen. I would love to give you my money. Thank you, Long Time Shimano Customer
  • 3 0
 Say what you want but this proves it, Shimano has gotten to big and do what they want!!! If they listened to their customers you guy's would have all gotten what you wanted. Mountain Biking is surpassing Shimano, reminds me of Kodak film but hey like someone else said I guess they can just make brakes. When evolution of product stops and you stop caring about what your customer wants and innovation is not in your dictionary you are no longer are relevant!!! But hey at the same time I have been using SRAM for over 10 years and have never looked back, SRAM XO1 is Amazing and the different driver is here to stay SRAM has 3 Cassettes using this and look for more, even Chris King is releasing a new driver, say what you want but that is innovation at it's best!
  • 3 0
 WHat MTBs need is less complexity and 1x systems accomplish that by losing the front mech. It's a trend that will not go away and Shimano are dead wrong on this. I ran a Shimano 1x with Shadow Plus and Narrow/Wide ring and the chain retention sucked compared to my X01. SRAMS RD is a big part of why the chain stays on without a guide - again decreasing complexity.

I agree we don't need the gear range of 10-42, but SRAM played it safe to mimic a 2x10 that a lot of people were using. All of the cool features of XX1/X01 would have been fine with a 10-speed cassette. Why Shimano is not doing a wider range cassette is a mystery. So many people will buy one.

Shimano XTR Spandex RAce Snobs will buy the group to be part of the club, but XTR seems so pointless now.
  • 7 2
 I thought that spiral crate/box slide thing was pretty awesome. Drivetrain looks alright too.
  • 7 0
 Color me underwhelmed
  • 2 0
 It's still 2 chainring there... I wondering do them know sometime is very annoying when you shifting front mech'. When you in race, the front mech' is quite annoying when it's fail to shift up in time or because of big drop(impact), chain drop off from chainrings. Because of this reason I change to single chainring(e13) and a e13 chain guard, it's totally work even in enduro races... For me who need a double chainring for races?
  • 8 4
 XT will probably be just as good and for only half the price tag! No brainer really....
  • 5 1
 Or just get the new one-up big ring and get better spread, all for under a hundred bucks.
  • 1 0
 I definitely think that's going to be a problem for them: yes, I could buy your solution Shimano, or I could Just keep my existing parts and buy one of the many available cassette adapters and get a 42 tooth, or a 40 tooth and keep a short cage deraileur. It may be hard for them to break out of the OEM and "the jumps between shifts must be perfect!" crowd.
  • 8 3
 No thanks, I'll stick with SRAM..
  • 5 0
 Nigel Tufnel explains the importance of going to 11...
  • 1 0
 "Why not just make 10 the loudest?...These go to eleven."

I missed your comment on my first scroll through...but Nigel was the first person I thought of when I saw the article!
  • 2 0
 "But...... these go to eleven.... its 1 louder!" ahahaha Thats all this is about, too many Spinal Tap fans at Shimano and SRAM
  • 5 2
 Stoked, looking forward to replacing my six year old XT nine speed stuff next summer. I'm more than willing to wait for shimano.
  • 3 0
 nobody cares about 40t cassette ring made from aluminium?
as soon as it wore out (very soon) you will need a new cassette...brilliant!
  • 2 0
 One up is aluminum, so is Wolf's . Most front chainrings are aluminum and the front sees way more chain time that the lowest gear in the rear unless all you do is climb super steep hills. Just saying.
  • 2 0
 "do we need to set aside two paychecks to experience such wonders? probably not.."

that's smooth after $10k bikes and $1k carbon rim articles. sublime suggestion, rc. well done, sir.
  • 3 2
 As much as I want to see front derailleurs die, moving all this weight and complexity to the rear tire is starting to seem like a bad idea to me. We are moving the transmission off the suspended, structural parts of the bike and onto the unsuspended, exposed, ground-hugging part of the bike. There is more stress from being unsuspended, as well as adding to the unsuspended weight. If only gearboxes were as efficient as direct-chain drives...
  • 1 0
 "The front-load cable routing will be a challenge for some bike makers. - Greg Lambert photo" ?? 99% of bikes run cables along the down tube, not much of a challenge.
Looks like routing will be way more direct than going under the bottom bracket and great to hear the 2015 11 speed cassettes are compatible with 10 speed hubs.
My only concern is if the new chain is compatible with N.W as to run Race Face cranks/ring??
  • 2 0
 Al lot of molds were already made for carbon bikes with internal cable routing...
  • 1 0
 I'm disappointed in the look of that ugly crank. I like that you can run 1x, 2x, or 3x that is cool, I like that it does not need a proprietary free hub body, I also like the narrow Q factor, the smaller steps between gears is a pluse. But overall I may have to stick with SRAM on this one, and that tastes like vinegar coming out of my mouth.
  • 2 1
 Not sure where all the Shimano hate is coming from?

Putting XTR aside (because the VAST majority of us will never appreciate the diminishing returns we'd get for all that extra money), I really feel Shimano is producing some of the best products on the market for the AVERAGE consumer with their Saint, XT and SLX offerings. Speaking as a long-time mechanic and former SRAM convert who jumped from the Shimano ship about 10 years ago, I'm a firm believer that nowadays their brakes, cranks, and rear derailleurs can't be beat!

The only thing Shimano could do to ensure my eternal love would be a 9 speed clutch derailleur.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree @rory. There brakes are awesome, just bought a pair of SLX and don't think I could be happier. My 2012 ten speed XT crank set and 2011 rear derailleur work really well. Speaking of which would anyone like to buy an X0 rear derailleur, $100 and shes yours
  • 2 1
 You're right the basic stuff can't be beaten. But high end SRAM have it.
  • 2 1
 Interesting how a lot of people resort to bashing the product without even hearing how it performs (much less trying it). I'd say wait and see how it rides, I'm sure Shimano understands this stuff much better than all of us combined. Looks like another wheel-size-type turf war coming up
  • 2 0
 Am I the only one to notice Shimano is still using front derailleurs? This isn't the stone age! How can I like Shimano if they don't do the same thing as another popular company!
  • 2 1
 Why does Shimano even need to compete and be like SRAM anyway? SRAM components are expensive and they suck. I can just see SRAM going 1x12 with the next go around and hopefully Shimano won't go that route. It'll be watching cars go from manual transmission to CVT.
  • 1 0
 Just point out that the price difference is negligible between them and you can't say their components suck if you don't have their current components. I mean you can hat on SRAM because your a Shimano person that's fine Chevy guy's hate on ford for the same reason.
  • 1 0
 Will this Titanium 11 speed cassette be expensive. Oh yeah! As much as Srams? perhaps. And when it wears out?
Or you can convert a cassette with an adaptor.
More choices. I like it. Depends how much money you wish to throw down.
  • 1 0
 After laying everything out on a spreadsheet, with the gearing combinations. whether it's a triple or a double, the only time there's gears repeated is when it's whole gears, i.e. 1:1 or 2:1...no other time do the gears repeat. So...WTF IS EVERYBODY'S ISSUE? Go ride your bike.

Spreadsheet below:
www.pinkbike.com/photo/10816417
  • 2 1
 It could have turned out worse than this and I'd still never buy SRAM. Feels like something is breaking every time you shift, on everything from X5 to XX1 (yes, I've ridden all). But for now, Shimano 1x10 XTR has my name on it and is what I'll continue to run.
  • 1 0
 If what I looked up is right, assuming the prices are comparable I could go with zee crank get the xtr derailleur and cassette. Have something better than just going 1x10 for 700 ish. I wish I could just get x01 but I came to 1300 ish by the time I got everything including new hub driver. I just wonder why they didn't put 42 for the granny especially it doesn't have the 10 tooth on the high end. So you could easily just run a bigger front gear. But in the Midwest if the price is comparable to what I have figured up this will be the way I go. When does 2015 normally become available to public?
  • 1 0
 Strange. I was always under the impression that if something works better for reasons of engineering, you can't change that simply by marketing.

I can't really see how a 1x11 is going to create a superior drive system. As anyone should know, increasing the angle at which the chain interacts the drive train never really makes a better system mechanically. There's a reason that you don't ride the small (or big) ring in the front and in the back. It puts the chain at a disadvantage.

Using a single ring on the front gets rid of weight from extra rings and the front mech, but putting 11 in the back is questionable logic unless you are going to almost never use the extreme rings.

Don't get me wrong, I've run 1x setups before for commuters and runaround bikes, but unless you are using the bike for a single purpose (ie DH), flat roads, it's not really all that practical.

FWIW, I've been happily running 3x9 systems for nearly 20 years. I also ran a 1x7 for a while and have a belt drive runabout.

Also, I find it amusing that the article says "it's hard to imagine a better design for a front mech". 10 or 12 years ago, Shimano had an XTR front mech with spacing that adjusted itself throughout the range. This made it possible to have different dimensions at different points in its movement range. While it didn't really make a huge difference, that's a design that could give better front shifting if it wasn't so expensive in parts. The benefit did not outweigh the cost, but that doesn't mean it couldn't be better.
  • 1 0
 solid mechanical reasons for staying away from anything lower than a 11 speed rear...Shimano learned many years ago from their Capreo (9 tooth low intended for 20" travel bicycles) that A) they simply wear out VERY quickly (I prefer a 12 low) as all the stress is focused on one tooth rather than 2 or more at any given sub-second. and B) the hyper acute radius of the 9 tooth wasn't as efficient as, say, a 12 or greater tooth. Shimano really has this dialed (replacement warranty for that carbon chainring would be nice, though), and they simply don't do anything to be just another "we have one too!" company. Home run, big S. Now make me a XT version and I will be super, super happy.
  • 1 0
 Hmm, I see where folks are coming from with being disappointed-expecting something "better." I think Shimano should have just gone 11 to 42. Still 11-40 is pretty good. Its not like it is no competition for Sram. Funny how Shimano gets all proprietary with their cranks while Sram with their cassettes. I think both are ridiculous unless you are rich. Seriously, who pays $400 for a casstte? I'm sure Shimanos chain rings shift well but who could afford them especially when they get bashed up? Both are stupid. I understand most here like the whole 1x thing but I'm one of "them", a 29er hardtail rider, and I don't mind derailleurs. I like that I can instantly change the entire gear range for whatever terrain I run into. But then I'm poor and have no vehicle and actually ride to the trails. Thing is, maybe its because its a 29er, but I actually choose my granny over the 33 for the vast majoirty of my rides. I live on Vancouver Island, and I know that everyone says that they could do most on their 30something ring or don't need that low a gear but here, I think you might think differently. Trails are extremely steep and I need super low gears. I admit that the big ring is not required though . I use it just to spare the life of the middle. Oh, and as for shifting in the front, I use wickwerks who have over a dozen shift gates on the big ring so the shifts are alredy very fast and way cheaper than XTR.
One thing about Shimano is you know its built well and will shift amazing. They may be boring but they are reliable and have the feel dialed. Oh, and not all Sram brakes sucked, their "trail" series was actually really good. My Trail 9 brakes have been awesome, just too bad everything previous sucked.
  • 1 0
 Shimano is out of touch. I used to love their stuff, but Sram is producing what "average" riders want. I converted to 1x10 and would never ride with a front derailleur again. I was waiting to see what Shimano was going to release before upgrading to a dedicated 1x11 set up. They had a chance to do something great, but dropped the ball big time. How about a 10-40 cassette with a 28 chainring? The rear derailleur wouldn't have to work as hard to climb onto a 42 and there would be a high enough gear for fast trail riding. Plus, not having to buy a new freehub. I would have bought this in a heartbeat and I'm guessing so would lots of other people. But, instead they produce a 1x11 that only caters to the elite racers? This smacks of arrogance and "We are not going to admit that Sram made a good decision. So let's come out with something different, even if is worse". Clueless!
  • 1 0
 so this is a 1x11 system that doesn't need a new freehub body, that others can also use 2x or 3x system on if they want. same new chain.
and soon you'll have XT, SLX versions of it.

sorry how is this not better than XX1? (no, im just wondering. not trying to be sarcastic)
  • 1 0
 The cool thing is that you can opt for 1x11 or 2x11 using same cranks... So need to for an expensive upgrade. Couple that with no need for a special hub for cassette makes this a very cool option indeed. It's clear from the posts that there are some shimano haters but frankly their gear is top notch and cause for concern for all competitors. I will concede that a 1x11 that offers the xx 1 range would have been great but harden up guys and put some effort into it... The xtr 1x11 will see the dedicated float uphill
  • 1 0
 I'm the head mechanic at a bike shop. So get to see all the wear and tear on gear as well as testing all the latest stuff out. The new XTR hands down shifts better than XX1. And it wouldn't take an expert to feel it either! The durability is definitely on shimanos side too in every aspect. I'm constantly returning SRAM brakes for warranty issues or requiring bleeding. Shimano isn't perfect either but no where near the volume of problems as compared to bikes running SRAM.
  • 4 1
 Where the rest of it? I thought XTR was going DI2 for 2015. I've even seen some of the prototypes!
  • 2 1
 i guess it's kind of cool. unfortunately i have to keep riding my really old race face evolve dh cranks, with worn out splines and a chainring i stole from a donor bike/e13 supercharger combo.
  • 1 0
 I like that the cassette retrofits to all 10 speed hubs, but I'm a little gutted I finally upgraded my 1x9 to a 1x10 shimano system yesterday. Probably should have waited haha
  • 5 5
 Great stuff. I'll take Shimano over Sram any day. Having experienced both, Shimano just offers much better performance and most important, Shimano offers high levels of reliability. The words Reliability and Sram have never gone together well.
  • 2 0
 They have just acknowledged that SRAM is the leader but tried to cover it up by keeping a 2x chainring for "non-racers"

Shimano please don't fold to SRAM just yet
  • 4 0
 Shut up and go ride your bikes!
  • 2 2
 why is everybody bashing shimano? they have a different mentality than sram and make different products ... that suit certain types of people. i for one prefer multiple chain rings and closer jumps between different cogs.
if all companies made the exact same thing, everybody would be shouting that there is no diversity and no other options to pick.
  • 1 0
 Looks fantastic. Excellent engineering for quality long lasting shifting that other companies don't quite match. As a fit rider I can climb about anything on my 36 36 setup just now, so 36 - 40 will make sure on tired days!
  • 2 0
 Even thought it is pretty much the same thing as Sram XX1 witt he experience I have had with Sram I trust 100 times more Shimano I am a fan of Shimano i have to admit
  • 1 1
 Choose my drivetrain? OK I choose non-Shitmano & non-SPAM single speed or a gearbox. It's funny how Shitmano always seems to picture their gunmetal grey shit heavily shaded with a black background like it's supposed to look so high-tech & mysterious when all it is, is the same old obsolete shit they've been force feeding the MTB world since the invention of the MTB.
  • 1 1
 Its good to see Shimano sticking to their guns on this one. SRAM may have rushed a 1x11 group into the market, but Shimano actually took the time to R&D a proper setup with optimized gear spacing, without a proprietary freehub, and will probably be cheaper to boot. Not to mention Shimano products are historically more reliable and easier to service. SRAM may have the bling market cornered, but Shimano puts performance and function ahead of form every time.

TL;DR
SRAM half assed XX1 and it costs a fortune. XTR 11 speed will probably be cheaper, have a non-proprietay freehub, and will surely be more reliable. If you really need a 42t cog, then maybe you should run a 2x instead of a 1x.
  • 1 0
 wait for the electronic shifters... 2x11.... program the shifters and detailers to work as you like i.e. left shifts up, right down, and you won't know there is a front derailer there.
  • 1 0
 I am running a 32 race face N/W in the front and a 11-36 cassette in the back and it is very manageable. 11-40 cassette seams like it would be plenty big especially if you decided to go with the 30 t chain ring.
  • 4 1
 Di2 version will be unveiled separately I guess.
  • 1 0
 Plus the very interesting looking carbon wheels....
  • 1 0
 The vital press release has info on those.
  • 1 0
 The only advantage this has to SRAM is that the 11-40 will fit my current hubs. Which is actually a very good thing. I think 32 x 11-40 would be perfect for me.
  • 5 1
 shitmano
  • 1 0
 With how Shimano likes to dump product on the Euro market, look for this stuff to show up cheap on Chain Reaction and Wiggle for 75% off retail in 6-12 months.... Wink
  • 3 0
 Would the XTR derailer work with the Sram 10-42 cassette?
  • 1 0
 right?
  • 3 0
 Eleven. Exactly. One louder.
  • 1 0
 I am still waiting for Shimano's XTR level internal rear hub. Hey Shimano...you listening??!!!

Till then I will stick with 2x10.
  • 1 0
 Why's nobody mentioned the non-standard bcd?!? Everyone usually goes nuts when a new standard is introduced... Anyway, that in itself kind of ruins it for me...
  • 3 1
 Lame. Front derailleurs are lame. Shimano is totally missing the pulse of the industry.
  • 2 0
 I run xtr including brakes, 10spd everything and will continue to do so....this just gets a boo!
  • 1 0
 If the chain works with aftermarket w/n chainrings, then all you need to buy is the cassette, chain, and shifter for a good 1 x 11 setup.
  • 2 0
 Shimano's Ice tech brakes are double dribble dank, but Sram gets my nod on the drivetrain. I hate FD's!
  • 1 0
 I'm glad to see how SLX 2017 / Deore 2018 will look like, so I could replace my current M5XX/M6XX combo groupset at that time.
  • 2 0
 That chain ring looks like the molded plastic pants protector on the bikes at Target.
  • 1 0
 The prototype of the cranks looks way cooler than the production model. Infact all that protostuff is eye candy! But then.... What a ugly spider, dear lord Big Grin
  • 7 5
 Shut up and take my soul (as I will never accumulate enough money)
  • 2 1
 Not the best looking XTR crank, I gotta say. I think the best looking one so far was the last 9-speed one.
  • 2 1
 Any suggestions as to when it will be available? 2015 seems too far away and vague, the whole world will be on SRAM by then.
  • 1 0
 Madison say it will be available in August, with the wheels "rollin'" out in October.
  • 2 0
 Glourious Shimano master race. Will stick to my 10sp XT setup though Big Grin
  • 1 0
 One or two paychecks go home shimano your drunk more like 4 or 5 paychecks for us regular folks
  • 1 0
 He forgot to mention that the XTR. has less pedal effort vs revolutions in the middle part of the cassette than Sram
  • 5 3
 Dear Shimano, it's called research and develop. You're doing it wrong.
  • 3 2
 I gaurentee you the clutch works better than SRAMS. I'll also gaurentee thier brakes don't suck like srams....wait, you must be on the sram boat, which has NO research and design else their brakes won't suck.
  • 5 0
 Actually sir I run everything Saint, except for XX1 carbon crank arms with a Wolftooth w/n. I'm just saying this is a poor and late response to 1 X 11, most would agree.
  • 4 3
 What people do not realize is that with XX1 free hub design SRAM can not make economical cassettes that comprise the bulk of the market. What Shimano did is perfectly adequate. Racers and gravity riders do not need the gear spread of 10-42 as much, and most normal folks will benefit from wider spread of 2x11. Front derailler is not a problem.
  • 4 2
 +1 to this guy^.

People complaining about them not making a wider range cassette like srams 10-42 would complain equally as much if shimano made a proprietry freehub body so they can use their cassettes. The majority of riders (suprisingly dont live on pb) actually still do use 2 or 3 chainrings so this stuff will be great for them.
  • 1 0
 Nothing precludes them from making a new hub design later on. If they do, I wish it supports cogs in separate groups, unlike XX1, not on a single spider, and goes down to 9t - I am glad new derailleur does have more chain wrap.
  • 2 0
 ^ 100% on point.

The problem with the sram driver is that if you're going to make an alternative and claim it's superior to try and get it to become the new standard and not just some proprietary BS, you have to make it in the same ballpark cost-wise. Having only $500 cassettes as drive train options doesn't make it more attractive for 2 lower teeth. No thanks, I'll save $400, change my front chain rings and have the same gear ratio.
  • 3 2
 I don't think many of you know...but the electric XTR is pretty boss....but then again, most of you kids on here are haters.
  • 3 1
 where can I buy sram stock?
  • 1 0
 Sorry but every time I'm buying shimano for the brakes and sram for the drive train, works much better for me every time
  • 2 1
 Looks like a sparkly party balloon with no air in it. This is a sad answer to SRAM 1 x 11
  • 2 0
 XX1/XO1 wins on aesthetics alone.
  • 1 0
 sorry shimano but i think i'll hang on to my 9-speed xt's for a little bit more.
  • 2 0
 No! The last Gen was so pretty!
  • 2 0
 Bio Pace and Rapid Rise two of Shimano's best ideas
  • 1 0
 Glad i replaced my XTR M980 (3x10) with XX1 and didn't wait for this XTR 1x11 crap!!!
  • 1 0
 thought they may have at least tried to trump them with a cableless option? overall disappointment... Frown
  • 1 0
 This was released in April, but still not available for purchase until late August???
Pick up your game Shimano............
  • 1 0
 So when is this stuff going to be available????
4 months since it was released and still not available.................
  • 1 0
 SPROCKETS you fucking idiots, and not all the fucking sprockets are titanium, dick heads.
  • 1 0
 This reminds me of hyundai's aesthetics. They ditched the elegance of the previous xtrs.
  • 3 1
 2x11????
  • 2 0
 Or 3x11!!
  • 3 0
 I think what I really want is a 1x3
  • 3 1
 So ugly...
  • 2 1
 Waiting for X91 that will take over the world.
  • 1 0
 Look´s like alien objects.
  • 2 1
 really shimano is that it ,RUBBISH.
  • 1 0
 Good ! Prices of 9 speed transmission is gonna go down.
  • 3 1
 Missed opportunity.
  • 3 1
 Total bust
  • 2 3
 F sake everyone I don't care for modern up to date components, 8 or 9 speed Alivio works mint. O my life's not complete until shimano make an 11 speed mtb groupset.
  • 1 0
 Looks like my 2013 xtr cranks are going up in value. Thanks.
  • 1 0
 super ugly................
  • 1 0
 Front mech !?
2x !?
3x !?!?!
  • 2 0
 meh.
  • 1 0
 What's with all the ant-dentite comments lately?
  • 1 0
 One word : Disappointing!!
  • 2 0
 i miss stx rc
  • 1 0
 looks alright.. nothing special though.
  • 3 2
 IT'S HERE
  • 7 2
 and super eXTRa expensive!
  • 45 4
 "Single ring setups are for racers and riders with above-average fitness level" - Thank you Shimano... thank you! I would not be in that fitness state if not the people I met in my life . I wish to thank my mom for giving me good food, Dad for being hard on me, grandma for playing voleyball with me, and mr Blankey, my maths teacher who I was running from everyday when he was touching me in the back of his van. In the meantime I will go ride my bike and hold watch for those super humans cranking it up on XX1 42t rear cog and 28t chainrings... so strong, so heroic...

Dear Pinkbike editors: please arrange an award for the first picture of XTR9000 tripple chainset and 11-40 cassette in action.
  • 5 0
 How tf do you down vote a comment that funny.
  • 1 0
 Isn't XTR the equivalent of the XX1 in terms of price?
  • 4 0
 parkourfan - not sure why anyone would negative prop that comment. I'm still laughing. Here are two possible reasons. 1. The negative propper actually had childhood that is described by Waki and reading his comment brought back some kind of post tramatic stress because the reader never sought the proper counselling. Maybe it was Mr. Blankey. IDK I'm not an efin doctor 2. The negative propper takes all this crap way too seriously and can't believe that Waki or anyone else for that matter would post such a comment on such a serious and life altering topic as 11 by transmissions for MTBs. 1 or 2 by.
  • 4 1
 As a diehard Shimano devotee. I find this latest XTR a disappointment. I applaud the improved 2X options. But why not a "Dentist" version of 2X? Why a useless triple?
I am riding a 1X Wolf Tooth /RF Next SL 26T setup with the 11x42 rear. This is excellent with only the gap to the 19T cog the lone issue, which a 16T cog would probably solve.
I am less than the "above avg fitness level" Shimano describes and everything I ride is steep. Me thinks their market research is questionable. In fact I have to question a great deal of the marketing reads on cycling in general.

I think that Wolf tooth and the others making their XX hack jobs are looking pretty good for the next year or so as Shimano has just struck out for 2015.
  • 1 1
 A wolftooth 42 on the new 11-40 may be perfect.
  • 4 1
 The biggest news is that it fits standard 8-9-10 freehub bodies, I think that's brilliant and and I can't wait for the XT and SLX versions to come along and kill the XD driver stone dead. $500 for a hub shell and cassette, or an entire groupset for the same? Such a hard decision.
  • 2 2
 Exactly !!! Single chainrings sound great when you're riding bike parks where you can take the chairlift up.
  • 2 0
 Tkoberle 1x setups sound also great when you need to shift through whole range very often. Like in XC racing. Then when you are riding up&down in terrain requiring chain retention. I used a clitch rear mech on 2x setup and I was dropping chain to granny. Not as pften as with standard rear mech but still. 1x is just more reliable.
  • 1 0
 Long live FD!
  • 1 0
 Finally
  • 1 0
 Look at those crank!
  • 1 1
 I love the SRAM ad at the top of this article.
  • 1 1
 really nice group. I can't wait to see it in Saint
  • 1 3
 Even current XTR front derailler shifts better than SRAM rear. 2 front rings are not dead, not at all.
  • 1 2
 the XX1 I now have shifts better than any of the XT/XTR I have ever had on my bikes in the past....
  • 3 0
 Absolutely no way that is true. 10sp asymmetric Shimano chain + Shimano cassette + Zee + Saint shifter is the best there is a was. And adjustable clutch.

Anybody who disagrees just does not know what he is talking about and can't setup drivetrain. Indisputable fact.
  • 1 0
 Sorry to burst your bubble but the new XTR easily "feels" nicer to shift. I'm head mechanic at my local and I get to play with everything from both. I used to ride SRAM but shimano just plain lasts longer especially their chains.
  • 1 0
 I just installed the new 11 speed! Omfg it's soo nice! Fully agree with you though as a bike mechanic and dealing with repairs and warranty issues daily!
  • 2 4
 The moment we have all been waiting for!
  • 5 7
 Who uses gripshift?...
  • 3 3
 Hopefully nobody!
  • 1 1
 I did in 1998/99. On my 8 speed SRAM equipped DBR DH bike that only had 3 inches in the rear and 2.5 inches in the front. Damn that thing was fast...
  • 8 4
 Sram XO gripshift is awesome. You can do "campy-drops" i.e. drop and raise gears in one throw rather than clicking sequentially. And until you've ridden it, you have no idea.....which is 99% of the posters opinions on here, people who haven't ridden it but somehow have an opinion on how well it works...
  • 4 1
 My kids do. Much easier for them to keep track of gears.
  • 1 2
 I used grip shift for years, still prefer normal shifters...
  • 2 0
 used gripshift on Rohloff, no problem to use and very easy to operate
the only downside I found with gripshift is; if you are braking you can't change gears at the same time, where as on the trigger shift it is still possible

for a Rohloff is not so much of a problem because you can easily jump 14th down to 1st gear quickly once you stop braking
on Derailleur you can get easily caught out ie after a G out
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