First Look: 2020 Canyon Neuron:ON eMTB

Mar 10, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  

Today Canyon launch their updated Neuron:ON eMTB. The bike, which first launched last year, carries over many of its Neuron traits however it receives numerous updates. The main goal of the changes, according to Canyon, was to improve the handling and capability of the bike. There are four models of the Neuron:ON, including a women's model, available with prices ranging from 3,599 EUR to 4,599 EUR.

Major updates on the Neuron:ON include the battery being integrated into the downtube, which effectively lowers the center of gravity and improves the bike's handling. The rider interface has also been improved with a new integrated off/on switch and a weatherproofed USB-C charging port in the top tube so riders can charge lights, phones, GPS units, etc. while riding.
Canyon Neuron:ON Details

• Intended use: Trail eMTB
• 130mm front/rear travel (Sizes M-XL)
• 120mm front travel, 125mm rear travel (Sizes XS, S)
• 29" wheels (Sizes M-XL)
• 27.5" wheels (Sizes XS, S)
• 2.6" tire clearance
• Aluminum frame
• Shimano STEPS E8000motor
• 504-WH battery
• Price: $3,699 - $4,599 USD

The cockpit of the Neuron:ON is tidy. The off/on button is integrated into the top tube and, on the S-XL size frames, there's a USB-C charging port so you're never left without power for lights, mobile phones, or GPS beacons.

Batteries are now integrated into the downtube which allowed Canyon to fine-tune the ride feel of the bike, lowering the center of gravity and improving handling characteristics.

The larger sizes of the Neuron:ON use 29" wheels and the smaller sizes roll on 27.5" tread to keep the same ride feel across sizes.


Updated Battery Location and Controls

The team at Canyon say that the bike is designed to have the same ride feel across all sizes, XS-XL. The XS and S frames feature smaller 27.5" wheels and less travel. The shock tune across all of the sizes is the same but the leverage rate of the XS and S bikes is higher and more linear, allowing lighter riders to run higher air pressures and letting them get the most out of whatever shock is on the bike.

The motor is the Shimano Steps E8000 system. Canyon believe that this is the optimal system for this bike as the motor and battery are small enough to give the engineering team the ability to help the bike handle as well as it possibly can. Although there are larger battery systems available, this is the largest they wanted to go without sacrificing handling traits for more power.

The battery can be charged on or off of the bike. Riders can opt to remove the battery with a 4mm Allen key if charging on the bike is not practical. With the standard 2M charger, a fully drained battery can be charged to 80% in four hours or 100% in 7.5 hours. A faster 4M charger cuts those times in half. Canyon doesn't include the 4M charger as standard due to the substantial cost increase, but it is an option on their website.


Geometry and Suspension

The suspension and geometry of the Neuron:ON largely stays the same as the 2019 version. Seat tube angles have progressed to be slightly steeper with the XS and S frames now sporting 75-degree angles and the M-XL sizes resting at 74.5-degrees.

Bikes come standard with either a Fox DPS or RockShox Deluxe Select rear shocks but can be fitted with any in-line air shock that fits. XS and S frames use a 190mm eye-to-eye with 47.5mm of stroke to deliver 125mm of travel and the larger frames measure 210mm with 50mm of stroke which delivers 130mm of travel. As mentioned above, the kinematics of the XS and S bikes are different than the larger sizes.



Other Details
The bikes are spec'd with eMTB appropriate parts. The M-XL models have 203mm rotors front and rear. The smaller sizes have a 203mm rotor on the front paired with a 180mm out back. All bikes come with four-piston calipers on the front and two-piston calipers in the back.

Steel freehub bodies on Shimano hubs are designed to handle higher torque loads and bikes have either a Fox 34, RockShox Pike, or RockShox Recon RL fork, depending on the model.

The bike also has an eMTB specific saddle, designed to keep riders from slipping off the back during steep climbs, a fully integrated upper chainguide, and handlebars with internal wiring to keep the cockpit neat as possible.






For more information visit www.canyon.com


145 Comments

  • 62 5
 Seat tube still longer than reach... Someone is stuck in the past...
  • 5 4
 I have never looked that closely into e-bike geometry but with the bb mounted motor I can imagine that there is even less room for a seatpost than you'd already see in a "modern" kinked seattube frame. So to still accommodate the longer dropper seatposts (and the actuators for internal cable routing) the need the extra length. I do agree that for me (with 460mm reach and a 400mm seattube and the saddle nearly slammed) a frame like this would be unacceptable. But for many people I see riding with dropper seatposts this apparently isn't much of an issue. They typically clamp their post such that with the dropper extended, they more or less reach XC height. For me that would be about 700mm from the bb. So even though it's been well over a decade I've had the saddle that high, I still have this option with a 400mm rigid post (extended the full 300mm out of the 400mm seattube). People running droppers at full XC height though. With say 185mm drop they end up at 515mm. Not sure what collar height is of a modern dropper but someone riding the size L frame gets a 480mm seattube it seems. So that still gives 35mm for the collar, which seems doable.

So yeah, it wouldn't be for me because it doesn't allow me to get my saddle as low as I'd like it to be for most of my riding. But seeing the way most people set up their bikes these days, this one probably suits them well.
  • 6 1
 Agreed. I am 187cm and a 520mm seat tube on an XL was exactly the same as on my Spectral and is too long. I switched to a Levo and the seat can be slammed out of the way much easier.
  • 4 0
 @vinay: pretty sure the overly long seat tube isn’t just a Canyon E-bike thing. I’ve seen the same complaint about their regular frames.
  • 8 1
 @vinay: why would you run a dropper not at XC height in the up position? I get the idea of not having one at all, if your riding style, fitness and trails suit it; slam that seat and crank it.
But paying all that money, maintenance and weight just to have multiple positions that are only good for resting and maybe pedaling down a flat road? Why bother?
  • 2 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: or, have it at dh height when slammed and its at least better when extended. It all depends what you priorities are regarding your riding style. I prioritise a low seat when descending, but also appreciate a decent pedalling position, so an inch or so up but not the full 3 or 4 I'd actually need is where my dropper sits. A 180mm one up would be perfect and allow slammed and xc modes.
  • 2 0
 @Eduardoramundo: Huh, so, rather than a mistake they have a different option more to the factors that meet your criteria....odd how that works. I have the same issue buying jeans.

Last weekend in Ocala FL @ Fattire Festival the Canyon was head and shoulders FAR busier than any other vendor for folks looking to demo their wares...all in all, what amazing bikes.
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: I guess everyone is different, but for me, if its more than an inch or two below ideal XC height, then I basically have to stand up to put down any sort of useful pedalling power. At which point I may as well just slam the thing and stand up anyway.
  • 2 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: definitely everyone is different, depending on the bike I feel a bit more comfortable with it dropped an inch or so from max height, to keep weight centred and the bars within comfortable reach.
  • 10 8
 I am not a fan of woke as fuk geos, rather reasonable exaggarations as a way of spicing up our lives... but honestly when seat tube is longer than the reach, we should all be allowed to shame the maker senslessly. It should be a tag under each article with such bike #precambriangeometry
  • 5 0
 what is the weight?
  • 1 2
 @AyJayDoubleyou: Well yeah, that's why until now I still haven't tried a dropper seatpost. For the riding I do I haven't had the urge to raise the saddle, let alone do so on the fly. My frame does have a seat tube diameter that is compatible with most modern dropper seatposts so the option is there if I really want it. But my local climbs are a couple of minutes long at most, no point sitting down. But I can definitely imagine it would be great for those into marathon racing (where it is important to preserve energy but still hit some tech sections) or simply for those who can't or don't want to stand up for more than a couple of minutes. To each their own.

Either way, the comment was about the reach being shorter than the seat tube length. I never realized this relation was a thing to be honest!
  • 2 0
 @vinay: dropper posts aren't about climbing
  • 1 0
 @brookland27: Alright, sorry I just meant to say I currently don't feel the need to have a high saddle (for whatever it would be good for) let alone be able to adjust saddle height on the fly.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: The problem isn't the reach, but just how absurdly high the saddle is at it's lowest position. I own a Spectral and the saddle feels like it's always up because of that giant mast. Why companies don't simply spec a straight 400mm or so seat tube, with 210mm+ droppers is beyond me... By the time you add the dropper collar, saddle and clamp height to these new Canyons, all you can run is 125 or 150 droppers...
  • 1 2
 @LaurensVR: Droppers longer than 150 are unnecessary for anyone shorter than 190cm, at least on longer travel bikes, particularly 29ers. By average top of the rear tire is at around 430mm seat tube length. If you want to accomodate even 150 of travel you don't need/want your seat to be any lower than 500mm above BB... it just makes no sense. ATM with 75deg seat angles being the standard, a 180cm tall person uses 450-470 reach in order to get reasonable ETT like 610-630. So seat tube length could be 430, max 450 for up to 185 person...
  • 1 1
 If you don't have your dropper slammed to a seat colar you are either:
A. on the wrong size frame
B. on the correct size frame but too short of a dropper
C. riding a bike with a geometry from the dark ages...basically, anything earlier than 2016
  • 1 0
 @eugenux: not gonna lie, that's pretty obvious. The biggest issue is the travel jumps between the different sizes, it's why as soon as I can I'll be buying a one up 180mm. I might need to space it down to 170, but it'd be a whole lot better than the 125mm I've got now, that is 40mm up in the frame, has a 15mm bigger collar, and could be 5-10mm higher occasionally. The 'adjust to suit' breed of droppers really are the best option available, because, as one up say, it gets the maximum drop for more people.
  • 1 0
 @LaurensVR: Well yeah, as mentioned in my first post seat tubes this tall aren't for me. I've got 400mm now and wouldn't get anything much taller than that. Most modern bikes appear to be taller though. Not only Canyon. I'd "blame" this on the fact that because they now want to spec big wheels (27.5" or bigger) in the rear, they often have to resort to a kinked seat tube so that limits the room they have for the seatpost. Liteville does an offset straight seat tube so they can spec a longer seatpost but most brands still seem to want to connect the seat tube to the bb. So with the limited straight room they have they could still make it short. Which would be fine with me but those who want to use a dropper actually get less use out of them. If you want to slam the collar you can only get a shorter dropper (with less travel) or you need to extend the seat tube like Canyon does and install a longer dropper but also have to cope with a higher minimum length. So that would probably be why brands go with some middle ground. The options to have your cake and eat it too are still there but you'd need to look for brands who spec a straight seat tube or at least a longer straight section. Liteville comes to mind. There probably are others too.

By the time (or even if) I'm converted, I hope they have this stuff sorted Wink .

@WAKIdesigns : I don't know, I think that's only part of it. The reason I like my saddle low is that I can move around over my bike to get my weight where I want it. And maybe push the saddle one side just above my knee. The instances where I'd do that obviously isn't when the rear wheel is heavily loaded (like when the rear suspension bottoms out, if I'd have that). Sure the rear tire still needs to clear the saddle when you do bottom out but that's it. I haven't dug that deep into axle paths and seat tube angles as you may have so I don't know what the limit is. But I do have a preference where I want my saddle to be with respect to the bb and if the rear wheel limits how low the saddle can go I can see me rather spec a smaller rear wheel or get a bike with less rear suspension travel than deal with a higher saddle. Not saying I wouldn't be able to learn that, but I do feel the lower saddle is more fun.
  • 24 1
 First bike I know of that's got a stutter.
  • 6 11
flag fiatpolski (Mar 10, 2020 at 5:45) (Below Threshold)
 Right? They should have called it the Neur:on.
Or Mor:on?
  • 2 0
 new neuron:on
  • 14 2
 I'm going for a ride on my new neuron:on on monday. Confusinging.
  • 25 4
 2015 geometry.-
  • 3 1
 Also not sure I've ever seen the HTA get steeper as size goes up...
  • 2 0
 Hahahaha
  • 2 0
 @tgent: Different wheel sizes so tweaked hta
  • 2 2
 Why because a medium doesn't have 460+ reach. Not everyone wants a boat anchor of a bike. Everyone e seems to be so enamored with slopestyle comps where guys throw tricks but at the same time want super long drive itself plow rigs. I do t get it
  • 2 0
 @brookland27:

I don’t care about long reach. 450mm is enough on a medium....
But, STA not steep enough, chainstays too long, HA too steep, seattube too long.
  • 1 0
 @brookland27:

Try a bike with a size longer than your usual. The effect is quite remarcable. #iamafan
  • 1 0
 @eugenux: I've sized up on my DH bike this year to test out a longer reach more long term in aggressive riding scenarios. I expect to enjoy a bit more room there. On my trail bike ( I dont do enduro) I hated the super slack long reach rigs I've tried. They are stretched out less agile and IMO less fun in all but the high speed downhill segments. Harder to throw in the air too. Just my 2 cents of course
  • 10 0
 "The bike also has an eMTB specific saddle, designed to keep riders from slipping off the back during steep..." how does someone handle this on a normal bike?
  • 4 0
 I recall Sam Hill has a knobby saddle. Initially improvised with tire knobs on them but later on they got a saddle that had these integrated. Obviously his goal wasn't climbing though Wink . That said, I get that e-bikes are designed for steeper climbing but I can't see how you could get so overly chilled out that you'd slide off the back. With pressure on the pedals and grip on the bars, wouldn't you just loop out before this happens?
  • 7 3
 By standing and stomping on the pedals rather than la-z-boy reclining.
  • 13 3
 That’s just a load of crap called marketing, creating solutions for non existing problems.
  • 7 8
 @Twowheelsjunkie: Just like ebikes...
  • 6 3
 Normal bikers will be off & pushing so the saddle wont matter except as a handle. Ebikers will be riding up steeper stuff.
  • 4 0
 @Twowheelsjunkie: I was thinking the same but the reality is that you can and will ride stuff with an ebike that you wouldn't even bother without a motor because you would have to carry the bike.
  • 1 1
 I'm going to preface this by saying I'm a big fan of e-bikes. I have never EVER heard someone say anything even remotely similar to, "I gotta get me one of them e-bikes so I can ride that shit that's soooo steep you'd slide off a normal saddle." To reiterate, this has never been said ever.
  • 2 0
 @fullfacemike: Hard to believe you really know what you are talking about. The motor allows me to ride ascends which I probably could ride a few meters without a motor but it's not economical because it costs too much energy and you can't create enoug velocity not to tip over. You won't slip off a normal saddle but riding steep stuff for minutes or hours that you wouldn't bother riding without a motor for more than a few seconds you'll also save energy because you don't have to sit cramped as the saddle supports you.
  • 1 0
 Selle San Marco Concor Supercorsa.
  • 15 6
 It looks good, but I am not sure about the engineering and manufacturing quality. Their road frames were exposed a few weeks ago. Canyon have a bit to work to do, in terms of geometry aswell
  • 18 1
 Someone is Hambini fan? Big Grin
  • 4 1
 how and where were they exposed? Link?
  • 10 1
 @pakleni: cant stand that hambini dude, he's so far up his own ass he can see out of his mouth. he may be a fine engineer but watching the way he works on bikes makes me cringe, it's all so over blown, for what is basicly the same thing every time.
  • 7 2
 @b45her: I personally find his videos hilarious. I think a lot of things he says are exaggerated, but he has valid points as well. He is more engineer than he is Cyclist
  • 5 0
 ..and he is much more an engineer than mechanic. That being said, aside his picturesque style, his engineering is just spot on.
  • 1 0
 @b45her: Only Hambini video I was able to watch and actually like was the Sram GXP but he was saying what literally any shop mechanic would tell you, just with fancier words
  • 3 0
 @b45her, @pakleni I think most engineers are more engineer than mechanic. Seems pretty much the same in most industries.
  • 4 1
 @pakleni: Hambini is a really sad person, so much hate speech in such a short time.
  • 3 2
 @Tiez: hahahaha hate speach hahahaha that's hahahaha funny.
  • 1 2
 @pakleni: possibly but lots of the issues he complains about are caused by people trying to press that sleeved BB contraption he sells into frames that are designed to accept plastic cups. the whole idea of the pressfit bb was so that manufacturing costs could be cut because they dont have to be super accurate or need the frame threaded.
try to push a solid billet of metal into those holes and ofcourse you are going to have issues occasionally.
  • 4 0
 @b45her: The companies he's pissed off with suck, They are selling defective frames with an oval bb instead of round like it should be, His bb solves that problem, Press fit bb requires everything to be round or the bearings wear out very fast!! Hahaha
  • 2 0
 @b45her: No, the frames are defective, BEFORE he installs his Custom BB. I think a lot of people are just upset because he exposes their favourite bike brand. Hambini often tries to highlight that the bike companies are using marketing to conceal crap manufacturing quality.
  • 1 1
 @markar: he complains about everything and everyone in an attempt to peddle his silly little sleeve, i've fitted hundreds of pressfit BB's and i'm yet see one where any of the problems he complains about exist.
  • 11 0
 Finaly a USB Port can't wait to install a smal Fridge and drink an ice cold can of Monster on the Trailhead
  • 1 0
 the dream
  • 6 0
 Since when does 7 different cables flapping around just like every other mail order bike constitute a 'tidy cockpit'??

Editors searching for things to write it would seem.
  • 5 1
 I just can't understand why basically every E-Bike that has come out besides the YT Decoy has some little ass shock on it with a tiny stroke meant for a cross country bike. These are heavy bikes that are often piloted by larger individuals. Why would you design these with such high leverage ratios that the shock has to be basically maxed out air pressure for someone over 200lb? It makes zero sense.
  • 2 0
 Lots around with coils, check out the Range , Kenevo, Meta......
  • 10 2
 67.5° HA, ugh ....
  • 4 3
 What is the justification for making mountain bikes with ha steeper than 65 anymore? Just get your chest a little lower and learn some decent bike handling skills for climbing rather than make the bike feel like garbage on the downhills.
  • 2 3
 @DoubleCrownAddict: just stupid... this is a non sense.
OF COURSE a steeper HA is better to climb. And the Neuron is a trail bike, not a DH bike.
Not so long ago, 65° was in downhill territory...
  • 1 0
 @RoadRunner13: Many short travel trail bikes are quickly approaching 65. Marin Rift Zone being one of them.
  • 4 0
 I had hoped that the new generation Neuron would be a sick downcountry bike... nope they went and made a EBike for XC racers. SMH
  • 5 1
 Have to say... This is the worst looking bike aesthetically i have seen in a long time. Canyon, i expected better. Hope it rides well.
  • 2 0
 People complaining about the geometry on this shouldn't be the surprised. The sender is the only Canyon bike with "up to date" geometry from them. Strive is steep, Spectral is steep(ish), Neuron is steep.
  • 3 0
 Torque is (almost)decent.
  • 1 0
 @eugenux: The torque would make an amazing park/freeride bike with a 200 or 190mm Double crown fork up front and a coil on the back.
  • 4 0
 It's only a matter of time until they come with integrated LCD screens for nav and infotainment systems.
  • 3 0
 I'd be down for some heated grips.
  • 3 3
 I ditched that saddle after the second ride, its an easy bike to get familiar with, only that the extra pull that the motor gives will really pull you back, but some extra lowering of the chest or getting off the saddle will compensate.
Canyon geometry is spot on for giving the bikes a very similar handling to unpowered bikes.
But the saying that this new integrated batterie lowers the center of gravity seems to defy physics as it looks like some mass has been displaced towards the top ????
  • 3 0
 Exactly! Integration of the battery made the bike heavier and brought weight more up and to the front which is a step back. It looks better, but everything else gets worse.
  • 1 0
 I hope that steel e-MTB specific freehub is stronger than the standard Shimano XT Microspline. I have experienced 2 failing on me plus another one on my mate's bike. Out of 3 that I know, not bad,
  • 2 1
 I don’t need an Ebike at age 51 but damn I’d love take this for a rip around my local trails just so for the sake of it. It would be a hoot.
  • 4 1
 That's how I ended up with my Levo. My wife wanted to try an ebike, so I figured what the hell... Huzzah consumer debt!
  • 5 1
 No one needs anything really bar food & water. But I wanted one, so I bought one. More riding, more runs. My legacy pedal bike got sold soon after.
  • 1 0
 @mcozzy: Well, roof and access to medical care.
  • 6 7
 Since the Levo SL arrived, bikes with this type of power and battery weight must only appeal for all day rides (which i would still do on a normal mtb as time is not the problem) or for someone too posh to pedal? The additional weight makes them so unwieldy on descents they dont feel like riding a bike anymore. If you haven´t got any background in cycling i guess thats a moot point.
  • 3 2
 ...or any bike prior the Levo SL with a Fazua engine - Levo SL is nothing new in terms of weight, but one thing Spesh does better then any other brand is marketing
  • 3 3
 @listeryu: Ahh come on man, that’s absurd. I got a full day of big riding in SoCal last month on one. There ain’t no Fazua offering out there that comes close.
  • 3 2
 @listeryu: Except that the fauza motor is less powerful than spz's SL, and the only bike I have seen with a fauza motor is horrendous (Lapierre), while the Levo SL is quite the looker.
  • 6 5
 The levo sl is out for like what, a month now? Too posh to pedal? That’s definitely not what its about, pal. Mine is the furthest thing from “unwieldy” on the downhills as it could be. I might even throw around the word composed. You’re just talking out of your British ass
  • 4 4
 @listeryu: I agree, but no major company does Fazua. Lapierre did for a moment, and I wouldn't buy a fkng LaPierre even if Nico himself was supposed to deliver it to my door personally with a bottle of Cristalle and 3h of free skill clinics.
  • 4 4
 @Caiokv: shittiness of LaPierre goes way beyond how awful it looks. Canyon is Opel, Lapierre is fkng Peugeot or worse. They were fine in Zesty times around 2010 because there weren't many better bikes. Almost everyone moved forward since then.
  • 1 0
 @listeryu: i rode the Fazua motor in several different frames. Its a neat system, and the battery weight was so good i had an extra battery in the rucksack. The friction/motor drag compared to the Levo SL motor is significantly increased, hence my choice.
  • 1 0
 @Bustacrimes: I thought that the main selling point on the fauza was not friction when powered off?

When I rode the SL I forgot to test it with the power off, how much drag is there?
  • 2 2
 @Caiokv: Not really i think. I think you have to remove the motor and put it into your back pack. to make it frictionless. Not sure. Big seeling points are also that you can easily remove the motor and the low weight. My biggest problem with Leveo SL is that you can't even remove the battery.
  • 5 4
 So unwieldy on descents? That's not a very specific complaint. Once most riders get used to the weight they can do everything and more on a 50 pound e bike that they could do on a regular 35 pound bike. I'm clearing jumps on mine that I didn't try on my old bike because I couldn't get the speed for them. The boost you get from a couple pedal strokes on full power is a real turbo boost. Because it's got a motor I can run a double crown fork and still climb super fast, yet go faster downhill than I could ever dream of on a bike with a sissy single crown fork.

I'm becoming convinced that the people who complain about the weight of e bikes just read about e bikes and imagine things more than actually having long term experience with them.
  • 2 3
 @DoubleCrownAddict: with all due respect there is enough difference when switching from Double Down casings to full on DH Casings... yes I have ridden E-bike they are not that eager to pop... the difference is bigger than DH bikes vs Enduro bikes. Getting used to the weight does not mean that there is no evident difference in handling. This is why Fazua wins. Because when you hit the lifts or shuttles you remove most of it. It all depends on what you want off course, some people, including some of really fast riders, just plow through stuff. For them. it makes zero difference. In the very same way I get pissed off when people use the word "playful". I want to see the person saying it do 360s, preferably backflips and general sideawys styling on big lines before they tell me they need a "playful bike". Because inmost cases, it's some stupid talking of a bloke who can't even do an X-Up. I mean, there's definitely some water in what you are saying.
  • 2 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I'm not familiar with Fazua but having a removable battery seems strange to me. Why would you shuttle an e bike in a truck or take it to a bike park and chairlift it instead of climbing? Seems like you want the best of both worlds but what it really sounds like is a pain in the ass with having to take the battery out, find a place to store it, and then have to go retrieve it. I'm imagining these situations:

"Oh darn, I got high and left my battery in the woods."

"I wish I could charge my battery while I store it in the locker at the bike park. Its dead and now I have to pedal by myself"

"I hate carrying an extra battery in my backpack but its the only way I can make it home."
  • 3 2
 @DoubleCrownAddict: Because if I go to jump in a bike park I prefer a 15kg bike over a 22kg bike. For local riding I can live with the added weight which in case of Fazua is 4kg. I'd need slight help over 1.5h ride, not somethign to power me through stuff or get me to the top. I like light bikes because I like air time, preferably at weird angles. If I lived in actual mountains I'd possibly had a regular E-bike with dual crown fork like that Haibike
  • 3 0
 @Caiokv: Fazua certainly had the least resistance when it was launched. I have found the SL motor to be even more efficient in that aspect, and quieter also. Its the closest to riding a normal bike in feel, and when you reach the limiter it doesn´t feel like you´ve got a flat.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Well, you can, it's just a little bit of a project. Has to be done in order to fly with it.
  • 2 0
 @Bustacrimes: Agreed! When I started on it I actually had the boost set to off and was peeling along, then realized. My plan is to try one out in SoCal again, but remove the main battery entirely and just use the bottle battery. For big climb/descents like in South Lake. Access road easy climb, then bomber DH. Rinse, repeat.
  • 1 0
 @Bustacrimes: nice, thanks!
  • 2 0
 Actually not bad looking bike for an ebike, I hate most of them and base model relatively affordable.
  • 2 0
 Relax, it's just a bike... you'll catch the corona stressing so much...
  • 2 0
 It would be way cooler if they did a Torque ebike.
  • 2 2
 Intended use: trail eMTB? Fack outta here. Didn’t know new trails were being made for eMTB riding.
  • 6 0
 E bike climbing trails are a thing now. Flow trail climbs for fun and tech climbs for the more extreme and skilled.
  • 2 1
 @DoubleCrownAddict:
That's a waste of good trails.
  • 2 1
 eBikes are getting more and more difficult to discern from manual bikes
  • 1 0
 eBikes are getting more and more difficult to discern from manual bikes
  • 1 0
 The new 2020 Canyoncal Meta Neuron lol
  • 1 1
 Why did they update a short travel EBike? We need bigger travel.
  • 2 1
 Agreed, these short travel single crown bikes are really holding the sport back from it's true potential.
  • 1 3
 @DoubleCrownAddict:
The sport?, what sport?, poorly skilled fat guys trying to ride bike they can't handle at speeds they can't control?, probably thinking they need DC forks, when, in reality, they can't do a drop from the sidewalk even if their life would depend on it. This is the sport you are referring?
  • 2 0
 @eugenux: I didn’t say DC but at least in the 160 travel or 180 like the YT Decoy or the Commencal Meta Power. There must be a lot of fat guys you see ride these EBikes cuz here in SoCal I see Aaron Gwin, myself, and other fit guys slaying the trails on EBikes. They are lapping people left and right on EBikes.
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 Looks like the Jeep e-bike.
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 That seat-tube weld...
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 Canyonnencal
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 If a Grim Donut is ridden in a forest and no one sees it...
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 E-grimdonut
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 Damn! Thats an ugly one.
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 *Neuron:NO
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 dangit! was supposed to be an upvote! sorry...
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