First Look: Nukeproof's New Aggressive Trail Bike - the Reactor

Sep 12, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  



Depending on how far back your mountain bike history knowledge goes, the Nukeproof Reactor name may be familiar. It was first used for an aluminum hardtail in 1996, when Nukeproof was still based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Nearly 25 years later the model name has resurfaced, but this time it's being applied to a full-suspension, aggressive trail bike that's available with either 27.5" or 29" wheels.

The 27.5” Reactor has 140mm of rear travel and a 150mm fork, while the 29” version has 130mm of rear travel and a 140mm fork. There's also an RS version for both wheel sizes, which sees the fork travel bumped up by 10 millimeters.

Nukeproof Reactor Details

• Wheelsize: 29" or 27.5"
• Aluminum or carbon frame options
• Travel: 130 (29") / 140 (27.5")
• 2.6" tire clearance
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Threaded BB
• Price: $2,729 - $5,399 USD
• Available: Late October 2019
nukeproof.com


Along with the two wheel size options, there are carbon and aluminum-framed models. This is Nukeproof's first full carbon frame – their previous carbon bikes used alloy swingarms. Now, even the aluminum bike gets carbon seatstays in order to shed a bit of weight.

Complete bike prices range from $2,750 for the aluminum Comp model up to $5,400 USD for the carbon RS edition. There's a healthy number of build kit options, with two complete aluminum models and four carbon models, along the option to go the frame-only route.

The Reactor is expected to be available by late October.


The Reactor uses a 210x55mm shock, and there's a flip chip on the seatstay for geometry adjustments.
Cables are internally routed through the front triangle, and externally routed on the swingarm.


Frame Details

Room for a water bottle inside the front triangle? Check. Threaded bottom bracket? Check. Those two important details are taken care of, and Nukeproof also equipped the Reactor with a generous downtube protector to ward of flying rocks and other debris, and enough room to fit 2.6” tires, or to run something smaller and have extra mud clearance.

The derailleur and brake housing are internally routed through the front triangle, but then emerges just in front of the bottom bracket and remains externally routed on the swingarm. That under-the-BB routing is a point of contention for some riders, but it is relatively uncommon to run into any issues with pinched or smashed housing – the chainring or crankarms are more likely to hit an obstacle first. On the topic of smashing into immovable objects, the Reactor also has ISCG 05 tabs for chain guide / bash guard mounting.


There's plenty of downtube protection to keep the frame safe.






Geometry

No matter the wheel size, the Reactor has a 66 or a 65.5-degree head angle depending on the position of the flip chip that's found on the seatstay. Flipping the the chip from the steeper 'Trail' to the 'Rail' position also drops the bottom bracket height by 6mm, and slackens the seat tube angle to 75-degrees.

On the RS models, the longer fork slackens the head angle to either 65.5 or 65-degrees, and the seat angle drops to either 75.1 or 74.6-degrees. The seat angle isn't as steep as what's quickly becoming the norm – we'll see what that translates to out on the trail once we get a Reactor in for review.

Reach numbers range from 451mm to 514mm for the 29” model, and 425mm to 516mm for the 27.5” option.



Suspension Design


The Reactor's Horst Link suspension layout is similar to whats found on the Nukeproof Mega, but the kinematics have been altered to suit the Reactor's slightly more pedaling-oriented focus. Anti-squat sits at 92% in the 32/50 gear ratio, but it falls off fairly quickly as the bike goes through its travel in order to allow the suspension to work unimpeded on rougher terrain.

The Reactor has a 21% leverage ratio change, which is also a bit higher than the Mega. That was done in order to increase the amount of mid-stroke support and end-stroke ramp up – Nukeproof expect this bike to be ridden hard, and don't want riders to find themselves blowing through the moderate amount of travel too quickly.


Models

Nukeproof's parts spec for the Reactor make its 'get rowdy' intentions clear. All bikes have a piggyback shock from either Fox or RockShox, and a 2.5" Maxxis Assegai / 2.4" Minion DHRII tire combo. A 200mm rotor and powerful brakes are also standard on most models as well - this isn't a bike that was made for casual cruising.



Reactor RS Carbon

• Reactor RS Carbon: Carbon frame, RockShox Lyrik Ultimate / Super Deluxe Ultimate, SRAM Code RSC brakes, X01 Eagle drivetrain. $5,400 USD.


Reactor Factory Carbon

• Reactor Factory Carbon: Carbon frame, Fox 36 Float Factory / DPX2 Factory, Shimano XT brakes, drivetrain. $4,900 USD.


Reactor Pro Carbon

• Reactor Pro Carbon: Carbon frame, RockShox Pike Select / Super Deluxe Select, SRAM Guide RE brakes, GX drivetrain. $4,400 USD.


Reactor Elite Carbon

• Reactor Elite Carbon: Carbon frame, Fox 36 Performance / DPX2 Performance, Shimano SLX brakes, drivetrain. $3,800 USD.


• Reactor Expert: Alloy frame (carbon seatstays), RockShox Pike Select / Super Deluxe Select+, SRAM Guide RE brakes, NX drivetrain. $3,100 USD

• Reactor Comp: Alloy frame (carbon seatstays), RockShox Revelation RC / RockShox Super Deluxe Select R, SRAM Guide T brakes, SX drivetrain. $2,750 USD>



photo Roo Fowler

photo Roo Fowler
photo Roo Fowler
Where it all began. The 1996 Nukeproof Reactor.








224 Comments

  • 113 0
 All studio pics and no Sam Hill drifting turns makes Jack a dull boy. Gorgeous looking bike tho.
  • 108 0
 just wait till next month...
  • 7 58
flag jorgeposada (Sep 12, 2019 at 2:39) (Below Threshold)
 Some reason I hate having a shock that close to my balls.
  • 28 0
 @jorgeposada: don't look at a Liteville then...
  • 8 2
 The sizing is on the money The smaller 27.5 for shorter riders is perfect too.
  • 18 5
 @jorgeposada: @jorgeposada: are you two feet tall or do you just sit on the top tube alot?
  • 4 0
 Just a really good looking bike,though
  • 5 6
 @endurocat: honestly disappointed that no size small for 29er. I'm short, have had no issues riding size small Evil Wreckoning or Ibis Ripmo, both of which have more travel than this bike. the bigger wheels benefit smaller riders as well.
  • 9 18
flag jorgeposada (Sep 12, 2019 at 10:21) (Below Threshold)
 @mattsavage: I do a thing called dirt jumping with the seat slammed so my massive scrotum hang dangerously close to moving linkage while clocking air miles. Top tube shocks are fully anyway.
  • 10 2
 @jorgeposada: Dont you wear underwear and tight pants? Nude dirt jumping..just.. bleaghk
  • 3 3
 @scary1: You may be on to something there!
  • 6 3
 @jorgeposada: How do we get more women into mountain biking ?
  • 3 0
 @Nukeproofinternational: you guys doing a frame only?
  • 2 0
 @preston67: Honestly I had the same question in the North East. In North Carolina and South you will see a ton riding very well on serious setups. Imagine it's similar out west.
  • 2 1
 @jorgeposada: that's a lengthy scrotum!
  • 2 3
 @preston67: As it turns out, neither men nor women are into having some duder bro turn a bike review comment section into another opportunity to talk about their apparently comically large testicles.
  • 1 2
 @fullfacemike: I know it's a crazy concept but some of us have no problems getting female companionship and having a break to actually ride and not risk your girls life is your best bet, trust me,,, or not.
  • 42 0
 Those carbon hubs with the nuclear logo on, they are the epitome of Nukeproof. (Unless you’re a kid)
  • 10 0
 remember the Hershey hubs with the clear plastic shell so you could see the axle?
  • 9 0
 @nojzilla: yeah man. Do you remember the Bullseye red white and blue ones?!
  • 3 1
 @tobiusmaximum: oh yes, I'm old AF!
  • 5 0
 I had a set of those hubs back in the old days. They were great. So great that someone smashed a window and stole my bike a few years later.
  • 7 0
 I still have the front hub. The set screw assembly was a bad idea. I had a machinist buddy make some end caps so the bearings wouldn't be overloaded. Gonna lace it up with a Mavic Ceramic rim and DT Revolutions for my wine-tasting bike.
  • 3 0
 @twozerosix: Wine tasting bike?
  • 8 0
 I remember those. And why am I so old? Who are all you people? Get off my lawn!!!
  • 6 0
 @pinhead907: AKA a general smooth-tired riding-around bicycle that will see no loads aside from occasional drunk curb hops.
  • 5 0
 @twozerosix: Drunk curb hops are were legends can be made......and destroyed all at once. Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @bman33: au contraire... can the legend made by drunk crub hops ever *really* be destroyed?
  • 1 0
 Still have a set
  • 3 0
 @bman33:
St Patrick's day.
3am.
The dark backstreets of Bordeaux.
My poor 1970s peugeot, she didn't stand a chance.
Full taco.
Long walk home.
  • 2 0
 @dirtyburger: ^^^ That was great story...lets keep it up folks!
  • 19 0
 The Reactor Expert seems to be quite reasonable priced, I'd be surprised if I don't see it in the budged picks.

Mr Kazimer, can we battle off Reactor Expert, Habit 4, Ripmo AF and Stumpjumper EVO Comp, please? Maybe throw a Spectral for good measure.
  • 6 1
 Throw a Jeffsy in there mayhaps? So many sick bikes out there...
  • 3 1
 How about the virus escapes too? That one seems well speced for the price.
  • 4 1
 @PtDiddy: virus escarpe
  • 3 0
 @savagelake: yeah. Auto correct.
  • 8 0
 @savagelake: the Virus Escape is what brad pitt rode out of the military base in world war z.
  • 6 0
 @crsimmons: it's also what every girl who never slept with me did.
  • 1 0
 throw the new more aggressive Fuel EX in there as well to get all the big names in the test. More and more Nukeproof really showing they are here to throw down against the big boys. Love it!
  • 2 0
 and commencal TR 29 also
  • 1 0
 @fecom: There could be a really good battle of the bikes for this year, and it wont be over best enduro bikes.
  • 1 0
 @savagelake: you mean what every girl that never slept with you did?
  • 2 0
 I'm an idiot
  • 2 0
 The "Elite Carbon" looks like an even better deal to me personally. SLX instead of NX, Fox Performance stuff instead of Rockshox 'select' (at the top rockshox and fox are compariable, but i perfer fox below that point), then it's carbon if you care. So better components IMO and a frame upgrade for $700, usually you take a big hit in componentry when you make that jump to carbon which is why the best aluminum bike is such a good deal.

FWIW in your comparison diamondback release would be nice to have in there as well.
  • 11 0
 Nukeproof are looking 'up market' now - Really would make it hard to even consider picking a frame from one of the more 'fashionable' names considering they will be made in essentially the same place and cost £1k or more especially as I have found NP warranty to be top notch.
  • 8 1
 Just remember not all rear suspension designs are created equal.
  • 7 0
 And to add to my own statement. Not all rear suspension designs cost the same amount to license.
  • 1 0
 @yupstate: yet Sam hill wins on a well-designed four-bar. Save the liscening money.
  • 10 0
 Excellent spec at a decent price?!?! As expected from NP. I can go Fox/Shimano or SRAM/RS. Only thing I'd change is the dropper. Buying the Fox/Shimano build as soon as it comes out. I've been looking for a mid-travel bike. This one came out right on time. Sorry SB130, Hightower, and Rascal. I guess I'll be going Nukeproof once again.
  • 14 1
 Nukeproof 5010
  • 4 0
 You're so right ! The color ways look a lot like the 2016 5010 (blue), then the 2017 5010 (yellow) and then the red 2018 5010!
  • 3 0
 Reminds me of the Scott trail frames from a few ago. Looks fun.
  • 2 0
 In looks. I'd love to see how this version's Horst compares to the DW on the Pivot Mach 5.5, and VPP of the 5010 and Bronson, though.
  • 2 1
 @drpheta: I had a bad experience on a 5.5. Have you ridden one? Perhaps it was setup, but it felt like I was riding my grandma's couch! Hated it. And it doesn't climb worth shit. Seat angle is too slack on the Pivots. They're behind the times...
  • 2 0
 @mybaben: I actually ride one currently, and it's fun as hell for me. You probably needed volume spacers in the shock.

It's actually a bit overkill for me, but I sold my 5010 V1 to go to a bigger bike (Trek Remedy to this). I like it much better than the Remedy. Despite how fun this bike is, I may end up back on a 5010 in the future when I've had enough time on this one.
  • 1 0
 @drpheta: That's cool. Glad it's working for you overall. The current Remedy is supposed to be really nice. I haven't ridden one though. Due to where and how I ride, i need to stay with bigger bikes, 160+. I'm on an Intense Tracer now. It's a 2015 and is great, but geo is dated and susp kinematics are just better these days. Next year i'll get a new bike. Hopefully another Tracer, but I'm open minded... Love the looks of the 275 Mega, and it reviews very well! Anxiously awaiting the new Tracer and new Mega! LOL.
  • 7 2
 The MegaTR is reborn Smile
Long live the MegaTR.

I have a MegaTR XL with -2 angleset (shortens the reach slightly), 160mm fork (used to run 170mm), I put 26" wheels on mine as I wanted the longer rear end for stability, 165mm cranks. Fun bike to ride.

www.bikeradar.com/reviews/bikes/mountain-bikes/nukeproof-mega-tr-275-pro-review
  • 11 0
 You put 26” wheels on cos you’re too tight to change out all your wheels and tyres, let’s be honest hahaha
  • 3 0
 @Caliber38heavy: haha.
Fork too dont forget. Smile

Me... tight... really... ok.... yes I am.
I got too many kids Smile hahahahaha
  • 2 0
 I just picked up a 27.5 mega, and wish I would have waited for this Reactor.
  • 1 0
 TR275 riders unite!! Still loving mine, praying that the stays hold together....
  • 1 0
 Anyone else thinking a mullet on this bike would be the one? 29 front, slacken it out a bit, yummy
  • 8 0
 i don't need it i don't need it i don't need it I NEED IT
  • 8 0
 Why nx?
  • 3 0
 @sourmix: why sx?
  • 8 5
 I really wish there would be more 100-120mm aggressive trail bikes, I'd much prefer up to date geo with less travel than the typical 140-150mm bikes around at the moment, I was hoping this was the bike
  • 41 2
 Have you been living under a goddamn rock? Tallboy 4, new Ripley, Pivot Trail 429, SB100, Giant Trance 29, Evil Following, Trek Top Fuel. You know, just to name a few.
  • 13 3
 @Almazing: nah I mean pushing even further, like a brit hardtail with a bit of squish in the back, back under my goddamn rock I go
  • 9 2
 @Almazing: there are basically no good value options in that category...
  • 5 0
 @jzPV: True, but once you add the Banshee Phantom and there are at least two.
  • 2 3
 @Ttimer: yeah, but frame only never really translates to good value... shouldn't be that hard for Canyon or someone else to offer a short travel 29er that's not a XC world cup rig with starting prices like the Neuron or Spectral. 130mm on a 29er is too much when you already own an enduro.
  • 10 0
 Transition smuggler
  • 2 2
 @nfontanella: slacker please something truly rocking a sub 65 head angle , decent reach with a snappy back end. Something that makes you look at these bikes in a different way like the Process 111 did when released
  • 10 1
 @sewer-rat: Nah, even bikes like the Stumpy Evo run into the problem that their geo is writing checks that their suspension can't cash. A 100mm bike with a sub 65° HA would be far too specialized and limited in application for most riders and regions.
But i would guess there are some places in the UK where you can get one custom built (probably in steel).
  • 3 1
 @jzPV: The 2020 Giant Trance Advanced Pro 29 starts at just $3300 for a SX build with a full carbon frame.
  • 16 2
 @sewer-rat: Is there something about the UK's terrain I'm missing that requires(or at least very much desired) to have the longest and slackest of something? Or is it so that people and their sick bros can do a sick edit of the dozens of sessions in literal 3 berms and one table top jump of a 20km trail system?


I've ridden my friend's Pipedream Moxie. It's good at descending, and even then, it's not that great at it. Climbing is terrible, BB is too damn low, and it's heavy. It's a novelty bike, at best. The closest I've ever gotten to a 'hardcore hardtail' is my old Nukeproof Scout 290 build with a 140mm fork. It was a fun bike, but only in certain circumstances. Everywhere else, it was mediocre. It has been recently replaced with the new Chameleon C and I don't miss the Scout one bit. Longer, lower, and slacker isn't the answer to everything.
  • 9 0
 @Almazing: Nah I don't believe there is, I just think a lot of us lot like slack bikes and vans, probably no real justification other than liking them and liking stuff that looks different. Some tracks are steep and everyone knows how muddy it is here (like a f*cking swamp for 11 1/2 months of the year) but I doubt any steeper than anywhere else, we can just be suckers for liking stuff that looks different, at the end of the day you've got to like what you ride right. Like the punk / britpop movement of bikes - not in the way Sick did it
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat: Fair enough! I can see the merits of wanting something unique and different. While my hardcore Scout 290 was difficult to ride in the majority of riding I did, it was a fun machine that made me a better rider.
  • 4 0
 @Almazing: Being honest you are right, it would probably climb / ride like a turd for 80% of the time compared to the likes of a SB100 etc, but the other 20% I'm pretty sure would make up for it. I think I've also changed as a rider a lot now , to me now (it never used to be) it's not the speed of getting there but the enjoyment of the journey that matters whilst enjoying a bike I love the look of - either that or a midlife crisis Salute
  • 1 0
 Sewer rat, I’m with you all the way. I have a Ragley mmmbop with a 64 head angle and it rocks as an everyday bike. It can pretty much take it on anything. I would like it’s geo with 120 squish in the back. A little forgiveness in the rock gardens.
  • 2 0
 @sewer-rat: i can relate to that, we are getting old
  • 3 1
 @Almazing: Yes, you really are missing what UK riding is all about. There definitely aren’t 3000’ never ending descents. There is however plenty of super steep, techy riding. Go look at recent edits of riding in Surrey hills with Brendon, look at Caldwell visual edits on insta, the steeps that Ratboy rides near Alton Towers. “Enduro” (god I hate that term” descents in Grizedale forest. Again on insta check Joe Smith riding around lake Vrywry (who knows how you pronounce that!) UK doesn’t have a plethora of top DH riders from cruising around trail centres hitting the same 3 berms and a table top. And I’ve not even touched on Scotland, riding is amazing there.
  • 2 0
 @sewer-rat: It's called a Cotic Flare ????
  • 1 0
 @Davec85: nearly but not quite rowdy enough, I’m thinking BTR territory
  • 2 1
 @Cord1: UK riders are the most stylish dudes I've ever seen riding. Crazy how much fun those guys could have hitting the same 3 berms and table top over and over again. Just not my type of riding since I prefer to keep moving forward. I rarely session a single feature, and if I do, I'll re-ride the entire segment or loop again.

I used to be a wannabe enduro bro. But enduro bikes are barges compared to more fun mid or short travel bikes. I have more fun riding a shorter travel bike on the ragged edge than a long travel enduro bike.
  • 1 0
 @Cord1: Not as steep as Oblivion tho.
  • 1 0
 Like a 100-120mm version of a Pinner in a slicker package - I’d buy it in a heartbeat, may need to get swarf or BTR to look at a design for me


www.btr-fabrications.com/products/pinner-frame/#frame-options
  • 3 3
 @Almazing: Because steep and tall isn't the answer to anything other than mincing round a blue loop or putting on lycra and being anally retentive about the weight of your grips/etc.

I'm old enough to have ridden the full range of mtbs, from the slack rigid bikes of the 80s, through the ridiculous long stem/narrow bars/steep head angle bikes of the 90s, all the way through to my current bike, which has a 63.5 degree head angle, and I just don't understand people who think that bikes should be steeper or shorter. Steep bikes handled like crap back in the 90s and they still do today.

As for UK trails - there's enough here to provide a training ground for a decent number of DH World Cup and World Championship winners over the years.

JP
  • 2 0
 @Jprestidge: I never said bikes should be steeper and shorter. Old school geo was terrible. I said that long, low, and slack isn’t always the answer. Geometry is a game of compromises. Add or remove something here, you naturally and inevitably take away or add to and from something else. There’s a sweet spot and I personally believe that today’s MTB industry in on it. There’s a reason why the overwhelming majority of riders here in the US don’t ride 63 HA hardtails with 1300mm wheelbases and 290mm BB heights. Because they’re not the best(or even good or decent) for the type of riding here.
  • 2 0
 @Jprestidge: Also, Nukeproof is a UK based company who knows all about riding in the UK. If stupid slack, low, and long was all it’s cracked up to be, then why is this UK designed bike not like that?
  • 3 0
 @Almazing: global sales dude, UK is a niche, if ya wanna shift volume go mid road
  • 6 0
 @sewer-rat: we’re not that clever and we defiantly don’t shift volume! Haha. It’s based on the geo our athletes, designers and engineers want to ride, not influenced by “numbers” just what works for us.
  • 1 0
 @Nukeproofinternational: fairplay, hoping to see Elliot smash the 4x on it Pimp
  • 1 0
 @opetruzel: not really an option if you are just starting and don't want to go all in. You can get a Neuron for 1999 € and a Spectral for 2099 € with pretty solid components. But there is nothing comparable with less travel... even though that would make much more sense for someone who wants to get into the sport but who isn't interested in XC races or technical terrain.
  • 2 1
 @Almazing: I've never been convinced that a steeper head angle does anything other than take away from a bike's handling. What is it that you can't do on a bike with a 63 degree head angle that you can do on one that's, say 71 degrees (the old standard)?

The old argument used to be climbing prowess, but I can honestly say that my 2018 Mega climbs steep and technical stuff just as well as my old 70 degree HA hardtail. Everywhere else the Mega obliterates it.

Chris Porter got it right many years ago:

'So you run a slack head angle on a bike and it works very, very well at speed and is much safer on the steep stuff. The opposite side of the coin is that the bars feel like they flop a bit at low speed, and you need to lean the bike over a bit more to steer when going at low speeds. That’s the sum total of negatives; not many then.'

JP
  • 4 0
 @Jprestidge: You're literally comparing close to 10 degrees difference in HA. NO ONE riding a modern MTB from the past 3-4 years has HAs that steep anymore. Even the steepest XC race bike has HAs of 68-69. Most trail bikes are anywhere between 65-68 and enduros are 63-65. What the hell is your defenition of steep? Is it 65/66 degrees like on the Reactor or your own Mega? That's fairly commonplace nowadays. Have you been living under a rock? Have you gone from an old Spesh Stumpjumper from 15 years ago right in to a modern Ragley? You're literally comparing the difference between 71 and 63 degrees which is a drastic change.

Not everyone gets to only descend all the time. People have to climb too. What can I not do on a 63 HA bike? I can do mostly everything probably. But I will not be having any fun. Climbing a 63 HA, long wheelsbase and heavy hardtail on anything more than 5% grade is a chore. The front end wanders around and good luck with any switchbacks. Descending is the only think they're good at. And even then, it's still a hardtail, and as such, bound by the weaknesses of being a hardtail.

A broken clock is right twice a day. That's what I feel about these 'hardcore hardtails.' And I mean no disrespect by that. I like that they're around, but it's not for me or my kind of riding.
  • 2 0
 @Almazing: that’s the other thing we don’t do very well over here, we love pushing up steep hills , shredding down for 30-60 seconds then repeating
  • 2 0
 Hold your breathe for a little longer. Norco has what you want coming out very very soon.
  • 4 0
 @Almazing: preach dude. A hardtail / shorter travel bike is pretty much by definition going to be at lower speeds than your full-blown enduro sleds.... I can't really wrap my head around why someone would want a short travel bike that handles like a schoolbus at low speeds, and that's exactly what these mega-slack HAs and long wheelbases are going to give you. I'd take an old Honzo or Stache over the "hardcore" hardtails any day.

If you look at a bike like the Reactor and balk at the "steep" HA, consider that you might have drank too deeply from the bro-science koolaid. The bikes that basically defined the aggressive short travel category (Process 111, Smuggler, etc) are in the 66-67° range, and there is absolutely nothing wrong with how those bikes handle. Geometry is a balance of tradeoffs, not a more-is-better pissing contest.

@Jprestidge 71° hasn't been standard for a loooooooong time, even in XC. Nino's been racking up podiums on ~69° since about 2015.
  • 1 0
 @TheBearDen: I’m intrigued, give me some deets
  • 1 0
 @Almazing: You realise the Reactor isn't a hardtail?

JP
  • 1 0
 @Jprestidge: And you realize I was talking in generalities right?
  • 1 0
 @Almazing: I have a slackish hardtail.
65* and local trails are very xc. It is awesome. My mega is for trips to Arkansas.
  • 1 0
 @sewer-rat checkout bird bikes aeris 120 and 120LT
  • 5 0
 Looks cool, but am kinda dissapointed with the lack of higher end alu build.
  • 2 0
 Geo on the 27.5 is bang on. Simialr to SB140 but with out the pricetag or extra kashima to service/fail.

Glad they are keeping the CS length fairly short, because its a trail
bike and we want it to be nimble. Yea chuck the chainstays back out to 440-450 on enduros but for trail lets keep them in the 425-435 mark.

Reach is nice and long. Shame the XL has such a mazzzive seat tube, as we do have 200+mm droppers now, Nukey.

Generally I’m really impressed. Will definitely be testing one out
  • 7 1
 Looks clean af
  • 24 2
 No it’s carbon????
  • 1 0
 I was saddened when they dropped the Mega TR from the line up as it was more than enough bike for most UK riders. My 2015 one is still going strong and every ride it brings a smile to my face. I have been racking my brain what my 2020 replacement would be and here we are, the perfect bike for me.
  • 4 0
 Reminds me of the original mega frames
  • 3 0
 Pricing seems really reasonable for a good looking bike with good looking spec kits.
  • 5 0
 #LooksLikeAnAltitude
  • 2 0
 Question. Is the headset zero stack or integrated. Please please please ZS. Integrated is just shiiiiiiit for customisation.
  • 2 0
 Zero stack!
  • 1 0
 @dhrideruk: YES! Thanks
  • 4 1
 looks like a bronson V2 or 5010
  • 2 1
 Same though, it’s a V2 bronson
  • 1 1
 Beat me to it! Definitely looks exactly like a V2 Bronson.
  • 5 0
 First Look it does! But Santa uses a VPP and no horst link
  • 4 0
 @Shartriloquist: yes exactly, one is a VPP and the other an FSR... the very same...
  • 1 0
 Except the geo is way nore up to date. Bronson is conservitive at best
  • 3 0
 Nice looking bike, too bad about that cable routing though. oof
  • 5 1
 old scott spark
  • 3 0
 It'd be nice to see an aluminum version of the pro carbon/factory carbon.
  • 3 0
 lets see the 2020 Mega already...
  • 1 0
 They should put the reach, top tube, head angle, and seat tube angle measurements at the top of the chart. Those are the most important metrics.
  • 1 1
 Looks tall to me and not slack enough. For when a real short travel aggressive geo? Longish, Ultra low top tube, 64° ha and around 135r-150f travel. That will make big sells
  • 1 0
 It's a Trail bike, not an Enduro bike! Don't expect Enduro geometry on a Trail bike.
  • 1 0
 @mybaben: it's a bike intended to go down. Call it downduro, downcountry, trail, enduro, superenduro or whatever you want to call it. What really makes a difference is geometry and travel. We should be able to buy ultra hardcore short progressive travel bikes, that are playful, trickable, lighter and more nimble and pedallanle at the same time than full "enduro" bikes. This bike was intended to be a hardcore trail bike, and it is more the same as always. I would buy a steel hardtail rather than this bike. At least british hardtail frame builders have the modern geometry sorted better than the big names...
  • 1 0
 I had a 2015 Mega TR 275 and loved it, but the chainstay cracked and they had no replacement. Hopefully they fixed their cracky chainstay designs.
  • 2 0
 That's NICE, where's the alloy? could tempt me off my HT aggro trail bike
  • 10 0
 Alloy photo bikes have only just landed will have them on our website by the end of the week
  • 1 0
 @Nukeproofinternational: Nice, might have to treat myself to a new frame for Xmas!
  • 4 0
 @Nukeproofinternational: really wish you guys would make an alloy version with a better parts spec. something along the line of the new Ripmo AF. Similar to the Reactor alloy expert bur with Shimano XT drivetrain and brakes. It would be hugely popular.
  • 2 0
 Water bottle room, niiiiice! Not even kidding.
  • 1 0
 Hopefully a sign of things to come on the next Mega.
  • 3 0
 Frame only option?
  • 2 1
 Why do so many brands cut the travel of the 29er down compared to the 27.5?
  • 3 2
 To maintain geometry. Bigger wheels with the same travel means everything else changes or a taller bb.
  • 4 0
 I'd imagine that with the better roll-over you don't need as much travel, and running less travel helps to counteract the slight loss of agility/maneuverability/playfulness that comes with the big wheels. It will also reduce flex in the fork etc. slightly.

In terms of geometry it may help them keep the stack height closer to where they want it. The headtube is around 10mm shorter on the 29er already. The amount of travel also effects where they can position/angle the seat tube too so that may another factor.
  • 1 10
flag squarewheel (Sep 12, 2019 at 7:45) (Below Threshold)
 @gafoto:
So basically you say because they are too lame to make two different frames they just cut down travel for 29er.
It‘s all about keeping the costs low instead of making the customers happy.

Well done industry.
  • 9 0
 @squarewheel: The 290 and 275 are different frames , they are designed different and not as a butchered verison of one or the other Smile
  • 1 0
 @squarewheel: ???? If they were identical frames with the wheel size only being different, the 27.5 would have its BB too low. Or the 29er would have its BB too high.

Even with interchangeable frames(there aren't too many), there are usually different dropout kits to make for up the drastic changes in BB height and to preserve the intended geometry.
  • 1 0
 @Nukeproofinternational:
I did not refresh, thats why i did not see the post from @dingus.
I see they are different. My bad.
But still why cuting down travel? I‘m up for a new bike but just 10mm more travel is too less for me.
  • 1 0
 @Almazing: what is a too low BB for a 29er?
  • 1 0
 @scary1: I don't know. Most BB heights on modern 29ers are nice and reasonable nowadays. I have ridden 29ers with BBs TOO high, and it's sketchy.
  • 2 4
 Big fan of Nukeproof. Have a long shocked Mega 290 that just rips everything.....

....however this bike seems like a step in the wrong direction for the pragmatic folks. Internal routing is a disappointment. The pricing and value is not nearly comparable to the last few model years also particularly the alu models. Big upticks in price and lower component specs. SX and NX just shouldn't be specced when SLX and Deore are options.

Otherwise, I like the general concept behind this bike. Knowing how Nukeproof specs bikes I'm sure it'll be plenty capable and a bit porky. The 275 and 290 are both a lot of bike and a little less is probably better suited for a fair bit of folks for general trail and park/flow shenanigans.
  • 9 1
 I agree with you on the value of the aluminum builds. What’s the point when you can get a full carbon frame and significantly better components for roughly $700-$1000 more? Aluminum builds, value isn’t there. But when you get on the carbon bandwagon, that’s when your money goes a long way. And compared to literally ever manufacturer out there, Nukeproof carbon builds represent unmatched bang for buck. Tell me who else has a full carbon bike with Fox Factory suspension, the excellent XT groupset and brakes, and DT Swiss wheels for under $5000. f*cking no one. That’s who.
  • 4 1
 I don't get the hate for internal routing. Yeah early iterations 20 years ago sucked on road bikes when you had to fish un-housed cable through. Every modern internal routed mtb I've tried has full length housing and guides, so you just slide the cable/hose through. It's no hassle and easier than faffing about with zip ties on an externally routed frame where there's always that one that breaks on every ride.
  • 1 0
 I'm guessing one won't be able to long shock this Reactor. Would be great to have a 135 or 140mm rear option on this rig. Looks sweet.
  • 1 0
 @btjenki: Shock sizing is 210x50 for the 29er and 210x55 for the 27.5. If stroke lengths were 47.5mm or 52.5mm or etc, you definitely could 'Lunch Ride' it by removing the 2.5mm spacer in the shock without affecting static geometry. I suppose you can always put a 210x55 shock on the 29er and see how that goes.
  • 2 1
 Intense basically does... and they throw in a set of carbon wheels to sweeten the pot. Hard to beat some of intense’s prices right now @Almazing:
  • 2 0
 I have to disagree. The value on the Factory model is still outstanding! Full carbon bike, with Fox Factory and XT 12spd, with 4 piston brakes, all for under $5K USD! That is awesome! You couldn't get that on Santa Cruz for less than $8000!
  • 1 0
 @Colson217: Plus they're just super amazing bikes anyway! I demoed a 2019 Tracer and it was ridiculously good. Full Fox Factory, X01/Gx, XT 4 piston brakes for $5500 USD. Epic!!
  • 3 0
 @Colson217: Eehhh not quite. The Primer Pro build, which is the closest(I guess) to the Reactor Factory build is still $800 more. And you're getting a mix of GX/XO1 instead of a full XO1. And I find aluminum DT Swiss wheels superior to any of eThirteen's offerings to include their carbon.

Hell you can get the top of the line Reactor RS for $300 cheaper than the Intense Pro builds, and it's equivalent to their $7000 Elite builds. If I wanted a SRAM/Rockshox build, the RS will fit the bill. I literally have to change nothing on it. Besides the dropper.

Intense may be slightly cheaper than everyone else. But no, they can't even touch the spec to price ratio that Nukeproof has.
  • 2 0
 I had forgotten the new primers bumped up the price. I was looking at the pro tracer spec sheet. Which I think is definitely one of the jewels of reasonably priced bikes @Almazing:
  • 1 0
 But you are right it’s still not quite as good as this @Almazing:
  • 1 0
 @Almazing: I suppose I'm not one of those consumers that cares too much about carbon. The Megas stiffness/compliance seems spot on to me in Aluminum and I've got my laundry list of items that are more impactful to performance before a carbon frame would be under consideration for myself.

I suppose my minor complaint is that Nukeproof has always had some blazing builds in sub $3k range. There were certainly compromises, but frame, suspension chassis, tires, and drivetrain selection were always very mindfully chosen. Perhaps the US tariffs are somewhat to blame, I really don't know, but seeing the drivetrains and to a lesser extent the suspension take big dips at the lower price points in addition to the increased cost is disheartening to me. The new SLX and XT costs are not very high.
  • 1 0
 @Inclag: I bought a Mega 290 Factory back in 2018 for under $4000, which was a really good deal. The 2018 Mega 275C RS was close to $5000. Prices have gone up steadily. More so than the rate of inflation. That being said, whether or not you like carbon, it's incredibly hard to dispute the price/spec ratio of Nukeproof's carbon bike builds. Of course, this is relative to today, and not last year or the year before. Meaning it's unfair to compare today's prices with last year's due to variables with the economy, manufacturing, etc. and whatnot. Every bike I know of has seen a bump in price for 2019 and 2020. Some of which even has a reduction in spec while inflating in price(I'm looking at you Trek).

Yea in the grand scheme of things, it's thousands of dollars for a damn bike. But looking at it closely, even with the yearly price bump, Nukeproof bikes(at least the carbon models) are still the kings of price/spec ratio RELATIVE to what else is out there TODAY. Relative and today are key words here.
  • 1 0
 @dthomp325: There are some monkeys out there that can't climb the liana,... internal routing is the only routing
  • 4 2
 Alloy frame.... with carbon seatstays! NO THANKS.
  • 1 0
 Big deal. It's just the seat stays. Who cares?
  • 2 0
 Reason why you say 'no thanks'? Every Devinci Wilson alloy has had carbon stays since forever. Mine took 10 trips to Whistler and endless park laps here in Colorado zero issues.
  • 1 1
 @bman33: Because carbon sucks. Alternatives to carbon witchcraft exist and are far better in many ways. The question is: why do you like or defend carbon? Give me real good proven reasons please.
  • 2 0
 @Franzzz: "carbon sucks" is an opinion. Endless applications such as aerospace and F1 racing where it works out perfectly. Also, it can be laid up in any fashion needed for a desired ride quality. I have broken three aluminum frames and two chromoly frames over the years. Zero carbon and that includes numerous trips to Whistler and endless downhill park runs in Colorado with zero issues. I'll refer you again to my reference my Devinci Wilson when it comes to carbon seat stays. Again, zero issues and it's super stiff. If you material has its pros and cons. Or the other materials out there? Absolutely. But to say carbon sucks it's just a hyperbole opinion. maybe you had bad experience or cannot afford it. However, that doesn't negate all the folks using it without issues does pro and amateur
  • 1 0
 @bman33: Thanks for you very good explanation, and sorry for my `anti carbon romantism`. Just saw a guy yesterday who miraculously didn`t die because of a seized carbon steerer, not mentionning the exploded forks on road and gravel bikes, craking mtb frames and so on. My experience tells me that carbon is pretty much a matter of luck but when I buy a frame and ride I don`t want to play the lottery. I often ride in Spain where terrains are rocky and many riders have sad issues with their carbon bikes; compared to my old alloy Rocky Mountain and my steel hardtail that have nothing bad to declare, it`s true that I keep being sceptical concerning carbon advantages, except for competitors. Beside this, sorry to be sentimental, but my environmental concerns prefers recyclable and durable stuffs. Cheers.
  • 1 3
 I like looking and reading new bike reviews but let me write the next one. 27 or 29? Yup. Alum or carbon? Yup. Small bump compliance? Yup. Smooth out rough trail? Yup. Flip chip? Yup. Gears? Yup. Geo slack? Yup. Expensive? Yup. Feel free to copy and paste. Your welcome.
  • 1 0
 congrats you're hired
  • 2 0
 Not even a Sam Hill reference? weird.
  • 1 0
 LOL. It's a Trail Bike, not an Enduro bike. Wink
  • 1 1
 too many new bikes have been released lately.. but i see no 63 degree HA bikes.. where´s the longer lower and slacker thing this days Frown
  • 1 0
 That's because most of the releases have been "Trail" bikes, not Enduro bikes. Trail bikes are not going to have 63-64' HA. That's for Enduro bikes.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Rocky Mountain Altitude and also like a Fezzari La Sal.
  • 2 0
 Mega tr is back if it hasn't been said before
  • 1 1
 I've been looking at frames for a while now and this got my attention. Beautiful bike !

Too bad the carbon frameset is $4000 CND....
  • 1 0
 Give me a well designed $1000 aluminum FS frame without a rear shock and I'm sold. Let me build it how I want it.
  • 1 0
 is it just me or does this look almost identical to the old santa cruz bronson???
  • 1 0
 hope this reactor runs also with SPD pedals... Excited for the video when Sam rides the bike
  • 1 0
 Gmbm has a video on it already. Bike looks sick
  • 2 0
 looks like an Instinct
  • 1 2
 Cables hanging under BB,I'm out.Surley the cables could have popped out neatly at the bottom of the downtube and onto the chainstay.
  • 3 0
 @jase111171 Pivot does this too on some of their bikes. I never had any problem. I think it looks more problematic than it actually is.
  • 2 0
 @foggnm: @jase111171 Same with my 2015 Intense Tracer. Cables out the down tube and onto the chain stays exactly the same way. Seems crazy, but I've never had a single issue in 4 years of riding the bike, and it's been on every kind of trail there is; bike parks, rock gardens, lava rock tech, everything! IDK??
  • 1 0
 @mybaben: @foggnm @jase111171 I once saw a branch sneaking its way their on someone's bike, it didn't brake anything but it tightened the derailler's cable so much that it switched too many gears and blocked the wheel, he stopped pretty much on the spot.
More fear than harm fortunately, he pulled the branch out, put the derailler back in place and could keep riding.
  • 1 0
 have an old Spes Pitch this way and is PITA. Never ever gonna buy same shit
  • 1 0
 Where is the frame only option??
  • 1 0
 Coming apparently, v soon.
  • 1 0
 ~ NukeProof had a baby with Fezzari ~
  • 1 0
 where is SAm ? only question does SAM ride it ? ;-)
  • 1 0
 LOL. It's a Trail Bike, not an Enduro bike. Wink
  • 3 0
 Just wait. We’ve something to show you soon
  • 1 2
 Why no dw link?@Nukeproofinternational:
  • 1 2
 And don’t use Sam as an excuse and if you still do , how much faster would he be on a dw 5 or 6 link bike(cough cough iron horse)?@Nukeproofinternational:
  • 2 0
 @DONKEY-FELTCHER: I’d say, and gunna put it out there, he’d be exactly the same speed on a dw6 as he is now once he fully adapted.

It’s easier to buy huge speed/time gains with new tech when you are a beginner to average level but once you get close to the top, those margins become blurred and it’s questionable whether a like for like replacement would make any difference at all.

He could swap to Fox, Enve, Schwalbe and Shimano and it wouldn’t make a difference so why would changing a frame make a difference?
  • 1 0
 @DONKEY-FELTCHER: Our team like what we have going with the Reactor, it works for us and feel this offers what we want from our bikes.
  • 1 0
 I am waiting for new Mega 290
  • 1 0
 and I am waiting for new Nuke HT 27.5
  • 1 0
 The looks remind me of a full suss scout.
  • 1 0
 I quite like the older one.
  • 1 0
 If it was a dw link maybe they could pump some product out for DT?
  • 1 0
 SH is worthy of the best suspension and the bro-horscht is not cutting it.
  • 1 0
 Nice looking bike. Too bad it has no kinematics benefit.
  • 1 0
 So, going downhill, is "aggressive trail" before or after "super enduro?
  • 1 0
 So you can fit wt tires on 28 mm inner rims ,is that it ?
  • 1 0
 Beautiful hub!
  • 2 2
 LEMME GET THAT '96 REACTOR THOUGH.
  • 2 3
 Seems like a couple of sweet bikes, but CRC and Nukeproof have terrible customer service
  • 1 1
 i m the only who find it ugly????????
  • 1 0
 Yes, you are. Sorry.
  • 2 0
 Your my favourite @mybaben
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Mega TR
  • 1 3
 It took them too long to make carbon 29er. And maybe a bit late to get Mega 29 carbon
  • 1 1
 Looks like a 5010.
  • 3 5
 Not great, not terrible.
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