First Look: 2021 Pivot Mach 6

Dec 8, 2020
by Daniel Sapp  

Pivot's Mach 6 has undergone a redesign for 2021. The bike still rolls on 27.5" wheels front and rear, but the geometry and suspension undergo updates as does the frame itself. The shock is now mounted in a vertical position, providing 158mm of travel and the bike is available in sizes extra small to large.

The carbon bike is available in a number of different builds with both air and coil shock options. Prices range from $5,599 USD for the Race XT package all the way up to $12,099 for the Fox Live Valve equipped Team XX1 AXS build.
Pivot Mach 6 Details

• Wheelsize: 27.5"
• Travel: 158mm (r) / 160mm (f)
• Carbon frame
• 65° head angle (low)
• Chainstay length: 431mm
• Adjustable geometry
• Price: $5,599 - $12,099 USD
pivotcycles.com


bigquotes“Everyone knows that 27.5” wheels are more fun, and the new Mach 6 pegs the fun meter at a new level. We don’t just spend our days slaving away designing bikes so our World Cup riders can set their fastest time (although we do a lot of that). More often than not, we’re looking for bikes to make us feel like superheroes and put the biggest smile on our faces. The Mach 6 does that and then some, making it my new favorite bike. The Mach 6 is fundamentally designed to be super fun and poppy, giving everyone the magic carpet ride with maximum performance and maximum fun.”Chris Cocalis, Founder of Pivot Cycles



Frame Details

The biggest update to the Mach 6 is in the suspension orientation being flipped vertically, similar to other bikes in the Pivot line, using a trunnion mount, metric sized air or coil shock. According to Pivot, this allows them to create a more compact frame design using less material, making the bike lighter and stiffer. It also allows for better integration with Fox Live Valve, and gives Pivot more control over the standover height.

The bike is available down to an XS size which should fit riders 4'10" and the size L should fit riders up to 6'2" tall. Each frame size is tuned and constructed to have the optimal ride quality for size of the rider on it. Additionally, a size large water bottle fits on all bikes with all shock types.

Cable routing is fully internal, and Pivot's 'Tool Dock' system is compatible with mounts under the top tube and underside of the frame. Chainstay protection is made out of a low durometer rubber to help quiet chain noise and all frames can clear up to a 2.6" tire.

Pivot's 'Tool Dock' system allows riders to mount tools and accessories under the top tube, or the down tube.

Suspension and Geometry

The Mach 6 is designed to be a bike that riders can ride on aggressive trails. With that, there are multiple suspension options available, including a coil shock. The 158mm dw-link suspension is inspired by Pivot's Phoenix DH bike and maximizes the bike's rearward wheel-path for optimal performance with square-edge bumps and rough terrain, according to Pivot.

The geometry of the bike is adjustable via a flip-chip. Head tube angles are 65-degrees in the low bottom bracket position, and 65.6-degrees in the high setting. Seat tube angles are 75.5-degrees in low and 76-degrees in high, and the chainstay length is 431mm. Reach on the size large is 480mm in low and 485mm in high.




Build Options

The Mach 6 is available in a number of different builds, 14 to be exact. There are both SRAM and Shimano drivetrain options, along with choices for air or coil shocks and Fox Live Valve. The most budget-friendly selection comes in the form of the Race XT kit which sells for $5,599 and is spec'd with a Shimano SLX shifter, cassette, and brakes. The rear derailleur is XT. It's rounded out with a Marzocchi Bomber CR shock and Z1 fork.

Coil builds are available starting at the Pro level and riders can choose between the 'Pro XT/XTR and Pro X01' builds which sell for $7,099 and $7,699, respectively, and come equipped with Fox Factory suspension. The top of the line Team XX1 AXS - Live build features Fox Factory Live Valve suspension, SRAM's XX1 Eagle AXS drivetrain, Code RSC brakes and Reynolds carbon wheels with I9 hubs sells for $12,099 USD.







275 Comments

  • 213 5
 This tool dock system looks like something that will be kicked off the bike by the first rock/log you encounter
Weird idea
  • 123 2
 I think they wanted to make bashing a chainring somehow more expensive to fix.
  • 27 34
flag jamesdunford (Dec 7, 2020 at 23:57) (Below Threshold)
 If you read the description, it says top tube or down tube. Meaning you’ve got two options, one which likely isn’t designed for riding down to a trail but more for carrying add ons to the trail.
  • 68 0
 It was definitely designed by someone froma dry and dusty climate. In the UK, that tool would be plastered in mud from the first minute.
  • 19 0
 @jamesdunford: Sure, where you gonna put that stuff once you're ON the trail?
  • 48 0
 @MindPatterns: clearly you’re planning on leaving it on the trail... wherever it gets knocked off.
  • 13 3
 @jamesdunford: they seem to have gone full on "bike packing strap stuff to the frame" here! Tool under the BB waiting to be smashed off, spare tube strapped under the down tube waiting to be punctured by a rock and CO2 under the top tube waiting to gouge your shoulder when you try to carry the bike.
  • 22 2
 I guess in-frame storage is only something Trek and Specialized are capable of doing?
  • 8 0
 Don't worry the spare inner tube will protect it
  • 33 8
 Nobody who had ever ridden a bike on a remotely technical train would design something that stupid
  • 10 1
 @jamesdunford: sounds like a brilliant idea! Once you get to the trail you can switch from downtube to toptube. Amazing!
  • 10 0
 @Tinshield: I think in-frame pizza boxes should be standard.
  • 15 0
 This doesn't make any sense. I ride the same trails as the Pivot employees in Arizona. Plenty of rock strikes on our chain guards. Seems like a really bad place. Links of some of our local trails on South Mountain Geronimo and National trails. Plenty rocky and plenty dry.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5jAEURFaFI

youtu.be/aJY1wZzvBWM

youtu.be/3g4EFvoZcaw
  • 4 0
 @skill7: Cable tie a inner tube to bottom of downtube! Great idea, who needs a carbon frame protector, mtb tech moving on rapidly! Good way to sneck your spare tube before you even fit it!
  • 1 1
 Correct.
  • 7 1
 That tool is an amazing oversight for engineers living and presumably riding in one of the rockiest places in the world.
  • 8 0
 I hope Pivot releases a marketing video with the tool dock mounted underneath the bottom bracket showing that it’s strong enough to smash through most rocks and logs without leaving a scratch and prove all of us haters wrong.
  • 1 0
 Is the tool sturdy enough to write off the frame if you hit it hard enough? "Sorry, that's not covered under warranty"...
  • 3 1
 Doesn't seem like an "ideal" place for it for sure. Seems like it all they were trying to do was mount a tool then they could have moved it to the other side and put it in between the rear shock and the bottle cage. But it doesn't seem like it's a deal breaker, it's not much lower than the iscg tabs and it's definitely higher than the chainring. Even if you lose it on the trail, you'll probably notice it's gone while you are looking at your mangled chainring and be able to pick the tool/get a new case. Me thinks a bash guard would be a good idea for anybody worried about it.
  • 2 1
 @mountainsofsussex: no no no they're showing you the tool in use under the BB. it doesn't get stored there.
  • 1 0
 @DaFreerider44: hopefully a large size box.
  • 3 0
 @Tinshield: Technically forbidden bikes has a stuff spot underneath near the bb for tubes ext
  • 9 14
flag DriverB (Dec 8, 2020 at 9:08) (Below Threshold)
 I can't say I understand this trend where people feel like they need to bolt any and all manner of objects to the carbon frame they just paid $$ premium for, presumably in part due to its light weight. Put your multi tool in your pocket and drink enough water before you ride or carry a hip pack with water for longer rides. Problem solved. And then we don't need to suboptimally design bikes around silly features.
  • 2 0
 Not only that, but if it manages to survive it will be perpetually covered in grime/dirt/mud/etc.
  • 1 0
 Almost kinda makes sense since they don't spec a bash guard of any flavor. Seems someone isn't riding hard on technical trails with actual rocks in and on them.

I was never one to poo-poo under-the-BB cables (except the ones that left the cable creep down and made the loops bigger over time), but this is pretty silly. My current frame has both a nice surface crack on the downtube at the edge of the protector and a nice gouge dead center on the protector, I would have destroyed that tool thing and probably the tube at least twice, just in the past couple months, and only one (the protector gouge) was from a crash... The crack is just from rocks getting whipped up by the front tire!
  • 2 1
 @DriverB: They should start listing bike weights with everything strapped on and a full bottle of the biggest size that fits. The stuff inside my Stumpy added almost a pound with a normal tube in there, though I haven't weighed it with just a tubolito and no pump in there, should shave like 1/3 of a pound...
  • 1 1
 @zede Yes, but if you look they actually have bosses under the top tube, so I presume most people would put theirs there
  • 1 0
 @skill7: nailed it. doesn't ever rain in phoenix
  • 1 4
 @just6979: I don't blame them for not specing a bash guard on the bike. The vast majority of riders (including most pro ews riders) get a long just fine without them. It's less effort/cost for them to not include one and let the people that need one add it to their bike than to have something 90% of riders don't need on there. I definitely think there is a place for bash guards on some peoples bikes though but for most it's just dead weight.
I do give props to pivot for including chainguides on their bikes though. Longer chainring life, better retention, etc. Would be cool to see more manufacturers do that.
  • 3 1
 @grldm3: With narrow-wide rings, a chain guide is in the same category that you put bash guards in: optional for 90% of riders. 8 years or so on narrow-wide with a clutch and I've never dropped a chain (outside of a crash), but second ride on a bike without a bash guard the chain got a stuck link from a mild rock impact.

How does a chainguide give longer chainring life? Guide shouldn't touch the chain under normal operation, so it's not like it's saving the chainring teeth from having to pull the chain onto themselves...
  • 2 2
 I sometimes wonder what kind of mountain biking some of these bike designers actually do. Like, that's such an obvious no-go for any kind of significant technical terrain. As you say, you'll lose it and not even know it was gone until an hour later.
  • 5 6
 for the love of God it doesn't mount there. they're just showing it in use
  • 2 1
 @Jshemuel: Umm, yeah, it sure does mount there. What "use" are they "just showing it in use" for?
  • 2 2
 @Jshemuel: You can see it in the same position in a few other pictures. That is where it is stored
  • 2 2
 I thought you had to go to Vegas to pay $12k for smashing the box?
  • 3 1
 Why don't they just mount their tool dock on the tires? That would make about as much sense as under the bottom bracket. Seriously, have they never heard of mud, logs and boulders? Well, at least it is fine for dry days on blue flow trails at a bike park.
  • 1 0
 Its made to compliment the Fox Live Valve so you don't have two random mounts.
  • 3 0
 You guys got it all wrong. This is a purpose-built bike for shelter-in-place park warriors. The dock system is to affix to a display, preferably rotating.
  • 2 0
 Ain't that a good place to destroy vintage StarTAC phones?
  • 1 0
 At least it's not on the tire
  • 2 1
 To all those that don't understand its use.... It is optional...
  • 2 0
 @fragglerock16: Yes, but it's a pointless option. On any bike besides a mountain bike, it would be a decent spot. On a mountain bike, it's an option that exists just so they can say it exists. Anyone who uses it for actual trail riding will most likely break it off fairly quickly, thus almost no one will use is. So Pivot gets to fill their press releases and marketing with "more tool attachments than anyone, yay!", when in reality they just added some bosses (and cost) that will remain completely empty on virtually every one of these bikes that is actually used regularly.
  • 1 0
 @skill7: Same in the PNW
  • 1 1
 @MattyBoyR6: This doesn't make any sense.
Yes it does. Backpacks are lame and everyone is figuring out that those waist bags are really just fanny packs with a new name, and all the enduro bros want all their tools on the bike, damnit! I don't care how ill conceived it is, mount it on there somewhere!

Personally, I'd go with a sliding mount of some sort on the dropper post.
  • 3 0
 @Poulsbojohnny: damn you just dissed the backpack doods and the fanny pack wearers. Fanny packs show your commitment to the sport and backpacks protect your spine. What can this smash box do?
  • 134 7
 This actually looks like a sweet bike, well done Pivot for turning around and making another good-looking bike (and not just in the visual sense, this looks bang-on). The previous Mach 6 was pretty bloody ugly.
1 gripe - why have a full SLX drivetrain except rear der and call it 'XT'? A. it's not an XT drivetrain. B. I'd take an XT shifter with SLX der over the other way around any day, and I'm sure many, many others will agree with me.
  • 40 1
 Yeah, sadly bike product managers still seem to think specing a higher end derailleur will win over consumers cuz bling. It's pretty common knowledge now that the shifter is more important than the mech for shift feel, and weight diff is minimal.
  • 14 0
 They get so much right, but they keep doing this. I don't get it.
  • 6 1
 @gramboh: it is easier to see a rear derailleur than a shifter or cassette when you look at the bike. Hopefully it will have a different color in the future so that it will also be important for managers.
  • 13 0
 Came here to call that out as well. Incredibly misleading, and not very honest in my opinion. Also agree on taking the SLX der and XT shifter.
  • 13 0
 Yeah it's deceptive and a terrible value for what's really an SLX build. Lots of awesome carbon bikes coming in close to $4k with full SLX, which this basically is. Even Specialized (a traditional LBS brand like Pivot) has the carbon SLX Stumpy EVO clocking in at $4100.
  • 11 1
 Why not spec Deore with an XTR rear derailleur and call it "XTR"?
  • 5 1
 @Tinshield: Shhhhhh. They may think this is a good idea....
  • 1 0
 Agreed. Pivot does this. My "XT/XTR" Firebird 29 is XT with an XTR rear derailleur. It's not a bad spec at all, but the shifter is the biggest difference in the two groupsets. But if someone wants to upgrade the bike as they go the Pivot way of doing it might not be entirely bad as a shifter is cheaper to upgrade than a derailleur. I like matching components so my bike is becoming xtr while my xt stuff trickles down to my brothers bike.
  • 5 8
 @gramboh: Common knowledge? More like common assumption. How many people have tried it both ways? I have, and I'd rather have a better mech. Sure ball-bearing pivots on a shifter can make it _feel_ nice, but the mech has way more moving parts and actually has to deal with the elements and continue to make precise movements while covered in muck in order to actually _make_ good shifts.

The shifter hangs out (relatively) safe & clean on the bars, and just pulls X amount of cable per click, not super hard to make it pull consistently even with lower-end materials. The mech hangs off the back, getting hit by rocks and brush and covered in mud and/or dust, and needs to consistently translate X cable pull into a 3-dimensional movement of the pulleys while maintaining appropriate chain tension. Better materials & construction here directly translate into consistent repeatable movements of the chain across the cassette.

Everyone who thinks the shifter matters more should go put an NX mech on an X01 shifter, or Alivio mech on an XT shifter, and see how they like that.
  • 4 1
 @just6979: I see your point but putting an NX shifter on an X01 mech would be almost equally as terrible. With shimano builds specifically there is very little difference performance wise between slx-xt-xtr. Not a slam on the higher specs but shimano does a very good job at trickle down on the shifting performance. In a blind test nobody is going to be able to tell whether it's an slx or xt mech on there. The shifter is a point of contact though and the actual feel of the higher spec shimano shifters is very real. On sram it's kind of the opposite, an X01 mech is well known to be more durable than a GX mech so it does make sense to upspec that but I've never heard about that being a major thing with shimano.
  • 2 0
 I bought the old model a couple of weeks ago and it is a crazy good bike, despite some looks, the only disappointment is it had a full XT drivetrain... with SLX shifters.
  • 1 1
 @grldm3: "but putting an NX shifter on an X01 mech would be almost equally as terrible"

And I'm telling you it isn't. The shifter levers might not feel as smooth, but the actual movement of the chain, the actual shifting of gears, will be pretty damn close to matching. And once you push the lever, that's what matters.

I could not care less that my shift levers are on bearings instead of bushings if my mech isn't properly moving the chain and shifts aren't actually happening cleanly.
  • 2 1
 @grldm3: cage on xtr mech is a lot stiffer than xt, making crisper shifts. Plus it's lighter where it matters most: at wheels. Have only used with xt 11spd shifters. But you're talking me into xtr
  • 4 0
 I recently upgraded the slx shifter on my blackthorn to an XT, which has better feel, double down shift and I believe one additional upshift. Pivot should have spent the extra $15 or whatever the OEM cost is and throw on the XT shifter which IMO is a nice upgrade of the slx. Otherwise the slx parts are quite good, but again to call a bike an xt build only because it has an xt derailleur is stupid.
  • 5 0
 @just6979: the XT shifter has a double up shift but the SLX doesn't, do you're genuinely getting a performance upgrade.

I had a 12s XT shifter with both an XT and a Deore rear mech and, while I didn't do them back to back, didn't really notice a difference in shift quality.
  • 4 0
 This came up recently on MTBR as well. The sales and marketing team at Pivot needs new blood. This naming convention is a left over from when I first got back into mountain biking back in the 90's. Most other brands have moved away from this BS naming convention.
  • 1 1
 @2d-cutout: The double shift feature is just that, a feature, not a performance upgrade. The ability to double shift by itself does not change the feel or performance of normal shifts.
  • 2 0
 @just6979: one push or two--which is quicker? Also the Shimano upshifter is releasable from front with index finger. Hand rolls slightly forward and pulls you into the descent with an extra gear. Still a 'normal' shift. We're now off topic, and buried in props
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: performance in this case is not speed, it's smoothness and crispness.

Pretty sure even the single shift ones are usable from both directions.

"Pulls you into the descent" by rolling your hand forward? What are you talking about? If anything you'd roll your hand back a bit on a descent, similar to dropping your heels. Just look at all the flatish brake lever angles on the DH circuit.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: I dont quite know what he means either, lol. But I've found it to be the quality and performance with smoothness and crispness. The SLX shifter is pretty much all-polymer or hard plastic. The XT is Polymer or hard plastic with metal triggers and the XTR is mainly metal. Along with the number of shifts up and down you are able to do. XTR has the best feel and quality while SLX feels cheaper, but at the end of the day, I don't notice a big problem with my SLX shifter. It still shifts smoothly and does its job.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: start gate and anywhere else you're sprinting to re/gain speed. I use it to gain speed for jumps in moderately graded terrain. Are we now going to debate which shifter/chain/cassette combos upshift fastest, in the absence of automated testing, which the big manufacturers have probably done? Performance advantage one: two gears. Two: hand position
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: again, yes but performance on a track was never in the convo. And double-ups is a feature, not a refinement, and we're talking about the quality of shifts, not the number of shifts.

Still have no idea what the hand position thing it's and no idea why you would ever want to have actuating a shifter lever require a major hand position change.
  • 82 3
 "EVERYONE KNOWS 27.5" WHEELS ARE MORE FUN!!!"
  • 18 14
 Yup, but wagon wheels couldn’t be happier helping slow-awkward folks and that’s kind of sweet in a fun way. They also seem to slow down otb maneuvers for my viewing pleasure, fun to watch on FF
  • 1 2
 This!
  • 70 3
 If you think 27.5" is fun you should try 26"
  • 5 0
 @kkmb: I’ve been mountain biking for over twenty years. You can consider that box ticked.
  • 9 1
 @kkmb: if you think 26" is fun you should try a 20" BMX bike. Big Grin
  • 6 1
 @kkmb: But won't my balls explode and my feet fall off if I dare ride such "obsolete" things? Pinkbike keeps telling me 29er is the only way, but 27 is always surprisingly "fun", so I'm so confused on what this 26 is supposed to be? It's smaller... but the 9 and 6 are like upside down twins, so maybe 26 works best only if you go to the opposite hemisphere than where you usually ride?
  • 1 0
 That was my takeaway as well.
  • 2 0
 Geometry actually looks really good too. A break from the current trends and should be a very poppy ride if the suspension feel follows suit.
  • 1 1
 Nah, 650b is just 26+ tires....
  • 1 0
 @ProperPushIrons:
It looks very traditional/conservative, despite claims that it's new improved geometry. (Ratio of top tube length to reach basically same as every bike from 2000 to 2010. So 75 to 76° seat tube angle is some wishful thinking).
  • 1 0
 @WoodenCrow: but it’s not like they tried to make a big slack limo bike and failed. It’s a considered effort to make a poppy, lively ride in a time when there aren’t many bikes like that because everyone’s tryna out-slack each other. The higher BB is a big one for me, I’d put money on team riders playing a role in the shape of this thing.
  • 1 0
 @Skarhead89: you could say 26” is actually 26+, ever measured the diameter of a 26” wheel with proper mtb tyres?
  • 1 0
 @ProperPushIrons: my 650b bikes with Maxxis 2.5wt and Schwalbe 2.6 tires measure out to 28" wheel diameter. Perfect size compromise IMO.
  • 2 0
 @ProperPushIrons: that's a fair point, I prefer a livelier bike myself so I appreciate you seeing that angle
  • 55 1
 So the brakes are SLX, the rest of the drivetrain is SLX, but the derailleur is XT so it's the XT build?
  • 18 0
 There's a word for people who try that kind of crap.... but there might be kids reading.
  • 26 0
 It's not only SLX-build. It is $5,599 SLX-build.
  • 4 0
 @JAK79: No kidding. With 14 build kits available, you would think Pivot would have been able to sort this out better and not try to pull one over on it's customers. Hey, their top-of-the-line build is USD $12,100 and probably close to $16,000 CAD. At this price, you would be afraid to ride it, let alone get it dirty...lol
  • 2 0
 @RowdyAirTime: Yeah, I know that this has been addressed many times and there are people who will buy it for that much...AND, it's still upsetting somehow to me.
  • 1 0
 @wasea04: When you are talking over $15,000 CAD for a pedal bike, pricing has definitely gone beyond crazy...
  • 42 1
 The XT kit is really an SLX kit for $5,600 wow that is super expensive.
  • 7 1
 With marzocchi suspension to. Unless that frame is like 4 grand you’d be better off just building it up yourself.
  • 8 0
 Stumpy EVO with SLX is $4100. Nukeproof Mega with SLX is $4000. Vitus Sommet SLX, $3500? Yes, there are many far cheaper options than this "XT but really SLX" build.
  • 5 0
 @bulletbassman: Frame only price is not listed yet, but for the switchblade it’s $4,150 with an aeffect crankset included.

So yeah, it’s $4k

Leaving yeti in the rear view mirror in the battle for most gucci and exclusive pricing.
  • 7 1
 @vaedwards: I’d buy a pivot before a yeti but I definitely can’t afford either
  • 3 0
 @vaedwards: Pivot has to include a crank cause they believe customers that buy frame only are too stupid to buy the right cranks.
  • 25 9
 “The chainstays are the same length on all sizes” is the new battle cry of the internet certified engineer who rides a 6 year old Trek Remedy. It replaces “seat angle too slack” and “no water bottle”.

That said, 96% of people who own Pivots have more internet comments about how good the bike is than miles ridden.
  • 3 0
 Damson.jpg
  • 8 0
 @wibblywobbly I'm a 4 percenter.
  • 2 0
 Good ol' wibbly.
  • 8 1
 Not if you live in the Phoenix area. Pivots doing lots of miles on South Mountain every day of the year.
  • 17 0
 Looks awesome! Ive always wanted a bashguard/tool combo ????
  • 7 0
 Tool-bash
  • 2 0
 Bash kit
Aka I’ve lost it somewhere on the trail kit
  • 20 3
 Looks like an expensive Banshee Rune V3. I know which one I'd choose.
  • 3 0
 You’re not the only one!
  • 17 1
 12.000$
Be serious
  • 2 3
 The top tier Probably has fox live valve or something silly like that
  • 10 0
 @SonofBovril: says right in the article that its live valve and full AXS.
  • 3 7
flag q232 (Dec 8, 2020 at 1:02) (Below Threshold)
 And only "65° head angle (low)"
  • 5 0
 @Trudeez: and as we know live valve is shit for hard hitting. Or did we forget the giant review?
  • 11 0
 I think it's cool that a company is designing bike for their local terrain instead of just mindlessly chasing trends. Something tells me that a relatively moderate headangle and wheelbase work better for their local trails than massive wheelbases and slack everything. I bet this thing would work great in the east coast too. The pricing is a bit much, but the SLX/XT build with the coil shock is probably crazy fun if you're ok buying something with slightly lower spec than the competitors.
  • 10 0
 As a former AZ desert dweller I can confirm that super aggressive long, low, slack bikes are not a benefit for most desert trail riding. Lots of pedaling on undulating often technical terain.
  • 5 0
 @BRRN: I mean, I'd happily sacrifice a tiny bit of stability at speeds I almost never hit on local trails for not having pedal strikes galore and getting bottom or the downtube caught on rocks and logs. Pretty easy call, actually.
  • 7 0
 It's getting harder to find a good East Coast bike.
  • 9 0
 Showing only xs- l but they mention an xl fitting risers up to 6’2?

Also that bottom build is made to trick people into thinking they are getting value. Kinda bullshit in my opinion, con artists.
  • 10 0
 I'm excited to see them use the SRAM universal derailleur hanger. Any use of a 'universal standard' on a bike is a win in my book!
  • 3 0
 MTB or Univeresal. Pick one.
  • 13 3
 So this is the fifth bike in enduro field test
  • 27 1
 I still reckon it's a Nomad...
  • 4 14
flag noplacelikeloam (Dec 7, 2020 at 23:29) (Below Threshold)
 @2d-cutout: it’s the norco range
  • 4 0
 @2d-cutout: I heard it's dec 15th..
  • 6 1
 @noplacelikeloam: Range is a 29er....
  • 1 0
 @Timo82: Good call.
  • 9 3
 It looks nice, I love how they optimise / tune the ride characteristics for each size. Especially since the CS length is exactly the same on each size.

Medium size gets a the ride as desired, everyone else gets something compromised. Aside from cost I wonder why they keep doing this?
  • 11 2
 Just cost. no other reason.
  • 10 0
 Only reason they use cost as an excuse is straight up lazy engineering.

Santa Cruz has been moving the pivots back on recent frames in larger sizes. Increases chainstay length and ups anti-squat/rise.

Only added cost is design engineer/industrial designer time on FTs because the swingarms are the same. Pretty good compromise, other brands should take note.

Specialized added a shitload of adjustments to the stumpy evo to give more geo choice independent of frame size. Again a fairly cost effective way to do it.
  • 1 0
 @thelibrarybiker: Interesting. I did not know how Santa Cruz did that. There's also the option of the flip chip in the axle.
  • 3 1
 @thelibrarybiker: You can't blame lazy engineering if the project management doesn't ask for or even allow the option. I'm sure Pivot's engineers could compute ideal CS lengths to get similar feel through the size range. But, if management says "we don't want to pay for that", doesn't matter if engineering did the work, it's not going to be produced that way.
  • 5 0
 I may be being naive, but what are the advantages of Trunnions shocks? If you’re screwing bolts directly into the shock body doesn’t that increase the risk of trashing it due to bad frame alignment, impacts, etc? People hated that Specialized shocks used to mount directly to the yoke.

At least with DU bushings and spherical bearings it was these that died first.
  • 5 0
 Shorter eye to eye, more compact and tidy frame design.
  • 8 0
 I think the advantage is that you can fit a longer shock in the same space? And cause standards need to change every 3 days.
  • 4 3
 Pretty simple , new standard = you can’t adapt your previous shock, so if you want an upgrade you have to buy a brand new shock (which is also more expensive , because they finally found the perfect valving you always needed)
Then many bikes come with new standard = you can’t sell your old shock
Same for boost , super boost and so on
  • 1 0
 That really is a problem, check the forum thread on the DVO Topaz f.ex. My Topaz was warrantied two times within the first 8 weeks of riding, now with the now, stronger sealhead it lasts for 2 months already - which is longer than ever befere....
  • 6 0
 It’s slightly too blueish-grey for me, so I bet it climbs like a walrus. Could also use some SRAM brakes for me to complain about.
  • 10 2
 Why is the BB in the sky?
  • 2 3
 it is interestingly high yes.. low and high should around +-340mm
  • 4 1
 @Lagr1980:
Its almost 360 in high! Thats higher than any unplanted 29ers! Infact, i think its a world record.
  • 48 0
 To protect the tool?
  • 7 0
 @mexicanoportugal:
Yea. Actually maybe this is a 26" bike in disguise..... Drop some 26ers in and it would be perfect!
  • 4 1
 @Richt2000: or drop-an-angleset bike
  • 7 3
 Interesting strategy releasing a 4 year old bike for $12k... let's see how it'll work out for them.
  • 5 0
 It's why I chose the 2020 version. High anti-squat and high bb makes it a chunky limestone superweapon that also bombs the downs.
  • 8 0
 I think Pivot is based in Arizona which may be partly why they made some of these odd design choices based on the terrain they typically ride.
  • 11 0
 They're based in Phoenix I think and a lot of the local riding is chunky and rocky, so a high BB makes sense. Just how low bb make sense in NW where you have steeps and lots of new school loamy tracks. Variety in bike design is good, imo.
  • 7 1
 Yes they are in Tempe Arizona near South Mountain. And close to Sedona & Tucson. Pretty much rocky and chunky on most trails. Having a high BB is nice.

Here are a few links to some trails on South Mountain which is about 2-3 miles from their main shop. Not me riding.


www.youtube.com/watch?v=s5jAEURFaFI

youtu.be/aJY1wZzvBWM

youtu.be/3g4EFvoZcaw
  • 10 3
 Because people who ride in technical terrain know that BB in the 330s doesn't work if you need to get up/over rocks or have rocks on the trail you pedal. The difference in handling between a 335 and a 350 BB is hardly noticeable, something that you quickly get used to. But the amount of pedal strikes and ability to hop up/over logs and rocks in the way is huge.
  • 6 1
 @Abacall: not saying it should be 330.
I disagree on a high BB not being noticeable, its massively noticeable when cornering, dropping down steep chutes or balancing at slow speeds.

Seems they’ve made a decision based on 5% of rider’s terrain.
  • 4 2
 @Richt2000: Yeah, the high bb is less stable. It makes maneuvering take less effort but requires a lighter touch and is a little slower on seat of the pants riding. If you run the math on the moment arm difference between 1cm bb height difference to the rider, it's really small, like the difference between having a water bottle or none.
  • 1 0
 @WalrusRider: That un-explains the tool placement though...
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: I think it's less about the forces required for turning/leaning and more about the feeling of being _in_ the bike vs _on_ the bike. Lower BB gives more of the "in" feeling, which can add a lot of confidence for some people. Part of the reason people like 29ers and mullets: higher axle[s] means relatively lower BB and more "in" feeling, especially in the front where any slight increase in the forces needed to create an OTB is very welcome.
  • 2 0
 Concept- very difficult-yes- not everyone rides the same terrain.
  • 2 0
 @Richt2000: 5%? where is you come up with this number?
Love to the analysis behind it.
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone:
It was a guess. I’ve ridden many places, some of them extremely rocky. Never had a problem with a 340mm BB. There must be very few places that require a 350-360mm bb for clearance.
  • 2 1
 @Abacall: Agreed. I’m on a patrol right now and rock strikes really do suck. Just had a pretty good OTB a few weeks ago from pedaling pretty hard on fast flat out section. The bb is literally so low that my foot touched the ground and sent me over hard.
  • 1 0
 Patrol?
  • 1 0
 @bikeporfavor: yeah transition patrol
  • 6 0
 i am just happy to see they didn't jump on the 29'er band wagon.....hope other brands take note (Devinci) so i can buy my New Spartan
  • 2 0
 They did. Just not with this bike...
  • 1 1
 @joostd: best check again....you are incorrect
  • 8 1
 I'd own a Pivot if they weren't press-fit BB. Instead, I have an Ibis.
  • 17 2
 Nice man, letting the bike do the work
  • 5 0
 This bike looks great but a bit unsure about the BB height - 353mm 13.89” in the low setting? Seems a bit high to me.
  • 5 0
 fewer pedal strikes in rocky terrain and less BB hits too.
  • 2 0
 @MattyBoyR6: & more ground clearance for that well placed "tool dock" system...lol
  • 3 1
 I enjoyed the Mach6 v3. It was high quality and climbed amazingly for a 6" travel bike. The negatives were the head angle was too steep and you couldn't run a coil shock. I'm pleased to see this v4 has a coil but the HA is still too steep, disappointing the BB height has gone up too. It will be interesting to see what changes the Firebird29 v2 brings.
  • 2 1
 You can run a coil shock in the previous version.
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: I know people have done it, but when I enquired I was told by Pivot that it's not supported and would invalidate the warranty. They supported the use of the ElevenSix briefly, but withdrew later, as the Clevis put too much side load on a narrow coil piston shaft.
Secondly the leverage curve of the v3 is almost flat for the last 50% of travel, making it particularly unsuitable for a coil shock unless custom tuned.
  • 1 0
 @ashfordakers: That's true but you can get coils with 18% progression. Since the first half is so progressive, I've found it hard to use full travel (on my riding terrain, no huge jumps). currently using a Manitou Mara Pro which is pretty much perfect for an air shock, but I could do coil.
  • 7 5
 Why are they even making fox 36 forks anymore? All of the sudden trail bikes are also enduro bikes and everyone is up for smashing rocks with their overforked and over geo’d bike. It used to be put a boxer on it and it’s a downhill bike, now it’s put a 38 on it and it is 1k more, weighs more, and does the same thing with the same travel and damper.
  • 15 0
 I'm betting there are a tonne of riders that think the 36 is the goldilocks fork for general riding. I'm expecting them on my next trail bike.
  • 2 0
 As some one who always rode 36s or helms on mid travel trail bikes I can definitely see why people prefer 38s to 36s on long travel ones. Definitely agree most people are fine with either but if you are spending the type of money a new mtb costs you might as well buy what you want. Personally the pricing seems on high side but wow is the frame gorgeous and I’m a huge fan of their factory team so I’ll be considering one for sure.
  • 6 0
 I have never found the limit of the 36, so I will stick with it and save myself 1/2lb and 20% of the money...
  • 6 0
 Everyone knows that 27.5” wheels are more fun - hell yeah they are!
  • 2 0
 "Additionally, a size large water bottle fits on all bikes with all shock types."

A "size large" water bottle? Do they/you mean a 750ml/26oz bottle? Because I've never seen a bottle labeled with letter/name sizes, only capacity.
  • 4 0
 Haha all these comments on the 'SLX' build... but how awkward is an AXS & Live Valve build?! "Let's ditch the cables... now add more cables!"
  • 5 0
 Sweet, can't wait to dock my tool with my new ride.
  • 2 0
 whole new meaning to DW-Link
  • 5 0
 Just imagine Ross seeing one of these on the trail "PIVOT, PIVOT"
  • 7 6
 “Less material, more expensive.” Thats Pivots new slogan.

I live in Phoenix and see plenty (majority) of the low skilled, deep pocket riders out here. The rich douches in Scottsdale are the only people keeping this company afloat.
  • 5 1
 ...and half the riders that clean National.
  • 4 0
 Is it possible to get just a frameset?
  • 1 0
 What tool is that under the top tube, a different pivot one? I've been trying to find one that has a multi tool and co2 on it, but I thought the usual pivot one was just a multi tool.
  • 1 0
 No aluminium build and the geometry count it out for me. Even if I could afford one, it probably wouldn't be at the top of my list of options anyway. It looks nice otherwise.
  • 4 0
 Yesss.. 27.5 Can't wait to see how it compares to my HD5!
  • 3 0
 First bike I have seen in a while that actually makes me consider buying a new bike. Price is pretty hefty though.
  • 2 0
 Shoot, that Live Valve version is the perfect companion to that carbon Specialized kids kicker bike...for people with a money tree on their farm...lol.
  • 2 2
 This looks very similar to that Norco Shore. Especially the linkage.

The same things happens with cars (they all start looking very similar) but I don't mind with bikes because I assume that it means that is the manufacturers all getting closer to the best shape for a bike. Like the Scott gambler? Looks like a Session, which looks like a operator, and all look great.
  • 2 0
 This bike really reminds me of my old Yeti SB5, and that bike was super fun so I bet this one is too. Plus no Switch Infinity to give you maintenance nightmares!
  • 2 0
 Pivot-I appreciate how you are doing size specific carbon layups. Please, please start doing size specific chain stay lengths.
  • 4 0
 that things mint! nice work Pivot
  • 4 0
 RFX by Pivot
  • 3 0
 I think I just found my next frame. Nice work Pivot.
  • 3 1
 Slack ST angle and limited sizing. Interesting for a bike launching right now.
  • 4 5
 please stop validating 27.5 by saying it's more fun and so we designed it to be poppy and playful. A lot of people just like or fit better or 27.5 bikes and don't want or need them to be super "poppy" and jibby. Tired of this being the marketing excuse and design focus for 27.5.
  • 4 1
 Pivot continues its noble quest to keep mountain biking unaffordable
  • 1 0
 They make great looking bikes, and they ride great...amazing craftsmanship too....the logo is irritating though. And stoked to see a new 275 whip.
  • 2 0
 wish they would make aluminum frames so us poor people might be able to afford one.
  • 1 0
 PBS WON'T need tools any just a place to carry tools for people who don't ride pivot bikes sorry don't need to carry them for your own pivot bike
  • 7 5
 12000 $ wtf better get a real motobike for that money
  • 10 0
 I feel like most people who buy top end Pivots can comfortably afford both...
  • 4 3
 Cool to see a new 650b bike (it's not 27.5, that's 650a). Maybe the wheel size will stay beyond mullets.
  • 2 0
 Super Boost Plus 157 (SB+)
  • 7 1
 It's an inexplicable design choice. 27.5 doesn't need the extra stiffness and that tire clearance doesn't need the wider chain line. They just alienated frame only buyers or buyers with lots of nice hubs in 148 who would swap the wheels.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: but it is less dish and more bracing angle. If you are buying complete and not frame only the only reason not to go super boost is if you are worried about heel rub or hoping to swap over your wheels. But you could always get conversions so swapping wheels over would work
  • 1 0
 For me, having a spare tube down low like that, would just be frame protection.
  • 1 0
 Weird that it only goes up to size Large and that it doesn't use superboost like the switchblade.
  • 4 0
 It uses Super Boost Plus 157, same as the current DH standard hubs. Same as the Switchblade, Firebird, Phoenix.
  • 1 1
 @kevinkeenan: NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
  • 1 0
 @kevinkeenan: Didn't see that explicitly mentioned, but makes sense since all their other bikes are using it. Still weird that it only goes up to a Large with a reach of 480mm and the seat tube angle seems slack by today's trends.
  • 2 0
 @matadorCE: Yeah, it's in the FAQ on the website. Where they also have answers to the pertinent questions like, "Did you just design Super Boost Plus to give all the commenter’s on Pinkbike something to talk about?"
  • 4 1
 no XL?
  • 2 1
 Seriously. WTAF. 6-4 rider here, I guess Pivot doesn't want my money.
  • 3 6
 Do you read much?

“The bike is available down to an XS size which should fit riders 4'10" and the size XL should fit riders up to 6'2" tall.”
  • 3 0
 Pivot's website doesn't show an XL option for this bike. Maybe they figure taller riders will want the Firebird with similar travel but 29" wheels. (Fair enough, I'm 6'2" and that's what I'd pick.)
  • 2 1
 @ABhardtail: the geo table in the article doesn’t list an XL either. But what’s also weird is that the ‘Large’ has a super low Stack (600 mm) which means effective Reach is around 470 or so when comparing to modern frames. So I guess Pivot is ignoring riders over 5’10”.
  • 2 0
 No XL, and the L isn't that long if you correct for short-ish stack. I guess they assume anyone over 6' is going to choose 29" wheels??
  • 2 0
 @Bullit-Boy: Was thinking the same. Even at 6'2 it might be compact.
  • 1 0
 @Bullit-Boy: No kidding, I’m 6’3” with 36.5” arms...and this Mach 6 is one of the only bikes I’ve really really liked the looks of in the last 3-4 years (plus, it’s pretty much a 2021 version of Turner’s 2016-era RFX, so that’s promising). Super disappointing there’s no XL or XXL.

As for the large sizing, GT’s 2019/2020 low-stack Force 29 in XL (495mm reach) only fit me with a 100mm 15-degree rise stem (90mm horizontal). A 70mm stem was significantly too short. The original 50mm stem felt like a kids’ bike to me. But I suppose I could get a large Mach 6 and run a 100mm or 110mm stem like it’s 2005 =P
  • 4 3
 I wonder who is « everyone « . I haven’t had any request for 27.5 bikes in my shop this past year...
  • 1 0
 Desert terrain is about the only place I’d prefer a 29er.
  • 1 0
 I just wanna know why we haven't read about the "SRAM's XX1 Eagle AXS suspension,..." on PB??
  • 1 1
 Is it just me or is this almost a carbon (pun intended) copy of the new gen transition bikes patrol or a small wheeled sentinel!! Just saying ????
  • 1 0
 It’s pretty similar to a 2016-era Turner RFX 4.0 (also engineered by DW) — I consider it a 2021 RFX =). Transitions are 4-bar Horst links. The RFX and Mach 6 are nearly identical DW-Links.
  • 1 0
 So sick! On my list to test! I can see the tool mounted on the BB catching a rock and ripping out.... trashing the frame?
  • 3 1
 That tool placement has to be a joke...
  • 1 0
 They closed so many trails at Trestle for so long and I was expecting better results.
  • 2 0
 That actually looks good! good Bronson alternative
  • 1 0
 Re height up to 6'2. Is a 6'2 rider cramped since that is the limit of it. (6'1 rider here).
  • 4 1
 swells ones penis
  • 1 0
 Follow anyone down a trail that has this bike and you will get a free tool!
  • 1 0
 BRRRRZZZZZZZTYTTTTTTTTTTT thats the sound of the dentist coming to buy their third all-rounder this year
  • 1 0
 Did anyone else notice that there are almost 50 variants of this 1 bike??? How is a distro supposed to cope with that ?
  • 3 1
 Looks amazing!!!
  • 2 0
 I agree!
  • 1 0
 Yeahh.....27.5” ain’t dead........boy that’s a mouthful
  • 2 2
 It is it's just not had it's funeral yet
  • 1 0
 Alloy Frame make it happen
  • 1 0
 cool now i just have to win the lottery brb buying a ticket now
  • 3 5
 Geo numbers are laughable!, it is like Pivot discovered the second gen SC Bronson. Some of the details are questionable to say the least and some look like an afterthought. 65.5 HA with a fox 38 and a coil?...laughable.
  • 1 0
 Wait.... THERE IS NO XL SIZE?!?!
  • 1 0
 Water Bottle and tool storage.....NO THANKS!
  • 1 0
 Nice bike... Dam super boost
  • 3 3
 tool dock on xc bike maybe. on trail or enduro bike it is just dumb
  • 2 2
 Smash in a 29er fork and there you go
  • 7 0
 Ur getting bb rise instead of drop then. Better off mulleting a 29er or waiting for native ones
  • 3 0
 Switchblade?
  • 7 4
 @bikefuturist: 27.5 bikes are better to convert to mullet than 29er. Only a 29er owner would tell you otherwise.
  • 3 1
 i'd want to smash in 2x 26" wheels into this to bring the BB back down to earth!
  • 1 0
 @bikefuturist: Pivot says that you can use a 160mm 29" fork, the recommend a Fork with 150mm.
  • 2 0
 Or Firebird?
  • 3 3
 Ahahahahahhhhh...12099 $…
  • 2 2
 Not particularly pivotal redesign
  • 1 0
 Pivot Clash
  • 1 2
 Too much P* bikes in the market... I can't distinguish between Pivot, Propain and Polygon.
  • 2 1
 Field test mystery bike?
  • 2 1
 Looks like a turner
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Turner
  • 7 9
 wow you can get a great Ebike for that price also. soo all the ebike arguments about how expensive they are VERY INVALID.
  • 3 0
 This is some solid satire guys. Please stop down voting it.
  • 1 1
 Meh....
  • 2 0
 Just less awkward looking
  • 2 1
 Lol, the geo on that thing is almost comically aggressive.
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