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First Look: 2022 Canyon Torque - Options For Almost Everyone

Dec 6, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  

Looking for a 27.5” park bike? What about a long travel mixed-wheel machine? Or maybe something with dual 29” wheels? Aluminum frame or carbon? Whatever your answer, there's a good chance there's a version of the 2022 Canyon Torque that will fit the bill.

According to Canyon, the new Torque was designed to be “the perfect option for a seaon in Whistler, Queenstown, or any other all-time riding destination.” In other words, they wanted a bike that could stand up to months (and years) of hard charging on a wide variety of terrain, everything from big jump lines to rugged, natural, EWS-worthy tracks.
Torque Details

• Wheel size: 29", 27.5", or mullet
• Rear travel: 170mm on 29" / 175mm for 27.5" and mullet
• Carbon or aluminum frame options
• 63.5º or 64º head angle
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Price: 2,699 - 5,499 Euro
www.canyon.com

To help with that goal, the 29” Torque has 170mm of front and rear travel, while the 27.5” versions have 175mm of rear travel and a 180mm fork. The mullet versions, which use the front end of the 29” bike and the back end from the 27.5” bike, have 175mm of rear travel and a 170mm fork. That's a lot of numbers, but the main takeaway is that the Torque was built to handle the rowdiest trails around. The fact that it's dual crown compatible is a testament to that, and the frame itself has the same Category 5 rating as Canyon's downhill bikes.

A flip chip allows for 8mm of bottom bracket height adjustment, and changes the head angle by .5-degrees.
The Torque uses Canyon's tool-free thru-axle - that lever slides into the axle once the wheel is secured.


Even with that Category 5 rating, Canyon was able to shed around 200 grams off the total frame weight for both the aluminum and carbon models – the claimed weight for the carbon frame (without shock) is 2650 grams. They also added the ability to carry a water bottle inside the front triangle, something that was lacking on the previous version.

Other details included a threaded bottom bracket, SRAM's universal derailleur hanger, and fully guided internal routing on the carbon frames (the alloy frames use foam tubing to keep things quiet).



Geometry

The Torque received significant revisions in the geometry department, gaining up to 30mm of reach for each size compared to the previous generation. In order to keep the cockpit from feeling too stretched out during seated pedaling, that longer front center is tempered by a steep 78-degree seat tube angle. The head angle now sits at 63.5 or 64-degrees depending on the position of the flip chip at the rear shock mount, which is nearly two degrees slacker than before.

The chainstays grew by 10 millimeters, and now measure 435mm for the 27.5” and mixed-wheel models, and 440mm for the 29” versions. The chainstay length is the same no matter the frame size – although the Sender downhill bike has adjustable chainstays, that feature isn't available on the Torque.


Yes, the new Torque is dual crown compatible, as Thomas Genon demonstrated at Rampage.

The Torque is designed to work with both air and coil shocks, and there's now room for a water bottle.
It's also long-travel dropper post compatible - the amount of drop can be adjusted in a matter of minutes by unscrewing the post's collar and turning a plastic sleeve.

A mixed-wheel Torque CF 8 just showed up for testing – look for a full in-depth review once we get enough land and air miles in on it.


Models & Pricing

There are a total of six different complete Torque models. In the United States, the list of available options is a little smaller - riders will be able to choose from the AL 5, CF 7, or CF 8.

Torque AL 5: $3,299 USD / €2,699
Torque AL 6: €3,199

Torque CF 7: $4,399 USD / €3,699
Torque CF 8 Mullet: $5,399 / €4,499

Torque CF Fabio Wibmer: : €5,499

Torque CF 9: €5,799




219 Comments

  • 209 4
 The colorway on that AL 5 is a choice
  • 71 2
 I'm happy that they reserved the objectively best looking paint job for the cheapest build (both the lil moine one shown here and raw alu)
  • 30 1
 I love it!
  • 37 4
 Looks like the type of paintjob I would buy, and love for the first week, then deeply regret having in my garage... Specs and prices and on point though, right down to the AL 5 which is a very solid build in todays market. Hope the frames have been beefed up...
  • 15 1
 @letsgethurt: yep that looks mint... and a bit purple too.. Easily the best bike, and if you are going to thrash a bike for a few seasons in a bike park maybe it'd be the best option.
  • 7 1
 @Mugen: There's also a boring option on the AL 5.
  • 9 3
 @Mugen: Exactly what I was thinking! Pure excitment and pride during week 1, second guessing and regret for the rest of the bike's life
  • 12 0
 I got a letter in the post today from my 10 year old self, it said "THIS is the one, you idiot! Buy this bike!". The colorway puts a smile on my face, like a warm-up for the ride.. Very rideable spec too!
  • 23 0
 ...I beleive that is the "My Little Pony" color option. And also the best color option.
  • 4 0
 @Mugen: I agree with you. Hopefully the frames have been improved......and the warranty/customer service
  • 3 0
 Doesn’t look like it will be available in US Frown Would buy that in a second.
  • 5 5
 i got the #69 upvote. sorry ill see myself to a different article
  • 4 0
 @Mugen: Canyon might be good value, but in this case you have to factor in the price of a whole new riding wardrobe, as you can be sure *nothing* will match this bike...
  • 2 0
 to peel your eyeballs out or not to peel your eyeballs out that is the question
  • 25 1
 Petition to bring back fun colors on bikes not just black, gray, tan, and moss.
  • 3 18
flag unrooted (Dec 6, 2021 at 8:19) (Below Threshold)
 @yoimaninja: do you understand the most basic rules of economics?
  • 7 0
 I feel like they chose that color for their cheapest option in order to get people to spend more on the more expensive options
  • 3 2
 That color will likely be in the sale outlet on the Canyon website soon.
  • 3 1
 I just wish my Santa Cruz was this colourway! At least I got loosely blue. There are enough black, grey and red bikes out there.
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: you mean you wear colours and not just all black?
  • 3 0
 @mountainsofsussex: lol speak for your self dude, I can match that.
  • 4 1
 who needs better spec when you can get that paintjob
  • 2 0
 @lawrence-s: spent many many years pre covid comminuting on busy roads - bright colours on all my riding gear to avoid being road kill...
  • 1 1
 Canyon always has awesome colorways.
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: You will need some Pit Vipers to ride that bike
  • 1 0
 @duanehundley: or those advent calendar Alpinas!
  • 1 1
 Daymn! I need that paint job!
  • 2 0
 @jason475: no man, it's pure shell suit. Or late 80s ski jacket.
  • 197 0
 Canyons marketing team "heres our riders doing 45ft gaps, jump tracks, rampage with dual crown forks"

Canyons warranty dept "our metallurgist has checked over your frame and said its been used for doing jumps, therefore we can not accept your warranty claim"

i wont bother buying another, thanks Smile
  • 86 0
 My carbon strive frame cracked and was told is wasn't warranted because " it was an outside influence"no description, no report, sweet FA. That's why I've moved away from Canyon now.. awful service
  • 9 0
 Wait they expect you to ship them the frame for warranty? Bass ackwards...
  • 9 27
flag SvenNorske (Dec 6, 2021 at 6:50) (Below Threshold)
 Trek FTW.
  • 50 0
 Repeated stories of difficulties from dealing with Canyon’s warranty department are why I’ll probably never pull the trigger on one despite their good prices. I may be willing to give up dealer support for a good deal, but not warranty support as well. At the end of the day, I’d rather support a local shop who is going to support me back if I have a warranty issue. My LBS helped my former semi-pro DH neighbor (who is one of the hardest on equipment I’ve ever seen) when he kept breaking his Ibis HD3 bike frames. Ibis kept replacing his frames until they developed the HD4, which he has been unable to break. Instead of refusing to warranty, they took the frames back and used them to develop stronger frames moving forward and not only got my neighbor as a customer for life, but also sold me on the brand. The stories from Canyon has done the opposite for me.
  • 9 0
 @whambat: FWIW I cracked a Strive frame in July and Canyon was beyond great for me. I wonder if the overseas Canyon experience is different than the US one? Not sure
  • 20 0
 @SvenNorske: For what it's worth, I have several friends who have a lot of experience warrantying cracked Trek frames and they seem pretty pleased with Trek's customer service. That being said, if the frames didn't constantly crack they wouldn't have any experience customer service in the first place...
  • 6 0
 @whambat: I have a neighbor who’s had many issues with his Canyon and their warranty/service department has come up short. Too bad. They’re giving the direct to consumer segment a black eye.
  • 2 1
 @HtownGiant: Have not broken my Neuron (yet) but each time I've called with a minor issue, Canyon USA has FedEXd the small part. Johnnie on the spot!
  • 10 1
 @Philthy503: Big difference between small $30 parts being replaced and being left with a broken $2,000+ frame.
The gesture is nice, but I'd rather have to pay for the small parts and know they're going to replace my frame if it fails from normal MTB use.
  • 2 0
 @rbarbier12: you're talking about a company that's putting out a significantly higher volume of bikes though, so you'd expect the cases of cracks to go up as their output does.
  • 3 0
 @HtownGiant: that’s awesome you were treated well. When that becomes the norm versus what we’ve been hearing for years, I think Canyon will get a better rep and have even better sales. You think with the cost savings of direct sales would allow them to have enough extra frames to warranty more liberally.
  • 4 0
 @nickfranko: it wasnt very funny when my friend dented a seatstay, the only option they offered him was a full CF9 frameset for £1900 lol, rather unsuprisingly, he still has a dent in his seatstay
  • 1 0
 @HtownGiant: and I’d love to hear more good stories about their warranty because I was eyeballing a Sender 6 for an affordable bike park bike, because it’s hard to beat that price for a decent DH bike.
  • 7 0
 @bigun6767: Seems like there is a trend with the German companies. I had a rocker failure because of an obvious design issue, and Radon/Bike-discount told me that this is no warranty case. No explanation, nothing.
www.pinkbike.com/u/Kaspitch/album/RADON-Jab-rocker-fail
  • 3 0
 @Kaspitch: wow, that is poor!
  • 5 0
 Yeah... Canyon and YT both make some pretty sick bikes, however nowadays you must consider the quality of the warranty department before purchasing a bike from any brand, which really sucks. Both of their warranty departments aren’t dedicated to their paying consumers. Hopefully someday that will change.
  • 1 0
 So true. The irony. Smile
  • 3 1
 Specify which Canyon office you dealt with. No issues here in Australia.
  • 1 0
 Weird, I have had a stellar support from Canyon so far. Only praise for them and that is why I'm on my 4th Canyon bike so far.
  • 2 0
 @HtownGiant: I had a 2019 Spectral CF 7.0 and the front triangle cracked twice. Both times the frame has been replaced (though I suspect it was only the front triangle). So Canyon has been great to me in this regard.
  • 1 0
 @tkdbboy: it seems by and large that Canyon USA sucks. I worked in the industry for years in CA and they have a pretty terrible rep even word of mouth locally. Their facility in Southern California is huge with several on hand mechanics, but they refuse to work on any bikes in house for some odd reason, and they are an absolute pain to get parts/information from.
  • 1 0
 @Caligula1620: Yeah I heard US does suck ... also same with Poland.

It's better to voice which office exactly rather than Canyon as a whole because if in the slight chance that anyone who works at Canyon reads it, then that specific information is useful rather than a blanket 'Canyon service sucks' statement.

In the end you deal with a person on the other end, and they could be completely useless or an absolute legend. If the Australian staff were in the US office then you'd likely be singing a different song.
  • 1 0
 @tkdbboy: I'd be surprised if these issues are purely geographical and that the breakdown is somehow culturally based, but otherwise I agree!
  • 88 1
 " In other words, they wanted a bike that could stand up to months of hard charging on a wide variety of terrain"

Not for years?
wow...
  • 86 0
 When Marketing meets Legal.
  • 23 0
 Notice the article has magically been updated with “(years)” now. Smile
  • 63 0
 My friend has a three year old Canyon, and Canyon cannot supply replacement parts (for the frame).

Buyers beware!
  • 2 0
 Spectral?
  • 8 0
 When I was looking for a new bike this type of thing was regularly reported by canyon owners…I did not and will not buy a canyon.
  • 7 0
 isnt that actually against some EU rule?
  • 7 0
 @unrooted: theres an entire business there for someone making parts for knackerd cantons
  • 1 0
 Which parts?
  • 2 0
 which one?
  • 1 0
 It’s a Spectral yes.
  • 1 0
 The seat stay on one side needs replacing.. He is now looking to replace the frame.
  • 43 6
 Holy balls batman, hold me back on that AL5! The bees want their knees back! that thing puts the yum back in bubblegum. For realsies though. I want it.
  • 41 3
 Sounds great, until you have to warranty something
  • 4 2
 What issue did you have?
  • 2 0
 That day will come for sure
  • 32 1
 So nice to see they have kept the 27.5 wheel option still available. This wheel size should never die or be relegated for back wheel use only.
  • 4 0
 Too bad there is no XL though.
  • 1 1
 @makkelijk84: Ah fair enough.
  • 4 1
 #27_5aintdead
  • 2 0
 right? so nice when they provide options rather than pretending one size fits everything
  • 2 0
 @luckynugget: Spot on. 29 all round or 27.5 all round. Perfect!
  • 22 2
 How quickly will the frame crack after purchase?))
  • 84 1
 Yes
  • 37 2
 It comes pre-cracked.
  • 6 0
 @tonit91: That way they can tell you it is a feature when you inevitably have to warranty your frame.
  • 6 1
 Very little 2018-2021 Torques cracked. Check out the YT owners group on FB ... Capra rear triangles crack a lot
  • 12 0
 Although the bikes offer good value for money, I can't help but feel that prices have increased pretty significantly the last 3 or 4 years. It would be nice to see a price evolution over the last 3 years of direct sales brands, results could be interesting.
  • 8 0
 Indeed, my 2013 Giant Reign 1 was 2600€ with, back then, a fox 32 ctd, a fox ctd crap shock and full SLX equipment.
So 2700€ for the AL5 with a Zeb, piggyback shock and Deore drive seems abotu as good value.
  • 2 0
 I bought a Torque FR8 with Lyrik MoCo and Formula brakes in 2008 for 2200.-€.
Add an adjustable seatpost and it would have been 2500€ then.

Looks like a good value today for the AL5 as it looked with the FR8 to me.... before I broke the frame and they said it was my fault, seatpost to long etc... got a new frame in the end, but I don't want to get through all of this again.
  • 3 0
 I bought spectral al 6 in 2017. It was 2300eur (now 2999), and came with better wheels and slightly better components all around.
  • 1 0
 2020 Canyon Torque cf8.0: 4k€, almost the same specs (appart from float x2 performance instead of dhx2 factory and 36 instead of 3Cool . So I would say it is not too bad for this version
  • 12 1
 Canyon's line up is a bit confusing now, with the Spectral, Torque and Strive overlapping hugely, all with 160-175mm rear travel, 160-180mm front travel and similar angles (except the Strive is looking very dated now), and all available with 29 wheels, and Mixed wheels for the Torque and Spectral
  • 1 1
 I agree. If I am not mistaken the Srive is the only one not to be updated for this run. It's geo looks massively out of date compared to these other models. I wonder if they are going to do something to differentiate it from the Torque and Strive
  • 3 0
 @sorryiamtheboss: Yeah, Strive was updated in 2019? to be 29" only. I don't see why the EWS team wouldn't use the torque or spectral, I think the reason Jack Moir gave to sticking with the Strive when other member of the team moved to the Spectral was that at the time he was used to the Strive, and had it dialled in for him. Maybe we will see a new Strive ready for the EWS to kick off next year. I'd expect to see at 29" only, and maybe keep some form of the shapeshifter
  • 7 0
 @melonhead1145: This clip explaines Jacks bike choice: www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lymyl1E4Ld0
  • 4 0
 @johanlindh: yeah, I found that clip really interesting. It just seemed that having a bike that he can manhandle and really put where he wanted had bigger advantages over a bike that was marginally more stable, but harder to control on tight corners. IE new geo vs old (3 year old) geo.
  • 13 1
 i bought a brand new ebike, DIDNT LAST A DAY!!!!! MY GOD CANYON DOESNT EVEN RESPOND TO THE WARRANTY CLAIMS!!! THIS BRAND f - sucks.. i thought it was great.. their maketing is the most missleading thing ive seen ever.
  • 8 0
 Your name may be why they won't honor your claim. Maybe the bike isn't for riding fast?
  • 15 4
 4 different seat angle references in the geo table, and still not publishing the actual seat angle. #stophidingactualseatangles
  • 9 1
 Yeah that is mad, surely all we need is Actual, Effective and reference seat height?
  • 9 1
 It depends on the frame and wheel size, but the actual seat tube angle is between 69.7 - 71-degreees. It gets steeper with the larger sizes, which is great to see. The full chart of all the values is here: www.pinkbike.com/photo/21752303
  • 2 0
 Who rides 0% SAG? So no given seat angle is accurate
  • 2 0
 @pasteque51: no, but at least it gives a good indication against other bikes
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: or just measure it at stack height.

The other variable is rear wheel travel. This bike has 170mm so with any reasonable kind of sag it’ll put riders waaay over the back if you have long-ish legs.
  • 1 0
 @melonhead1145: if you give me the angle at 30% Sag yes maybe, the pedalling position depends on the suspension course
  • 11 2
 Shouldn’t the canyon emblem letters be leaning the other way or maybe just not as much? I cant help but wonder if the other side looks similar to ZOYZAC or some crazy whatever like that and turning my phone around or upside down doesn’t seem to be helping my OCD. I guess w/the price being so doable U could just put some SC Decals on it and it might look a lil betr. (It’d probably ride better too haha) wait a minute? Come to think of it
I guess, I’d be the first to say it but yea,
Eek
It Looks like a Hightower ahahaha
Which isn’t so bad
  • 5 0
 cannot unsee the letters leaning to the wrong side
  • 4 0
 I think Canyon always had reverse italics...
  • 2 0
 @shortcuttomoncton: this, the backwards leaning letters have been their logo for.. Since they exist?
  • 9 0
 Another freeride bike just got enduro treatment. The best part about the old torque was the fact that it was SHORT. 425mm stays are SIIIICK!!! 440 mm reach on a Small is stooooooopid!! Its meant to be a flickable freeride bike (in 27.5 at least) not an "enduro bro" needs more "confidence" bike. Small people should be able to size down too.
  • 18 8
 Apparently, I'm the only one that thinks the al5 is hideous. It looks like something a 5 year old with adhd would design.
  • 14 0
 TBF that's exactly why the rest of us think it's awesome. If Mabel from Gravity Falls rode MTB...
  • 6 2
 Hideous is the way to go. On the other hand, there is always a boring option.
  • 10 3
 @cxfahrer: trust me, my skills are bad enough, I don't need that bike attracting even more attention.
  • 4 1
 @inked-up-metalhead - they do make that in a raw aluminum version that's a lot less visually jarring: www.pinkbike.com/photo/21752338.
  • 3 2
 @mikekazimer: ah yes, the version for 30+ year olds (at least mentally). Much less likely to garner looks while rolling over a table.
  • 2 0
 Reminds me to that old hatchback after an accident where the owners only option was to buy a non-matching color bumper at the local scrapyard.
  • 7 0
 I hope I wont see that many broken torque on IG anymore, or ones with a lose rear end
  • 1 0
 Can you post links to these?
  • 1 0
 You probably have not seen mine yet..
  • 8 0
 Torque AL5 with the CF9 parts sounds like the best possible idea here.
  • 4 0
 Nice pricing, albeit with weird sizing, but you'll never find me on a Canyon. The warranty horror stories are sufficient to make sure this company doesn't earn my business until they realize that frames break and most people aren't doing 45ft jumps to break their frames.
  • 6 0
 Did they fix the problem with the linkage developing significant play over a short riding time and the other problem with linkage bolts shearing apart tho?
  • 2 4
 Came down to owners not maintaining their bike or being heros with tools and shearing bolts. Had one for 3 years with none of those issues.
  • 4 0
 @tkdbboy: got a riding buddy, who had Canyon send him 2 frames because both had play in the linkage. "Not maintain their bike" the play happened over about 2 weeks, that's definitely not down to poor maintenance.
  • 2 1
 @A1990ToyotaHilux: Got 3 riding buddies and myself with the bike and it doesn't have the issue.
The owner's group had a poll on who had this issue and very little to none had it. It's just the people with the loudest voice get heard and get assumed they're the majority.
Some owners just had very worn bushings which does come down to maintenance.
Your mate could be an exception.
  • 2 0
 That crazy color Al 5 doesn't seem to be available in the states. Was actually a little tempted. Probably for the best based on what I've heard on their warranty department. And yes, I would consider buying a bike for color alone.
  • 3 0
 all these bad Canyon customer support stories seem to be from the EU, while in the US area, My whole family has had nothing but good experiences with canyon's Customer service dept.
  • 1 0
 My old man got to return his bike and get a Torque CF8 more than 30 days after the bike arrived, they replaced the shock mounts at no cost to me, and have been nothing but kind while doing so
  • 2 0
 I have a 2020 torque CF9 and it has been great for Pemberton/Whistler but I haven't had to try and deal with any warranty stuff. Climbs well, descends great. I haven't had the loose rear end issue that others have had but I check my bearings pretty frequently. It's fun in the bike park but I'm not really sending it like a lot of other people. You get a lot of bike for the money. I'd buy another one but now after hearing everyone else's horror stories of service, I'm a bit hesitant.
  • 6 0
 Great prices!
  • 2 0
 I hardly believe they are not the 2019 prices!
  • 2 0
 Canyon finally read the memo about seat tube lengths.
Hope you're getting one in for review @mikekazimer ? Preferably the 29er, but also stick it in the high setting to see if it works as a mullet. Thanks in advance.
  • 1 0
 It says in the article that they got a mixed wheel cf8 in for testing. It's the image description of the green cf 8 toward the end.
  • 1 0
 @Dlinsky: Thank you sir. Better than a kick in the nuts, I suppose.
  • 1 0
 Size L 29" is 435mm seat tube in their site, I guess that's a typo...
  • 1 0
 Seat tube length still appear tall to me. It is a matter of priorities I suppose. They could have extended the seattube lower so that they wouldn't have had to make it so high whilst still having enough room for adjustment and to clamp the seatpost properly. But people want a bottle mount nowadays and with this suspension design, this is where the bottle ends up.
  • 3 1
 @chakaping, yep, I’ll be putting the miles in on the mullet version over the next couple of months. And @vinay, I’d say the seat tube lengths are fine - there’s plenty of room for a 200mm dropper post on the size large I have.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Ok, if it works for you then that's good. I feel that I want the top tube so low that with the cranks level, the front knee is still fully above the top tube so that I still have room to move around instead of only having that room when the inside leg is up (a posture which I feel compromises the possibility to pump and generate speed in a flat corner). And when I slide my weight over the back, I feel I need that kind of room over the saddle too. But yeah, if it is sufficient for you then sure it must be sufficient for a lot of other people so I don't question the validity of your review. In the mean time, enjoy the bike then!
  • 1 1
 Yeah they finally made a bike where I can get reasonable reach without a giant seat tube. That medium looks bang on for someone who is 5-10 like me
  • 1 0
 @chakaping my wife (162 cm tall) is on one of the new 27.5 Spectrals in a size small - even though the seat tube doesn't look particularly short, she can run the included 150mm dropper on it without adjusting the travel down.
Unlike some other brands where the post fouls on the rocker pivot (eg a friend's Scott Spark only allows 14cm insertion), Canyon have actually constructed the frame to allow you to fully slam the seat post right down to the collar if you need to.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: That's a really important detail for short-legged riders like me. I have the post fully slammed on all of my MTBs.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: Canyon gives max seat post insertion, that's important. But no you can't slam : size L has 240mm, XL not much more. A one up 210mm needs about 290mm, and other brands' 200mm at least that ...
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: but yes in comparison a 140mm max insertion is ridiculous! Big flaw in my books
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: Oh, but what's the point of having a short seattube if you expect your customer will likely run a dropper seatpost and there isn't enough room to slam it?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: if I understand your point of view correctly, yes, I agree it's a shame when the max insertion is limiting.
Running less than 210mm drop is a last resort for my size and riding, and for example if I look at a 29" Spindrift in size L, the post will stick out so much that it's as if the ST is 515mm (and not the real 460mm).
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: Looking forwards to that Starling review. At least they run a full length straight seattube so even the smallest size can fit the longest dropper and still slam it. Someone getting their stock geometry size small (so with the corresponding reach number) may not want the full length dropper but for a fairly acceptable surcharge they offer custom geometry so you can get that small seattube on a size large frame.

A more standard frame like the Pipedream Full Moxie (so no custom options) has a 420mm seattube on both their long and longer size though there is a bend lower down. I'd say you probably still have at least 290mm of straight tube in there though.

The king of it all is probably Liteville with their Eightpins dropper. Full length seattube and a good amount of travel out of their own dropper.

Either way, for a bike like the one featured in the article I'd expect you should be able to get the saddle properly out of the way and a seattube of nearly 18" on a size large seems like a reason to look elsewhere. It may just be more relevant to me as I ride a hardtail, but I'd say the bike can be so amazing but first and foremost it should give you the space to move around and actually command such a bike properly.
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: How did you cope before 210mm dropper posts existed? Were bikes unrideable before 2019?
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: I was specifically referring to the seat tube on the small spectral 27.5 CF allowing the post supplied with that bike to be slammed - I have neither measured nor checked the specification charts for every Canyon /dropper post combination.

Bear in mind that the max insert length Canyon give is for the circular cross-section of the tube - you don't need to include the actuator length, so your One-Up V2 comes down to 282mm.

FWIW for relevance to this article, the Torque CF lists max insertion as 275mm on the large size (240mm only on the AL frame). As @mikekazimer says above, it's enough to allow a rider that would typically choose a large to run at least a 200mm dropper.
  • 1 0
 @dsut4392: yes I saw the carbon Torque has more. But I'm not considering carbon, so it doesn't change a thing for me.
Yes the correct measure is 282mm, and I hope Canyon/Propain are conservative and thus a large Spindrift will still allow me to slam "enough" the post.

Before long droppers, I used the quick release even with a dropper, depending on terrain. Megavalanche part on snow requires the seat completely out of the way for proper use of tripod technique haha and then there's big uphills in the second part too, for example Wink
  • 1 0
 @vinay: yes, straight seat tubes for the win!
  • 3 2
 I’ve owned two torque’s and have absolutely loved them. My one wish was the bottle space. That’s solved, and I don’t even mind the XL not being available in 27.5” as 515mm reach might be a bit long for my riding despite being 6’5”.
  • 3 1
 27.5 is on the short side for 6'5", even the 29 is not that long.
6'7" speaking.
  • 1 0
 @cxfahrer: I like to ride my party time bike with a smaller size than most of my height would.
  • 2 0
 Oh nooo, I just pre-ordered the commencal meta sx, because my current canyon torque is not aggressive enough, they made all the right adjustments tho... What do you guys think: Meta SX or Canyon Torque?
  • 6 0
 Meta. Commencal makes awesome shred sleds
  • 1 0
 On the Canyon site it doesn’t look like they offer size small in 29er or Mullet configurations (at least in Canada). Starting with a 465mm reach in the smallest size and only offering 3 sizes is leaving out a lot of riders. I guess less skews is how they get the pricing down..? Trek/Specialized offering 6-7 sizes is really nice actually.
  • 1 0
 It is interesting / depressing to see the price of the top spec Torque has gone up 66% since when I bought their 2013 bike equipped with XTR, Fox Kashima, Race face carbon cranks, basically top of the line everything. That said, it was an alloy frame and it had a carbon seatpost rather their own dropper. O and Brexit.......
  • 10 10
 I hope they keep 27.5 because imo 27.5 plus feels better than both 27.5 and 29 as long as run on sufficiently wide rims you get a miles smoother ride, more grip etc... most of us aren't EWS or DH racers needing DH casing 2.4 tyres for a ride in the woods. What we want is a supply ride hence why we spend up to 10k on suspension bikes...and one of the easiest and cheapest ways to get a comfier ride feel is with a pair of 27.5 x 2.8s. Same rollover almost as 29 with better comfort.
  • 9 0
 And the tyres are thinner than a fag packet, and get punctures if you look at them the wrong way. Never found that I need more grip than from a 2.4 tyre
  • 8 4
 @melonhead1145: it's not the grip, it's the massively reduced chatter and compliance. 2.4 is actually gripper in wet mud and plenty grippy enough generally. For roots and and rocks 2.8 feels massively more plush and composed than 2.4 and makes a bigger difference to feel than even fitting £1000 shocks..I know because I run an 11.6 and Smashpot and the biggest difference to calming the ride comes from the higher volume tyres. I can get 1000 down votes and I will still keep riding plus for where I live...it works miles better for natural trails and woods. For hitting huge lines at Whistler obviously it probably is durable enough but let's be honest how many people in the real world that buy these bikes are actually doing that every weekend?
  • 2 1
 @Danzzz88: You are so right on the 2.8 thing. I’m only on 2.6 because I couldn’t find any of the tires I wanted in 2.8
  • 5 1
 @Jules15: I get people ride super aggressive through sharp rocks and may have trouble with sidewall durability on plus tyres... but from a performance perspective they allow you to carry speed and smash through stuff with way less feedback and harshness than regular tyres. I feel like they didn't get enough chance because most were trying them on sub 30mm rims and getting squirm. I'm also not talking the huge oversized 2.8s like Kendas either which are way too big. My sb165 is rate for a 2.6 max rear tyre and I'm comfortably running a 2.8 Maxxis in the back with room to spare. Also no with inserts sidewall support is even less of an issue. It really is a shame people have jumped on the bandwagon all the racers use because for us mere mortals their setups are not ideal. Their bikes are designed and tuned to be as fast as possible all expenses spared... I guarantee if anyone rode a pros bike they would find it an absolutely awful chatter harsh mess. Who wants their 160mm + enduro to feel like a hardball when going for a ride through the woods or some casual bike park use. You don't need DH casing 2.4s for anything other than hitting 30-40mph on super rough downhill trails where the durability becomes a priority.
  • 5 0
 My wife loves, loves, loves her 2.8s for our cobblestone and roots trails around here. I tried, and I can't stand the way they ride, like my wheel is never quite where I planned on it being, so I ride 29x2.4. My son thinks we're both wrong and likes 27.5x2.6. I do hope they keep build options for all of us.
  • 4 0
 @Genewich: Do you know how wide the rims are on your wife's bike. For me personally the slight lack in precision is more than made up for my the stability and reduced feedback. But you are right everyone has different preferences...I just wish all this bike companies will keep producing stuff for everyone and not just stuff Pinkbike wants to shove down people throats as been the latest and greatest on a regular basis. Thing is most people don't hit double blacks every weekend at mach chicken...the majority of the population just goes for a ride through their local trails and a few hit the bike park every now and then. I don't agree with this everyone should be on the same setups pro EWS riders use as they are concerned about maximum efficiency and speed at the expense of everything else. Riding an EWS bike will shake you around like an skeleton in a biscuit tin.
  • 1 0
 @Danzzz88: Her rims are 35mm internal, probably the smallest I'd try 2.8s on. As for me, I started riding when anything over 2.0 was a high volume tire, and I've just never gotten on with anything bigger than 2.4.
  • 1 0
 Nah, my 2.8s were horrific, absolutely zero sidewall support (minion dhr2 exo) so they just made the bike feel vague and squirrelly, and although they were grippy, the 2.6 pirellis that replaced them are miles better, especially because I can run them at lower pressures. If you're happy with them, that's fine, but I can tell you now most people don't like them for a reason.
  • 1 1
 Do you know if the suspension is as progressive as their previous model? I've tried a number of modern Enduro bikes, and they've all been far too 'wallowy' for park use, (diving and bottoming out on take offs etc) regardless of suspension/fork set up, but I'd heard good things about this bike.
  • 1 0
 My previous model had 5 token in the Fox X2 damper. i dont think it was very progressive by suspension design. and According to some tests the Mullet versions of the new ones are lacking mid travel support with the coil shock. So I assume it isnt very progressive aswell. Should be fine with an airshock and some tokens tho.
  • 4 0
 People who pick up AL 5.0 are pretty BASED. Hats off to you
  • 3 0
 To be fair to Canyon, since 2017 they have replaced 2 frames and 4 sets of Raceface cranks on my Strive, all under warranty.
  • 3 0
 I hope they fixed the rear suspension
  • 1 0
 More info please?
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: old one was quite inactive under braking
  • 2 0
 @Noeserd: Source? More info?
  • 4 1
 Looks like a YT Capra to me.
  • 1 0
 Can that CF9 weight be right? I know the CF8 has a coil shock, but I'm struggling to see where the rest of the 1.1kg weight difference is?
  • 3 1
 Coil shock probably 400-500g, xtr/carbon crank not full xt another 400-500g , carbon bar 100g, dt swiss 240 hubs vs 350 is another 110g.

Its the thing, lots of little things done to drop a bit of weight soon add up to a big difference, even if they've not really compromised durability, just cost.
  • 1 0
 The coil shock alone is almost a 700g difference
  • 2 0
 @SimonJaeger: is it really that much different? I've always reckoned (very roughly) it's the weight of the spring different, and fox sls springs are around 3-500g depending on size.
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: But do you see any SLS springs?
  • 1 0
 @SimonJaeger: no, i just assumed based on it being a fox dhx2 lol.
  • 1 0
 @SimonJaeger: and if it really is more on the shock, there should be more than 1100g difference
  • 3 1
 170mm travel is more than I need. I'd be overbiked, or should I say I'd be over-torqued.
  • 4 0
 Capralieve my eyes
  • 3 0
 Canyon: Barbie Edition...hell yeah!
  • 3 0
 Coming to a blue flow trail near you.
  • 1 0
 A lot of complaints about Canyon’s warranty. Warranty won’t be an issue on the new Torque, it’s “Category 5” rated.
  • 2 0
 What is DT Swiss FR 2070?
  • 2 0
 Large has more lil more reach than my '20 yt jeffsy xl.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Clash. (That’s a very good thing)
  • 2 0
 I think I know what my next bike will be tup
  • 1 0
 *waits for them to update the Strive cause that's the one they need to update the most*
  • 2 0
 Terrible service warranty form Canyon...No thanks.
  • 2 0
 It all sounds really, really good. Until you realize it's a Canyon.
  • 2 0
 We've looked at these before, like a few weeks ago.
  • 3 1
 Wonky sizing.
  • 1 0
 For real. Their geometry makes it impossible for me to even consider their bikes. Always felt like, in order to get the reach I want from Canyon, I'd need a 5 cm longer inseam.
  • 4 3
 I'm 6.1 and would be riding a medium, crazy.
  • 4 3
 I'm 5ft 8in and I'd ride a large. Crazy.
  • 1 0
 I’m 6’1 and I’d most definitely be on a large.
  • 1 0
 Yeah I'm 6'5" and would go Large with those reach numbers.
  • 3 1
 @Freakyjon: reach is barely more significant than nominal toptube, considering the variables: spacers, stem length, bar length/rise/sweep/roll, and working toptube length. All that can be said with certainty is that the same object 89cm from your feet is easier to manipulate than an object 92cm from your feet.

Given its front center of 79cm, a 50/810mm riser bar, and 50mm spacerless stem, at 6' I'd like this in Small. Going by seat tube length, it's closest to what I already have. @chakaping: also crazy
  • 5 1
 @ceecee, unless you like really, really tiny bikes a small is not going to be the correct size for someone that's 6' tall. I do agree that they've pushed the sizing pretty far. For my 5'11" height a M/L size would probably be ideal, but the large really hasn't been too much of a handful so far, especially at higher speeds.

That steep seat tube angle does make a difference, and the pedaling position on the large is quite comfortable - sizing down would make things pretty cramped.
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer: that's not even a tiny counterargument. STA still varies on saddle height and fore/aft. When did 1225mm become smaller than small?--still longer than latest medium Nomad. I can understand longer stays and slacker htas, but I still don't know what you're doing with all that mid-center. You're going so fast in park that increased midcenter is the only way to increase wheelbase while maintaining desired handling? You expect it to still feel roomy when seated with saddle dropped? Is bending your knees and elbows not cool anymore? A medium Phoenix 29 has a 43cm reach--is it tiny? Genuinely perplexed, unless it's just good short-term commerce
  • 1 0
 Long front end can be good for handling, and for tall people who need the room. Here I just fear that appropriate XL reach is not matched by long CS, giving poor front traction on flat turns in my experience (CS/WB ratio 0.35 = beware).
At 190cm (6'3") here I won't consider longer than the L, and the ST is almost too short .. never thought I'd have that problem haha
  • 1 0
 Erratum : CS/WB ratio less than 0.35
  • 1 0
 @Uuno: elegant simplification which eliminates all but size Small. Sure you're not here to sell me a new link for 427/1191? Based on that and a 435/1196, I'd beware at .36! Thanks
  • 1 0
 Its basically what I'd want my jeffsy to be...
  • 1 0
 Torque seems like good name for an E.
  • 1 0
 So this must be the last bike in the Field Test?
  • 1 0
 All the options except size-specific rear centers.
  • 1 0
 Any cracked Aluminum Canyon frames, or just their carbon?
  • 5 0
 I cracked my 2015 aluminum spectral, but that was after five years of riding it mostly in the bike park so I wasn't too surprised to be honest.
  • 1 0
 Kinematics look very similar to Jeffsy
  • 1 0
 Medium is too small for me and large is too big Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Looks exactly like a Jeffsy
  • 1 0
 You can park your AL 5 right next to the lime green charger
  • 1 0
 I like the color; reminds me of my specialized MANGO.
  • 1 0
 Status but in stock!
  • 1 0
 proper value
  • 1 0
 Sweeeeet!
  • 1 1
 poor 26ers, they deserve more. still the best.
  • 3 6
 If you only have $3,299 USD / €2,699 to spend, you get to buy a cute little toy. Otherwise please enjoy your bike.
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