First Look: 2022 Mondraker Summum Carbon Comes with Integrated Telemetry

Jun 8, 2021
by Seb Stott  


In September last year Mondraker updated their illustrious downhill platform, the Summum. They gave it 29" wheels (with the option for 27.5" in the rear), made the tubes sleeker, lengthened the geometry and tweaked the suspension kinematics. But the big talking point was that the Summum - previously known for being one of the lightest DH bikes - was aluminium only.

Mondraker suggested the team riders preferred the "responsive" feel of the aluminium version. But since then we've spotted a bike that was unmistakably a carbon version of the new Summum, and now Mondraker are ready to reveal the finished bike.

The new frame has a carbon front triangle, swingarm and a one-piece carbon rocker link, helping to achieve an impressive claimed weight of 2,800g (6.17 lb) without shock.
Mondraker Summum Carbon Details
• 29" or mullet ("MX") options
• 2,800g (6.17 lb) claimed frame weight (without rear shock)
• 200mm travel via Trunion shock
• MIND telemetry system
• Carbon front and rear triangles and one-piece carbon upper link
• Chainstay length: 455mm +/- 5 mm with included geometry kit
• Head angle: 63.5º +/- 1º or +/- 2º with included geometry kit
• BB83 threaded bottom bracket
• 4 sizes
mondraker.com

Brook laying it over.

But there's more to the new bike than lightness. Flagship models will be available with Mondraker's integrated suspension telemetry system they call MIND. Previously only seen on Mondraker's Foxy and Crafty carbon models, the system uses magnetic sensors to detect the front and rear suspension travel position 100 times per second. Along with GPS data and Mondraker's own app, this information can be used to assess suspension setups or line choice, and can make setup recommendations.

Additionally, the carbon bike is more adjustable. The included geometry kit includes two alternative headset cups, which give either +/- 1º or +/- 2º of head angle adjustment. In all, this allows the bike to be setup with a head angle measuring 61.5º, 62.5º, 63.5º 64.5º, or 65.5º. The kit also makes it possible to add or subtract 5mm from the chainstay length, so it can be set to 450mm, 455mm or 460mm (the alloy bike is 450mm only). Otherwise, the geometry is near identical to the alloy bike, with a 350mm BB height, 63.5º default head angle, and reach numbers from 430mm top 500mm.


The mullet version is half a degree slacker

The carbon version shares a lot of the design language with the alloy bike. It wouldn't be a Mondraker without the brace joining the top tube and down tube (interestingly, the carbon prototype we spotted didn't appear to have this feature) along with the elevated seatstay which carries into the slim top tube. The carbon version differs from the alloy bike with a strut connecting the seat tube/shock tunnel to the down tube.


Other details include chainstay and downtube protection and a shock fender to keep debris off the damper.

The Summum RR is the top-spec build.

Mondraker couldn't provide information on prices or availability at the time of writing, but we'll update this article if we get more details.




106 Comments

  • 193 1
 Why the marketing BS of "Oh, our riders prefer alu" then 12 months later; "Here's our sexy carbon model".
Just own up to the fact that alternating metal and plastic is your release schedule. Some people prefer the economy of aluminium frames as they are cheaper and easier to produce, and some people will want the bling. I don't think you're losing customers if you acknowledge both and don't treat us like morons.
  • 25 0
 Agree, I don't think Mondraker comes out of this in good light. They could have perfectly release the AL version as it was, instead of mounting that narrative
  • 5 1
 How many people replace their bike every single year, that would be put out if Mondy owned up? Most people I know keep a frame for 2 years at the bare minimum, and most bike companies only update geos every other year anyway, sticking to the "improve performance" then "improve cost" model.
  • 4 1
 I agree it would seem more credible if they at least told us their justifications for making a carbon version. That being said, I don't think it necessarily means they lied. There are a lot more reasons to use carbon than just feel. It allows them to build more complex and optimized individual areas. Maybe it was the best way to include all the geometry adjustments while keeping weight down. Or other reasons that we just don't know and thus understand.
  • 4 0
 whatevers available at the time is always gna b put into the marketing machine.
  • 4 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: Exactly, there are plenty of reasons to prefer AL and plenty of reasons as well to prefer carbon. That's exactly where the issue lies.
If you go back and read the alloy version releases Mondraker pretty much framed it as if they found alloy was superior and thus they were sticking with it
  • 6 0
 because people that want carbon will wait, if you tell them a carbon bike is coming. This way you sell everyone an AL bike, then in 10 mon, you sell the carbon guys another bike. it's not science rockets....
  • 4 0
 Mondraker couldn't provide information on prices or availability at the time of writing, but we'll update this article if we get more details.
translation: Mondraker was too ashamed to inform the buying public that this bike is $15,000 USD.
but seriously, it has some pretty cool tech for those who are into it.
  • 3 1
 Well let’s see it what it is - a nice bike!
  • 3 0
 @shredddr: as a guy that rides an $11k Foxy, I will say, if you have the means, you should pick one up! so choice!

Ferris Beuller jokes aside, my guess is that it's in the $8000 range. DH bikes never have the stupid bling that puts them over the top, price wise. no XX1AXS and all that.
  • 3 1
 Couldn't it just be that mondraker looked at the success of specialized and commencal and thought well maybe we give it a try. Then when the athletes gave positive first feedback they made the switch but ultimately after an entire season they went back to what they know best as in carbon construction. Just a theorie. Why does it always have to be malignant intent on part of the bike company and not just and error in their ways ? Think of every time you changed your opinion. Plus it doesn't even say that the alloy version would be discontinued!
  • 1 0
 I wonder if Trek will release a plastic-fantastic Session next year after this year's alloy one gets a good shakedown.
  • 3 0
 @asapyohanes: because negativity and assumptions rule modern society....duh.

But yeah, it's a shame malignant intent is the first assumption most people make. Remember, as a mountain biker you are to choose your narrowly framed opinion and be a dick about it.
  • 2 0
 This is beyond true lol
  • 1 0
 @asapyohanes: first, nobody is equation questionable marketing decisions with malignant intent, there's a difference.
Second, while your hypothesis is certainly possible, I think it's pretty safe to assume the development of the carbon version was well advanced by the time they launched the alloy
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: Reading the comment it just sounds like people feel personally attacked by the release of a carbon frame they most likely didn't buy anyway. As far as I know, the development of a carbon frame goes through an alloy mule doesn't it ? So it would make sense that the alloy version comes out first and the carbon after ? The mondraker team did race the alloy bike last year so it's not like they stayed on a carbon frame. The only thing that changed in the geo ist Top tube length (+2mm) and fork offset. I really don't understand why people are upset about this
  • 1 0
 @asapyohanes: I don't think people are upset, but this is the internet and everyone talks in hyperbolae here.
  • 1 1
 i mean... developing an aluminium frame is a lot easier and quicker than carbon. making a custom size for a rider in aluminium requires basically no extra cost, just some custom cutting of the tubes, while a carbon one would need an entire mold to be made. It would not surprise me if more bike brands take more time before commiting to carbon now that everyone is changing to high-pivot setups
  • 1 0
 @asapyohanes: No one is upset that they've released a carbon version of the frame, what people are tired of is the trite and patronising way this year's model was marketed only last September; pinkbike.com/news/mondraker-goes-aluminium-only-on-2021-summum-downhill-bike.html
..as if we could never guess a carbon frame was in the works, but delayed by the global supply chain issues. *shocked face*
  • 1 0
 Marketing 101, hype one then the other. Get people talking. Seems to be working.
  • 27 1
 So can someone explain to me why 29er DH forks are set to 56/58mm offset, whilst 44mm offset is the hot ticket on all other bikes? Not being facetious but genuinely curious.
  • 3 3
 Probably just a if it ain't broke don't fix it thing. More offset does mean livelier handling and more steering angle before hitting the frame.
  • 16 20
flag TannerValhouli (Jun 8, 2021 at 7:18) (Below Threshold)
 DH bikes are made to go F A S T. Less emphasis on needing to make tight turns or have any kind of nimbleness at low speeds. Trail/enduro bikes still need to climb and ride decent at slower speeds to appeal to the broadest range of riders. DH bikes are designed with the above average to pro level rider in mind with the only goal being to get down the hill as fast as possible.
  • 1 0
 I think I remember a big article on here just about fork trail and offset characteristics. But I dont really remember all the differences because it's not simple, there are a lot of factors working together. If someone can find that article, please share the link.
  • 13 2
 @TannerValhouli: isn't shorter offset more stable?
  • 3 4
 @TannerValhouli: Exactly, which is why if we follow what all the industry is telling us: lower offset = more stable, then DH forks should have lower offset.
  • 5 0
 I could be totally wrong but I think it’s because of the super slack head angles on dh bikes they wanted to reduce trail a bit so that steering flop is less of a problem at slow speeds and increase steering input overall. I’d also guess that is has to do with crown to frame clearance. That being said I don’t know why they aren’t shorter than they are, they seems really long
  • 2 0
 Quite a few on the World Cup circuit are using these apparently. Not sure why RS & Fox etc. Aren’t offering them
www.mojo.co.uk/mojo-morc-crowns-3-c.asp
  • 14 0
 I think it's mostly tradition. Some WC riders are experimenting with shorter offset, but in my experience the differences are fairly subtle (within normal limits) and you can get used to anything pretty quickly. There's also a complex mix of pros and cons with going shorter or longer which are inter-related with stem length, head angle, reach, wheel size and more.

I don't think there's any particular reason why trail bikes have shorter offset than DH, except that they often have longer reach and shorter stems.
  • 6 0
 TT's are shorter and the steering radius is opened up with more offset but most importantly the rake of a DH bike in relation to its trail is compromised on DH bikes if the offset was less it would render a skittish feeling front-end. Several other factors come into play such as the bike is designed for DH and DH only where as @TannerValhouli, who was down voted explained it bluntly. Apparently the idiot nincompoops can't accept facts.
  • 1 4
 @McKai: this is right. You cant have a 63 degree head angle and 44 offset. You would end up with a huge trail number. Great grip in a straight line as soon as you turn the bike would just fall over and be uncontrollable. getting the balance between handling and grip.
  • 21 0
 @Mattbarnard1: "You cant have a 63 degree head angle and 44 offset."

New Transition Patrol: 63º HA and 44mm offset.
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: single crown vs. double crown, 44 is not good
  • 4 0
 @likeittacky: But why? The number of crowns doesn't change the geometry (in the mathematical sense).
  • 1 0
 @Mattbarnard1: Utter BS. MX bikes have the same HA and 22-25mm (stock) offset and they work just fine. The new 2021 DH forks have shorter than 50mm offset options.
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: these numbers are also working brilliantly on my shore too
  • 1 0
 @NoahColorado: So it must have a huge trail number and tip over when you turn or be fairly uncontrollable in a turn Wink . In all seriousness, for most DH riders there generally isn't a whole lot of handlerbar input but rather a whole lot of leaning so the fork offset probably doesn't have all that much influence unless your work the bars a lot.
  • 1 0
 @likeittacky: The number of crowns is irrelevant to the influence of fork offset.
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: I can attest to that.
I have a mojo offset reducing crown, which brought the offset of my fork from 52 to something like 43 mm, on my supreme dh with a head angle of about 61.5*. The bike works just fine
  • 1 0
 @Mattbarnard1: yeah, we heard this BS when specialized introduced first 29er enduro lol. 62deg HA and 34mm offset here(27.5 front wheel fyi), it steers beautifully at anything above walking speeds.
  • 1 0
 @Mattbarnard1: sorry man but my commencal supreme sx has a 62.2* HTA with a 37mm offset in a 29/27.5 mullet configuration. It is far from falling over or being uncontrollable and can and has been used as a trail bike when needed.
  • 1 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: 63HTA, 42 offset on my Honzo ESD works well too.
  • 1 0
 Me (not an engineer googling stuff) : "The short explanation is a small amount of trail equals a 'fast' handling bike, while greater trail equals a 'slow' handling bike."

Seems like the common sense answer is that more offset reduces trail, so given the super long wheelbase of DH bikes a bit more offset would bring back a bit more of the handling. Enduro bikes with slightly smaller wheelbases and less travel going with shorter offset to increase trail and focus more on stability.

That's all just a guess based on information and logic.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: It depends on in which direction the fork offset is. If the offset is forward then trail will get larger and vice versa if the offset is rearward. To get faster handling out of a DH bike I would think you would want a more nominal or rearward offset to counter the slacker head angle to the benefits of faster steering and good high-speed stability, but then again those sound like counterproductive goals. Who wants a twitchy bike at high speeds? I guess this comes down to how to do ride your DH bike? Are hauling butt on a jump line or flow trails where high-speed stability is the name of the game or are you riding rowdy technical terrain where speeds are generally slower at steering agility is more important? Those are two very different bicycle setups that command a DH bike.
  • 3 0
 @SuperHighBeam: shorter offset (so 44mm) is less twitchy as it increases trail. Longer offset (56mm for example) does the opposite and makes steering faster.
  • 1 0
 @kiksy: I think you're mistaken. I've looked at a few bicycle dimension charts and they would seem to indicate the opposite.
  • 1 1
 @friendlyfoe: Appears multiple concepts have been mixed up in this discussion. According to that .gif, as offset Decreases trail Increases (At 24mm offset trail is 106mm and at 28mm offset trail is 99mm). So the debate then is longer trail (shorter offset) more or less twitchy? The larger the offset the less sensitve the steering is going to be. It's akin to putting a ball in bowl. Larger Offset would equate to a bowl with steep walls while a Shorter Offset would be a bowl with flatter sides. It's much easier to push the ball up the flatter sides than the steeper sides. Hence as trail increases (offset decrease) the bike becomes faster handling (i.e. more responsive to steering correction)(flatter bowl) and as trail decreases the bike becomes slower handling but more stable at high speed (steep walled bowl). Hence I think there may have been some confusion as to what we meant by "fast handling" or "slow handling".

@kiksy I'm afraid you're mistaken. Short Offset= More Trail= More Twitchy, Large Offset= Less Trail = More Stable and less Responsive. If you ride twisty technical gnar on your DH bike a shorter offset would serve you well, but if you're hitting flow trails, jump lines, or big drops, big offset is your friend.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: here's another older article from Seb

www.bikeradar.com/features/pushing-the-limits-of-fork-offset-an-experiment

"Higher trail means greater stability and lazier, slower steering. Shorter offset or a slacker head angle results in more trail (slower steering); longer offset or a steeper head angle reduces trail, quickening the steering response."

And another from Cotic:

www.cotic.co.uk/news/2019/forkoffset

"51mm offset reduces the trail which makes the handling quicker and lighter around the straight ahead. This makes the bike feel nice and easy and responsive flicking between shallow turns, like down a flow trail. "

"Short / 42 or 44mm offset increases the trail, which makes the handling slower and more stable, which gives a slightly heavier feel around the straight ahead. "
  • 1 0
 @kiksy: So we're in agreement on what fork offset does to trail. I guess what is confusing my understanding here is the interplay of head angle, fork offset, and stem length since they all impact the same attributes of steering feel. The one DH bike I've owned (a 2010 Santa Cruz V10) had a relatively slack head angle but also a significant fork offset and a moderate length of stem; as a result, the steering was more slow than twitchy but it wasn't slow like a chopper motorcycle and certainly not as snappy as a trail or XC bike. I'm still failing to understand how short offset = slow steering and long offset = fast/twitchy steering, that seems backwards. Perhaps what is perplexing the matter is that fork offset has remained the same (equivalent) across virtually all bike disciplines with the other things typically changing being stem length and head angle. This insight would virtually seem to suggest that an XC bike should have a steep head angle and short fork offset and a DH bike should have a slack head angle and large offset. Thus giving both bikes a fairly neutral steering feel. Seems like DH bike have essentially been that way for a long time, XC bikes have compensated through stem length.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: I can understand how it seems backwards, there's a decent article here on bike trail:

dclxvi.org/chunk/tech/trail

I've gone from a short offset to longer offset fork on DH bike, whilst the steering definitely felt different, it wasn't huge.

I think the challenge with understanding bicycle geometry is that adjusting one thing affects others. I see your point about XC Vs DH bikes with offset, however adjusting the stem has other effects not related to steering, eg. Pushing your weight forward making it easier to keep the front wheel down on steep climbs.
  • 1 0
 @kiksy: Very true stem adjustments affect multiple parameters.
  • 10 0
 pretty sure that's bulldog on the top photo laying it down, not Laurie.... seeing as though brook is on 100% and Laurie is on fox..
  • 2 1
 Correct
  • 12 0
 Well spotted, my mistake. Corrected.
  • 1 0
 Brook rides Shimano pedals while Laurie is on Crankbrothers
  • 6 0
 Wow... being the happy owner of the previous version of this bike, I am totally salivating. Their geometry adjustment kit is the best ! Sooo fun to ride. I hope Laurie gets a few podiums on this beauty.
  • 2 0
 Thinking he absolutely will. He's only getting stronger. Great looking bikes too!
  • 9 0
 Price- too expensive. Availability- maybe someday.
  • 3 0
 my favourite part is how a company tries to sell us on light weight frames by eliminating the shock weight from the frame... Looks loo here is a 6 lb frame.... Post the frame weights of all sizes with the 2 shock options please and let us decide.
  • 2 0
 @madmon just 2 options? even though there are like a dozen or more readily(well maybe not now) available shocks to fit that bike?

I prefer the weight without shock, but with axle, hanger, seat clamp, and headset. a lot of companies leave some or all of those off and it's f*cking infuriating.
  • 2 0
 @conoat: ya for sure.. I just like the idea of multiple weights for the sizing
  • 2 0
 lol, last year the press release they were like "Apparently, Mondraker's World Cup riders found the aluminum bikes more responsive, and that's what pushed Mondraker towards using the material for the final construction." Big Grin

nice bike though!
  • 2 1
 As a huge fan of Mondraker bikes and summum carbon 2018 owner (2013-2020 summum pro team alu owner) I am very happy with this news. Some more people who prefer carbon now can have one more frame to choose from and get acquainted with these awesome bikes. However (prepare your guns folks) I still deny the idea of 29" in DH bikes, this is ridiculous (mullet is not an option, it is a crouch). Anyway, seems this bike can be operated with 27.5 wheels without decreasing performance.

PS. Sorry that "floating console" around the shock, like it was in earlier carbon versions, is gone. But still happy that my favourite bike brand evolves
  • 1 0
 That is one sick looking bike and wow there is a heavy dose of industrial design in that frame. I love how they have blended all of the suspension links into what would seem a monocoque unit (channeling the former Niner Jet 9 in that respect). That front triangle is sweet too and I reckon a water bottle would fit in there.
  • 1 0
 I think MONDRAKER took some insight from the original MEN in BLACK a little too seriously " best of the best of the best, sir!" All at a moonshot price. How many dentists ride DH bikes?
  • 2 0
 So what happened to the 'Our Pro riders preferred the ride of the Aluminum bike???' So now producing in plastic, charging more and not riding as well. Makes sense
  • 2 0
 It looks great, integrated telemetry seems like a really good idea as well, bet it would be great for weekend racers.
  • 1 0
 I really don't need data logging to tell me I'm slow and a hack at suspension setup! Cool idea tho, probably see it a lot more as an optional extra on other bikes.
  • 2 0
 This makes so much sense for privateers giving them the chance to get closer to the level of support pros got
  • 1 0
 How does the BB height stay the same on both bikes when the rear axle height will be lower on the mullet? Is there a flip chip somewhere?
  • 2 0
 Love that this frame weighs less (including shock) than a lot of current carbon trail bikes!
  • 1 0
 This also likes a great bike to shop for in like 3 years when it's price tag has dropped considerably on the used bike market.
  • 1 0
 MIND isn't actually available in the US would be nice to see that actually mentioned and explained, but I know this is marketing, not journalism...
  • 3 1
 Looks like a damn good looking DH bike!
  • 1 1
 Whatever the MSRP ends up being gives you a good idea how much you'll see it for sale as used in the classifieds or on FB marketplace.
  • 1 0
 Think we'll see a lot more bikes with adjustable geometry in the near future. Kudos to Mondraker
  • 1 0
 Such a good looking bike and it has a full chain guide and bash guard on it too. Drooling....
  • 1 0
 "top level build" saint is going to be 9 years old soon, its time for change
  • 1 0
 As a BC rider who spends 2/3 of the year covered in mud, I cannot imagine the pain of having to clean out that shock.
  • 2 1
 can't provide something that doesn't exist
  • 1 0
 Next level stuff! Very cool!
  • 2 0
 Formula 1
  • 1 0
 I know ! I own the previous version of this bike. Even tough I recently bought a Specialized Enduro, I can't bring myself to sell my Summum... Its such a gorgeous bike. It's like owning a super car. I bring it out for special occasions like a day at the park Wink
  • 1 0
 The Michelin racing hot patches also scream F1 to me. I love them although most seem to hate them.
  • 1 0
 That's a nice frame design
  • 1 0
 Very clean looking with the rear caliper tucked away like that
  • 1 0
 Nice to see integrated hall sensors.
  • 1 0
 It's the lightest bike Weight ---
  • 1 0
 Water bottle and kit tool mounts do they increase wheigh a lot?
  • 1 0
 Thats a nice Bicyclette!!
  • 1 0
 Lol "MIND" because Specialized already made claim of "BRAIN"
  • 1 0
 Oh my, that scrub in the top photo!
  • 1 0
 Very happy to see someone still on the long chainstays side
  • 1 0
 The AL version of this looked so much nicer
  • 1 0
 I'm too slow for that bike...
  • 1 0
 man im a sucker for those skinny mondraker top tubes
  • 1 0
 Please don't buy this bike and tumble it down the hill. Way too beautiful.
  • 1 0
 Summumy pinch me mon That things killer !!
  • 1 0
 Beautiful.
  • 1 0
 Wow...sexy AF.
  • 1 0
 Mullet??????
  • 1 0
 What does 'Summum' mean?
  • 1 0
 The pinnacle.
  • 1 0
 looks like a session
  • 1 1
 Illustration !

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