First Look: 2022 Trek Roscoe Hardtail

Jul 29, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  



Trek's Roscoe aluminum hardtail has undergone a significant number of updates for 2022, changes that are intended to bring it up to speed with the current crop of modern trail hardtails.

The previous version of the Roscoe was looking a little long in the tooth – it was still rolling on 27.5+ wheels and had a quick release rear dropouts, along with geometry numbers that were on the more XC side of the spectrum.

That's no longer the case, and the new Roscoe has 29” wheels for all but the extra-small size. The fork travel has been increased to 140mm fork, 20mm more than before. That quick release back end has been replaced with a 12 x 148mm thru axle, and, not surprisingly, the geometry is substantially longer and slacker.
Roscoe Details

• Aluminum frame
• 140mm fork
• 29" wheels (27.5" for XS)
• 65-degree head angle
• 430mm chainstays
• Size: XS, S, M, L, XL
• Price: $1,700 - $2,700 USD
trekbikes.com/roscoe

There are four new models, the Roscoe 9, 8, and 7. There's also a Roscoe 6 in the lineup that retails for $1,150 USD, but that one uses the old frame, which means it doesn't benefit from any of the updates described here. Given the dramatic growth of mountain biking over the last year or so, it's good to see more well-spec'd hardtails hit the market, especially at these pricepoints. On paper, the new Roscoe looks like it'd be a great stepping-stone into the sport, a solid platform to get new riders hooked.



Frame Details

Bad news – the new Roscoe no longer has kickstand mounts on the chainstay. I know, that's a tough pill to swallow. I'll pause for a moment while everyone dries their tears... In all seriousness, the Roscoe's frame has shed some of the details that made it stick out as a more entry-level option rather than one designed for more technical off-road riding.

The aluminum frame has internal cable routing, with a port in the downtube that's used to run a zip tie around the housing to keep it from rattling around. There's room for two water bottles inside the front triangle, and fairly short seat tube lengths that leave plenty of space for running longer travel dropper posts, although all models come with a 150mm dropper. I'm nitpicking, but it'd be nice to see the larger sizes have posts with more drop.

Other details include molded chainslap protection, downtube protection, and compatibility with SRAM's Universal Derailleur hanger. There's also plenty of room for running a 29 x 2.6” rear tire.



Geometry


The looks of the Roscoe didn't change too dramatically – after all, there's only so many ways to shape a hardtail frame – but its geometry numbers did undergo a complete overhaul. The head angle now sits at 65-degrees, which is 2.2-degrees slacker than before. It's a number that puts the Roscoe in the do-it-all category, as opposed to the more downhill-oriented hardtails like Kona's Honzo ESD, or Norco's Torrent, which have 63- and 64-degree head angles respectively, and manners that work best at higher speeds or on steeper trails.

As far as reach goes, that number has increased by around 40mm per size – a large frame now has a reach of 470, up from 428mm. The seat tube angle has steepened to go along with that increased front center, and now measures 74.7-degreees on all sizes.

The final number to note is the chainstay length. That's been trimmed down to 430mm, 8mm shorter than before. That number remains the same for all frame sizes.



Builds

Roscoe 9 / $2,700 USD

Frame: Alpha Gold Aluminum
Fork: Fox Rhythm 36, 140mm
Drivetrain: Shimano SLX / XT derailleur
Wheels: Bontrager Line Comp 30
Tires: Bontrager XR4 Team Issue, 29 x 2.6"
Seatpost TranzX JD-YSP18, 150mm travel
Saddle: Bontrager Arvada, hollow chromoly rails, 138mm width
Cranks: E*thirteen Helix
Handlebar: Bontrager Line alloy, 35mm, 27.5mm rise, 780mm width
Stem: Bontrager Elite, 35mm, 0 degree, 45mm length
Grips: Bontrager XR Trail Elite lock-on
Brakes: Shimano 6120 4-piston
Claimed weight: 28.95 lbs / 13.13 kg



Roscoe 8 / $2,300 USD

Frame: Alpha Gold Aluminum
Fork: RockShox 35 Gold RL, 140mm
Drivetrain: SRAM GX / NX
Wheels: Bontrager Line Comp 30
Tires: Bontrager XR4 Team Issue, 29 x 2.6"
Seatpost TranzX JD-YSP18, 150mm travel
Saddle: Bontrager Arvada, steel rails, 138mm width
Cranks: SRAM X1 Eagle
Handlebar: Bontrager Rhythm Comp, alloy, 31.8mm, 15mm rise, 780mm width
Stem: Bontrager alloy, 31.8mm, 7 degree, 50mm length
Grips: Bontrager XR Trail Comp lock-on
Brakes: Shimano MT420, four-piston
Claimed weight: 29.85 lbs / 13.54 kg




Roscoe 7 / $1,700 USD

Frame: Alpha Gold Aluminum
Fork: RockShox Recon Silver RL
Drivetrain: Shimano Deore12-speed
Wheels: Shimano hubs / Line 30 rims
Tires: Bontrager XR4 Team Issue, 29 x 2.6"
Seatpost TranzX JD-YSP18, 150mm travel
Saddle: Bontrager Arvada, steel rails, 138mm width
Cranks: Shimano MT511
Handlebar: Bontrager Rhythm Comp, alloy, 31.8mm, 15mm rise, 780mm width
Stem: Bontrager alloy, 31.8mm, 7 degree, 50mm length
Grips: Bontrager XR Trail Comp lock-on
Brakes: Shimano MT200 hydraulic disc
Claimed weight: 30.84 lbs / 13.99 kg




There are no guarantees that purchasing a Roscoe will grant you this level of talent.



217 Comments

  • 114 3
 Nice looking Honzo.
  • 136 6
 29lb Aluminum hardtail with house parts for $2700. What the hell is this world coming to......................
  • 5 9
flag pikebait2013 (Jul 29, 2021 at 10:11) (Below Threshold)
 @Three6ty: Sounds more like a Niner to me!!!
  • 22 4
 @Three6ty: based on the little amount of rain we have seen and my province being on fire again... A f*cking horrible heat death is kinda where we seem to be headed... Lol
  • 10 1
 @TheBearDen: Its not much better in California. Half the state (as well as Oregon) is burning down and we have not had a significant rain in 8 months.
I feel your pain...
  • 7 2
 @Three6ty: No shit. Can't figure out if it is just societal opulence, or consumer desperation. $2-3K USD should be enough to get a solid component set, not top end, but solid. Even at the $1700 price Trek should be ashamed of those brakes. Most manufacturers are cutting corners on brakes. They put maybe $45 into the brakes on the Roscoe 7? Not saying that it should have premium at that price but just the Deore level m-500 is cheap and much more functional. Seat/bars/stem/grips/pedals are forgiveable as long as they're functional, since everyone will have different ergo and preferences on those items.
  • 27 2
 @Three6ty: if you haven't noticed, prices have been going up like millionaires in rockets...
  • 8 1
 @lumpy873: Yep, I have noticed and those would be Billionaires!!! Wink
  • 23 2
 Looks like a Honzo. The "looks like a session" of hardtails.
  • 3 1
 @Three6ty: oops.. my bad... You're right.. Must be nice to have that kind of money to burn..
  • 3 4
 @Polyspecific: I think you miss the point of the 7, the base model exists to give the entry level to a bikes price point, sure you could throw in nicer brakes on from stock and bump retail up 50 quid but if you start doing that around the bike it ends up costing closer to the 8..... Then people don't have that entry level model... I think it's bang on for what it is.....pricing in the UK makes it a lot cheaper than an 8 and alot of riders will buy a 7 then upgrade brakes, change grips& tyres then run it until they need to replace somthing
  • 4 3
 @Three6ty: They only charge what people will pay. People keep paying more and more, bikes are still selling out, therefore they'll continue to hike the prices. These "pandemic prices" are here to stay..
  • 26 4
 @Three6ty: For real. The Giant Trance X comes with the same fork and brakes as the Roscoe 8, but only costs $250 more for Maxxis tires already set up tubeless and, you know, rear suspension. Bikes like this are literally priced and designed for people who don't know better.
  • 2 1
 @stumphumper92: No, I get how supply and demand works. Still better off with a 2-3year old FS in good shape for similar price.
To each his own. I realize this is for the Newbies out there, that don't know any better, but it is still $2700.
  • 1 1
 @netracer-enduro: i would say 8 model is useless, 7 is entry model, 9 - good as well
  • 9 1
 @Three6ty: I mean, it's got a Shimano 1x12 drivetrain, a Fox 36, and for what it's worth Bontrager components have more than proven to be quality.
  • 6 1
 @seraph: your not wrong. but with Tax you are $2900+. that can buy a a very good relatively new FS bike
  • 1 1
 @seraph: I meant to include Used in the "Relatively new" part
  • 16 5
 Everyone talking like $2700 is alot for a hardtail

Me... Looking over at my hartail that cost $4000..... Shhhh. Maybe they won't notice us if we stay quiet.

Currently looking to add a DoctaHawk to my collection...

I like expensive steel tubes.
  • 6 3
 @Three6ty: but then you are riding an old FS. Many of us who prefer hardtails don't care about price, we care about the ride. I have a kick ass squishy bike that I ride a lot, but my equally kick ass hardtail is my go to.
  • 2 0
 @Three6ty: that’s more than I paid for a new cannondale Jekyll before covid hit.
  • 1 0
 @Polyspecific: tektro orion 4p brakes are always good
  • 1 1
 not really...ugly AF
  • 3 0
 @OlSkoolJake: my steel Hardtail retails for something foolish like 5500$ CAD haha. Happy to have some friends in good places cause I like expensive tunes too.
  • 1 0
 @Dragonfly-: pre-Covid is the key..Every bike company has been raising prices due to covid.. More demand, higher shipping costs, higher raw material prices..
  • 1 0
 I’m sorry but 2700 usd and you get Fox Rhythm fork on the high end model ?

And isn’t Trek supposed to be direct to consumer.

Commencal, Nuke Proof, Ragley, Pole, One Hello all offer better specced bikes

Even with the corona gouge this is not worth the money.


@lumpy873:
  • 1 0
 Came here to say this.
  • 1 0
 @OlSkoolJake: I do like the Roscoe (and HTs) but my Genius 960 I just got MSRPs at 2500 but I paid 2400. For 600 bucks I got it down to 31.5lbs from 34 with a rear wheel/cassette swap + lighter tyres I had laying around. In the end I paid 300 more overall but I think I got a better deal.
  • 2 0
 @DANV: Trek isn't technically direct to consumer.. If you order a bike off the website, it will ship to a Trek dealer. And, you get the added benefit of paying shipping...
  • 2 0
 @zephxiii: *blinks in hardtail*
I no understand wot you speak.....
  • 4 0
 @lumpy873: i think people forget that this also comes from groupset manufacturers, sram and shimano both put their prices up and that has a knock on effect on pricing all the way down the chain
  • 1 0
 @netracer-enduro: supply and demand is kind of a PITA like that.. And with two companies supplying 98% of the market...
  • 2 0
 @lumpy873: maybe, but as a business you cant fault them in tying to make a profit, its litterally the whole point of their existance, where do you work? im sure most people who complain about bike pricing are not working for free in not for profit orgaisations, at the end of the day everyone is trying to make a living
  • 3 0
 @netracer-enduro: I have no issues with companies making money.. And with all the price increases, they aren't really making more money.. Every single component on the bike has seen a price increase. Raw materials have gone up, shipping costs have more than tripled over the past year... It's crazy to look at it all..

And looking back at my last post, I meant to say 2 drivetrain companies supply 98% of the market..
  • 1 0
 10000000% agreed @conman1395:
  • 32 2
 Trek, oh Trek - how did you put the Stache out to the pasture???
Such an original and blisteringly fun and versatile bike.

The new roscoe looks like heaps of fun, but i'm still not sure it's a valid successor.
  • 3 8
flag BikesBoatsNJeeps (Jul 29, 2021 at 8:41) (Below Threshold)
 Stache is still available, in FS form as well. My buddy has a Stache 9.8 and he rides it like a maniac. He loves the handling and the grip is impressive. The only time it seems like the tires and rolling resistance is holding him back are on long fire-road pedals, otherwise he charges through terrain everyone else is pulling back a little on. Plus I think we weighed it at around 12.5kg with pedals and cages, which is around 4kg lighter than my Rootdown BA with similar parts kits.
  • 8 3
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: The Stache is discontinued and is no longer available, too bad it was a fun bike.
  • 5 1
 Seems like they morphed the Roscoe and Stache with a little bit of Fuel mixed in.. But, would have been cool to see a little more resemblance to the Stache..
  • 3 5
 Nothing funny about a 29+ bike...
  • 2 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Both versions of the stache are discontinued, the Full Stache was discontinued after 2019
  • 6 1
 You nailed it. This is no stache. Stache was unreal. Ahead of it's time.
  • 4 1
 www.trekbikes.com/us/en_US/bikes/bikepacking-touring-bikes/1120/1120/p/33304

The Stache is still around, its just in a bikepacking mode.
  • 3 0
 @CuyunaHTmn: The Stache and 1120 are different frames. Stache is looking like it will be still available as a frameset.
  • 1 0
 @paolocolletti: ita truly a unique bike. I know many super experienced riders and bike reviewers who all fell in love with it.

The decision to discontinue making it shows, imo, that Trek has lost whatever little "soul" and magic touch it had as a big corporate bike brand.
  • 2 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: indeed its' pros far outweigh the cons on fire road sections. It is the most counter intuitive bike i EVER rode- 29 3" tires look like a barge, but hop and pop like a mad chihuahua. Its a manualing beast as much as it is a bikepacking rig. No other bike can be described like that.

However, it is very much discontinued...
  • 3 0
 People either "get" the Stache, or they don't. I bought one due to the short chainstays (currently at 412mm), which would be short for most 26" bikes and is unreal for a 29+, don't know why others can't follow suit and even claim their 29ers have "short" chainstays that are an inch longer. It's the most satisfying bike I've ever owned, I doubt I'll get rid of it anytime soon. I named it Tutu, cuz it looks like a clown bike, but it's the most capable bike I've ever owned.

Concerning the 1120 Trek lists the chainstays at 440, but according to the pics that seems wrong, tire to seattube clearance is similar to what I have on my Stache. Looks like the same frame to me. Salsa also no longer has their Woodsmoke, which is comparable geometry but ugly.
  • 1 0
 @TomBasic: totally agree- but i've met more people who were pleasantly surprised (or sometimes amazed) by it, than those who felt it is awkward or cumbersome. Seriously, i've been riding and reviewing bikes for over 15 years, and the Stache is the most surprising and counter intuitive bike i've ever ridden. And i know riders who have 10 times my experience who feel the same.
The fun factor is through the roof, assuming your cup of tea isn't all out raw speed. On flowy trails it simply mind blowing. On rocky or jagged stuff, which we also have plenty here, it can get a bit jolting, and you have to sacrifice comfort by pumping the tires up to avoid tearing them (not to mention those shitty Duroc rims)... but still, what an insane bike! Again, such a shame trek backed off the idea, when there is such a fan base.

The woodsmoke is indeed quite parallel, but i've heard it rides quite different and many of them suffered critical carbon cracks. But, in general, i'm 100% convinced the 29+ trend (at 3") has merit, and really am puzzled why we dont see more of them.
  • 2 1
 @foxinsocks: My gut impression is that people are dismissive of anything fat or semi-fat or plus or even slightly chubby when it comes to the status quo. Don't you remember how much fat-bike-shaming went on here in the past decade when fat bikes were becoming a "thing?" Despite the fact that certain bikes are optimized for certain conditions the bike industry and populace are largely same old, same old. How 'bout Aaron Gwin not wanting to even try the Grim Donut? That's why "shame on Trek" for discontinuing the Stache. After getting my bike I contacted customer support (Dec 2017) about something and expressed my love for the thing, here's a quote I got, "It’s definitely one of the most popular bikes amongst people that work at Trek mainly because it’s a fun bike to ride that is very capable in a lot of different types of terrain." That's why I say people either get it, or they don't. We either move forward as a whole, or we don't. Remember the death of 26"? That was foisted upon us by a concerted effort across the board. 29" was ahead of its time. Then 27.5 came out. Even though now 29 is the standard and 27.5 becoming the outlier the industry all decided to jump en mass on the 27.5 bandwagon, because it was a case of boiling the frog in water: 29 was too radical. Same with the Stache: 29+ is too radical. I rant here because I have always found fault with what's been available. I wanted these things before they were popular: Wide, light rims, wider tires, wider handlebars, handlebars with more bend, shorter cranks, blah, blah, blah.
  • 1 0
 @TomBasic: I agree with what you're saying about people shying away from fat bikes or plus tires. That's definitely a part of it.

However, I don't think 29+ is objectively "better" or suits everyone. Its not the end all and be all. Im a die hard metalhead- i dont mind being a fringe. Heck, i probably prefer being a bit unique- and the Stache is just that. Sure, it has its' quirks, and issues that plage fatty tires such as tire durability, somewhat ping-pongi feel, and rim durability issues (altough trek tried to hit a pretty nice sweet spot). But for all its' small flaws, its just so much fun to ride on such a variety of terrain. I dont expect it to ever become a mainstream bike, im sure neither did Trek, but in the hardtail "community" it definitely gained an enthusiastic following.
I think the nail in the stache coffin is actually the rising sales and market share of ebikes taking away Trek's main attention. In other words, typical big money sellout scenario.
  • 1 0
 @foxinsocks: The industry provides what sells, not what's objectively better. Point being that there needs to be more education and exposure. You say, "i've met more people who were pleasantly surprised (or sometimes amazed) by it, than those who felt it is awkward or cumbersome." That's the problem. What you say is how it should be. But, it can't, and won't be that way if manufacturers only provide what they want to sell. You and I are not disagreeing, but I feel the industry is very lacking in how it dictates what people have to buy. As a consumer you're either a sheep or a maverick. If you're a maverick, like us, then you have an antagonism with the industry, because you'll want things that are not being made or used to be made and are no longer in vogue.
  • 1 0
 @TomBasic: maverick? Maybe the industry realized that people weren't buying the plus tire hype? They were all the rage for years and now you barely see one. I had a couple of plus bikes and would never go back. They just don't ride as well unless you're crawling along river rocks or something where grip and stability is an issue. If the sidewalls are strong enough to support you at lower pressure then the tire is a tank and is brutal to climb. I'd take a 2.5 over a 2.8 anyday almost anywhere, even on my hardtail. 2.6 ain't bad but after that it's deminishing returns. As for short chainstays they can be great on smoothy poppy tracks, especially 29ers, but also don't make for as stable a ride at speed, and a lot of people like speed! I just don't agree that people who like more traditional bikes are sheep, I think given the options over the last decade they've just decided it's what they want. Geo has evolved a lot and with regards to reach head angle etc and all of this new thinking has been whole heartedly embraced
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: much of what you said is true, although as someone working abd breathing this industry for almost 2 decades i can tell you that a huge majority of beginner to intermediate riders would hugely benefit from plus bikes on just about any trail. But that's besides the point- my main question to you is- have u ridden the Stache?
  • 1 0
 @foxinsocks: No, I have to say I haven't ridden a stache - happy to be proven wrong. But what aside from stays that are a few mm shorter than a honzo (which I had) and balloon tires, which I really don't like, what's so unique about it? I'm happy to accept that it's more than the sum of its parts, but I just really don't have a lot of interest in the round parts, haha. I really didn't like the few plus tires I spent time on. On my middle child I went from 2.8 minions to 2.6 dampfs to 2.35 marys and found more confidence in the marys in all ways outside of loose rubbley stuff. Sure, beginners can benefit from bikes that make things easier, but the idea of learning on balloons and then tossing them when you've progressed seems kinda wasteful. Should have seen what I learned on! It's not a game changer going plus in terms of grip vs. a properly nobby tire - least not for me. Sidewalls and sideknobs trump all. Semi-slick balloons seem totally useless to me, especially now with tire inserts where you can get tires nice & soft, without having to resort to big finicky rubber that selfsteers and /or weighs a tonne. .
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: As you said, trust me - in this case, the stache is more than the sum of its' parts. Give it a try if you get a chance.
I've ridden the honzo a lot. I liked it, but it's a pretty standard bike. The Stache is a strange contraption with much more "character"- some may like it, some may not. Of all the people who took it out for a spin, i'd say most were smitten, at least a bit. Having said that, the stache is not my main and only bike. Mainly because i do ride aggressively, often in pretty rocky terrain, and that's where it falls short (like all hardtails).

Look, i'm the last person who would try to "convert" you. Much like the Stache, i'm not trying to become mainstream Smile Although i have ridden many plus bikes, and enjoyed most of them, my main bike was always a standard tire one. But, you do have to accept that most of the cons you mentioned (and i agree with most of them) apply to more aggressive riders or on more violent terrain. I was wrong to say beginner/intermediate riders- it's got more to do with the type of riding/trails. Some of THE most experienced riders i know, have a stache in their stable and swear by it (again, even if not as their main bike). For me, the Stache epitomizes the concept of Mountain Biking like no other bike i tried. I got a more aggressive Enduro/Trail bike, and if i'd wanna race i'd take a zippier XC bike, but none come close to the Stache's balance of fun and versatility. Despite some flaws. I've taken it to 100 mile endurance rides, bikepacking excursions, weekly trail rides, and even the occasional trials/jibbing session around the block, and it's as capable and fun in all situations. (check out Cam MacCaul's video riding the stache from a couple years ago. If Cam says its the most fun bike in his garage, you got to admit it's intriguing...)
  • 1 0
 @foxinsocks: I completely appreciate a bike with a bit with character and it sounds like the stache could be a blast. I still have a softspot for fully rigid steel bikes and even thing fondly about my old surly 1x1 which I sold, but definitely don't think they are for everyone. These niche bikes actually seem to impress the more experienced riders out there who can feel the nuance of the ride characteristics, while the less experience (most bike consumers) are just kinda holding on for dear life, haha. I love that we have all sorts of options, my only point was that I don't fault big bike brands for not trying to try to push esoteric bikes. It's a shame when a cool product disappears, but I don't blame a business like Trek for that. It's the responsibility of the fans to keep it alive! I would definitely throw a leg over one if the opportunity presents itself. Although, not on my local trails. My big burly RSD 291 can barely handle that haha.
  • 23 2
 Regardless of price, availability, build, etc, I'm really happy to see the bigger brands embracing 65 HTA on hardtails. It's about time. 65 is a versatile HTA that will suit all riders on all trail types. Yeah, there is still a need for 67ish HTA on XC race bikes and 63ish HTA on rowdy hardtails, but for most everyone looking at buying a Trek hardtail, 65 HTA is a sweet spot. Proper geo goes a long ways on a HT and for many years mainstream HT's have been held back because of being too conservative with HTA's.
  • 10 2
 This. A 65d HTA, unlike a full suspension, is actually around 66d undersag...and even steeper under some rowdy terrain. Those XC hardtail HTA's aren't doing anyone a favor.
  • 1 2
 @Svinyard: my Chameleon and my SB 5.5 are at similar static HTA and front travel...you are so right about how hardtails steepen up once they are moving. With a 160mm fork it still handles like a dream and is so much more agile than the Yeti. I can take tight hard turns about 1 mph faster on my Chameleon under identical conditions and with less aggressive tires.
  • 9 1
 Frickin stop making me want to buy one of these, my slack-for-2011 68 degree hardtail is still JUST FINE* thank you

*utterly terrifying
  • 27 8
 So... We gonna discuss how this bike looks just like the Alloy honzo and is being marketed as essentially the same bike?
--
This is what we call "phoning it in"
  • 13 2
 How would you do it different? The Honzo is a pretty sweet bike.
  • 5 2
 Looks more like the specialized fuse to me.
  • 12 2
 So if Kona Honzo bikes are out of stock (theoretically speaking, I'm sure bikes we'd never be in a situation where bikes are out of stock) people just shouldn't have access to this kind of bike? More choices for rad, affordable hardtails on the market is a good thing.

If you want to give credit to Kona for doing a good job making the Honzo in the first place, just do that. You don't have to take a dump on Trek in the meantime.
  • 3 2
 @thepwnstar39: I didn't say this bike was shit. I said it's just another company copying another company which according to this website's comments section is not okay.
  • 3 1
 Good luck finding a new generation trail hardtail that isn't almost exactly this bike: Canyon Stoic, BC Podsol, three or 4 bikes from Planet X.

If it is a trail hardtail and isn't 65ha/75sa, it just hasn't been redesigned yet.
  • 2 1
 Not too many really unique bikes out there, especially in hardtail arenas with the tried and true double triangle design.
  • 5 2
 Looks like a... Honzo AL Torrent AL San Quentin AL Meta HT AM Etc, etc.... The only Hardtail it doesn't look like is Chromag and Pole.... They didn't phone it in. This is the standard geo for a modern HT.
  • 2 4
 @OlSkoolJake: geo has nothing to do with looks.
  • 6 0
 @TheBearDen: a collection of triangles with similar geometry are gonna look pretty similar to each other, no matter what
  • 17 2
 Eh, the builds all kind of suck, and the price points aren't amazing. Plus the weight.
  • 9 2
 exactly. Geo is decent but that's about it. Those cheapo Rockshox forks SUCK in this price point. Its really hard to beat Giant's cheaper bikes because of their in-house Crest fork. Its pretty impressive compared to the Recon junk.

1400$ and you get a better spec with a real fork. HTA is only 66d but its cheaper and you could angleset it for 100$ and still have a cheaper/better bike imo.
www.giant-bicycles.com/us/fathom-29-2-2021
  • 2 1
 @Svinyard: That crest fork is surprisingly decent, but I can't recommend it, it's got a ton of quality issues worldwide.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: I just started working at a Giant dealer a few months ago and I'm pleasantly surprised at how good of value those Fathoms are.
  • 17 6
 Those bikes are woefully spec'd
  • 8 2
 more of the bike suppliers paradox: as a company grows and is more capable of accepting smaller margins on cheaper bikes, they are seemingly unwilling to produce lower price bikes. Look at Trek, Intense, Commencal, Cannondale, etc...
  • 3 2
 What? Trek still makes the 820… I don’t see your problem.
  • 2 1
 @johannensc: it's more so with the base line of their 'higher end' bikes. Trek is actually doing a bit better than I gave them credit for at offering quality builds for cheap so I was wrong there, but I'm just perpetually confused why there are some companies pushing the envelope of full suspension pricing (Marin, YT) while other companies that could do the same stand still.
  • 9 1
 For $200 more, you can get a Polygon Siskiu T7, a FS modern geo bike with comparable components to Roscoe 7...
  • 7 1
 Polygon KILLED it this year. That Siskiu T8 is where its at. And in Levy's testing, it climbed just as well as the Ripley...which is crazy...and was great going down too. Broscience aside...what an insane value: SLX/Full Fox Suspension and a sick looking paint job for 2360$. Then you look at these lame Trek spec'd hardtails and wonder why for that much money? Giant's hardtail is pretty sweet for the money tho at 1450$. Solid Crest 34mm Fork (dual chamber air spring, decent damper), Deore drive train, dropper and like 1400$. Enough money leftover to tweak it to fit anyones use-case.
  • 6 1
 I have a 2018 Roscoe 8 that has been an absolute blast to ride. It's still set up stock from the day I bought it. I know I'm in the minority here, but I think that 27.5+ tires work well for this bike. A little extra compliance to smooth out the chatter and a little extra traction when things get rowdy and the back end starts to skip around.
  • 4 0
 I agree, I get the whole plus tires not being needed on an fs bike argument, but the bike industry is making a mistake phasing them out on hard tails.
  • 2 0
 @cromes: agreed. Plus tires are awesome for sandy trails here in FL.
  • 2 0
 Ya, too bad there are so few plus tire options these days, they totally transform a hardtail. Useless in the mud, but otherwise they are comfortable, fast rolling, great climbing traction... Don't really understand the online hate...
  • 15 9
 nice bike, although for the same price of the Roscoe 8 I could buy the top of the line Meta HT with 10mm more travel, although availability would be the dealbreaker.
  • 42 6
 10mm more travel should cost more for some reason? more travel on a hardtail isn't always a good thing :/
  • 7 1
 Canyon Stoic 4 is a great option is this category (if availability not an issue)
  • 9 1
 for a slack aluminum hard-tail, 140mm is more than a enough...especially if Trek is trying to hit the new rider market with the base model. If you are hitting stuff that would necessitate anything over 140, you wouldn't be the target market for this bike.
  • 5 5
 Also the Meta HT geo is terrible. Short reaches with extra long seat tubes
  • 2 1
 @T4THH @dungeonbeast you guys are definitely onto something, please further elaborate...
  • 4 2
 @dungeonbeast: wow it's almost like some people prefer different things lol
  • 1 2
 Can't really compare trek and commy for value sense, with commencal being direct sales they do not offer value in a different way to a shop supplied bike, thats why some bike magazine reviews are now dividing categories into store and direct so they can compare apples to apples
  • 1 2
 @netracer-enduro: ye you can't compare commencal with trek since the latter is basicly synonymous with a fat wannabe Nino and and the one on a commencal is this 14yo doing back flips
  • 2 4
 @ream720: name one benefit of a long seat tube and the associated increase in stand over height? Especially on a hardtail.

I understand preferences for different head angles, travel, reach, etc. Hell my primary bike has a 67.5 HA with a 130mm fork.

But that meta HT seat tube is terrible. I have short legs, but I am still 6’ tall. I couldn’t ride a large frame from them if I tried.
  • 1 1
 @dungeonbeast: what would recomend then? other than the Meta, the Rosco or the honzo...
  • 2 0
 @dungeonbeast: Commencal took 30-35mm off the seat tube lengths of the Meta HT for 2021. I unfortunately bought a 2020 with the ultra long ST about a month before the 2021s were launched, but with current availability I'm glad I pulled the trigger when I did. I cut 5mm off the ST but that was much as I could do without the seat clamp getting friendly with the gusset weld at the front. Seems odd to make a relatively low standover frame then put that length ST on, but at least they have seemingly learned.

I don't really find the reach an issue. I've got a -2deg angleset in which did grow my reach a little, but for a long travel hardtail that's only going to grow its reach as it goes through the travel going for mega long reach is probably not going to be ideal for most people. It could stand to be a touch longer but it wasn't/isn't enough to really put me off buying another one or recommending them.
  • 1 0
 or the Marin San Quentin 3. I really enjoy it!
  • 4 0
 Its remarkable and, more than a bit suspicious that Trek has somehow discovered that trail hardtails can be built without 1990's XC geometry.
- How did they discover this mysterious secret?
- Was it smuggled out of a secret location by spies that gave their life?
- Did someone squeal?
- How many decades of testing has it taken for Trek to convince themselves such a concept might actually work?
- How many new QR rear axle standards were proposed before Trek went with 12mm boost axle?
- Was one of them Boost 141.521423? or maybe Boost 142 and 15/19ths?

So many mysteries!
  • 7 1
 The price jump is likely do to the price difference between a rear quick release to a through axel... :-P
  • 9 3
 just wondering what grade of Uranium they made it out of to make it that heavy...
  • 3 0
 Trek and their overpriced bikes. Roscoe 7 was 1500 CAD 2 years ago and even that was higher than competition for similar specced bike. Now they want 1700 USD for the 7. Guess they ran out of QR boost axles and had to finally catch up with other brands.
  • 4 1
 These look fantastic!! I've been looking for a new hardtail lately, and this might be the one I go with. I just hope I can get my hands on one before I'm too old for cycling...
  • 25 7
 Get a Honzo. -- we should not forgive Trek for making the last Roscoe have a QR rear end with a BOOST 141 hub... yeah you heard me, BOOST 141.
  • 16 10
 @TheBearDen, Boost 141 is just the QR version of Boost 148. In theory, on some wheels you should be able to convert the 141 QR end caps to thru-axle 148 end caps if you upgraded frames, or wanted to use Boost wheels you already had. No quick release at all on that bike would obviously have been ideal, of course.
  • 19 3
 @mikekazimer: for many folks the process of converting one thing to another using parts frome one thing and another isn't in their wheelhouse or something they want do. Don't be giving Trek some slack on this lol.

We never asked for more standards. So they inevitably spent money on a waste of time....
  • 12 1
 @mikekazimer: 141 is dead, period. Shimano is not moving forward with it, Formula TW has limited offerings, few hub choices outside of a select few from QBP- the limitations do not outweigh the benefits
  • 4 1
 @TheBearDen: I ended up replacing the rear wheel of my 2018 Roscoe with a custom build to a Hope Pro 4. It wasn't ideal, but the endcaps were easy to swap and made that rear end pretty bulletproof. I'm 235 lbs and ride rocky trails around Denver without any complaints.

DT Swiss hubs also convert really easily.
  • 6 1
 @mikekazimer: 141 boost hubs are made to reduce costs, because it allows to use very tiny diameter steel axle with loose bearings, instead of 12mm aluminium hollow tube with sealed bearings. So when someone spec this kind of hub on a bike the goal is to cut costs and hardly it will come with convertible hubs, wich are much more expensive.
  • 8 1
 @TheBearDen: Boost 141 was possibly the dumbest idea I've ever heard of. A laughably stupid standard that no one asked for. It probably saved trek 5c per build.
  • 1 1
 @TheBearDen: you're going to hate that Roscoe 6 still exists, though serious MTB riders will write it off because of its basic suntour fork it still uses the same frame (old Roscoe/ current X -caliber) and boost 141.
  • 4 2
 @thelittle: The goal is tire clearance, 141 was established when the bike industry told us all Plus bikes were the wave of the future and brands were trying to leverage plus sized tires for the novice rider at entry level price points- in theory, this makes sense. Why Trek felt they needed open drop outs for bike with shred ready geo is a complete miss. Just bump up the travel on your Marlins if you really want to "capture" the market
  • 2 1
 @TheBearDen: I was told the exact same thing by my LBS, I’m glad I listened the Honzo is such an amazing bike. A bit heavy but really nice!
  • 2 0
 @FarmerJohn: Exactly, the goal is having same tire clearance as boost 148 but saving money using very cheap steel axle loose bearings hubs. So they can save sub 10 dolar per bike causing a permanent headache for the owner.
  • 3 1
 This day and age this might be what shit costs for all we know.
Does it look like a Honzo? I guess in the "it's an aluminium hardtail and the brace is similar" sense it does. But the headtube area and chainstay are both very different. So all the "Honzo" comments should really just read as, "looks like a hardtail".
  • 1 1
 the cheapest models colourway is like a brighter version of the standard Honzo colourway too i think
  • 6 2
 Finally, they are making general hardtails with better gemometry that is not just 2010s XC racing.
  • 1 1
 This is the first modern hardtail frame they have made, last gen Roscoe used X caliber frames with smaller 27.5 wheels and longer forks to correct the BB height, a compromise from the outset, now it has its own platform it is a propper attempt, although the 7 is now £200 more expensive in the UK, notable over a sub 1500 bike
  • 3 1
 between this, rm growler, various konas, it will become hard to compete via superior geometry in the hardtail category. They will have to fallback to compete on parts and prices and weight . . . . I'm waiting.
  • 4 0
 Soon to be clogging single tracks under newbie tourists an being wheelied through traffic by a chav near you SOON! ¿
  • 1 0
 meanwhile companies like marin are selling full suspension bikes with extremely similar specs at literally the same prices. I know I'm not a product designer or an engineer, but it's hard to understand pricing like this sometimes.
  • 1 0
 The only reason a person would spend $2700+ on a trek roscoe is because they didn't do their homework. I got my polygon full squish for $1900. I love Trek, but I hope Polygon and other DTC brands force the big guys to lower their prices. It probably won't happen, but I'll hold out hope!
  • 1 1
 I suspect that your Polygon isn't spec'd as well as the Roscoe 9, with a Fox 36 fork, Shimano XT/SLX 12-speed drivetrain, and Bontrager Line 30 wheels with 2.6" tires.
  • 1 0
 @seraph: You are correct, it doesn't have a 36. The $800+ difference you would spend on a bike with no rear suspension is not justified by having some better parts. It still has a back end that's not as capable. I guess it's appealing to many, but my wallet, bad back, and ankle prefer a full squish for less money that can do everything that HT can do and more.
  • 13 10
 2700 USD for 17kg hardtail? Well it looks good but my full sus is around that price and around 5,5kg lighter
  • 3 1
 I see website says 13.3kg
  • 2 1
 @bok-CZ: I'm very curious about the weight... 37 pounds for a hardtail is absolutely insane.
  • 2 1
 @bonkmasterflex: canadian site has the Roscoe 9 listed at 13.13kg or 28.95 pounds.
  • 5 2
 @bok-CZ, that weight was incorrect - the weight range is claimed to be between 28.9 - 30.8 lb, or 13.13 - 14 kg.
  • 1 1
 I did the same with my Scott genius 930, it’s a whole lot of cash for the normal folk out there
  • 3 1
 That weight has to be a typo. Otherwise, sick bike, pretty dialed geo for a modern hardtail. The budget build, upgrade the fork to a Marzocchi Bomber, go shred.
  • 1 1
 it is....Trek website says M frame size is 30.84 lbs / 13.99 kg for the base model. Weight drops to 28.95 lbs / 13.13 kg for the 9
  • 4 1
 I remember back when we'd ride hardtails because they were almost always a good deal lighter than any full suspension, and substantially cheaper. Even my Azonic Steelhead with a 140 Bomber was still lighter than my Cannondale Prophet with a Lefty., although not by much. These days, you can find plenty of capable of full suspension bikes for the same prices as hardtails, and more often than not, they aren't much heavier.
  • 5 1
 I’m no weight weenie but 17kg for a trail hard tail!?!?
  • 2 1
 Must be a typo.
From treks website : M - 28.95 lbs / 13.13 kg
  • 1 1
 @cxfahrer: that would make sense, I don’t think my alu Jeffsy is that heavy, and my friends nukeproof scout is noticeably lighter than that
  • 2 1
 Actually think this looks like a good trail hardtail. Trek sucks as a brand but they have a wide distribution and this is a solid offering. Prices are insane for all bikes. Hardtails are fun and can do the mtb things.
  • 1 0
 I’ll just get it out of the way. Get a Canfield nimble 9 and build your own. Killer geometry and steel perfection. I built mine up for less than $2700 some used some new parts. And you can support the little guys!
  • 4 1
 Is that weight correct? 16.9kg seems...excessive...
  • 2 1
 "There are no guarantees that purchasing a Roscoe will grant you this level of talent."
There is also no way of seeing in that picture if he's actually on that bike!
  • 3 1
 No size specific chainstays, how is Outside, er uh Pinkbike going to ride this?
  • 4 1
 Good looking bikes.
  • 4 1
 Available q3 2023.
  • 4 3
 I think I paid 2700 for my kona satori... on a payment plan, 1 year ago. How is this get people into the sport money?
  • 4 2
 The more you pay the worse the colours are
  • 4 1
 Trek Ronzo
  • 3 1
 Yup just tried to preorder one and it's June 2023 LOL
  • 1 1
 ha! what?!
  • 3 1
 Same size wheels and keeping it real. Nice one Trek!
  • 5 5
 These bikes are terribly specced(as expected from Trek), but at least they got rid of the stupid plus-sized tires that people thought they wanted, but really didn't.
  • 2 1
 hey, no 141 boost QR hub! we can start recommending this bike to newbies.
  • 3 1
 I'm not a hardtail guy....but this still looks like a fun ride!!
  • 1 1
 1700USD, so like 2200Cdn(guess?) for the entry level with thru axle? I don't mind the Bontrager parts, but the price is steep, even if it had "brand" parts.
  • 1 1
 I for one am glad they are making a rowdy hard tail. The more the merrier. So what if it looks like a Honzo, there are only a few ways to skin a cat.
  • 1 0
 What's the point of premiering hardtail bike with first availability in middle of 2023? WTF?
  • 1 0
 73 STA? If you add a bunch of reach, you steepen the seat angle to compliment that. Fools.
  • 1 0
 Honestly 2700 is crazy for an so so hardtail. You can buy a half decent day for that price
  • 1 0
 Do you think merida big trail 600 is a better hardtail then roscoe 7? It's at the same price point here in Australia.
  • 1 1
 Does anyone else see a group of assorted fasteners when glancing at the geo chart… maybe it’s a PB mobile screen thing
  • 6 5
 16.9 kg? This can't be right. My wife's Slash is 15.7.
  • 4 1
 Check the Web it's 13.3kg for the top one
  • 1 1
 Someone at PB please double check the weight. 16.9kg (without pedals I guess) is way over the top even for a cheap parts build.
Other than that bike looks great. Solid geometry, plenty of sizes.
  • 1 2
 You lost me on the major down grade of brakes between the 8 and 7...why not charge $1750 or whatever the whole cost is to keep a complete Deore group?

FAIL.
  • 3 2
 I'd actually suggest you don't sleep on lower end Shimano brakes. They don't have the Servo-Wave cam and don't tend to suffer from the wandering bite point the higher end brakes have. The only issue is you need to upgrade the rotors and pads to metallic to get any sort of performance out of them.
  • 1 1
 @m47h13u: except we’re comparing MT420 4 pots vs MT200 2 pots.
  • 1 4
 Shimano SLX / XT derailleur on the Roscoe 9? Is this a loot box thing? "Man I sure hope mine comes with the XT out of the box."

...but seriously, does SLX/XT depend on market or is Trek simply accounting for supply issues?
  • 6 1
 pretty sure it is SLX shifter with XT derailleur.
  • 1 1
 @Aqui: you are correct, went to Trek's website after seeing your response
  • 2 2
 It's a sales ploy, on the floor, a bike is easily sold by the name on the derailleur alone because most newcomers have no idea the shifter is the important part. A lot of brands skimp on chains and shifters knowing most aren't savy enough to know the difference between XT/SLX/Deore.
  • 1 1
 Most likely a XT derailleur with SLX shifter
  • 1 1
 @m47h13u: damn, did not know that was a thing (at least based on the bikes I own/owned)....I see SLX or XT for any drive train components, I would expect the entire drive train to match that spec.
  • 2 1
 @SATN-XC: one good example I could think of was a Fuel EX 9.7 a few years back came with GX derailleur but NX shifter, chain and cassette. You'd be spending top dollar for a carbon bike only to be let down by a super heavy rear end and spotty shifting.
  • 1 1
 @Aqui @alexksquared: Hopefully that's backwards but you're likely correct as people are more likely to pay up for an XT derailleur.

XT shifter and SLX derailleur is an awesome "blue collar" combo IMO. I've got two bikes in the garage with XT shifter and SLX derailleur and it's a solid, cheap setup. I'm not so sure you get the same cost : performance benefits with the XT derailleur and SLX shifter

@m47h13u interesting, I wasn't aware of that as "policy" but it totally makes sense. Good chain can really make or break the shifting performance IMO. Running a GX Eagle chain on my hardtail with SLX derailleur, XT shifter, Wolftooth chainring, E13 TRS+ 11speed 9-46 cassette and it performs way better than it did running an 11 speed SLX or even XTR chain. You can get those 11 Speed SLX derailleurs for cheap online, and they're actually available.
  • 1 1
 2020...looks like a Session... 2021...looks like a Honzo... star to see a pattern...
  • 2 1
 650b wheels are now long in the tooth?
  • 1 1
 Brands have no issues making XS bikes fit 27.5 wheels, but having longer chainstays on L and XL frames is a no-go...
  • 1 0
 The top one looks like it's the cheapest one
  • 1 0
 I’m guessing the bb is the ubiquitous Trek press fit bb.
  • 1 0
 What is it with Trek refusing to do steep seat tube angles?
  • 1 0
 Still loving my 2015 Stache (Non midfat) with a 140mm fork.
  • 2 3
 Nice lookin bikes but $1700+ for a hardtail, u kidding me?! Especially with those specs
  • 1 1
 Is that effective chainstay length?
  • 1 2
 Will it be in 2023?
  • 1 1
 Would this be for the freeride ?
  • 2 3
 Looks like a:
Honzo
Ragley Big Al
Specialized fuse
Norco Fluid HT
Canyon Stoic
Merida Big.Trail
and others
  • 19 1
 In other words, it's a hardtail?
  • 3 1
 @mikekazimer: It doesnt look like a 1990's XC bike. This is a a first for any Trek "trail" hardtail.
  • 1 1
 Put a PNW Coast dropper and beat your buddies both up and down the hill.
  • 1 1
 I wish they would do this formula to the Stache Frown
  • 3 3
 Trash already. Merida and Devinci do better alloy hardtails.
  • 1 0
 Do you think merida big trail 600 is a better hardtail then roscoe 7? It's at the same price point here in Australia.
  • 1 0
 @Abe81: if the specs for both are as they are here (UK) then the Merida Big Trail 600 has better spec.
  • 1 0
 @MuddyFoxCourierComp: i know the forks are a step up on the 600, is there anything else that stands out? Thanks.
  • 1 0
 @Abe81: I think the brakes too from what I remember
  • 1 1
 Ready for the Remedy to return to 29" wheels
  • 2 1
 I would buy
  • 1 1
 No thanks! I’ll save my money and buy a Ragley instead
  • 1 0
 Where will you buy it? Out of stock forever..
  • 1 0
 @weeknightwarrior: idk the one in my living room seems to be pretty “in stock” to me
  • 2 2
 Giant Fathom 29 2 does it better for cheaper.
  • 1 2
 Fathom apparently comes with wrong offset chainring and Crest fork that has clicking issues. Lots of internet chatter about worn chains and chains dropping due to the chainring offset being too big. People are resorting to aftermarket 3mm offset chainrings to fix Giants' mistake
  • 1 1
 @dave119: oh man. That sucks! I would change the fork out to a Pike and get an oval. But I can only have one bike and one wife. Hope anyone who wants to buy one catches this before purchasing though!
  • 1 0
 @dave119: Not just the Fathom, my friend got a Trance 29 3which was fitted with a 0mm offset chainring, causing him to drop his chain in a granny gear. The Trance is specced with a Praxxis crankset so he contacted them and they shipped a new 3mm offset ring with no questions.

The only downside is that they put it in a bubble wrap envelope and it arrived bent and buckled, so he emailed them again and they shipped another one in a box.
  • 1 0
 trek b like...
  • 2 2
 Availability: 2024.
  • 1 3
 16.9 kg? for hardtail?
other then that - 7 model quite good looking for the $$ comparing to competitors
  • 2 2
 2023 Crowdfunding
  • 1 1
 Remedy next?
  • 2 2
 Tough crowd today.
  • 1 2
 Is this what the premium, subscriber-only content is going to look like?
  • 1 2
 Bone jarring in the tech. Full suspension is good.
  • 1 3
 This hardtail article took me back to the days of when I was poor and didn't know sh*t.
  • 1 2
 Is it made in Cambodia like the Marlin?
  • 1 4
 This does not look like a Session, this looks like a Kona Honzo.
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