First Look: 2023 Habit - Cannondale's Most Popular Bike Gets Revitalized

Apr 4, 2023
by Henry Quinney  
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Cannondale has released a new, revised version of their trail bike, with the Habit now coming in two distinct configurations that aim to cater to the widest possible range of riders. There are two models, the Habit and Habit LT which, you guessed it, is largely the same bike but with more travel. On a positive note, though, this isn't just bolting on a bigger fork; the LT model also sees the rear travel increase from 130 to 140 mm.

Cannondale claims this frame is meant to be robust, straightforward, and easy to live with. In some ways, this is no surprise. Not least because that's what all bike brands say, but also because the incumbent Habit saw a lot of action under any number of Cannondale's creative riders.
Habit Details

• Wheel size: 29" (27.5" XS Frames)
• Aluminum or carbon frames
• Travel: 130mm (r) / 140mm fork
+10 mm for LT version
• 65.5 / 64.7º (LT) head angle
• 77.5 / 77º (LT) seat tube angle
• Size-specific chainstays
• Sizes: XS, S, M, L, XL
• Price: $2,300 - $5,500 USD
cannondale.com



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There are some nice touches on the frame.
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All bikes have extra bosses, should you want to carry extra spares.

Frame Features

The bikes are both built around a 29" platform, except for the extra-small models which will use 27.5" wheels. The standard Habit has 130 mm rear travel paired to a 140 mm fork, whereas the LT model sees 10 mm more travel front and back. The bikes use the same frame, and the same shock lengths but different stroke lengths. You could, of course, remove the stroke limiting spacer on your standard Habit should you want something slightly deeper feeling in the future, or have the option to make the whole bike slightly more aggressive.

The carbon models will have individual kinematic tunes, whereas the alloy will see three tunes shared between five sizes. While the bike doesn't come in a mix-wheeled option, Cannondale have already been working with Cascade Components and they will make an aftermarket link to convert the bike should you wish to.

Cannondale claims that the Habits are built for fun, and they've tried to make the bike easy to work on and live with. This includes non-headset internally routed cables, standard shock eyelets, a threaded BB and a SRAM UDH.

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No headset routing here.

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The Habit cuts a clean figure.

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Geometry

The new model sees it grow longer and slacker compared to the current version, increasing by around 20 mm in terms of reach, and going to a slacker head tube angle and steeper seat tube. The new bikes also see their seat tubes shorted and the standover height decrease.

The bikes feature head angles of 65.5 or 64.7 (LT) degrees depending on which travel option you go for, which puts it firmly in the same bracket as this year's releases of similar bikes, such as the Canyon Neuron, Transition Smuggler, and Commencal Tempo. The 77.5 or 77º (LT) seat tube angle is adequately steep to give balance to the reach figures, which are also contemporary at 480 mm for a large. Interestingly enough, this bike, much like the Canyon, sees a comparatively high stack height. The 640+ mm value would have seemed drastic even just a few years ago but is perhaps now going to be a newly established norm.

The bikes use what Cannondale calls their Proportional Response Suspension and Geometry. Whilst many of the key figures in terms of the geometry will translate across sizes, the bikes will come with size-specific rear triangles. Cannondale will also change the suspension kinematics per size. Reading between the lines, I would also imagine they'll be offering size-specific damping tunes. This approach makes sense considering the bikes will not only have different weight riders on them but also because by changing the rear end you're also changing the size of the lever, and isn't uncommon across other brands.

I think size specific rear-ends are really important. Anyone that's experimented with a 0.5-degree geometry flip switch can often be surprised how they notice the difference. It can sometimes be strange to see bikes built around slightly-adjustable geometry and then also come with the same size between the small and extra-large.

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The alloy Habit shows you don't have to make it from carbon to make a great-looking bike.

Build Options & Pricing

27.5 29 U Habit 3 - GRY
27.5 29 U Habit 3 - PRH
The Habit 3 features SRAM NX, Select level suspension from RockShox, and G2 brakes. It's available in two colors and has an RRP of $3,325

27.5 29 U Habit 4 - BLK
27.5 29 U Habit 4 - CRD
The Habit 4 features the fan-favorite Deore 12 speed, a RockShox Recon RL fork, a Deluxe Select shock, and Shimano MT200 brakes. Again, it's available in two colors. It has an RRP of $2,300

27.5 29 U Habit Crb 1 - JDE
The Habit Carbon 1 will sell for $5,550 and uses a Select+ Pike and Deluxe, as well as mechanical GX and Sram G2 brakes.

27.5 29 U Habit Crb 2 - BPL
The Habit Carbon 2 features an SLX and XT mix, and the same shock as the Carbon 1, albeit with a slightly more entry-level Pike fork. It uses the Deore brakes and will sell for $4,350.

27.5 29 U Habit Crb LT 1 - CHK
The beefed-up Habit Carbon LT 1 $5,550 shares the same price as the normal Habit 1, but has a beefed-up Lyrik fork and Code R brakes, as well as some other select burlier spec choices.

27.5 29 U Habit LT 2 - LYW
27.5 29 U Habit LT 2 - SBK
The Habit LT uses the alloy frame and an entry-level Lyrik, but comes with the Select+ shock, SLX four-pot brakes and Deore 12 speed. This could really be a good choice for those that want something they can push hard and aren't interested in carbon. It has a retail price of $3,625.



For more information, please visit cannondale.com.

Author Info:
henryquinney avatar

Member since Jun 3, 2014
312 articles

144 Comments
  • 309 2
 Thumbs up for not joining the bad habit of headset cable routing
  • 110 1
 The revised Bad Habit will have headset cable routing, press fit BB, size specific chainstays but they get shorter on the large frames, no spot for a water bottle, flip chip with .1° of adjustment, extra kinks in the top tube, and a Lefty.
  • 23 0
 the bar is really that low these days
  • 15 1
 @jeremy3220: You forgot that it will have Super AI Offset wheel spacing. Only works with super boost bikes and needs to be dished 36 mm to the drive side.
  • 8 0
 @jeremy3220: and pull shock
  • 1 0
 It's headtube vs headset routing. Makes much more sense.
  • 164 2
 A nice, reasonable trailbike with no deal breaker WTF engineering for engineering's sake... I'd ride it.
  • 61 5
 The most important detail: No Ai-Offset. Finally no more weird, proprietary offset standard that requires a bunch of custom or proprietary drivetrain- and wheelset components. Looks like Cannondale might have finally given up on that.

No through-headset cable routing is also a bonus in my books.
  • 21 5
 @Muscovir: What was proprietary about that offset? Anyone can build a wheel with that offset using a regular hub, spokes and rim, can't you? Specialized also had that offset back when they were using 135mm OLD rear hubs. When boost 148 came around, Syntace came with what they called EVO6 (so they offset the hub 6mm). Basically, it was something anyone could do and what many were doing already. A different acronym doesn't actually mean it is something different.
  • 10 1
 @Muscovir: my Jekyll has AI offset and while I definitely could do without it, all that was required was for my rear wheel to be dished a few mm from stock.
  • 15 8
 @vinay: No one else is doing it though. The problem is that you're locked into a "standard" that isn't compatible with components meant for Boost spacing without modification. Claiming it's not technically a "proprietary" standard seems casuistical.
  • 2 0
 @Muscovir: Is it? What happens if you lace a boost hub to a regular rim and dish it such that the rim is 6mm offset? I honestly don't know as my frame takes 142x12. Also I still have this old Specialized P1 2006 kicking around which takes a regular 135mm bolt on hub and as long as you dish it with an offset, it fits. As you say it is only Cannondale and Liteville currently, does that mean that Specialized quit earlier? I considered this option for my current frame but the builder recommended it wasn't worth it (as my frame takes 26" wheels which would be strong enough with 142mm axles).
  • 17 0
 @Muscovir: I learned a new word, thanks.
  • 8 1
 @vinay: AI offset made it practically impossible to swap wheel sets with other frames that are standard boost. Not a problem for those with only one bike but for many that swap parts often re-dishing the rear wheel each time is a deal breaker.
  • 4 2
 @noleschmidt: Out of all standards with wheelsizes, axle lengths etc, just dishing the wheel differently seems like a minor issue. Now I'm not one with several bikes that are so similar that sharing wheels makes sense and I do understand that for those who do, it can be an issue. Waki would call it a "first world issue". But I stick with it that "proprietary" is a big word. Anyone can lace up a wheel that fits with any boost hub from any brand. And any frame builder is free to build a frame with an offset rear.
  • 3 0
 The craziest thing is that a well made normal bike with no weird feature is coming from Cannondale.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: I agree that proprietary isn't the right word for it. But I don't think it's fair to call it a minor issue either... It's not like your average mountain biker has a spoke tension wrench and has the experience and tools to do a good job offsetting a wheel. And unless it's a custom build you can't get a new wheelset and throw it on. You can't get a "quick" replacement on vacation. (even your average Cannondale dealer isn't going to carry OEM wheels for sale?) And your much more limited in trading wheels between bikes which isn't "that" uncommon.(WAY more common then people with spoke tension wrenches IME!!)
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: Sorry, I'm completely lost about what the average mountainbiker is like. When I read comments here, it seems like lots of people replace the bearings on their suspension linkages. I'm not that much of a fullsus rider so I don't know all the variations, but it seems to me it often requires bearing presses specific for that frame. People get a new fork, chances they need a different sized top cap spanner too (if they don't want to notch the fork crown). One thing that hasn't changed much since the era of square taper bottom brackets (which new standards have we seen since?) is the wheel truing stand and the basic square nipple. Yet compared to these other tools, it may be the one you'd use most (or can most easily share with your friends as it is compatible with everyones bikes). As for experience, no one is born with experience. Do it and you have it. But unlike my experience with a crank extractor (remember those?), at least this is experience that's still useful. Not sure whether a regular factory wheel can't be offset. I once laced up a wheel for a commuter bike but complete forgot that the roller brake adds a good bit to the left side, so the rim was way off center. Apparently I could lace it that much off center even though I had the proper length spokes. I put the brake on and centered the rim properly, all good. Those 6mm is nothing, I'm pretty sure you can make that adjustment with pretty much any wheel. If the rider can't, the mechanic at the bikeshop can.
  • 86 5
 I forgot that people still buy Cannondales... Then this shows up with modern geometry, affordable pricing, an entire fork and not a partial one. I don't even know you anymore Cannondale. It does however look like a YT.
  • 5 4
 I can see why a proprietary hub with narrower flange spacing would annoy people, and the looks are polarizing.
What did you not like about the Lefty?
  • 9 0
 They must've been given a fast deadline since they didn't create any solutions for problems that don't exist. Sidenote, I watched a documentary on RedBull tv last night while on the trainer and found out that when mtb freeriding first gained popularity, Cannondale threatened to sue a group of riders for using the term freeride after they trademarked it. Insert poop emoji here
  • 5 0
 @MI-Corey: That's how the sport of Fro-Riding began, and now look at us
  • 7 0
 @MI-Corey: nothing more American than trying to copyright/patent/trademark language and words.
Insert eye roll here.
  • 1 0
 Is it a bad thing for a bike to look like a YT these days?
  • 34 1
 Decent geometry, decent parts, decent value, clean design - looks good all around! Seems to be nice, reasonable, general purpose trailbike.

Does that mean Cannondale is cool again!?
  • 2 0
 The Cannondale waves thing was definitely a step in the cool direction. Is that still a thing? And if so, where is the launch video?
  • 36 0
 Can you guys make those geometry tables any smaller? Smile
  • 1 2
 You know you can click an image to view it in a separate window? Agreed it will always be grainy so it won't be pretty when you zoom in, but it is possible to decipher the chart. Hey, call it a spy-shot, they're supposed to be barely readable Smile .
  • 19 0
 I feel bad for the Cannondale employees. They are probably awesome bikes but never seen in the wild or seldom reviewed. Is it the Marketing budget or small dealer network?
  • 13 0
 and to think its their most 'popular' bike?! Not sure i have ever seen one in the wild?!
  • 24 0
 @v7fmp: I think it depends where you live. Different areas have different shops with different stuff on offer. It's kinda like fashion. When I lived out east I never saw Commencals, now they are everywhere. But I did see Cannondales!
  • 15 1
 Their new Jekylls are legitimately rad. I do think Cannondale being east coast tends to get less notice, just because the major North American brands are more PNW/California focused.
  • 16 0
 Lots of Cannondale in the road bike world. I think their mtb line is a bit of a side project compared to road bikes for them these days.
  • 4 0
 @withdignityifnotalacrity: see a lot in the Mid-Atlantic
  • 6 1
 Lots of enduro racers on the Jekyll in the US, and they support some seriously quick racers.
  • 5 0
 @stunnanumma1: I'm in the mid-Atlantic too, but honestly don't see a lot of the newer models. Lots of weirdo lefty XC Cannondales still knocking around though.
  • 24 0
 @stunnanumma1: They float THAT well..?!?
  • 5 0
 @Corinthian: really good suspension
  • 3 6
 It's the marketing but also the brands image to riders. Cannondale is a road brand through and through so it's not shock that their mountain bikes gain no traction amongst the community. Add that to the fact that they continue to pump out hot new aero road bikes at a time when everyone wants to ride in the woods and you fall to a level of irrelevance. I see PON focusing more on Cannondale's strengths rather then fixing their weaknesses - ergo high-end MTB will not exist long-term from them and GT will gain any relevant tech. If I had to guess, Cannondale will look a lot like Canyon in the coming years - direct to consumer, slight side-steps on the manufacturing end.
  • 3 3
 REI sells them. But i think that anyone buying an MTB at REI is likely not riding too much off road. With that said, I bought my wife a really sweet C'dale flat-bar road bike at REI - they were the only ones who had it in stock.
  • 3 0
 Max Beaupre is bringing some good publicity ripping it up on the enduro circuit so far. Also at NEMBA fest last year the Cannondale trailer had a custom frame they were funneling beers thru, so there's that...
  • 1 0
 @mca896: They had a big presence at the BMEs last year as well. The Fischer boys were on the team, and JT has gone on to Yeti, now.
  • 6 0
 @stunnanumma1: By mid-Atlantic you mean Azores?
  • 4 0
 Cannondales are everywhere on the East Coast I think its just a location thing.
  • 5 0
 Rode 3 years ago in New Brunswick with someone with a carbon Habit, and it was a seriously good-looking bike. I kept doing double-takes, thinking "that's a Cannondale?" 10/10 would ride.
  • 2 1
 @scrawnydog: That's probably it. PON probably doesn't need another high-end MTB brand in their portfolio - they've got Santa Cruz firmly established for that. But they also kinda don't need another entry-level MTB brand as they've got GT and Focus - which both seem to be settled in their own segment of the market. Cannondale on the other hand has always been the odd one out for the last 20 years at least in the MTB world.
  • 4 0
 @Muscovir: Have been very relevant for XC racing during that entire time, including at least one olympic gold medal and plenty of other high priority WC wins.
  • 1 0
 @v7fmp: I've seen them on Vancouver Island and there are a few listed for sale on pb locally. MEC ("canadian REI") sells them. The builds are a bit strange. Polygon (and previously ghost, when MEC carried them) offer better bang for buck.
  • 1 1
 They brought this on themselves. Bringing the Lefty to life has to have some sort of consequences. To me they have gotten off lightly...lol
  • 2 1
 @scrawnydog: From Wikipedia: “ The 1984 SM-500 All-Terrain Bicycle was Cannondale's first mountain bike. The front wheel was 26 inches in diameter whereas the rear wheel was only 24 inches large "to increase traction for climbing in steep, muddy terrain", Cannondale said.”

TLDR: They were cranking out proto-mullet MTBs when most Pinkers were in diapers. Not just a road brand for sure, as *interesting* as some of their decisions have been.
  • 1 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: I agree. Never saw any Cannondales when I've been out west riding. But in the East and Mid-West, not so rare. I'd buy this bike but I still have too much fun on my 2017 Bad Habit to get rid of it.
  • 1 0
 I live in PA and I see Cannondales everywhere. I see scalpels, hard tails, and a lot of Habits. Those are popular around my home trails.
  • 1 0
 @energetik: Didn't they used to weld the frames in PA or something like that? The ones with the smooth welds.
  • 1 0
 @mca896: Their bikes were first made in CT, then PA. They tried to expand into motocross, which failed and bankrupted the company. They were bought out by Dorel, which closed the PA factory, then sold to PON.
  • 1 0
 In France I remember seeing a shit ton of previous gen Jekyll and Trigger on the trails. Now they're almost extinct
  • 12 0
 When non headset routing becomes a selling "feature" you know that you have done your pinkbike due diligence.
  • 5 0
 Saw the metallic purple alu one on a bike festival last weekend. It sure looks nice! I understand people complaining about how it looks like any other trail bike, but sometimes it's nice going with simple, proven concepts, rather than innovating for the sake of innovation.
  • 8 0
 That purple is absolutely stunning in person. Pictures really don't do it justice! Well done @Cannondale!
  • 5 0
 Thumbs Up!!!! That Habit 4 might be my new go-to bike for when people ask me what "real" bike they should buy but they don't want to spend more on their bike than their car.
  • 11 9
 Cannondale have an interesting history. They didn't start out as a bike manufacturer but they did innovate and push the sport through the first big boom and they had a huge presence in racing. They went bankrupt after developing the MX bike and now they're just a name slapped on another Pon product to maintain the illusion of choice.
  • 8 3
 “Maintain the illusion of choice”. Perfectly phrased. I believe Pon now own (just in terms of MTB brands), C/Dale, GT, Mongoose, Santa Cruz, Juliana and Schwinn.
You’d never guess they have history with VW….. (aka Audi, SEAT, Skoda etc)
  • 5 0
 They were purchased by Dorel in 2008 and spent the next decade or so making slightly weird, often not-very-good MTBs and really popular road bikes before Dorel was purchased by Pon.
Say what you like about Cannondale, you can't really accuse them of being identikit bikes.
Apart from this one, ironically Big Grin
  • 3 1
 @chakaping: Agree. I miss the days when all Cannondale's ideas were slightly bonkers.
  • 4 1
 @chakaping: I have been riding a Habit from 2017 with a Lefty. It was attractively priced when I bought it and a very fun bike. I liked it! The new Habits look ok, but they lack that „special“ character.
  • 2 0
 @CrixxBrain: same here. Love my 2017.
  • 1 0
 Describing Cannondale as a "Pon product" is disingenuous. They're a subsidiary with an independent leadership structure. If they get anything from Pon, it's probably the company healthcare plan.
  • 4 0
 @alexdi: Compared to the C/Dale of the late 80’s to mid 90’s, today they couldn’t really be more immersed in corporate hierarchy if they tried.
I’m not sure about how much free reign their leadership has either; reading the Pon site (with various tidbits such as “we delivered 710,000 new Pon bicycles globally”) suggest that they have a holistic view of their recent brand acquisitions, and know exactly how they want to utilize them (very much like VW, as it happens).

Looking on Pon’s bike site, it‘s clear who’s calling the shots with regard to what C/Dale should (and shouldn’t) be, as well as who to market to.
Looking at the lineup, Santa Cruz, GT & Juliana get the headline spot in “Performance”, while C/Dale (along with Focus) is in the Sports section. Schwinn & Mongoose are relegated to the Lifestyle section. That sounds an awful lot like Audi/VW/SEAT to me, and a decision put in place by Pon, rather than Cannondale’s leadership.

I’ve nothing particularly against Pon, or the modern day C/Dale. But I am a fan of the older, original version of the Cannondale brand and (and sometimes crazy) bikes, and this newer version feels a long way from it.
  • 1 0
 @Corinthian: Yeah, Cannondale used to be an innovator- aluminum frames, headtube suspension, 1.5" headsets, Lefty, maybe something to do with flip-chips, 30mm bb axles. But when was the last time Cannondale came out with anything weird that was actually relevant? Giving your rear wheels some weird spacing no one understands or cares about doesn't count. Eliminating some key features from the Lefty also does not count.
  • 3 0
 I like the LT. I'd also like Cannondale to expand the Lefty line, up to 215mm of travel, and in between. Also strange that they don't make their own rear shock and dropper given that they are already making multiple forks.
  • 2 0
 "Cannondale claims that the Habits are built for fun". Nice, this is great news, as most mountain bikes on the market are built for not having fun.

All jokes aside, props to them for having bikes available both in carbon/alloy and offering decent build kits with a good price. Would love to see a review (hint, hint)
  • 5 0
 Habit 2: Back in the Habit
  • 3 0
 Can't wait for Habit 3: Tokyo Drift
  • 4 1
 Looks like a very solid trail bike. The builds and prices are more competitive as well. They just need more colors in the Carbon LT1 model.
  • 1 0
 @cannondale Congratulations. I must eat my words. A few years back I sold my CAAD12 and told the LBS that I'll never buy another Cannondale because of the AI, Lefty, BB30, etc...

No you've gone and made everything standard, normal, clean, and simple. I'm back, and you're better than ever since everybody else is on some real shit right now.
  • 1 0
 What did you not like about the Lefty?
  • 1 0
 @Insectoid: it's really hard to service locally because they don't sell the special parts and tools to do it. It's also got a damper in it from the stone ages.
  • 1 0
 I have a ‘23 habit 3 I’ve got 2 rides at frick park in pittsburgh on. This replaces a large 11 Santa Cruz nickel. All I can say is WOW. I never felt truly comfortable on the nickel. It is a large and I’m over 6 feet. The XL habit felt fantastic immediately. I don’t live in Pittsburgh anymore so the chance to ride familiar trails was great for comparison sake as well. Surprisingly the climbing ability outshined its ability to descend. I was able to climb things with ample traction before I’d spin out.
  • 1 0
 Makes me sad to see the down specking continue, for the same price last year you got an hollowgram crank and slx brakes on the carbon 2. Now deore....don't get me wrong deore is a fine piece of kit but not the kit you are taking home to meet the parents. Not a full xt build with premium wheels to be found on the website...I guess they realized that nobody would pay the 7500 USD sticker price for a solid xt build. I miss the days of budget deore, value slx, performance for a small premium xt and lust worthy ( but silly priced) xtr.
  • 1 0
 I've been looking at these but cannot for the life of me find one to swing a leg over. I am stuck in size MARGE land.. aka a 5ft 9" guy, the reach numbers on the regular Habit size L is 480mm, then Medium is 455. The LT in large is 475 and Medium is 455. I ride a 2020 Nomad right now and its a 460 reach, feels great, but don't want to go bigger. Anyone have a new Habit and what sizes you riding vs height?
  • 4 1
 Cannondale now being their usual propriety by NOT implementing headset cable routing made me chuckle..
  • 3 0
 Looks great… will Cannondale sell you a frame only carbon? What kind of weights…
  • 3 1
 Does anyone know if Cannondale got phased out Ai rear hub spacing. It’s the reason I didn’t buy the Jekyll why buy a bike that none of my wheels fit.
  • 5 3
 I mean, all you needed to do was have the wheels re-dished.
  • 4 0
 @calispeedboi, the new Habit no longer uses Ai spacing. It has a 55mm chainline without any need to re-dish the rear wheel.
  • 3 2
 Its annoying but really its just two turns of every other spoke nipple to dish it correctly. Thought it was more complex but that seemed to do the trick.
  • 2 3
 @Takaya94: It is more complex--if you only adjust the spokes on one side, you're either lowering or raising the spoke tension of all the spokes (depending on which side you picked).
  • 4 0
 @barp: right, forgot to mention that you need to loosen spokes on the opposite side. It really is simple though. Just loosen brake side and tighten to driveside until you get a 3mm dish offset (for boost bikes). Only took a few min to do mine and never had issues with spoke tension.
  • 1 0
 the fsi still does but the scalpel HT got rid.
  • 4 0
 the non-straight toptube callout crowd is quiet on this one.
  • 1 0
 I guess it’s deeper than we thought and have something to do with the location of the bend. My assumption that the closer the bend is to the middle of TT, the more people see it. Now we need a brand to A/B test it.
  • 2 1
 Why is small a 29" wheel bike. That makes little sense to me. Should be 27.5. Even medium should only be mullet. Leave the 29 for large and XL.

Good looking bike that I'd consider if I wasn't SM/MED.
  • 1 0
 Is this an April Fools Habit!!?!
External cables, a threaded bb, UDH , shock tunes per size and size specific chains stays, say it is really so
And affordable pricing falls on back and hits head wakes up in 2030>
  • 2 0
 it‘s a sad state when you‘re a happy that a new bike release doesn‘t have headset routing… but well done cannondale!
  • 2 0
 What is that bump stop looking thing at the back of the seat tube, a mud guard maybe?
  • 2 0
 Tall sizes where the chain stays get longer and the actual seat tube angle gets steeper. Amazing!
  • 4 1
 Get those cables through that fucking headset. NOW
  • 1 0
 Loving the head badge. I'd love to see this brand come back in a big way; their history and heritage is so significant to MTB.
  • 3 1
 Wheres the headset cable routing? Definitely not modern
  • 3 1
 Can I get XT on that Rainbow Chameleon tip? SX is trash.
  • 1 0
 So you're telling me I can either get the spec with G2 R and Pike or Code R and Lyrik.. for the same price?? Interesting
  • 1 0
 Damn, I was kinda hoping the new one was going to be a high pivot / idler like a downsized Jekyll.
  • 1 0
 The white carbon frame looks like a marshmallow with the wide tubes and head section, I like the alloy shape much better
  • 2 1
 Another Clevis bike, that’s what we needed
  • 3 3
 Can only ever see this brand in an XC light. Probably a decent trail bike though.
  • 4 0
 Back in the day they made pretty good All-Mountain (back when that was still a thing) and DH bikes. They experimented with a twin-shock DH-bike prototype as recently as 2019. Jack Moir was originally supposed to join their DH team, but everything was cancelled last minute.
  • 6 0
 @Muscovir: Prophets were cool.
  • 6 0
 Volvo Cannondale was a force in 90's downhill. Martyn Ashton rode a Cannondale trials bike for years and years
  • 5 0
 @TommyNunchuck: Cedric Gracia won the Rampage in 2003 on a Cannondale Judge.
  • 5 0
 I had the last gen Habit and it was actually pretty dope and could take a hit. With this and the new Jekyll in the mix I think they're looking pretty strong in the trail-enduro range again.
  • 1 0
 @nozes: I know and I was in Fort William when he won that in the same year
  • 1 1
 Id say this looks more like my polygon siskiu t7 and canyon spectral than yt capra
  • 2 0
 Bring back the Raven
  • 1 0
 Bring back those sweet warranty kits to fill frames up with a couple pounds of epoxy foam.
  • 2 1
 Couldn't put the frame storage on the alloy? Every gaddam time....
  • 4 2
 Looks like Jeffsy
  • 2 1
 yo looks so sick! kinda looks like a revel
  • 2 1
 That's a far cry from the revolutionary Cannondales I remember.
  • 1 1
 Is this the first cannondale with a Yeeeuuro Hump top tube? Das ist it XOXO
  • 2 2
 This bike actually looks good I’d buy this over the above gorilla gravity article I just read
  • 1 0
 What’s the cable geometry?
  • 1 0
 ATK funded R+D
  • 2 2
 Looks like a previous gen canyon torque
  • 1 1
 Yes and some specialized trailbike models
  • 1 1
 @henryquinney album is set to private; can't click through to pics
  • 1 1
 Wish those chainstays were still longer for the XLs
  • 3 3
 Definitely not an original looking bike.
  • 1 0
 It’s a bike.
  • 1 1
 Designed and Tested by The RatBoy - Gotta be a winner
  • 1 0
 Looks like a polygon
  • 1 1
 It's about time.
  • 1 3
 Habit and habit Lt? Are those the same frame just different eye to eye suspension or does the frame changes?
  • 2 0
 From the article--just a different stroke length on the same E2E shock.
  • 4 5
 looks like a generic YT bike
  • 5 8
 Looks like a Capra.
  • 5 1
 You meant Jeffsy Smile
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