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First Look: Airdrop Release a 27.5" Slacker Downhill Bike

Jan 26, 2023
by Henry Quinney  
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After three years, and nearly two dozen blog posts detailing their journey, Sheffield-based brand Airdrop has announced the full release of their Slacker Downhill bike. The bike uses 27.5" wheels front and back and may signal something of a departure from what you might expect from a downhill bike in 2023. However, this is for a very specific reason. Most downhill bikes are developed to race, whereas the Slacker is meant for fun and smashing out park laps, and it's not a moment too soon after they announced the arrival of Craig Evans as the first athlete on their roster last week.
Airdrop Slacker Details
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Aluminum frame
• Travel: 200mm / 200/190mm fork
• 63° head angle
• Reach adjust headset
• Chainstay length: 435mm
• Sizes: S1, S2, S3
• Price from £3599
airdropbikes.com

At the core of the reasoning behind the Slacker, much like the other bikes in Airdrop's range, is that they are small brand making the bikes that they want to ride. And being a small independent brand is quite important - truthfully I don't imagine they need to sell ten thousand of these things to make it worthwhile (in fact, their first run will be of only 100 frames). They look to be making this bike for a particular niche, and one that they consider themselves a part of - people who are looking for more than a mere plow. Where other brands may proudly boast of World Cup pedigree - Airdrop says this bike is for the New World Disorder generation. Speaking of which, I personally wouldn't be opposed to Mike Levy conducting an extensive test of the bike in the Utah desert wearing boot-cut jeans and a 661 pressure suit.

There are passionate people at any level of the bike industry, but whether it's Neko Mullaly's Frameworks project, any number of a slew of brands covered by TEBP, or a brand like Airdrop, it's always great to see smaller brands or individuals going their own way on things. It seems like only yesterday that Pole were ruffling feathers by their approach to greater reach values on their bikes and that ended up pretty much fundamentally changing bike design, even if it was considered a bit left field at the time.



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No 29" wheels or internal headset rooting. I hope you like this one, Pinkers.

Frame Details

In the years that this bike was in the works, a lot of things have changed in downhill. Most notably many brands and racers have settled on a mixed-wheeled platform. However, Airdrop were steadfast in the pursuit of their preferred downhill bike setup. This isn't a 27.5" bike itching to be mulleted. This is a bike that is sold with the wheels and geometry that it's meant to be ridden with.

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Like other Airdrop frames, this is an alloy bike. The BB and main pivot are a single CNC unit and the lower shock mount is a CNC cradle. It also features a one-piece machined raw rocker link.

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When they say park they mean it. There are Slacker models that will benefit from the rugged simplicity of single speed.

Each frame comes with a reach-adjust headset included. It's not uncommon to see bikes, mostly carbon ones, come with some kind of oval headset that doesn't need to be removed and reinstalled like a traditional press-fit headset. Asking James Crossland, the designer at Airdrop to explain the reasoning for this style of easily rotated cups aren't in the Slacker he said that they wanted to build a bike that was not only fun to ride but easy to live with and live with for a long time. He explained that push-fit cups are great but they also require the headset to be preloaded correctly every time, which isn't something everyone knows how to do, and if this isn't done to the right torque it can end up with problems with the headtube or headset. He said that they want to make a bike that's easy to work on, but also expressed that they didn't want to make one that places convenience above long-term reliability. The bike will come with a neutral headset, as well as cups that can off +/- 5 mm of adjustment.

The linkage uses a full complement of oversized hardware to, again, put an emphasis on longevity. However, on these oversized bolts, you won't find large 10 mm Allen key interfaces, and that was deliberate, with Airdrop explaining that it's better to round a bolt and strip the threads from your frame, regardless of how unlikely either eventuality is when bikes are made with decent quality hardware. All bolts are CNC and run through stainless steel oversized bearings. There are no blind bearings or pullers required for this frame, either, and you should have a good line of site to simply punch the bearings out with the tap of a small hammer. The bolts are locktighted from the factory and the frames run a UDH.

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Park bikes are the new enduro.



Geometry

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As branding slogans go, ‘Sessions Not Seconds’ is one of the catchier ones - and it sums up the brand's approach to its bikes. The Slacker is available in three sizes, S 1, 2 and 3, and the reaches could be considered on the more conservative side compared to other bikes out there. However, it's worth remembering that due to the long travel and raked-out fork, it isn't uncommon for downhill bikes to have slightly shorter reach values compared to the modern enduro bikes, whose geometries most of us are familiar with. That said, with bikes at 430, 455 and 475 mm when in their neutral headset position, these bikes aren't huge in terms of reach either. Through these sizes, Airdrop's sizing chart suggests anyone between 160 and 193cm (5'3" and 6'4") should be able to find a size that works for them.

With a 63-degree head angle, a stack of 633 mm for a large and a rear center across sizes of 435 mm, the geometry chart suggests this will certainly be on the more neutral end of the spectrum when it comes to DH. For instance, a mixed-wheeled V10 in a large has chainstays as long as 456 mm in its extended setting. What shorter stays give up is how they weight the front wheel, which can reap plenty of rewards in terms of stability but at the cost of being able to lift the front as well as how maneuverable the bike can feel in certain situations.




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The silver one-piece rocker really stands outs against the stealth black frame.

Suspension

The Slacker has a relatively smooth suspension curve, which is relatively linear in its fashion, albeit whilst offering a moderately high amount of progressivity (28.7%). You tend to find that getting above 30% is moving towards the upper limit of what some shock rebound tunes can cope with.

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This high initial leverage rate at the start of the stroke means that the bike should break into its travel easily, and with a rate of 2.85:1 at the 30% mark, it should also be happy to get moving whilst in its travel, too. Airdrop combines this with a slightly rearward axle path that extends 4.5 mm rearward in the first third of the travel. This pairing of path and rate will hope to smooth out small repetitive hits such as small braking bumps.

The uncomplicated and predictive rate of progression means that the bike will be able to handle both coil or air shocks, and you should be able to land on a setup that strikes a balance between a small bump and ramp-up.

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The bike also has a relatively consistent rate of anti-rise, which runs between 60 and 40%. Anti-rise is a value to express what the suspension does under braking. A lower value means the bike is more likely to stay active under braking. A higher value is a bike that is happier to go into the stroke and prevent weight transfer into the hands as you get on the anchors.

At around 50%, the Slacker should feel relatively neutral, and be happy to use its travel without packing down too much or the suspension jacking under heavy braking.



Models & Pricing

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Slacker frame with Rockshox SDLX Coil - £1799
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Slacker frame with Ohlins TTX m.2 Coil - £1999

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The Slacker Luxe model will feature a single-crown Rockshox 190mm Zeb Ultimate RC2 & Super Deluxe Ultimate shock, Sram Code Rs, GX DH drivetrain, Unite cranks, Reverse BlackOne DH wheels shod with Michelin DH23 tyres, all finished with Burgtec bar, stem, grips and post - £3599

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The Slacker Deluxe shares many of the same components, except with a Boxxer RC2 World Cup fork and upgraded Code RSC brakes and Hope Fortus 30 DH wheels - £4199.

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The Slacker Park model features the same brakes and suspension as the Deluxe but sees the GX drivetrain swapped out for a park-proof single-speed setup from SB One. It also features the splattered Unite cranks, should that be your thing - £4299.

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The Slack Works goes to Ohlins suspension for the most premium build in the Slacker range - £4499.



All orders will ship in March. For more information please visit their website.

Author Info:
henryquinney avatar

Member since Jun 3, 2014
338 articles

236 Comments
  • 263 1
 Finally not some bullshit priced downhill bike. No nonsense just works. If I ever need one I know what I’ll be grabbing.
  • 33 12
 better than SC !!!!!
  • 26 0
 Looks like a stinkingly nice deal indeed.
  • 15 53
flag DoubleCrownAddict (Jan 26, 2023 at 5:44) (Below Threshold)
 Two dozen blog posts by the company and zero reviews proves it works?
  • 12 43
flag succulentsausage FL (Jan 26, 2023 at 5:45) (Below Threshold)
 It's perfect except for the rear end not being 148 like the Demo and the TR11. There's literally no reason for 157 especially with single speed. Non-148 rear ends is what has kept me on long travel enduro bikes for park bikes because it's bonkers not to have a set of backup wheels with you at the park.
  • 31 0
 @gravitybass: I have plenty of 150mm hubs in my basement. Buy a dh bike.
  • 13 4
 If you want to race it, just slap a 29er front end and drop the crowns as low as it goes before the tire rubs, maybe run lower rise bars too. This thing is great.
  • 3 13
flag jomacba (Jan 26, 2023 at 7:22) (Below Threshold)
 @RedBurn: Not a chance.
  • 22 0
 @gravitybass: Given that the average industry standard for DH bikes is 157, and the fact that it provides a wider spoke angle, I would argue the exact opposite. There is legitimately zero advantage to a 148 rear axle width. My feet are size 11 and I've been on 157mm rear axles for 20 years, and never had a "clearance issue".
  • 6 1
 Looks like an NS Fuzz! Which makes it sick!
  • 6 0
 Proper use of Aussie slang : No internal headset "rooting".
  • 13 1
 @jomacba: US size 12 here and my heels have rubbed on every bike I have owned since 135QR. lol. I think it comes down to the individual and how they stand on the pedals and an appropriate Q factor, moreso than their shoe size.
  • 1 0
 @Mtbdialed: I can't argue with that. A 68mm BB will definitely give a narrow Q factor. I also ride Mallets, which is find allow my feet to float well. Shoe choice plays a roll as well. I ran the older fiveten impact clipless, and now I am on the new hellcat pro. Definitely a narrower shoe.
  • 1 0
 Hear Hear 10 points Son
  • 4 10
flag dododuzzi (Jan 26, 2023 at 9:11) (Below Threshold)
 @DoubleCrownAddict: it is the way PInkbike works: press releases are camouflaged as "first looks". It makes it look like they are doing something while in reality they are just passing along photos and manufacturer description and claims.
  • 3 1
 And from a boutique brand. Anybody but Specialized Corporation!
  • 4 1
 @jomacba: what bikes had 157 20 years ago? I remember them all being 150 back when I was just quite old.
  • 2 2
 @jomacba: I believe Boost 148 has wider hub flange spacing (and therefore more advantageous spoke angle bracing) than DH 157.
enduro-mtb.com/en/super-boost-plus-standard
  • 3 0
 @Zozordan: From what I understand of that article, all the hub spacings have pros and cons, but ultimately 157DH has the most even (50/50) dish, which creates a stronger, stiffer, and more evenly tensioned wheel than the other spacings.

"While the dish ratio of Super Boost Plus is slightly more even than that of Boost 148, the gains are only marginal. However, it’s still far off the perfect 50/50 ratio of 157 DH hubs."

"As with all hubs, the rim is centered over the hub. However, due to the uneven flange spacing found on a Super Boost Plus hub the rim is not centered between the flanges. This offset is the so-called “dish”.
Compared to Boost 148, SB+ allows for a more even tension ratio between the drive side and non-drive side spokes. Super Boost Plus wheels have a dish ratio of around 60/40, compared to Boost 148, which has a less even dish ratio of 62/38. The less dish is required, the more even the tension ratio and the stronger and stiffer the wheel."
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: can a 29 fork ride 27,5 well?
  • 2 0
 @PauRexs: sure why not
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: I don't see how that is wrong? The rim is (should be at least haha) always centered over the hub, but not necessarily the hub flanges. The rims should be in the center of the bike, regardless of hub spacing, and the hubs fill the gap between the drop outs, which again, should be centered overall. Cannondale was trying to replicate that same 50/50 spoke tension that is found on DH157 hubs by having an asymmetrical frame.
  • 3 0
 @leon-forfar: The point is the hub is offset to one side, so the rim is not centered over the hub.

I actually think its a great idea.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: I guess it's another solution to the same problem. I guess the caliper would have to be inside the stays rather than on the seat stay. That bend in the stay may lead to increased fatigue given that now the frame is taking extra stress by being asymmetrical rather than your spokes being offset. I know a lot of brands have asymmetrical rear ends, but this seems a little... Cannondaley. But hey Cannondale doing Cracknfail things hahaha...
  • 3 2
 So then any of this bikes should come with 29 forks so then you can mullet the bike at any time.
  • 6 1
 @DoubleCrownAddict: Go back to your hole.
  • 1 0
 @Murder-One: Didn't BeOne have 165 or so? Also, twenty years ago was the era of wildly overbuilt to keep up with "the progression of the sport" (hucking) so I wouldn't be too surprised if others also had wider axles.
  • 3 1
 @hamncheez: I think what he's referring to, is the spoke angle in a standard frame using a 157DH hub spacing creates a more equal tension spoke angle. Take a look at Hope hubs, specifically their DH hub. The non drive side flange is closer to the center of the hub than other brands like DT swiss.
If you have noticed, alot of rim manufacturers are offsetting their spoke holes approx 3mm to even further gain an even spoke tension. My reserve wheels use king hubs with a spoke offset in the rim of 3mm. The end result is a wheel built with the same spoke length on both sides, and a near 50/50 spoke angle and tension.
However, Let's remember that the discussion here is about hub spacing and its solitary effect on spoke angle, specifically comparing 148mm to 157mm on DH bikes, not alternative solutions to this issue.
There are many design challenges within the industry that can be solved from many perspectives.
  • 1 1
 @hamncheez: Yuck. Unequal spoke length/tension is such a bad idea.
And so is throwing a 29 fork and wheel on a bike designed around 27.5. Especially if you want to go race.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: The offset hub is quite common, isn't it? Syntace also shifted the 148mm hub 6mm to even out the spoke tension and call it EVO6. Specialized has been doing this since way back. I've got a 2006 P1 which is single speed but as they used a regular HG body and just used a lot of spacers alongside the sprockets (the frame has cable guides and they did supply a mech hanger should you want to run gears). So even for that bike they shifted the hub. So yeah, you don't need a wide hub to do that. 135mm (or 142) can be offset too and I see no reason why not.

@emptybe-er : I don't think he's advocating unequal spoke length.
  • 1 0
 @themickeyd: simple yet elegant
  • 140 1
 27.5 front and back? Is this some kind of new standard? A mullet I'm the front and back?
  • 36 1
 I know, I’m excited with this BRAND NEW concept, 27.5 front and rear! Think about the advantages, quick and nimble and without the hassle of having a big wheel on the front Smile . Time to sell my recently purchased mullet bike to get this cutting edge tech. All joking aside, I think it’s awesome that manufacturers are still making 27.5 f/r as an option. I have that setup on my enduro bike and its just so much fun.
  • 100 1
 Party in the front, also party in the back.
  • 12 0
 @Patrick9-32: part party party party party everywhereeee
  • 20 0
 Definitely hoping that this new trend catches on with all bike manufacturers. 27.5 seems to be the sweet spot for most average-sized riders that are looking for a fun bike to ride.
  • 3 49
flag Mtbdialed (Jan 26, 2023 at 8:09) (Below Threshold)
 @paulpimml: what do you consider "average"? I ask, because the average male MTBer is like 2" taller than the general average in the population(US at least). 27.5 is great for people under 5'5 or so, but that is like 15% of MTBers(and over half of that 15% are women). 27.5 is nearly dead for a reason....it's demonstrably not as good as 29. 27.5 may be "fun" on dirt sidewalks(flow trails) for jibbing and what not, but when it gets chunky, steep and filthy rutted, 29 is faster, smoother, better.
  • 11 0
 It's similar to the famed 26" front and rear, but not quite as good
  • 37 3
 @Mtbdialed: Bruh we don't care. I have heard literally every argument and marketing gimmick in the book on why I should buy a 29er and my answer is still no. I really don't care that it will roll whatever percent better than a smaller wheel. I don't care if it makes tech easier or if it makes me .5 of a second faster. 27.5 is is what I like and I will not be convinced to buy a new bike every god damn time some new wheel size "innovation" comes along. Just go ride your bike and have fun doing it.
  • 3 38
flag Mtbdialed (Jan 26, 2023 at 8:42) (Below Threshold)
 @WestC0astWanderer: cool. but that doesn't help you as 99.99% of people don't agree with you and 27.5 will be just like 26 in another 5 years. the marketplace doesn't care about your feelings.
  • 7 0
 @WestC0astWanderer: That's Deep man deep sed.
And yes folks he is right. ride your damn bike.
  • 13 0
 @Mtbdialed: It's called ride dynamics, otherwise known as feel. For non-racers who have been biking for a while, feel, fit and comfort is what matters. It's interesting what's going on in the car industry where some of the future high-performance electric cars will actually have shifting because true car enthusiasts value the ride dynamics and being able to shift gears is a big part of the feel and experience. Ironically, having shifting in electric cars actually makes them slower and less efficient. Same thing for full 27.5 vs other sizes - for many of us it is really about the feel. I am all for different wheel sizes. Anyone who tells another what wheel size should be ridden needs to think about why they really ride a bicycle.
  • 21 0
 @Mtbdialed: "99.99% of people don't agree with you" Please provide your polling data here Captain Empirical. Big Grin
  • 13 0
 @Mtbdialed: what if I don't want to feel like I'm riding down the highstreet whilst mountain biking?

I'm here for fun not plush easy riding trying to win races...

There's a huge market for people riding tight techy not racing who want something manouverable and fun

Not long slack big wheel rut eaters
  • 14 1
 @paulpimml: It's astounding how some manufacturers only offer 29er or mullet. Their excuse was full 27.5 wasn't selling. Well, I wonder what they will do/say about 29ers or mullets now that they are also not selling well. What a bunch of clowns some of these people designing/pushing bikes. Why would you ever get rid of full 27.5. Big Kudos to Airdrop for keeping it real and providing choice for those that love 27.5.
  • 11 0
 @FatTail: and we need 27.5s and 26ers for all the people with "BMX Backgrounds". Everyone knows wheel size choices depends on your riding background.
  • 14 0
 @Mtbdialed: and no ones cares about your stupid opinion. Some people prefer 27.5 bikes, why does that bother you so much?
  • 3 22
flag Mtbdialed (Jan 26, 2023 at 10:35) (Below Threshold)
 @DoubleCrownDicked: I build 100's of sets of wheels a year. I just went and looked and I built exactly 7 27.5 wheels. 1 set of 27/27's and 5 sets of mullet wheels. lol.

sales figures don't like. 27.5 is dead.

OH! I also built 2 sets of 26's(dj. lol)
  • 2 23
flag Mtbdialed (Jan 26, 2023 at 10:37) (Below Threshold)
 @BobbyHillbomb: I don't care what you like. I am glad you like it. my point is that in 5 years, you are either going to be on a 10yr old 27.5 bike and find it nearly impossible to find wheels, tires, spokes, forks, etc.....or come over to the dark side! LOL
  • 2 9
flag YukonMog (Jan 26, 2023 at 10:44) (Below Threshold)
 @WestC0astWanderer: you could apply that logic to you buying a 275 in first place!!
Arguably more of a marketing exercise than 29ers
  • 13 1
 @Mtbdialed: Your nonsense deserves a downvote. This round's on me!
  • 2 0
 @YukonMog: no not really. I got a used 2016 frame and frankenbiked it together with what I had laying around and for a season it had a 29er on the front until the fork broke. The bike is 7 years old now and I haven't had the urge to buy something just because its new. The only new bike I have ever purchased was 26" DJ.
  • 6 1
 @Mtbdialed: I won't be buying a new bike anytime soon. I don't like 29" wheels, I don't like long bikes. For me mountain bikes should of stopped in 2013.
  • 5 7
 @deli-hustler: "I don't get the point of this transmission that shifts it's self? 3 speeds is plenty, and quite frankly I like manual brakes....lets you feel the pedal!"-you if you were buying a car in 1960. lol
  • 2 2
 @Mtbdialed: I have a bike from 2020 but that's my ebike. That came with the worse groupset available at the moment (SRAM SX), my 2013 26" hardtail has got the best groupset available in 2013 (XTR) the XTR is far better and I would say it's better than the XT that is now on the ebike. I have XO on my enduro bike and that's no better than the XTR.
"Why does my car keep flashing up the engine management light?" You buying a car in 2023
  • 1 1
 I must remember, don't feed trolls...
  • 2 4
 @deli-hustler: naw, I drive a Ford and an Audi.....you learn to ignore check engine lights. Big Grin

anywho, sure, 10sp XTR was amazing. the front derailleur that you originally had....is NOT. so is current XTR. yes it's more finicky because it's two more gears, but if you have a modicum of ability to maintain a bike, it is far better than the older stuff, by way of a much wider ratio(even than 2x), and it shifts under full power and lightning quick.

XX1 axs is pretty sweet, btw. I would go so far as to say it's the best groupset on the market, that has ever existed. I have it on 3 bikes(well, one is the wifes but...) and it's basically been completely flawless aside from breakage that is my fault.
  • 1 1
 @Mtbdialed: ah see I haven't had a front mech since 2012. I did borrow a friends bike with GX axs and it was nice to use, but I forget to charge my Garmin, so age is my reason not to have axs. I'm happy with my fleet of bikes, old hardtail for messing about on, ebike for towing my little girl on her tagalong and the enduro bike for bike parks and maybe a DH race.
  • 3 0
 @Mtbdialed: I like your math = bulshit Wink
  • 86 0
 The pricing on these is incredible. Well done, airdrop.
  • 19 1
 The pricing by airdrop across their entire range is incredible.
A while ago they addressed pricing on a pinkbike article and said, “we’re not here to take the piss.”
That really stuck with me… 6 months after that article and I will be picking up one of their Edit bikes (very soon). I can’t bloody wait.
  • 35 0
 Now that's a proper downhill/park bike. I'm really over the whole "longer, lower, slacker" thing with 29" wheels to make it easier to ride over chunk. It just sucks the fun out of railing tight berms and popping off lips and throwing the bike around when it feels like trying to do a 3 point turn on a side street in a limo. Make bikes fun/scary to ride again!
  • 36 0
 If you buy one they will send you a Christmas card every year which is nice as it's the only one I get.
  • 38 5
 The singlespeed one is my next bike. f*ck yeah Airdrop, the bike industry needs you now more than ever. I'm scared for the day that all the used DH bikes in the buy and sell are just whack 29/mullet plow bikes that jump and jib like shit. I think most bike companies are ran by people who have never ridden a downhill bike, and think that their only purpose is racing. Freeride is more alive now than it's ever been, but most of the bike companies seem to care more about selling sport check ass 29 pedal bikes to the Karens than the die hards of the sport. Airdrop f*cking rules! Not a bad price tag either.
  • 7 3
 Underrated comment
  • 9 1
 Karens ride 29ers?
  • 19 4
 @cuban-b: yes around the local enduro trail network that surrounds the 900K townhomes they recently bought in and then they go to the city council meeting to vote against the dirt jump proposal because they want to see an ashphalt pumptrack instead as well as a climb trail for the DH network so they can finally ban trucks from using the shuttle road. The 29 wheels do a great job of soaking up any jump lips that could have caused any sort of airtime and keep Karen safely on the ground, and increase rollability so they can get around the uphill blue flow loop faster so there's there's still time to have an affair with their hot yoga instructor before picking up the kids from soccer practise
  • 6 0
 lol wut
  • 4 0
 @luckynugget: This is strangely specific Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @luckynugget: Preach it brother
  • 1 0
 @Pocopatroller: we takin bout Practice
  • 31 2
 Hahahahaha at exactly this moment all of the fork companies end their 27.5" sale. Y'all ready for fun size wheels again? I know I'm out there to smack lips, hit whips, and laugh in a way that some find offensive but all shredders know as the cackle of stoke. I don't care about the speed, actually the longer it takes me to get down a trail the more time I've had to enjoy what I'm out there for. Smaller, stiffer, lighter wheels that don't work quite as much like flywheels. LFG
  • 17 0
 how well will it take a 26"rear? My wallet just started getting nervous.......
  • 5 0
 In reality there's 10mm difference in radius from 27.5 to 26 DH tyre. Roughly 3mm BB drop and maybe 0.5 Deg slacker but might be able to drop crowns on fork to lower front to even it out.
  • 2 0
 @bat-fastard: yeah I've run 26 in 27 forks before an i measued it at 9mm :'D (26 magic mary to 27 Minion)
I like super short stays tho...
  • 2 0
 @naptime: I've a transition double, super short rear makes bike soo fun.
  • 8 0
 @bat-fastard: nice, I'd love it if they re're'd the bottle rocket
  • 15 0
 After spending a year tending to 29" wheels on my dh bike, I still like the idea of 27.5" wheels for dh better. 29 rolls great yes but I don't race and I do have to try to true my own wheels. 36H 27.5" is just stronger.
  • 2 0
 This is another spot on point, I'm eating 27.5 wheels at the minute, bumping up is going to be expensive if it's worse
  • 14 1
 This bike is a beauty! Have nothing to complain about the 27,5 wheelsize. Don't understand the need for bigger wheels, might be faster, but lacks the playful feeling. For me, of course!
  • 6 1
 Same
  • 14 0
 Comment section on this post gives me hope for the future. We let 26" wheels go to easily. Glad to see people trying to keep 275 around. We need less wagon wheel bikes
  • 11 1
 bummer they wont sell/ship to the US, i'd grab one of their bikes in a heartbeat
  • 64 0
 That's sorted now dude, shipping to the US is on
  • 39 0
 Also Canada and Australia if anyone's interested
  • 1 0
 @AirdropBikes: Yo don't forget us in NZ!
  • 13 0
 @David8048: how could we forget NZ?!? We’ve got Slacker frames on the way to Vertigo Bikes in QT right now.
  • 1 0
 @AirdropBikes: Just looking at the Edit frameset, checkout rejects any Canadian address I've tried so far.
  • 2 0
 @kryten: Thanks for the heads-up. That should be sorted now but if you still have trouble, give us a shout on hello@airdropbikes.com and we can help you out.
  • 7 0
 I do wish these small, rider lead brands would stop making sensible & well spec'd, designed and priced bikes. Instead, I think we'd all prefer to have seen nice and novel headset cable routing arrangement, preferably one that uses some type of easily broken, proprietary A-ahead spacer system to boot. Won't they ever learn....?
  • 11 2
 looks like a Session
  • 6 0
 Typo: "it's better to round a bolt and strip the threads from your frame" should probably be "it's better to round a bolt THAN strip the threads from your frame"
  • 7 3
 This is fantastic but with Revs gone there’s no really many places to actually ride it. Hopefully they’ll sell like hotcakes and people start building places where we can ride them.
  • 4 1
 That's my only reservation about buying such an awesome bike. Nowhere to ride it and the nearest chairlift is 1000 miles away.
  • 3 1
 Revs will rise again in spirit if not in actuality. There’s a momentum in the UK bike park and micro park scene.
  • 4 1
 Revs will be back at some point (see recent article in MBR). At said below, Dyfi is also good.
  • 3 0
 The UK Literally have riding everywhere though? Sucks Revs closed, but they will be back for sure!
They're world renowned and one of the best there is imo \m/
  • 2 0
 @kyleluvsdh: There’s a lot of places to ride but not many with a uplift that justifies a downhill bike. Most bike parks you’d be better off on an enduro bike and the few where you’d want a DH bike are in North Wales or the Scottish Highlands miles away from where most of the country lives.
  • 3 0
 why is the single speed more than the GX model?

Shifter, gears and derailleur vs. single cog, and a tensioner
***note***different cranks on the two models.
£100 difference (single speed costing more?????)

That pricing seems..........wrong.
  • 14 0
 The singlespeed setup on the Park bike uses the SB One G3C tensioner with an adjustable clutch. It’s very, very nice but it retails for EUR 329 on its own.
  • 5 0
 The Luxe model picture is the same as the Deluxe with the boxxer instead of the Zeb. quick edit required.
  • 6 2
 1800gbp + 360gbp eu sales tax (20%) + 85gbp eu import duty = 2245 gbp = 2550€.

might call it "airdrop smuggler" and pick it up in sheffield. but i really dig the bike.
  • 5 0
 You’ve forgotten to claim back the U.K. sales tax, also at 20%
  • 32 1
 You could remove the UK sales tax from that but yeah you're right. All I can say about that is #f*ckbrexit
  • 1 0
 Just "smuggled" some bike parts bought at Superstar via a friend who just came back by car from the UK. Brexit killed 80% of their sales.
  • 1 0
 So i would pay "eu sales tax", but can claim back the "uk sales tax", which will equalize more or less?
  • 6 1
 I live in Sheffield and I want to start a business smuggling Airdrop's from Monkey Island to the mainland. Any buyers?
  • 5 0
 Take them Airdrops and bring me back bike24 orders
  • 1 0
 @TommyNunchuck:
Take my money
  • 2 0
 @DerBastian: if they deliver to europe they will deduct the sales tax and the import processing company in your country will add the local tax and bill you directly, along with their processing fee. there may also be import duty to pay.
  • 2 0
 @DerBastian: you pay the VAT rate of your home country plus import duties which are normally under 5% on bike parts. The import tax on my 675 euro frame was 30 something euros. Anything over 120 euros and they cannot charge you VAT in UK they should deduct it at the time of sale.
  • 6 0
 Kudos on this bike. I hope you sell a ton of them.
  • 4 0
 Been waiting awhile for this frame to come out, and grabbed an Ex display Myst to use as my park bike. Going to have to swap over I think. Playful DH bikes are where it's at.
  • 2 0
 Ha. take that, nerds! From being smirked at in the lift line to being the coolest fckn kid in the yard for 2023 : my '13 gambler upgraded as manufacturer intended to some absolutely whopping 650b wheels and singlespeed . I think my bars might be 760 so choke on that too. Another season of shredding in style and saving mad dough.
  • 7 1
 SPLOOSH
  • 5 0
 Hello and good to see you back, my Kona Supreme!
  • 3 0
 Not in the market for a DH bike but that looks like a solid bike for the money, value still exists in the mountainbike industry, who knew.
  • 4 0
 Love to see this. Not everyone is chasing the clock. Most of us normal riders just want a fun durable bike.
  • 3 2
 "However, on these oversized bolts, you won't find large 10 mm Allen key interfaces, and that was deliberate, with Airdrop explaining that it's better to round a bolt and strip the threads from your frame,"

What? Is the last "and" supposed to be "than"?

Also, who _is_ putting 10mm Allen heads on suspension parts?or even 8mm? My last few bikes all use 15-20mm pivot axles/bolts and every bolt head was 6mm, with maybe a few 5mm on like shock mounts. Pretty sure the optimum head size is related to the torque spec and not the size of the hardware it's attaching.
  • 2 1
 " Anti-rise is a value to express what the suspension does under braking. A lower value means the bike is more likely to stay active under braking. A higher value is a bike that is happier to go into the stroke and prevent weight transfer into the hands as you get on the anchors."

A higher value _forces_ the suspension into the stroke under braking. A lower value isn't just "more likely to stay active" , it actually _is_ more active. Big difference on both sides.
  • 3 0
 Agree with what you're saying. If you want to read more about the Slacker's kinematics we did. a blog post as part of the Slacker Project a while back: www.airdropbikes.com/blogs/the-slacker-project/6-suspension
  • 2 0
 @AirdropBikes: Thanks! I actually wasn't commenting on the bike's actual kinematics, just they way they were described. I quite like the kinematic. I personally prefer a flatter anti-squat, but I understand the intention of the Slacker's AS curve. Good stuff.
  • 3 0
 Fkn sick 27.5" bike Airdrop! Kudos.

Now I want to hear more from @Mtbdialed he seems to know what everyone needs and isn't afraid to jam it down their throat!
  • 3 0
 Can’t stop looking at that machined pivot, so nice! Not looking for a new bike, but then again…
  • 4 0
 Looks like a smooth Operator,
  • 3 0
 Love this brand, bought the Edit, it’s been a great bike. Would recommend any of the airdrop range.
  • 2 2
 May not be a fox logo but at least it has fox internals. The fact they got Öhlins on a bike and kept it under 5 should open some eyes, and the 190 dred sorry zeb is neat if you’re the type to take a dh frame to the trails. Have fun climbing bud! All around good deal, 7/10 would recommend.
  • 2 0
 question... anyone know of a modern geometry dh, park bike with a 1 1/8 headset? trying to use a 888 dh fork i have laying around. thanks.
  • 4 0
 you could buy a works components headset and their Reducer Crown Race - For Fitment of 1 1/8 Forks to a Tapered Headset.

i think other companies do a similar thing
  • 5 0
 The reach adjust headset that comes with the Slacker is compatible with 1 1/8" straight steerers because it's for dual crown DH forks.
  • 1 0
 All modern Dh/ park bikes can be run with a 1 1/8 fork. I think almost all DH forks have a 1 1/8th steer tube. But you just need a 52/30 crown race instead of a 52/40.
  • 1 0
 @AirdropBikes: this is a better idea than mine.
  • 4 0
 I want a DH bike all of a sudden
  • 3 0
 do it.
  • 4 0
 27.5 and single speed! I love it when you talk dirty to me!
  • 1 0
 Been holding out with all these 29” bikes, no interest. At least this has me interested. Only 100 available which are probably sold out already but hey maybe they will do another run.
  • 3 0
 i support everything about all of these decisions. well done airdrop
  • 5 2
 Kona asked to have their dignity back.
  • 20 2
 They lost it by only making whack 29 mullet enduro bikes and getting rid of the DH bike so other brands like this that aren't run by enduro race nerds are going to take that dignity
  • 5 4
 @luckynugget: Maybe if people were actually buying DH bikes, instead of complaining on Pinkbike, companies like Kona would still be making them.
  • 5 0
 @ScandiumRider: Doing my part. Once you get into a town with a decent riding scene, you will see that DH bikes and freeride is very much alive and well. If you're in a town with nothing but enduro trails, it's probably easy to think thats the current state of the sport everywhere.
  • 2 0
 "FOR GOING OFF, NOT SHOWING OFF."

I have found my new favourite brand \⁠(⁠°⁠o⁠°⁠)⁠/
  • 3 0
 Single speed! People are finally smartening up.
  • 2 0
 Very nice bike.. i do wonder what people think of 63 head angle for bikepark?
  • 4 0
 Alloy 27.5!
  • 2 0
 What website am I on? This bike is hot and reasonable... Is it April already? Well done Airdrop!!!
  • 2 0
 Oh boy, oh boy, oh boy, there go my savings
  • 2 0
 A thing of beauty. Take my money.
  • 3 1
 Nice bike looks just like my old 2013 commencal supreme fr
  • 2 0
 If my Rocky Mountain Maiden ever quits, I'll get this one.
  • 2 0
 That's a Kona Stinky! Which was a rad bike, at the time.
  • 2 0
 Wow, what a looker... I thought I didn't need one, but man...
  • 2 0
 Kona is kicking themselves for DCing their Process 165 too soon...
  • 2 0
 HOW ARE THEY GETTING MICHELIN DH34s!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 15 0
 Easy. Just order some and then wait for the 2 years and hey presto
  • 1 0
 Pinkbike said "DH 23" on the description. Probably another dream tyre from Michelin? Smile
  • 2 0
 Damn, good builds at fair prices! Say it ain't so Mr. Lahey
  • 1 0
 Kinda makes me want to sell my Sender.......I said kinda......I love that thing!
  • 1 0
 If it's truly for the NWD generation it should have a 69 head angle and a 250mm reach with 12" of travel.
  • 1 0
 Great, so my 2016 canyon sender is still not obsolete since it has similar geo on 275 wheels.
  • 1 0
 Is airdrop using specialized sizing? Why can't everyone use the same size in this industry!?!
  • 1 0
 Simple but yet such elegant.
  • 2 0
 Aluminum!!!
  • 1 0
 ... and it has the new Michelin DH 23 (???)
  • 2 1
 Holding out for the longer one tho.
  • 1 0
 great lines, i'd take one.
  • 2 0
 Kona lended the rockers?
  • 2 5
 The bike is sick and all, but if you look at the second to last photo with all the red decals like the shock and the fork the cranks the logo, and yet the pivot connected to the shock is a ugly silver, it just doesn’t match, if that came in red it would look so much better.
  • 1 0
 Nice looking bike, good geo, reasonably priced. What's the catch?
  • 1 0
 This would make a solid park rat weekend racer bike.
  • 2 0
 This is so rad
  • 1 0
 Yo looks like a pretty dope freeride bike
  • 1 0
 Intriguing MRP chainguide with a mix of SXg bash and AMg Upper guide.
  • 4 0
 This is the combo we like. As you probably know, MRP are a great company to work with, always willing to listen and help.
  • 1 0
 @AirdropBikes: is it the SXg iscg plate or a custom one for you ? aka could I make the same combo myself
  • 3 0
 @1llumA: yeah it’s the standard ISCG05 plate
  • 1 0
 Clean looking builds and great pricing
  • 1 0
 New World Disorder generation. thats me!
  • 1 0
 Great looking bike, the want for one is strong
  • 1 0
 Looks like a giant slopestyle bike!
  • 1 0
 Nice to see a mention of having an eye on longevity @James Crossland
  • 1 0
 i want it
  • 1 2
 quality over quantity Very impressive ride Thing is A,m two meter Living 54years of my life in A midget world Damd.
  • 1 0
 MAMASITA!!!!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Slacker
  • 1 0
 LOVE THIS!!!!!
  • 1 0
 I love you
  • 1 0
 take my money.
  • 1 0
 Fuck yes
  • 1 0
 Love it !
  • 2 4
 Looks like a Hyper. I would wager a guess that you get what you pay for.
  • 1 2
 looks like a hyper
  • 5 7
 But can it be mulleted ?
  • 39 0
 I don't see any problem with throwing a 26" rear wheel in there
  • 6 0
 @William42: there is something wrong with that. it's f*cking sick that's what
  • 1 1
 Not all tires measure the same so many are mullets.
  • 3 0
 @William42: Haha, that was the correct answer. Just upvoted you to +26 Wink
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