First Look: Contra Bikes' Prototype 2.0 is a Steel, High Virtual Pivot Enduro Bike

Oct 29, 2021
by Seb Stott  



Contra bikes is the brainchild of Evan Turpen, former downhill racer, mechanic and self-taught engineer. After being the lead mechanic at a local shop, he took out a loan and learned to use engineering software from scratch in order to develop his own bike. His first prototype was a high-single-pivot steel bike which was a thoroughly impressive-looking first attempt. You can read more about that bike and the man behind it in this deep dive by Dan Roberts.

In that interview, Evan suggested the next step was to go aluminum, but after investigating that route he decided to stick with steel. Instead, he's changed the suspension design to a high virtual pivot for his second prototype, which is nearly ready for production. I called Evan to find out why.



Bike Check Evan Turpen - Bike
The new bike has come a long way from the first prototype (left).




Details
Wheel Size: 29"
Travel: 164mm (vertical), 170mm fork
Suspension System: High virtual pivot with idler pulley and counter-rotating links
Claimed weight: 37.2 lbs with pedals
Materials: Chromoly steel tubes with machined aluminium links
Website: contrabikes.com




Suspension design

Evan says his interest in high pivot suspension was piqued when he got a chance to try out a Commencal Supreme SX. "There were a lot of problems with it (high pivot forces, manufacturing issues, lack of progression, idler drag, funky pedalling and braking characteristics).... but I was blown away with how good it was in the rough. It was better than any downhill bike I had ridden at the time. With Contra, I wanted to improve all of the negative aspects of high-pivot bikes while keeping the positive characteristics intact." This is what inspired Evan's first high single-pivot bike. For version 2, the idler and the rearward axle path remain but the layout has changed.

It uses two short, counter-rotating links like a VPP design; if viewed from the drive side, the lower link turns clockwise and the top link turns anticlockwise as it compresses. Compared to a single-pivot, this reduces the anti-rise, which Evan wanted to prevent it from feeling like it was squatting into its travel under braking. The virtual pivot point (centre of curvature) remains high above the BB, like the physical pivot in the first prototype, creating a similarly rearward axle path to the single-pivot bike.

While most short-link bikes use some sort of strut(s) to connect the chainstay and seatstay, forming a solid rear triangle, here a machined aluminum rod connects the pivot points of the two links together. "It's a kind of a hybrid swingarm in a sense," Evan explains. "Instead of an asymmetric strut connecting the chainstay and seatstay just on one side, which can create a torque on the links, I have a symmetrical aluminum part I call the tie-bar... The tolerance on that can be really good because it's a machined part."

A lot of high pivot bikes mount the idler on the swingarm such that it moves as the suspension compresses, affecting the kinematics. I asked Turpen why his idler is attached to the frame. "I looked at having it mounted on the link because that was actually easier to package, but with my design, I couldn't get as good characteristics as mounting it to the frame. Also, the anti-squat isn't affected by chainring size with this design."

Instead, it is possible to adjust the anti-squat by changing the size of the idler pulley - a smaller pulley creates a lower chain line which increases anti-squat. Whereas if you want to change the chainring size, that will change the gearing only and not the kinematics. Evan says the position of the pulley will change with the frame size, so taller riders on bigger frames should get similar pedalling characteristics to smaller riders on the smallest size (assuming riders are roughly the intended height for the frame size.)

The bike is designed around a 24 tooth idler (a 22 tooth is shown in the pictures). This is bigger than most idlers and is intended to reduce drag. As the chain bends around the idler, the links have to articulate under tension, then straighten out again as they head for the chainring. The bigger the idler, the smaller the articulation angle and so the less power is lost.

Similarly, the idler is positioned further forwards than most. This gives a longer chain span between the cassette and the idler, which reduces the angle that the chain has to move laterally to reach the extremes of the cassette. This should also help reduce drivetrain losses when pedalling in the biggest and smallest sprockets.


The idler position goes with an effective pivot point which is quite far forwards, which gives the axle path a slightly longer radius of curvature than most designs. This allows the axle path to move backwards throughout almost all of the travel, without moving too far forwards at the end or moving back too fast at the beginning of the travel. The axle path shape is similar to the single-pivot first prototype, which had a physical pivot point far in front of the bottom bracket, although the counter-rotating links do result in a shortening radius of curvature towards bottom-out, which causes it to come forwards slightly further at the end.

The axle path is rearward throughout most of the travel, with a very slight forwards movement at the end. Note the scale is very squashed - it moves backwards 22mm over the 164mm of travel. The Leverage curve is progressive throughout, with a coil-friendly 24% progression.

Antisquat is calculated at a touch over 100% at sag in all gears. Anti-rise is on the high side, but lower than most high single pivots and drops off steeply through the travel.




Construction

The steel frame is welded locally by John Caletti. Evan investigated making the second bike out of aluminum for weight savings, but as you can see, chose another path. "I really have nothing against steel," he explains. "I was able to hit a stiffness level, at least in FEA (Finite Element Analysis), that was comparable if not slightly stiffer than my really heavy prototype swingarm I had, and the weight is 160g less than the aluminum swingarm I had designed so I was just like 'okay I've got to do this'. It's more affordable and probably more durable because the fatigue life of steel is higher than aluminum."

Evan was most concerned with saving unsprung weight from the swingarm for the benefit of suspension performance. The bearing housings and dropouts are designed to be as minimal as possible (which Evan admits makes the welding trickier) and the wall thickness is different for the chainstays and seatstays to improve strength where it's needed. Eliminating the two links used to drive the shock on the previous bike saved a lot of weight too.

Bike Check Evan Turpen - Bike
The new virtual pivot design saves a lot of weight over the old single pivot with its shock link by the BB.

Though the current dropout and hanger are designed to be as light as possible, Turpen intends to redesign the dropout to make use of a Universal Derailleur Hanger, thereby improving repairability. "Part of the point of the bike being steel is that people could have it for fifteen or twenty years."

As for the total weight, Evan says the frame is about three pounds (1.36Kg) lighter than the first prototype, and the new bike as you see it - including DoubleDown tires, a tool in the stem and pedals - is 37.2 lbs (16.9Kg). He says that with EXO tires, Fox 36, Float X shock and without pedals, you could get it below 35 lbs (15.9Kg).



Geometry

The geometry numbers aren't set in stone as far as the production bikes go, but the chart opposite shows the proportions of the bike pictured that Evan is riding, which corresponds to a size Large. For production, Evan will produce a Medium and an XL too, although the sizes may not be called that. For reference, Evan is 5’ 9.5" / 177cm tall.

The geometry numbers aren't intended to rewrite the rules and are broadly in line with other modern bikes. Evan thinks the geometry trends we've seen over recent years won't go much further (*Levy spits out his coffee*) so the numbers won't look dated in many years time. The head angle of 64-degrees is a touch steeper than some brands are going these days, but Evan points out that the bike's high anti-rise figures mean the rear suspension won't rise up as much when on the brakes. This means that relative to other bikes, the dynamic head angle when braking will be a touch slacker than the static figure would suggest.

If you did want it slacker, Evan says there's nothing to stop you from putting a 180mm fork on it. On the other hand, you could go down in fork and shock travel if you wanted more of a trail bike.




What's next?

Evan is hoping to launch the bike in spring with around thirty bikes ready for sale in three sizes. There won't be any pre-orders. Evan wants the bikes to be ready to buy when they're up for sale so he isn't hanging onto customers' money for an unknown amount of time. After that, the aim is to eventually make up 150 frames a year. There'll be an air and a coil shock option, and Evan says it will be comparable in price to a carbon frame and it'll be US-made and designed to last a long time.

Evan added that, according to FEA, "this bike *should* be able to pass the Tri-Test DH certification (at least virtually until I can get one there!) I want to get it certified for downhill and I have a swingarm that will give it 200mm travel so you could run it as a downhill bike with a dual-crown fork."

Further in the future, Evan is investigating getting a carbon version made in North America, provided doing so would save a significant amount of weight.

We're looking forward to testing the steel version in 2022.






127 Comments

  • 149 0
 seriously, though - blown away by the creativity and skill of some of these engineers. this thing looks amazing and i bet it crushes
  • 40 5
 I admit it looks nice and the fab skills are impressive, but its not a mullet™, so I don't even think its even rideable Frown

#29/29isDead

But for real, that bike is stunning and I would trade a kidney to have one. Best of luck to Evan!
  • 21 17
 @jackalope: So far the mullet bikes I've ridden didn't feel much better than my old 26" StumpJumper. The 29/29 does feel much better though. My local trails are pretty rough. Maybe mullets are best for smoother jump and berm trails.
  • 13 2
 @Evo6: Greg Minnaar is it you?
  • 29 2
 @Evo6: Are you crazy man? The Mullet Mafia (MM) will be coming for you now that you've slandered their superior "technology"! I've even put 22" wheels on the front of my car and 14" wheels on the back so I can pass safely through MM held territory. It sucks I had to take my 29/29 bike to the local landfill, but I did find an old Spesh Big Hit with a 24" rear wheel, so now I too can experience the sublime glory of speed *and* playfulness that no boring, borderline dangerous mono wheelsized bike could hope to match. MM4Lyfe!
  • 5 1
 @Oldgerald: Can't be - Minnaar never rode for Spesh
  • 3 1
 1st thing I thought seeing how that "strut" pulls the virtual pivot up, "Wow that is like nothing I've seen before."
  • 3 1
 @Evo6: I always found the front end felt super light on mullet enduro/dh bikes because it puts your weight further back when you're in 'attack position' or whatever. Especially when you really send it into berms they have a habit of the front wheel lifting out of the exit.
  • 11 0
 @jackalope: I am hoping to have a mixed wheel option for people that want that. I've tried it before on other bikes and it definitely has it's positives in certain situations. I'm looking forward to trying it on this new bike!
  • 2 0
 Weirdest solid rear triangle design I've ever seen... but I like it!
  • 2 0
 @jackalope: I have almost every wheel size & 20" x 4" rear & 27.5+ front works well but does look really really weird to look at?

www.pinkbike.com/photo/21564472
  • 2 0
 @jackalope: you've done it now, next thing you know they will discontinue 29/29 and only produce 29/27.5 and 27.5/26
  • 1 3
 Just because he runs CAD and some engineering software does not make him an engineer. That's like saying someone who Google's symptoms for a cold is a Doctor...
  • 1 0
 @4everkidd: Actually being able to use engineering software does make you an engineer, but doing engineering does not make any determination how good it is?
  • 39 0
 Brooklyn Machine Works vibes.
  • 1 0
 First thought as well. Man, I had a chance to buy a 24” BMW DJ a few years ago... shoulda pulled the trigger on that.
  • 1 0
 Yep, making me miss my Race Link more and more. Love high pivot bikes, there's nothing like them in the rough.
  • 1 0
 Totally. Get some shinburgers on this thing!
  • 1 0
 Exactly what I thought as soon as I saw it.
  • 13 0
 The Vital podcast about Evan and his bike is pretty awesome. Cool dude, with some really great ideas.
www.vitalmtb.com/features/Steel-American-Made-High-Pivot-Enduro-Bike-Evan-Turpen-Contra-Bikes-The-Inside-Line,3309
  • 17 2
 That axle path is jaw dropping
  • 14 0
 Or maybe I've fallen victim to a scale that represents it in a magnified manner
  • 5 0
 this is very similar to my 150 highlander, which goes to -24mm at full travel. the big hits on this rig should be unreal
  • 6 0
 @GotchaJimmy: From 435mm at 0%, 445mm at sag, 455mm at 100%. It grows 5% of the total chainstays. Not a insignificant amount.
  • 3 0
 @Notmeatall: Thanks for that, pretty much just as cool as I hoped it was!
  • 4 1
 @twonsarelli: I'm really worried about this. It changes the center of the bike a big amount. After a drop you suddenly has way more front weight because the rear end got away from you. For straight plowing, no problem, but when you are railing corners? I'm still not sold completly on the setup.
  • 3 1
 @Notmeatall: i am not an engineer, so i can't make any quantitative claims about cornering. however, i have not felt any negative change in cornering characteristics vs. my non-high pivot bikes. the fast, repeated impacts don't feel significantly different but the deep impact sensation is quite pronounced. i haven't run the figures but it seems that the shortening of the front is compensated for (more or less) with the growing rear end, so that it feels super stable. overall, i think the single high pivot is an inferior design to the switch infinity, which i am very used to. i can't speak to a virtual high pivot, though.
  • 6 0
 @GotchaJimmy: In hindsight we should have made the scale different. I'm not trying to mislead people, but it does go back 22mm if that helps.
  • 2 0
 @EvanTurpen: Super helpful!! Thanks for pushing the envelope and dropping jaws Smile
  • 6 0
 @Notmeatall: You'll have to try this bike. So far the handling in corners has been spot on and even off jumps and landing off of drops. Manualing always takes a bit more effort than a "normal" bike because the chainstays grow. This effect could be reduced with a mixed wheel setup or shorter chainstays. These are all possible things to try on the bike in the future.
  • 1 0
 I experienced weird characteristics on big landings with my banshee legend but the bike was too small for me which made the problem worse. Cornering felt really good though. I think if the front end of the bike is long enough for you the Cs growth shouldn’t be big problem @Notmeatall:
  • 1 0
 Have a look at the Craftworks enr for impressive axle paths. That being said, really liking it
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: tbh.. the bike i enjoyed most and would shove the bike in for corners was my old balfa bb7 and that has 50 odd mm of rearward travel.

So i don't think it's as much of an issue as you think. You tip in to the corner, shove it into its travel and suddenly becomes super stable,
  • 1 0
 The graph scale is horizontally exaggerated, but its still impressive that so much of the path is rear-ward.
  • 8 0
 Sign me up, I want one. I've been considering a Forbidden Dreadnought for a while, but this seems to tick every box that the Dreadnought doesn't for me. Made in the USA, super unique, small brand, STEEL!!! Both bikes look incredible. Can't comment on this thing's suspension performance, but the dual-link high pivot design seems to be working really well for every brand that's tried it. I'll do whatever it takes to grab one of those first 30.
  • 8 0
 I love it! Such a cool direction right now in the bike market, lots of neat little niche builders doing interesting things. Reminds me of the late 90's again!
  • 9 0
 One of the best bikes I've seen on PB! So clean, with top-notch manufacturing. Want...
  • 5 0
 Wow that's really cool. Just when you thought maybe we had run out of new ways to link up a rear suspension.
Any plans to do custom sizing aka Kavenz-style (i.e. 4 reach, head tube length, seat tube length and rear center length options with all other numbers being shared)? Current options especially in carbon really limit size range, or suitability for XS or XXL riders. Having a way to do some level of customization would be a huge plus of working in steel domestically.
  • 7 0
 @alexsin I would love to offer custom options in the future as well. I understand that all riders are different and may prefer a different reach, bb height, head tube length, head angle, chainstay length, or even different kinematic. Depending on the day or where I am riding I might prefer different geometry myself! I think for the first ones it will be best for me to launch with a number of frames immediately available in the stock sizing I have come up with that I know will work great with this suspension design. That way I can be efficient in producing them when I'm trying to get the bike company off the ground. I will definitely explore the option of adding a custom program, but I will need to put a lot of thought into how to reduce the lead times on custom versions (since this can get out of control quite quickly).
  • 1 0
 @EvanTurpen: When you make this happen, and I am watching from here on out, make a Ti option and you will have a blank check from me. no kidding. this thing is stunning!

cheers!
  • 1 0
 @EvanTurpen: I love this bike. I agree wh your strategy of making what will sell and can be put into the hands of customers quickly. Best of luck with the venture.
  • 7 1
 Evan, very cool design! Any chance you are considering using a 1.5” head tube so it’d be easier to adjust reach or head angle? I really like the idea of being able to run 200 mm of travel and using this as a DH bike.
  • 10 0
 @solidautomech I haven't looked into this on the steel frame yet...but I will have a look. It was something I looked into on the aluminum frame I designed. I like the idea of being able to run a reach or angle adjust headset which the current 44mm headtube doesn't really give the option for. I'm not sure if you knew, but this same bike with a different swingarm and rear shock installed becomes a 200mm travel mixed wheel World Cup downhill bike with a 63.3° head angle 472mm reach, 455mm chainstays (at sag) and a 351mm BB height. These are very similar numbers to some of the leading DH bikes on the market. I intend to test this setup as I love downhill and would like to ride this setup in Whistler Smile
  • 1 0
 @EvanTurpen: I read in the article that you could swap out the swing arm and rear shock to run it at 200 mm and that really caught my eye cause DH bikes are still my favorite bikes and my favorite type of riding so lets hit Whistler! Haha. That option has me really considering buying one of these when they are available. What is the best way to keep up with what you are doing and to know when one can be ordered?
Thanks!
  • 2 0
 @solidautomech: The easiest way to get informed about the bike and when it will be available is to sign up for email updates at contrabikes.com I'll be putting out info through the email list as things get closer.
  • 5 0
 A, most od these idler equipped highpivot bikes need lower chain guide quite up to increase the chain wrap on the chainring.
B, rear derailleurs were (and it won't change) designed for chains that come horizontally.

Why suspension designers havevn't tried rotating the derailuer hanger counterclockwise? To bring the situation of lower pulley back to original layout.
  • 1 0
 What about pulley between the chainring and guide ring to increase chain wrap on the chainring? i.e. to force chain engagement on the chainring to 1 o'clock instead of 3 o'clock.
  • 6 0
 @fluider I am actually working on designing a dropout that is rotated correctly to meet the SRAM UDH standard. They recently released a revised version of their tech doc that does exactly what you are talking about by rotating the hanger counter-clockwise for high-pivot idler equipped bikes. The only problem with this is making sure that the hub can enter into the slotted dropout guides without the wheel having to be to far forwards. If the wheel has to be to far forwards during installation then the tire runs into the chainstay yoke/brace making it difficult to install. As for the lower pulley on my chainguide, that is to increase chain wrap, but also to decrease the amount your rear derailleur cage has to rotate to accommodate for lower chain growth. My derailleur cage barely rotates at all as the bike compresses, which really helps suspension sensitivity and should increase derailleur clutch lifespans.
  • 3 0
 @alexsin: This is an interesting idea...Similar to the new Rocky Mountain e-bike, but done specifically to re-route the chain. I would be worried that it would increase drivetrain friction because it would require two idler pulleys. That is because it would be in the under tension portion of the chain while pedaling. I am very happy with my current layout with the lower chainguide for increasing chain-wrap and reducing derailleur cage movement. This is the best setup I can come up with currently.
  • 7 0
 This looks beautiful. I know everyone has different preferences, but this thing really fits the bill for me. Well done sir!
  • 7 0
 Didn't vital cover this like WEEKS ago?
  • 8 1
 Up, Up, Down, Down, Left, Right, Left, Right, B, A, Start.
  • 1 0
 But what's the mortal kombat blood code?
  • 1 0
 Infinite lives!
  • 3 0
 I really had to think about how the suspension compresses. Didn't seem to make sense the first 2 or let's say 6 times I simulated the movement in my head. Needs a video!! Awesome project, massive props to realizing this thing!
  • 4 0
 Seems this offers the primary benefit of high pivot (rearward axle) without the crazy anti rise and anti squat numbers.extremely intriguing.
  • 1 0
 My first real MTB was a 1993 Scott CST Comp...a triple butted Tange Prestige lugged frame....it rode very well. I used to stare at it and marvel over how slight it's tubesets were, and this bike distils a similar elegance you just can't get with dumb plastic bikes or aluminum monstrosities..say what you will, but steel is a remarkable material for a bike frame.
  • 5 1
 Incredible work. This thing looks fast.
  • 4 0
 Carbon wheels aside it's pretty wild that bike only weighs 37 pounds...
  • 1 0
 I'm gonna be keeping an eye out for when these are released...Evan if you're looking for someone to test how this thing fares in grim Bellingham winter conditions, give me a holler...
  • 2 1
 Evan, this is even more exciting than your proto (which was very exciting). Really looking forward to seeing where this goes! I'd love to some day swing a leg over one of these.
  • 1 1
 Hell yeah Evan looking good! At first sight I was seeing equalink but without a Pivot at the stays..... didn't realize the tie bar terminates at the link pivots untill I read that part and looked again, makes perfect sense!
  • 4 0
 You had me at externally routed rear brake hose!
  • 1 0
 atm i'm running a 32'' front and a 24'' rear it is perfect I am now totally on board with mullets super playful in the rear and stable in the front (except that you have to run a unicycle tire)
  • 3 0
 What a story and what a beaut of a bike.
  • 2 0
 Comes with free idler grease tattoos for your right upper thigh. Chainring tattoos are SO 90's.
  • 1 0
 Not If you use a wax based lube....
  • 3 1
 Saw this: "self-taught engineer" laughed.

Saw the bike. Stopped laughing. Seriously nice work.
  • 1 0
 Really great work! I love how moving to a short link 4 bar design has actually reduced the weight - very satisfying engineering.
  • 1 0
 Not a fan of the timepiece look, but function-wise it looks really good. I'd just have to close my eyes or maybe get used to it.
  • 1 0
 Seriously impressive, Evan! My long legs thank you for a straight seat tube and not having to worry about “effective” seat tube length.
  • 1 0
 Only possible though because chainstays grow so much. Everything's a trade off!
  • 1 0
 Can I come work for you so I can get one of the first 30??? Im an engineering student Smile
  • 2 0
 Dear Evan, please take my money! Seriously can't wait to ride this bike.
  • 1 0
 Will need to keep my eye out for that on the trails, definitely would be curious to have a chat
  • 1 0
 Funny - I thought the first prototype was the later version until I actually read the words
  • 1 0
 "Coil friendly 26% progression" Should be measured from sag, so that is 17% progression.
  • 1 0
 If there was an onlyfans of suspension squish videos of that bike I would pay for it
  • 2 1
 This thing looks insanely cool!
  • 1 0
 I thought that that guy was Aaron Gwin for a second
  • 1 0
 But is it upcountry or downcountry
  • 1 0
 Its either uptown downcountry, or downtown upcountry.
  • 6 0
 @SacAssassin: , I think this one might actually be a "Big Country" bike, but don't quote me :-P
  • 1 0
 @Phaethon85: im sick of coming to pinkbike not reading the article and there being no information in the comments section, this place is slipping
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: I like that better.
  • 1 0
 I don't care how much this frame ends up costing. I must have it!
  • 1 0
 *Shudders* bike on sand!

Looks mint though!
  • 1 0
 @mezzer661 I carried it there for the photos. The last thing you want on any bike is sand in your chain!
  • 1 0
 how long till the itrack suspension guy threatens to sue him
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez Everything is good! The idler is mounted to the frame and doesn't move with the suspension. Hugh's i-track patent covers moving idlers that aren't attached to the swingarm. I've actually been chatting with Hugh on and off the whole time during development. He knows a TON about high-pivots and kinematics.
  • 1 0
 That looks fantastic. I can’t wait to see it in action!
  • 1 0
 @jgottya1 I'm hoping to put out a riding video eventually so people can see it in action!
  • 1 0
 @EvanTurpen: Thanks. The bike looks fantastic. It just moved into my next purchase spot. Nicely done!
  • 1 0
 Looks dope, good work Evan Smile Especially like the straight seat tube !
  • 4 0
 @DGWW Thanks! The straight seat tube originating from the bottom bracket is REALLY nice. Tons of seat post insertion and your seat tube angle is the same no matter what height you run the saddle.
  • 1 0
 This thing looks amazing!
  • 1 0
 I'm a sucker for handmade CNC links and steel frames. Sweet looking ride.
  • 1 0
 Looks absolutely awesome - love it!
  • 1 0
 I'm in love. I want one now.
  • 1 0
 Its going to be really hard to ride this bike without a turbo button.
  • 1 0
 Fantastic piece of work but clearly never designed to work in the UK SLOP
  • 4 0
 @docs90 We'll have to wait and see! If Seb ends up reviewing it then we can get a definitive answer about the UK slop. I guess it depends on how sloppy the slop is...if it's like Leogang Downhill World's 2020 then I'm not sure what bike would survive!
  • 1 1
 This finished product is a stunning bike. I like the prototype more though.
  • 1 0
 Make the idler smaller, and make one in 650B and I’m sold.
  • 1 0
 I want to see a video of the suspension action!
  • 1 0
 I loved that video game!!!
  • 1 0
 Now, that's something you don't see every day.
  • 1 0
 pure madness...in a good way
  • 1 0
 Looks like a donut……..
  • 1 0
 That bike is beautiful tup
  • 1 0
 I wonder when he plans to release his ebike version.. sarcasm
  • 1 0
 This looks epic! Finally, steel may just be winning people over (again).
  • 1 0
 Sexy bike! Slap a 40 on it and let's GOOOOO! Big Grin \m/
  • 2 1
 Well done Evan.
  • 2 1
 Absolute Work Of Art!
  • 1 2
 Be nice to view your website without the compulsory sign up and suck my data
  • 6 0
 @muddytreker Sorry! Not trying to suck any of your personal data...I'm not a fan of SPAM emails and phone calls myself! I haven't built out the website yet...The email sign up is just there for people that want to be informed as soon as it goes live.
  • 1 0
 Waiting for the tandem.
  • 1 0
 Holy Steam Punk, Batman!
  • 1 0
 Bring out the Nintendo
  • 1 0
 horizontally challenged
  • 1 0
 BEEEEE YOOOOO TEEFULLL
  • 2 4
 more links please!
  • 2 5
 the bike screams "LOOK AT MY IDLER!"
  • 3 0
 I know, right? 1st impression was bad, it looks too weird.
When I red how that large radius make the idler less of a drag, and the forward position give a adjustable anti-squat value separate from chainring size, I am sold! Ill get used to the looks thankyou.
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