First Look: DT Swiss' New 1900 Spline Wheelsets

Oct 13, 2021
by Dan Roberts  
DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset

Entry level might bring connotations of something that could fall apart just after you’ve got far enough away from the shop to do anything about it. But entry level to DT Swiss might mean something else.

Sure, they’re a bit higher in price than other truly entry level wheelsets from other brands. But the Swiss brand has squirreled as many technologies from their higher end wheels as possible into their new 1900 Spline range while still keeping the price down to close to that of the previous generation wheels. Added to that, these entry level wheels employ the exact same level of attention to detail and quality control in the building of them than all the other wheels that come out of their doors, no matter the price.

The Spline 1900 range is divided in the X, M and E denotations for cross country, all-mountain and enduro riding respectively, with the biggest addition to the new range being that they all roll on DT Swiss’ ratchet system. A change that now means the whole line of MTB wheels uses the famous system, no more pawl hubs to be seen here.





DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset

1900 Spline Details


X 1900 Spline
Wheel Size: 29"
Hub: 370 with 18T Ratchet LN
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110 or 15 / 100 front & 12 / 148 or 12 / 142 rear
Rim: aluminum, 25mm (X 432)
Brake Mount: Centre lock
Spokes & Nipples: Champion spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminum nipples
Weight: From 1844g
Price: From $609 or €449


M 1900 Spline
Wheel Size: 29" or 27.5"
Hub: 370 with 18T Ratchet LN
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110 or 15 / 100 front & 12 / 148 or 12 / 142 rear
Rim: aluminum, 30mm (M 502)
Brake Mount: Centre lock
Spokes & Nipples: Champion spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminum nipples
Weight: From 1894g
Price: From $609 or €449


E 1900 Spline
Wheel Size: 29"
Hub: 370 with 18T Ratchet LN
Hub Spacing: 15 / 110 or 15 / 100 front & 12 / 148 or 12 / 142 rear
Rim: aluminum, 25mm (E 532)
Brake Mount: Centre lock or 6-bolt
Spokes & Nipples: Champion spokes, Pro Lock Squorx aluminum nipples
Weight: From 2004g
Price: From $609 or €449


For the 1900 Spline range, the Ratchet LN system uses the same two main ratchet parts as the higher end 350, and older 240, hubs, but differs from the Ratchet and Ratchet EXP with the seal on the freehub body and not in the hub shell. This small detail enabled the hubs to achieve a lower price while employing the ratchet system instead of a pawl system.

DT Swiss’ ratchet system uses two spinning pieces, one driven by the hub shell and one by the freehub. The advantage over a pawl system is said to be the amount of surface contact when the ratchets engage, as the whole faces of the two ratchets mesh together.

This upped surface area distributes the loads over a larger area, lowering the peak loads while also reducing the amount of point loads. That all goes together to create a system that is remarkably easy to service and keep running smoothly for a long time.

DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
The new 370 hubs gain the famous ratchet system from DT Swiss and now mean that all MTB wheels offered are on the ratchet system.
DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
For the Ratchet LN system, the two ratchet pieces are the same as the higher 350 hubs; the difference between it and the Ratchet and Ratchet EXP systems is that the seal is on the freehub body instead of the hub shell.

That means the 370 hubs at the centre of the system are now up there with the 350, 240 and 180 hubs as hubs for life. Through wear and tear there will inevitably be a point when the rims and spokes may need replacing. It’s entirely plausible then that these new 370 hubs could be carried over from wheelset to wheelset or even bike to bike and run, with very little maintenance, smoothly for a long time to come.

The Ratchet LN system can also be fitted to the previous DT Swiss pawl hubs with the Ratchet LN upgrade kit. The upgrade kit includes the threaded ring, ratchets with 18-teeth, springs, spacer, shim ring, freehub body and special grease. Although a 3-pawl ring nut removal tool and ratchet ring nut removal tool are needed to do the conversion, which you might only find at a bike shop, unless you’re a complete tool nerd.

With the Ratchet LN system using the same ratchet parts as the 350 hubs, there are multiple options for points of engagement with 24, 36 and 54-tooth ratchet upgrade kits available to purchase. The X 1900 and M 1900 spline wheels are centre lock only, but ship with the 6-bolt adapter. The E 1900 wheels are available in either centre lock or 6 bolt brake rotor interfaces.

DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
Upgrading to a Ratchet system from the previous hub's pawl system, increases the surface area, decreasing the peak load numbers and point load situations.
DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
The Ratchet LN system is available to buy as an upgrade kit for the older pawl hubs.

The rims of the 1900 Spline wheelsets use a sleeved rim, as opposed to the company’s higher end wheelset’s welded rims. A small aluminum insert that fits inside the cavity of the rims aligns the rims and along with the high strength glue, creates a stiff and strong joint at a lower manufacturing cost.

The X 1900 wheels use the X 432 rim with a 25mm inner width to align better with the slightly narrower tires used in cross country riding and have a lower overall weight.

The M 1900 wheels use the M 502 rim, the sleeved version of the XM 481 rim, with a 30mm inner width and the E1900 wheels use the E 532 rim, the little brother of the EX 511 rim, although made out of a different grade of aluminum alloy.

All three rims use eyelets, instead of the PHR washer system in the higher end wheels, and DT Swiss’ Champion straight pull spokes that are a constant 2.0mm diameter. All the wheels come ready taped and include the steel version of the DT Swiss’ tubeless valve to make getting them set up tubeless quick and easy.

There's the usual information included on the rim to detail the tire width and pressure ranges along with the dot code that when scanned, pulls up all the necessary data and parts that the wheel uses to make it easier for sourcing spares, fixing the wheels or seeing which upgrade parts will fit.

DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
All rims are aluminum and use a sleeved joint, with a small aluminum insert in the cavity of the rim. A high strength glue sticks it all together.
DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
All rims also use eyelets along with Competition straight pull spokes and Pro Lock Squorx aluminum nipples.

Despite being called an entry level wheelset, the whole 1900 Spline range receives no less attention to detail in the building and quality control of the wheels. All the wheels are completely hand built, with the only machine involved being one that de-stresses the wheel several times per side during the building process. This makes sure every component is in its final resting place during building, ensuring that when tensioned, the wheel will be more evenly tensioned and more importantly, will hold that constant and high tension for longer. We’ve all taken budget wheels out first ride, only to hear the pinging noises while you roll and bounce as everything settles, and with it changing the spoke tensions. With this constant de-stressing of the spokes and their connections to the rim and hub during building there’s none of that happening when you go and ride.

DT Swiss also stress the importance of using their Pro Lock nipples that include thread locking compound on the internal threads of the nipples. While this does add a little more effort to the wheel building process from the added effort in turning the nipples, it’s another reason why the wheels hold their tension and true for as long as they do. A small short-term loss in the building process for the long term gain of wheel durability.

Each wheel is also meticulously checked in the quality control process to record the wheel builder and every single spoke tension in the wheel, to guarantee that the spoke tension is set as close to the maximum as possible while keeping the change in spoke tension from one spoke to another as little as possible. The centricity and concentricity of the whole wheel is also recorded in this individual wheel fingerprint.

In the early days of DT Swiss venturing into wheel building, they experimented with machine-built wheels, but found that they simply couldn’t live up to the quality that can be achieved by building wheels completely by hand. If you’ve ever chatted to an experienced wheel builder, chances are that they will know exactly just how much of a turn they need to give for a certain situation, something that can only come with experience of wheel building. For DT Swiss, wheel building machines simply can’t rival this hands-on experience.

DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
All the 1900 Spline wheels are completely hand built but are de-stressed multiple sides throughout the build process to ensure that they hold their high spoke tension for as long as possible.
DT Swiss 1900 Spline Wheelset
Even though they're dubben entry level, the 1900 Spline wheels go through the same high quality wheel build process and quality control as all other DT Swiss wheels, noting down things like each individual spoke's tension.

DT Swiss were keen to point out the nuances of spoke tension in wheel building, which is one of the details they take care with on the 1900 Spline wheels. With a properly built wheel, it’s well and equally preloaded and with the rider on the bike, the system weight will be distributed to almost all spokes in the upper half of the wheel, increasing the spoke tension in those while decreasing the tension in the area of the contact patch.

If the preload is too low overall, this can lead to the spoked around the contact patch being completely unloaded, meaning the rim has to do more of the heavy lifting and the spokes can loosen even further and the wheel becomes unstable.

Conversely though, if the tensions in the spokes are too high at peak loads, like when you land a drop or jump, the force in the spoke can become so high that the spoke would plastically deform, essentially stretch enough that it won’t go back to its original length. This over stretching of the spokes reduces the tensions and again, the wheel becomes unstable. So it’s really a fine balancing act of all the parts in the wheel equation to make a wheel as performant and durable as possible.





We’ve just received a set of the E 1900 Spline wheels to put through their paces. With experience on DT Swiss’ higher end 1700, 1501 and 1200 wheelsets, it should be easy to compare just how these entry level wheels stack up to their more expensive counterparts, as well as truly entry level offerings from other brands.







150 Comments

  • 99 2
 Funny timing considering the 370ln star suicided itself on yesterday’s alloy stumpy evo. (Same with vitals)
  • 18 0
 Curious if it was the star itself or the connection to the hub? I stripped the ratchet ring (connection to the hub body) on a 370 pawl hub once... I'm not sure the pawls are the weakest link on the 370. In any case, I love the price point and performance of 350s. Nice to see the design trickle down.
  • 14 17
 @derekr: Yeah I'm curious also... The impression that I got was that the 18 tooth star ratchet design must be flawed? I believe this is a new design as the previous lowest tooth count was 36... Also the whole new LN interface. Maybe the treatment that the 370 parts get are lower quality or something? I haven't done too much digging so if somebody told me I was dead wrong I'd believe them. But I've been wanting to upgrade to some 350's for a while over my pawl 370's but now kind of feel like waiting to see what the deal is.
  • 23 0
 @nskerb: there's always been an 18t ratchet available (as standard) in 350 and 240s hubs
  • 12 0
 @derekr: thats also how i have broken the 370. I sheared the freehub section of the hub clean away from the rest of the hub body. Ratchet or pawls would not have mattered.
  • 6 1
 @lewisa10: did not know that. Thanks!
  • 6 2
 @benjwalk: I have done that TWICE with a 370, just an absolute garbage hub.
  • 11 0
 @nskerb: At least on a 350 hub, I've found the 18t ratchet to take some pretty substantial torque. I had a 29er plus mountain cargo bike a couple yrs ago built up with DT350 and 18t ratchet, 28T front ring and 11-46t rear cassette. I managed to pull both my kids and their bikes up some pretty steep hills with no issues... broke lots of chains though! This one was by far the steepest: www.trailforks.com/video/pb/521133
  • 5 5
 My 350 died after 32 miles. Appeared to be fine, but just wouldn't properly engage, it just made horrific noises and slipped forward. Unfixable, ended up with a new wheel. Nothing is indestructible.
  • 5 0
 @theconorcons: I killed a 370 hub the same way. Got a 350 mounted for free from DT.
  • 4 1
 The EX hubs are experiencing widespread ratchet failures as well. The QC at the star ratchet factory took a dump.
  • 2 0
 @derekr: That would be cardiac arrest hill with your setup for me Big Grin
  • 4 1
 My brother's new style DT also destroyed itself. The old ones were near bullet proof. The new style is questionable.
  • 8 1
 @EuroinSF: it’s a shame that DT is damaging their reputation with the new generation.
My 2019 era 350’s were awesome.
  • 2 0
 @derekr: Same issue with a customer at my work with a '21 Instinct C50, rear 370 3 pawl hub, the threaded gear ring stripped in the hub, the pawls were totally fine. He got a 350 with a ratchet sent in replacement.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: dude what happened to it? EXP hub?
  • 6 2
 And still only 18t on many 6k bikes haha!
  • 3 0
 @half-man-half-scab: if it's that much of a widespread issue, I would think it would be a metal quality issue from their supplier.

It's either porosity or problem with the purity of the alloy being used. DT could make the hubs perfect every time, but if the metal supplier is delivering bad materials, it won't matter.
  • 2 1
 @theconorcons:
@nskerb: I did the same exact thing on my 370 the other day, pawls and and driver were fine. Swiss rims are awesome, but their cheap hubs are... cheap :/
  • 3 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: that’s not how 350’s work. They’re always fixable
  • 3 1
 @nskerb: I'm not really sure why you're getting the down vote treatment on this. Sorry bro.
  • 2 1
 @garrisond5: PB comments are a logic dead zone.
  • 2 0
 @JohanG: no idea, brand new bike, took the wheel back, they had it for 2 months and then said I was getting a new wheel.
  • 1 0
 @johannensc: well clearly not when it went back to dt swiss and they couldn't fix it.
  • 1 1
 @JohanG: and no, standard 18t star ratchet 350 boost hub with a 11-46 cassette. Albeit on a ebike, but the replacement has done well over 1000 miles since.
  • 2 0
 @derekr: LOVE THAT CARGO! I have the Big fat dummy and its such a beast for family outings! I feel you on the chains!!
  • 2 0
 @blowmyfuse: I've seen a lot of contamination in aluminum stock recently. I would agree with purity concerns.
  • 1 0
 54t ratchet on my enduro for nigh on 4 years now. 100kg ready to ride with 30-50 low ratio. Somewhere between 6-8000km. Not a peep in all those years or kms.
  • 1 0
 @tprojosh: I felt so bad for the QC department I worked at in manufacturing years back.

Their sole job was to hunt down the garbage with micrometers, polished tables, bottles of alcohol and microscopes. Uggghhh!
  • 61 6
 Aluminium nipples have absolutely no place on a mountain bike. I have the older version of these wheels, really good rim for the money, good hub, good spokes. But one UK winter left the nipples seized on to the spokes, and truing was impossible. A mate had a set of the 1700’s, again, aluminium nipples ruined a good product. I rebuilt them all with brass, like they should have been from the start. All that to save 20 grams???? per wheel.

Aluminium nipples, get in the sea.
  • 9 12
 That has as much to do with how they were built, as it does with the nipple material and quality. If those spokes and nipples were properly prepped and the nipples were of good quality, this likely would not be an issue. Unfortunately it's all too common in factory built/machine built wheels.
  • 10 1
 @privateer-wheels: Ultimately isn't the issue with alloy nipples, metallic bonding and corrosion? Why use them at all.
  • 10 4
 @cogsci: good anodization and coatings, plus proper spoke and nipple prep can pretty effectively create a barrier against this corrosion.

Some people want every gram of weight savings they can get, especially at the extremity of the wheel where it matters most. For those folks, when alloy nipples are done right they don't give up much in terms of durability and serviceability.

You may not find chasing these weight savings to be a reasonable thing. Fortunately we have options for both groups of people.
  • 5 0
 I’m glad I’m not the only one. I will often replace the nipples with brass shortly after my warranty expires.
  • 11 3
 @privateer-wheels:

It’s not just the corrosion issue, the material is just not strong enough. From an engineering standpoint it is a poor choice. Once the wheel has been used (abused!) and is no longer true, that extra tension in some spokes can be enough to ensure that the nipple will deform when you try and adjust its tension. I’ve been building and truing wheels for 30 odd years, and whilst I’ll never learn everything there is to know about bike wheels, I know enough to understand that aluminium does not belong in a nipple! That minuscule weight saving is just not worth it.
  • 6 5
 All my wheels have al nippes....four bikes, six wheelsets. Never had a problem. How do you explain that?
  • 3 0
 @Cord1: from a practical standpoint, butted spokes with brass nipples makes the most sense. We all know that these wheels are specified based on commercial decisions, rather than practical. If it’s my bike, I would prefer the marginal weight gain of brass nipples and unbutted spokes.
  • 1 0
 @JohanG: same here. And usually I get troubles with nipples deforming when I am trying to keep a wheel straight while objectively it should go in the bin.
  • 5 0
 @Cord1: 7075-t6 aluminum is stronger than any brass that I know. The reason that spoke companies love brass is that it is great to machine so you have very fast production. Brass also is easy to nickel plate.
Personally I use aluminum specific anti-seize when I build up wheels will aluminum nipples since aluminum is more prone to galling.
  • 3 0
 @JohanG: I guess you don't have salted winter roads,or live by the sea? 100% agree with cord1
  • 3 0
 @lenniDK: no alloy nip is going to hold up if you are riding them in road salt. But personally I used to live in Newfoundland, and road plenty of coastal single track without issue. Not saying alloy nips are right for everyone, but they get a bad rap and not all of them really deserve it. A good alloy nipple will work well for some people.
  • 4 4
 @JohanG:

Explain it?
Ok, maybe you never ride in mud/rain/winter. Maybe they never get exposed to salt. Maybe you are a very light rider and have some very heavy duty rims. Maybe you never work on your wheels, so you’ve never deformed a nipple. Maybe you change your wheels every year so they’ve never had chance to corrode. Maybe they were hand built and someone spent a lot of time lovingly building them with some kind of corrosion resistant lubricant. Maybe you only ever ride for 5 minutes a week so they are still like new. Maybe you clean them meticulously every day and store your bike in a temperature controlled environment.

Maybe I’m wrong and aluminium nipples are the future?
  • 2 1
 @Cord1: easy does it! No one is saying "alloy nipples are the future". But they can work very well for certain riders when done proper.

The overwhelming majority of the wheels I build are brass, but I do many alloy as well.
  • 1 0
 @Cord1: Could be a particularly British thing? Fox historically got a bashing for bushing wear without the same trans atlantic incident rates. Could be UK year round riding conditions and a certain ph of grit.. the fox thing was more likely a British addiction to GT85 though.
  • 1 0
 @lenniDK: True. No salted roads. But this is a mountain bike. I'm also very careful if my rim tape is punctured to dry out the innards of the rim so sealant doesn't corrode my precious Sapim aluminum nipples.
  • 43 3
 You lost me at aluminum nipples.
  • 40 0
 "I've got nipples, Greg!"
  • 13 2
 Yeah, that's not something I'd use in connection with long term durability
  • 2 1
 I actually was of that mindset until recently when I managed to get a stick through the wheel on a bikepacking trip. The nipples stripped off but I was able to salvage the spokes and put in new nipples to finish off the trip... I'd much rather have the nipples strip out than have the spokes break.
  • 8 0
 @derekr: The problem with Aluminum nipples (hehe) is that over time they will corrode, and start randomly failing at a much lower threshold than needed to protect spokes.
  • 4 3
 Not all alloy nipples are created equal. Not all build processes output great wheels. There are some very high quality alloy nipples out there, and combined with the proper preparation before building, can give pretty trouble free and long lasting results. But brass is always a sure thing, there is no denying.
  • 7 0
 @hamncheez: "Can you milk me?"
  • 3 1
 @privateer-wheels: Valid point, but I wouldn't trust factory, and probably machine, built wheels to have meticulous spoke prep before lacing and tensioning. I've seen plenty of aluminum nipples on DT Swiss and Roval wheelscompletely corrode and fall apart after a half season of use.
  • 2 0
 @adrock-whistler: don't forget Bontrager!

Yes, I agree with you. Factory made machine built wheels - you don't get that sort of attention to detail.
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: It's usually the rims that fail first on the Bontrager's Wink
They must be built with the softest aluminum available.
  • 1 0
 @adrock-whistler: I've seen a few Bontrager's with crumbling alloy nipples as well!
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: Oh thanks for clarifying! I thought you were comparing to steel. I wonder if the corrosion is more prevalent on carbon wheels in damp environments (Galvanic corrosion)? Not sure. Never had an issue with corrosion on my aluminum nipples in my 18yrs riding the wet coast.
  • 1 0
 @derekr: So I'm not wheel building expert, but if you prep the nipples (grease them properly or whatever) they do resist corrosion longer, but I'd mostly say you're just lucky.
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: luck has nothing to do with it.

Alloy quality, anodization quality additional coatings, using stainless steel washers and proper spoke prep all play a role.

And still for some riders/some conditions, this may not cut it. For others they will do a fine job.
  • 19 3
 Nothing rolls like a DT Swiss hub.
  • 5 0
 And easily serviceable. I have had several different hubs, but I'm sold on DT Swiss hubs.
  • 6 0
 Agree for MTB, but smoothest hubs I've ever owned are some older Campagnolo ones. Had friends comment about how free they feel just rolling my road bike around. Almost 10k miles on them and just silky smooth.
  • 7 0
 Onyx hubs do..
  • 13 2
 The aluminum nipples have got to go, especially Prolock. They're a disservice to the user when the wheel needs to be trued, even if the threadlocker would initially give a longer service interval. I had a set of E1700 and they could only be trued once as the threadlocker made the nipples hard to turn, and them being aluminum, the square interface got mangled after one turn of the spoke wrench. I get why the saved rotational weight over brass nipples could be attractive for road/xc use (having done that myself as well), but in my opinion alu nipples don't belong on trail/enduro wheels of this price point where riders look for a good bang/$ ratio, not the lowest possible weight.

On my E1700 set I wasn't too happy about the straightpull spokes either. I had to replace one after casing a jump and hunting for a spare locally was an absolute nightmare as not even DT dealers had them - and this was before the covid parts drought. I got it fixed eventually but after that I made sure never to run straightpulls again. Yet another disservice to the end user.

Happy to see the ratchet system offered as a separate upgrade though!
  • 2 0
 Tape off and work the nipples through the rim. But yes everything else is true. Straight spokes and alu nipples make everything harder than it needs to be
  • 1 0
 @browner: by tape-off you mean to provide a reference point if you're just turning the spoke in place or twisting it? What's the best method to keep a spoke from turning? For some reason it never occurred to me to work through the rim... But then again, that requires pulling tire, making a sealant mess, removing rim tape, and cleaning everything with solvent so the new rim tape sticks. Now I know why I never thought of it. But maybe an option to true up my rim the next time I need a new rear tire.
  • 5 0
 @laksboy: Yeah I mean I know its a faff, but if the wheel is buggered $2 of sealant and $2 of tape is worth it. The best method would be to use a spoke holder (Unior make a nice one, Roval too, and DT Swiss' is alright) and then actually turn the spoke using a tool through the rim. The Squorx nipples on the wheel in this article you would have a hard time breaking in this method.
  • 12 0
 Cheap, light, and durable? Impossible!
  • 26 0
 It's the special grease that makes the difference
  • 27 1
 @Davec85: That’s what she said…..
  • 2 0
 Durable hub yes, durable rim.. maybe?
  • 7 0
 Pick two.
  • 3 0
 @DCF: i got a lot of homies riding those rims and they seem to be holding up. one buddy even snapped a head tube off his frame, wheel is still mint.
  • 3 2
 28 spokes +straightpull+ alu nipples is the worst combination ever. I have older E1900, the rim is great, but try to true this crap, and they came out of true in the first month of use (no dents etc.). Those wheels would be perfect with 32 butted spokes and brass nipples. Even the old DT370 hub is ok for me, it did over two seasons without any problems and looks mint inside.
And the wheel is stiff as f*ck, very far from being comfortable and complianr.
  • 2 0
 @deepstrut: good to know. They're on budget so I might check them out in the future. Also, I'd hope everything else would snap before my head tube. that's scary
  • 3 1
 Let's have a deeper look into the cheap/light/durable aspect. We only care about the E series because of durability, right. The E1900 wheelset is built with E532 rims, spokes are straight gauge straightpull Champions, hubs 370, aluminum squorx nipples. E1900 wheelset costs €449 and weighs in at 2131g in the 29, 6-bolt, shimano flavor (dt swiss website). They're quality stuff, no shame in running them if you have them currently, but in my opinion the asking price is a bit steep if you consider getting this wheelset as an upgrade.

Now let's see what another 29" enduro wheelset using DT parts might cost. Prices and weights are retrieved from bike24 today but some items might not be in stock currently so don't take this as a shopping list.

2 x EX 511 rim 29" 32h, €179.24, 1140g
64 x Competition spokes, j-bend 2./1.8/2.0 butted, €46.08, 384g
64 x Squorx nipples, brass, €26.24, 79g
64 x PHR washers, €0 (included with rim), 19.2g (weight provided by r2bike)
1 x 350 hub, rear, 148x12, j-bend, 6-bolt, shimano hg, €174.01, 254g
1 x 350 hub, front, 110x15, j-bend, 6-bolt, hg, €65.64,164g
2 x DT tubeless valve, €16.66, 18g
10m DT tubeless tape, €16.66, i guess 20g per wheel max?
0 x labor, I build my own wheels as most people I ride with do as well

Total €524.63, 2078.2 g. Compared to what parts they use for E1900, these are next tier components that build up to a heavy hitting wheelset with each component's reliability proven again and again, using standards that are easy to source cheap spares for locally and easy to service. Maybe you want a professional to build your wheels, maybe you have different opinions about the component spec, in which case you're welcome to do your own math and see where the scale tips for you. But how I see it, those ex511/350/comp wheels cost only €75.63 more, which is a rather small investment when optimizing cheap/light/durable for the long haul.
  • 3 0
 @letsgethurt: quit ruining things with facts and logic
  • 9 2
 X 1900 Spline 1844g 25mm
M 1900 Spline 1894g 30mm

Why even bother with the XC wheelset for a 50g weight saving? unless you really want 25 internal rims? but at that point there are lighter 25mm wheelsets out there from Hunt and Silt at a better price point...
  • 14 0
 1894g is for the 27.5" set, the 29" Set is considerbly heavier.
  • 3 1
 I bet X1900 will be used as OEM for entry level XC bikes
  • 11 2
 Why the Enduro set is 25mm wide and the Mountain 30mm?
Isn't 30mm the "new standard" in enduro wheels?
  • 3 0
 The E 532 rim has a 30 mm internal width though, I guess it's just a typo here in the article
  • 1 0
 @BigMagnus: yeah, maybe
  • 5 0
 The early reports on that new hub are troubling. On the bright side, I can confirm that DT's warranty process was quick and painless when I kept breaking the old 370 hub. Essentially no questions asked and they had a replacement out to me within a week.
  • 2 0
 Do they send a full wheel or just the hub? And do they pay for a wheel rebuild?
  • 3 1
 @islandforlife: I sent them the whole wheel and they sent the whole thing back after repair. One of the times they for sure replaced the whole hub, not sure about the other time.
  • 6 0
 The only thing that put me off the old version of these wheels was the 18t pawl hub. Now it's got the ratchet it should be easy to upgrade to 54t or even more with aftermarket parts
  • 9 1
 One of the things I have always found frustrating with DT Swiss is their refusal to give the public the option to buy the wheels with the 54t option. Nope, their answer is always "you can upgrade it anytime you want"... But for the money I am spending, I want the 54t from the factory... OK, I am done ranting!
  • 9 2
 @juancarlos776: suit yourself. I have the 18t on all my wheels by choice. Fewer engagement points=better suspension performance
  • 3 0
 @spaceofades: also stronger as well
  • 2 0
 @spaceofades: All good man, all I said is for the option to buy it that way, not for them to make them all that way!
  • 1 0
 @spaceofades: what? how is that?
  • 2 0
 @tjcayou: larger angle for engagement means more chain growth before pedal kickback. I prefer lower points of engagement on wheels when I build myself but generally just leave whatever comes with my bike.
  • 4 0
 @tjcayou: It's based on the idea that you want more "float" between engagement points so that the suspension movement doesn't end up affecting or being affected through the chain to the pedals.

I will counter his suggestion though by saying that I've never noticed it in 26 years of riding various bikes. Meanwhile, I definitely miss the extra engagement points when I ride anything under 30poe. I don't need much more than that, but having 36+ poe definitely helps for quick ratcheting over slow, technical terrain or when you want to sneak in a pedal kick to roll off a ledge from a near-stop.

The other counterargument to the low POE argument is that the situations where it would really matter are typically situations where you're going fast enough that no amount of suspension movement can catch up with the ratcheting speed of the coasting freehub. However, I've seen a few big hit freeride pros rocking those chainring dampers, so there must be something to it. I could see how it would help more with big moves with the rear brake locked up. But that situation doesn't really help the low POE case either since it's total luck how far away the pawl is away from the next engagement point at any given time. It could give the rider lots of play on one hit, then none at all on the next one.
  • 7 0
 I knew this article was sure to cause a ratchet.
  • 3 0
 that is aPAWLing
  • 3 0
 All this talk of nipples got me all horny for the trio of sexy metallic couours of shiny stainless spokes and raw unplated brass nipples against a polished raw ally rim. Please please please stop coating beautifully toned metal in boring black stuff mtb industry
  • 3 0
 Dear wheelmakers: Make a god damn keying for spokes that they don´t spin freely! I will not buy a single pair of current straightpull wheels anymore. When you dent a rim it is absolutely frustrating job to tension loose spokes around dent to make wheel straight. On trailside it is mission impossible if you are alone.
  • 4 0
 350 is a bit lighter, has better sealing and the current MTB ones come with a 36 tooth ratchet as standard instead of the 18 tooth that comes on these.
  • 2 0
 My 240 hub has been one of the most reliable bike parts I have ever had. I bought it new in 2006 and have run it on various bikes and in various configurations (9x135, 12x142, 12x148 Wolf tooth conversion) since then. It has been flawless since the beginning and even has the original bearings I couldn't even guess the miles on it. Many tens of thousands and those bearings are like new.

However, as much as I trust that hub, the required Squorx nipples on the EX511 rims I laced last year make me nervous. The rims are good, but I question the longevity of aluminum nipples. I guess time will tell...
  • 2 0
 I find it hard to fault DT wheels. Yeah, a lot of people dislike Ali nipples, but they don't phase me at all. My favorite factory wheelset of all time was the EX1750 which i had for years on a few different bikes. My Jeffsy now has XM1700s which i had planned to upgrade straight away, but after riding them for a while i really like them and don't think i'll probably bother unless i break em.
  • 7 3
 just gave everyone an upvote because school is boring and by golly so am I!
  • 5 0
 E 532 rim has a 25mm in the enduro wheel?
  • 3 0
 Yes, this is strange if true.
  • 6 0
 @Tigergoosebumps: Checked the website; shows 30mm internal for the E. Must be a typo on this release then.
  • 1 0
 Or....

If you look through the Pinkbike BuySell listing, you can find the same wheels for an even better deal, *BUT* with the DT Swiss 350 hubs and double butted spokes. I've been eyeing these:

www.pinkbike.com/buysell/3179905
  • 1 0
 So with the new ratchet design, does this hamper servicing the hub bearing in anyway?
With the old 3 pawl design, the drive side bearing could be drifted through the toothed ring, no special tools required.
to my understanding with the ratchet hubs, you need to purchase a pricy tool to remove the ratchet ring to enable the bearing to be drifted out and pressed back in.
What's the case with the new design on these 370 hubs?
  • 1 0
 Had two sets on two different bikes (previous models) the hub was ok, not much engagement but decent fast rolling, but the rim, on both wheel sets the rim separated at the joint after a few month and could not hold the sealant anymore, maybe I just case everything but its not durable for me at all.
  • 2 1
 So they finally put the old generation ratchet system in the 370 hubs. About time. But the 370 hub shell is weak and brittle and is exploding all over the place. The ratchet system isn't going to fix that.
  • 2 1
 Honestly my OG 370 has been pretty good. For what it is and purposefully neglecting it so I can break it and get a pro4 I still have not managed to kill it. 2 years deep.
  • 3 0
 They all use the exact same hub, so why is 6-bolt disc mount only available on the E model?
  • 5 0
 27'5 fading...
  • 1 0
 any reason to not simply go all mountain for XC if I'm looking for something a bit more durable? In the market this winter for an upgrade over my stock Giant XCT alloy wheels on my Anthem but I don't want to break the bank
  • 2 1
 what's funny about the upgrade kit is that tools for 3 pawl toothed crowd and ratchet toothed crowd are not included and cost 55€ each Smile (spoiler, you can find them for nothing trough china magic market)
  • 3 0
 DT Swiss missed a trick in not calling these in betweener LN ratchet configuration hubs 360
  • 2 2
 I remember an article about XMC1200 wheelsets, saying how they were hand crafted in Switzerland and treated with extra attention to detail... now this. Does it mean the XMC is no longer shipped with extra TLC?
  • 1 0
 I adore DT Swiss wheels but at $609, there has to be a good budget wheel available for less. Maybe DT will relaunch a pawl version for less?
  • 1 0
 The pawl version sees too many failures. Which is why they just brought it to an end I figure.
  • 1 0
 So does DT make any alloy rim thats wider and more XC oriented? Something like a lighter weight 27-30mm inner width?
  • 1 0
 The M502 in the article is 30mm
  • 1 0
 E1900 with 25mm rim? Don't think so ... Bet it is a typo, which is a bit lame for a wheel press release ...
  • 4 0
 This is Pinkbike . bad grammar and multipel typos are expected.
  • 5 1
 Loic Bruni topped the WC DH podium this year. On 25mm DT Swiss rims.
  • 2 0
 @privateer-wheels: great, but we are talking about a typo in a press release, not about superiority of 25mm rims over 30mm rims ...
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: without checking DT's website, I really wouldn't just assume that. DT make the HX491, which as far as I can glean the eBike counterpart to the EX471. That would actually make it a sensible choice - or a sleeved version of it. Tough rims, not to wide so the sidewalls are protected.

But after checking DT's website I suspect you are right. Probably a typo.
  • 3 0
 Special grease lol
  • 1 0
 Just spec this rim with a better hub and brass nipples at any local wheelbuilder
  • 1 1
 I did a coasting race Hydra vs 240 EXP. Similar weight riders, no brake drag, similar tire pressures. The Hydra won every time.
  • 13 0
 Man that's some science there. He even used a similar weighted rider.
  • 1 0
 It seems as though the new hub broke on PB and Vital on the new Stumpy Evo Alloy. Anyone catch the engagement on these hubs?
  • 1 1
 18 teeth ? In the year of 2021? 18 teeth, really? Complicated hub with astonishing anti-pedal-kickback built in thanks to freaking 18 POE. For 600€ :-)
  • 1 1
 The M1900 spline prior was a peace of JUNK!!! Rear hub in service twice...failed both times with ghost pedalling as a bonus...Byby Dt for me...
  • 1 0
 450 eur is now entry level? X1700 were 500 euro few weeks ago… go figure.
  • 1 0
 Small aluminum insert means the rim will be inherently unbalanced. Aluminum nipples, 18t ratchet... pass.
  • 1 0
 I usually like to turn some nipples time to time... but alloy ones... hell nah!
  • 3 1
 Snake oil? Possibly!
  • 2 1
 so after the 370 has ratchets now, what's the difference to the 350?
  • 15 0
 350 don't self distruct
  • 2 0
 I believe it’s better sealing and lighter. Either way I’m sticking with 350s. So bombproof
  • 2 0
 So ratchet.
  • 1 0
 interesting timing after the stumpjumper evo article
  • 2 0
 "dubben", eh?
  • 1 0
 Progress drafts are close enough. Keep PB authentic. Smile
  • 1 0
 Is this a clever advert for hope hubs
  • 1 0
 Fuck pawls
  • 3 6
 i'll stick with my we are ones and hydras thanks /s
  • 5 2
 Nice job comparing a carbon wheelset that's almost 3x the price
  • 2 1
 /s for sarcasm
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