First Look: Five Ten Drops 2 Lightweight Trail Shoes

Aug 16, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  
Five Ten Trail Cross shoes

Five Ten had two new flat-pedal shoes on display at Crankworx that looked and felt completely different from anything we've seen. First off, they are significantly lighter and much better ventilated than the skate style shoes that Five Ten built its gravity empire upon. The heel cups are more ergonomically shaped alongside the much more technically constructed uppers and soles are designed to flex towards the front to better facilitate hiking. That sounds like a true freeride shoe to me.

Five Ten Trail Cross
Trail Cross LT is intended to be a Summer shoe, so it's ventilated more than its high-top sibling.

They're named "Trailcross" and there's a classic low top (Trailcross LT) and also a gaitered high top version that was designed to keep out dirt and scree while you are either digging or slogging uphill on foot. Mesh panels and a mesh tongue evacuate water and dry quickly, and there is a waterproof insole that prevents moisture from invading the sole from the inside. The molded arch insert is also perforated to shed water quickly. Thin layers of D3O impact-absorbing plastic protect vulnerable zones near the ankles without the bulk look we usually associate with armored gear.

Five Ten Trail Cross
The LT sole's flex points double as water drains.
Five Ten Trail Cross
Pull out the arch support and you'll see the waterproof inner sole.

Five Ten Trail Cross
Classic Five Ten stealth rubber sole uses their non-marking Phantom compound. Special treatments at the heel and toe boost walking traction.

Flip the shoe over and you' be happy to find Five Ten's tacky and very durable "Phantom" rubber compound in the classic dot pattern, but with a new twist. The toe and heel patterns are tweaked a little to boost grip on sketchy dirt while you are off the bike. Materials and construction are excellent and the gray on black graphic treatment is tasteful - and, they're priced right. The Trailcross LT is projected to retail for $130 USD, with the high top Trailcross pegged at $160.

Five Ten Trail Cross shoes
Diggers are going to like the high top Trail Cross. The elastic gator is thin enough to be all-day comfortable and is protected by slim, D3O panels on either side. It's a performance mountain bike shoe, with enough flexibility built in to handle steep slopes and long slogs.

Five Ten Trail Cross shoes
Gator liner to keep the dirt out...
Five Ten Trail Cross shoes
...And thin D3O armor in the side panels.

Five Ten Brand manager Luke Hontz says Trailcross will be extended into a family of shoes targeted at the adventure side of the sport. Prototypes have already been used by diggers and riders at Red Bull Rampage. Hontz says the all-day, any terrain design is perfect for endurance riders as well, and Five Ten is already looking for ambassadors to sponsor.

Will we see versions with cleat options? Hontz says not for now. Five Ten's flat-pedal fans are their primary focus. "Everyone has copied our skate-shoe designs," says Hontz. "This is Five Ten moving forward with significant improvements and new materials. Trailcross is a shoe that we've been wanting to build for a long time."

What Do We Think?

What do we think? Almost every skate-based gravity shoe is heavier than it needs to be, suffers from poor ventilation and traps copious amounts of water. The new Trailcross promises to handily solve those issues, so if they perform on par under power and go the distance, you can bet that a lot of flat pedal riders will become fans.
Five Ten Trail Cross
Molded heel cups boost support. The tag is reflective.

Before you get too excited, though, Five Ten plans to officially release the Trailcross range at Eurobike, with the first production slated to arrive at retail stores around February 2020. There's a good chance that we'll have a review posted by then.





206 Comments

  • 227 45
 I DON'T WANT F****** VENTILATION! I WANT A DECENT FLAT PEDAL SHOE THAT IS FULLY F****** WATER PROOF!
In 34 years of riding at no point have I ever thought "Wow, I'm nice and cool but my feet are just too hot" But on a LOT of rides I've had wet cold feet that just get colder each time water is sloshed over them. I ride in goretex SPD shoes and my feet stay nice and dry, so do that!

* and breathe.
  • 17 6
 Truth bomb!
  • 12 5
 F******* bang on the money mate
  • 20 1
 Too posh for gaffer tape eh?!
  • 3 0
 Agree completely! Currently running Freerider EPS and they are ticking most of these boxes to be fair. Only cost me £45 too.
  • 21 1
 Buy your Five Tens half a size bigger and wear Sealskinz socks. You can wear in summer too, as the merino wool in the socks keeps your feet sweat free. Ventilation and waterproof, and they keep your feet warm or cool. FWIW, I think Sealskinz have really improved with every new pair I've bought. Gone are the days of them turning to cardboard.
  • 88 2
 Maybe in GB, I personally like well ventilated shoes Wink
  • 35 11
 Sweat is not really an esoteric concept, come on man. Two days ago I’ve been digging in goretex shoes. +18C. Came home after 2h, my feet were cooked. Same is true of jackets. It is rather silly to use expensive membranes in summer cycling jackets. You get wet from your own sweat rather quickly.

So for me personally, for wet conditions: merino wool. Socks and jersey. If it’s coldish, out synthetic compression layer underneath. Wet but warm, fresh and comfortable. Then after coming home, just hose everything down. And 5.10 shoes got much better with drying up in recent years
  • 57 0
 Mate, come for a ride in Queensland during the summer. Then you’ll be begging for ventilation everywhere!
  • 4 0
 @Jamesgoulding: Pluggers are waterproof.
  • 6 14
flag endurocat (Aug 16, 2019 at 3:44) (Below Threshold)
 This crappy shoes look so Downcountry.
  • 13 0
 Australia wants these
  • 4 1
 yeah so....get a pair of 5.10 Hellcats. your statement "Wow, I'm nice and cool but my feet are just too hot" is a total fallacy.

Super comfy shoe to the point I actually use it for trail riding. But I think my feet got heat stroke the other day....
  • 2 0
 Yes !!! Cold, wet feet don’t need no stinking mesh.
  • 14 1
 These shoes look purpose-built for whitewater kayaking.
  • 6 0
 @LemonadeMoney: I couldn't agree more! Its astounding that people are so unwillingly to acknowledge the benefits of modern waterproof socks. Seal Skinz and Showers Pass make great waterproof socks that make wet/cold climate rides way more enjoyable!!!
  • 3 3
 @LemonadeMoney: £37 for a pair of socks? Tell em they're dreamin.
  • 1 0
 I'm happy with cooler although, I don't ride in wet conditions. I am lucky enough to be in an area with weather patterns that change in a short distance from home. So, cooler for me, as long as it's robust,t is positive.
  • 2 0
 @jmjr: Mediterranean baby ;-)
  • 2 3
 @JDFF @LemonadeMoney - Whilst I agree that waterproof socks are good - really good (I've been using them since Sealskins were first introduced, or Porelles as they were known at the end of the 90's I think) they are just not a patch on having a good pair of goretex high ankle shoes as well. I've been out in all day torrential rain rides and kept dry feet (Northwave winter boots combined with waterproof socks and Endura waterproof trousers which go over the top of the ankle cuff that stops water run in) but try the same in regular ventilated shoes and *always* end up with wet feet. Plus, on multi day rides it means you are putting on dry shoes in the morning.
  • 6 0
 Ride in the rain and get wet
  • 17 0
 @WAKIdesigns: yeah granted I don't live in the giant mud pit that is the UK (at least from what I see in videos), but I've always opted for gear that would dry out quickly vs gear that would keep all the water out. Any shoe/garment that's built to keep 100% of water out is going to soak you with your own sweat if you're exerting moderate effort, then stay damp for days if you can't get them back to a hot, dry place. I use fancy membranes in winter sports, but I also try to stay slightly uncomfortably cool and manage my effort level differently to keep from sweating.... which I think would make for a boring mtb ride.

Personally I think the shoe looks like a great.
  • 14 0
 @bkm303: I agree. My military days as an Infantryman quickly led me to the conclusion that no shoe or boot is waterproof. Water will find its way in somehow leaving you standing in a puddle leading to immersion foot. Better to have light, fast drying and well draining shoes and socks. If it's going to be cold a good wool sock inside a membrane or something similar is a good go to.
  • 5 0
 @JDFF: but once the water runs down your leg & into your sick it has nowhere to go ! Just wear wool socks then your feet stay warm when wet
  • 1 0
 @meffwilliams: this is obviously a bike website, but this comment should be rated sooo much higher due to extreme truth lolol
  • 3 1
 YES, waterproof AND LACE COVERS!
  • 10 0
 These shoes are just five tens version of the Adidas Trail Cross Protect. However, the adidas seems to have less venting. I use them, they are sweet. Strange that pinkbike wouldn't even mention this shoe in this article.

www.pinkbike.com/news/adidas-terrex-trailcross-protect-shoes-review.html
  • 1 0
 Haha I say that all the time when people make comments about maybe a shoe is too hot!
  • 3 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Not to mention, if the shoe is water proof and water finds it's way in from above.. In the shoe the water will stay.
  • 2 0
 @bkm303: too much logic
  • 3 0
 I have metal plates on both of my friggin ankles!!! All I want is hi-top shoe in an spd. Is that too much to ask? Where are the proper 3 stripes?
  • 1 0
 @LemonadeMoney: totally agree!!
  • 5 0
 @mtbgeartech: bingo. Fast drying shoes and good wool socks are the way to go. I was in ranger regiment and spent years of my life in wet boots with extra pairs of Darn Tough socks and never thought "I need some waterproof boots."

Throw on some low profile gaiters if you really want some extra weatherproofing
  • 2 0
 @bigtim: Interesting. Looks like we have about the same amount of history with such things. I live and ride in very wet places also (temperate rainforest in PNW). I agree about waterproof riding trousers/pants over the top of tall waterproof socks. My experiences have yielded different results though. Feet stay dry warm and comfy with thin merino sock underneath the waterproof sock. Really dont mind shoes getting soaked and squishy as long as feet are happy. Are your waterproof shoes SPD or for flat pedals? That might be where we are coming to different conclusions?
  • 1 0
 @savmeister: waterproof trousers/pants. Tall socks with gasket gripper. No water enters. If wearing shorts water can sometimes sneak in, not a big deal with merino socks.
  • 1 0
 @LemonadeMoney: Matched with Freerider EPS and you are on a winner.
  • 3 0
 I live in a cold wet area, warm and dry weatherproof shoes make sense. HOWEVER, its plausible that other people live and ride in warm wet areas and therefore a well draining shoe makes sense.
  • 3 0
 @JDFF: I've got waterproof Northwave SPD shoes. Maybe its the fact that they are insulated which keeps my feet warm as well which makes the biggest difference, because I seem to get cold feet easily. A wet shoe with a wet outside a sock (even if it starts out dry inside with Seal Skins) soon leads to cold feet in the winter months in sub zero conditions. In wet summer riding I don't really give a crap if my feet get wet, as long as they are warm. The other issue I have is that I have size US14 - 15 feet, which means getting shoes a size bigger to wear extra layers isn't an option as I struggle to get bike shoes in my size in the first place! Ultimately I know that in winter if I go out in SPD winter boots I'll have warm dry feet, if I go out on flats I'll get cold and it's because of the shoes.
  • 2 0
 @bigtim: ah! Yeah, you are cramming some big feet into those shoes! Likely not having much room for circulation. That would make sense to have the weather barrier as part of the shoe. Yeah, wet feet in the summer isnt a big concern for me either.
  • 2 0
 @bigtim: Im going up 1/2 shoe size in winter to accommodate the socks. I totally see thats an unlikely option for you though.
  • 2 2
 @bigtim: also- may want to look into the new Ride Concepts shoes. I have the "Transitions" model. Lots of extra vertical toe room. Very nice shoes, spd, velcro/laces, stiff, durable. If you could fit into a pair with room for waterproof socks, could be a winner for you. I only bring them up because of the unique vertical space in the toes, could help you out?
  • 2 0
 @bigtim You do realize Five Ten is based out of Southern California, right? It barely rains here, and on the rare occasion that it does, we can't ride any of the trails until they dry out.
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: I was interested when I first seen this, but theres' no local dealers.
  • 2 0
 @dlxah: Yeah, but in today's day and age of interwebnet and new fangled flying machines you'd think a global brand could do a bit of research! To be honest, I wasn't having a whige at 5 10 in particular, more all mtb shoe manufacturers. It just seem like such an obvious product to make.
  • 3 0
 Different strokes for different folks. I would rock sandals in the summer if I could keep from bashing my toes. I like cool feet when it's 90 degrees & swampy.....
  • 1 0
 @LemonadeMoney: I already shoot for a half size bigger but you still never know if they'll fit. Id be happy if they started with consistent sizing.
  • 2 0
 @AntN: They are worth every penny. The cheapest place to buy them is the Sealskinz website. Subscribe to their newsletter for big discounts.
  • 3 1
 My feet sweat like a pig, and I'm usually riding in the dry, so I do want f**** ventilation! When it's wet and I'm bombing puddles half the water comes in the top of my shoes so being able to drain makes lots of sense...
  • 4 0
 Fair, not the shoe for you. But some us live in dry, hot areas and ventilation is much appreciated while summer riding.
  • 4 0
 @bkm303: This is spot on.
PNW full time mountain resident, rider/hiker/digger/skier... In my experience, stuff gets soaked, completely saturated no matter how water proof it was intended to be. IMO, don't worry about the wet, fear the cold. Good wool or technical socks, vapor barriers, gaiters, etc., all help. At the end of the day, you still get to take them off, their ability to dry quickly, makes getting back into them and start fresh quicker. I still have a pair of the original Impacts, they take forever to dry out after a good soaking.
  • 1 1
 @mtbgeartech: my many days at music festivals lead me to say that there are 100% shoes that are waterproof and I would take them over standing in wet shoes for 3 days straight. Every. Single. Time. Same goes for biking, I’ll take a little sweat for an hour or two over cold soaked feet any day.
  • 2 0
 Well some people ride in the desert and want cool feet
  • 5 2
 Look, everyone... At no point am I saying for companies to stop making ventilated shoes and line everything with goretex, and quite frankly I don't give a crap if you live in a desert and ventilation is what you like. What is the case though is that there are plenty of goretex waterproof spd shoes (which definitely work... I have them... My feet stay dry and warm... Fact), but there are practically no waterproof flat pedal shoes (fair one to @flolmschnee for the link posted, they look good) and there is a gap in the market.
  • 8 1
 FFS they didn’t discontinue their entire product line and release this ONE shoe did they? Do you freak out when every new shoe doesnt meet your specific needs?

I like this, finally a flat pedal shoe that doesn’t look like it was made for 15 year olds.
  • 3 2
 @blackthorne: no, and you clearly haven't read my posts. I think 5 10 shoes are great and in fact have 5 pairs. I was simply pointing out that even when looking at all brands there are very few waterproof flat pedal options (I've only seen one which as posted in 3rd comment which only came to my attention a couple of hours ago). It seems like such an obvious product to make which was my point, not that these, or any other 5 10, shoes should be discontinued.
  • 3 0
 Yay options. After years in the mountains I opt for breathability when it comes to anything aerobic. I'd far rather soak from the outside in than the inside out and if you use good base layers you can remain comfortable and warm. Creating a suffocating damp vacuum under the the pretense of "waterproof", like ski touring in a three layer goretex shell, unless you can guarantee no or minimal perspiration, just doesn't do it for me. Waterproof shorts are great because of the heat release through the base of the short- shoes are a different story. My question about these would be durability. I want to see how the many stitched and welded seams and material transitions hold up over a season of biking. If they do- cool- I'd be game. They look comfortable.
  • 2 0
 @bigtim
I'm in exactly the opposite camp, probably because you're in the cool wet UK and I'm in the dry high desert of New Mexico. I ride in temps from 0F to 100F and many of the newer 'enduro' shoe offerings just don't have the ventilation to be comfortable in summer (for me at least). Doing a 2000 ft climb in 90 degree weather with hot feet...is no fun. But fortunately we have lots of options these days!
  • 2 1
 @foggnm: That last sentence though is exactly my point... lots of ventilated options, practically no waterproof flat pedal options.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim: Have you tried the OWN FR-01s? These actually look like a knock off of those, but the OWNs come with a second wet weather liner. I had a pair and thought they were pretty good, but even the smallest size they make was a little too big for me.
  • 1 0
 @BEERandSPOKES: Would the Sidi Dimaro work?
  • 2 0
 and fucking lace covers, and BOA already on flat shoes!!!
  • 5 0
 Opinion: I'd much rather be in ventilated shoes than waterproof shoes in rainy weather (coming from a moderate climate)
1) Like other waterproof gear, I find that waterproofing buys you 20 min of being dry before the sweat of being in a waterproof layer nullifies the advantage.
2) Once this state is reached, I'd rather be in a ventilated shoe for two reasons: a) better ventilated shoes often have materials that don't weigh as much when wet or hold as much water and b) I want to give myself the best shot at starting to dry my shoes out.

Just two weeks ago I go some mild trench foot for being on the Colorado trail for 4 days and walking through snow drifts. Didn't rain once. Just couldn't get the shoes to dry out after being exposed to 10 min of walking in snow. Didn't want to be baking in heavily fortified waterproof kicks either.
  • 1 0
 When it's wet, Freerides are like wearing sponges on your feet.
  • 3 0
 The low cut version is damn close to my perfect summer shoe for most of Colorado. Either with rain showers or crossing mountain streams, I can’t keep my feet dry no matter what. I just want a shoe that will drain and dry as well as my old xc spd shoes. The only things I want is a light lace cover or lace garage and a good wind cover over the toes (like the ones on my 5-10 Kestrel Boas). The last wish is huge for the 40 degree swings I can get on a ride. A little toe cover makes a huge difference when it’s 40-50s, especially if your feet got damp from an afternoon thunderstorm and a huge temperature drop is freezing your feet, and the toe cover does nothing to overheat a foot as there are no muscles heating up in the toes.
I’ve been running some Bontrager flat shoes this summer: lighter and better for drying than my 5-10s but their grip sucks in comparison. Unfortunately, the hard sole on those Bontragers is too durable, hard to justify the cost on new shoes when they look too new. I’d love to get a good 5-10 summer shoe.
  • 1 0
 Like the concept and the hi or mid top version. The question is will the entire sole come off when I'm digging in the rain on the side of a mountain. Used to build in five tens, now used Merkel hiking boots then five tens for the throw down.
  • 2 1
 @H3RESQ: no BOA. When it breaks there is not a fix, ride over. Yes, they break. Good for other applications though.
  • 2 1
 You don't speak for the rest of us who ride in 100+F/30+C weather for half the year. If it is lightweight, durable, and highly ventilated, I want it now.
  • 2 1
 @Jamesgoulding: Or anywhere in Texas, too. I don't think the highways bubble up from heat where the complainers are from.
  • 3 1
 @thisspock: Yes, your days at music festivals certainly trump my and @Mntneer military experience. You win.

I lived in the cold and wet, hot and wet, so cold it couldn't be wet, and hot and dry 200+ days a year for many years.

Unless you wear hip waders your feet are going to get wet. Unless you're just standing around that is. Water will find a way in or sweat will soak you from the inside out. If it's cold you need to find a way to keep your feet warm while wet. If it's hot, you want your stuff to dry quickly.
  • 1 0
 @Jamesgoulding: exactly!
These seem fantastic.
  • 1 1
 I still ride Karver’s - they’re pretty good with water and now that I think about it, no, my feet have never been too hot...
  • 1 0
 I ride with waterproof socks from SealSkinz all year round. Problem solved. I also have a pair of 5.10 Freerider EPS High Top shoes which are waterproof.
  • 1 0
 @PeytonP: hahaha yeah I don’t think they realise there actual places where the sun shines!
  • 1 0
 It seems like there are more heavy, weatherproof shoes on the market in the "enduro" segment. They all look like they are designed for UK riding to me. Personally, I'm about 100% more likely to be riding when it's 85 and brutally sunny than when it's wet and cold and I would love more lightweight, well ventilated shoes as long as they still have decent toe protection.
  • 1 0
 @Jamesgoulding: haha it seems the Brits and the Canucks are the ones saying their feet never get hot, like they know what heat is.
  • 1 0
 @whambat: I live and ride in Cairns the "wet tropics" summer riding is 35C plus. When its hot AF no amount of supposed "ventilation" will cool black coloured shoes. I know this from experience. I don't notice hot feet, I do notice hitting one poxy puddle or creek crossing at the start of the day and the only part that get wet is the top of your shoe right on the 'ventilation' patch making your feet wet all day... just sayin.
  • 1 0
 @FloImSchnee: own them, and they're fine except walking on anything even slightly muddy - 90% of the sole is flat as a pancake! Had some spectacular slips & slides with those.
  • 1 0
 Oops, I stand corrected - that's a new version they've launched this year and the sole looks much more promising!
  • 3 0
 @AntN: to each their own, I guess. I’d rather have shoes that dry out quick mid ride, for that you need ventilation and draining. When I lived in hot humid areas, 35C+ and 100% humidity, some of my favorite sneakers were trail runners built like water shoes, with tons of drainage. In the high humidity, I always found sweat would pool in my shoes if they weren’t well ventilated or designed for drainage. Sidi xc shoes were my go to for a fast drying shoe on the bike.
Riding in the Rockies, my rides can range from 35C to 10C in the same ride and I can often expect one ice cold stream crossing to wet the feet no matter the shoe. Give me wool socks to keep my feet warm when wet and shoes that vent and drain to get them dry quicker. Whenever I ride in “waterproof” shoes, I have to stop to pour out the water after a creek.
  • 1 0
 Buy the leather freeriders, my feet stay dry.
  • 52 3
 us: can flats riders please have a cycling shoe with boa fasteners and a rigid foot plate like the clipless kids?

Them: how about some Adidas cross trainers?
  • 5 0
 I have been waiting for precisely this thing.
  • 9 1
 Isn't that kinda what the Kestrel was? Was supposed to be compatible with both flats & SPDs.

Would a totally rigid sole be good on flats though? I haven't ridden them in years so idk. I always thought the main reason we (clipless kids) had such rigid foot plates is just because our pedal contact patch is so tiny. The shoe basically becomes the pedal.
  • 14 2
 Boa fasteners are garbage. If they break you are out of an entire shoe... if a lace brakes, you can tie it back together and keep going... and then just get a new one. Also, the Freerider Pros have a semi-rigid plate in them that really helps with efficiency and foot fatigue, while still allowing for enough pedal feel.
  • 4 0
 I want a stiff sole but not rigid like an XC disco slipper. Boa, absolutely! At least a decent strap/lace cover...
  • 1 0
 @bikekrieg: you have a point, I’d still like to see one or at least a flat shoe with a lace strap. Giro and ride concepts have one but the traction just doesn’t cut it
  • 6 0
 I just want Adidas to buy Roo Shoes next so I can put a dime bag in the zipper pocket. Is that so much to ask for?
  • 2 1
 @nyles: just got myself some Unparallel West Ridge shoes. Flats, lace cover, and much gripper than my delamination Impacts.
  • 1 0
 @ryan83: God already gave you a pouch for that.
  • 3 0
 @mtmw I'm not a flat rider, but I agree with you....that the trend towards more laces is not my fav. I liked the old 3 strap velcro (light, effective, easy on/off). But my laced shoes just can't get the same fit as my boa shoes.
  • 3 0
 @bikekrieg: boas are fixable, maybe you have a crappy ride to finish after breaking a cable but they are fixable
  • 1 0
 @spaceofades: just saw this brand, ex 510 employees. Emailed em and they do a bike shop employee discount (because I can never justify over 100 bucks for shoes haha) so gonna give em a shot!! Thanks!
  • 1 0
 @nyles: good luck, my friend works at a climbing gym and they did a shoe demo, my friend said all of their shoes sucked.
  • 2 1
 I agree on the boa fasteners but the rigid foot plate isn't necessary since the pedal platform is quite large. Rigid footplate is only necessary due to the tiny size of clipless pedal contact area. Unnecessary for flat pedals although a stiffer sole does feel a bit better than a floppy sole.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: I mean what goes into a climbing shoe is so different and particular than a flat pedal bike shoe, I’ll take the risk.
  • 1 0
 @bikekrieg : My dad cut the boa cable on his brand new road shoe removing the tag. I tied it and it worked for a few rides while the replacement came from Shimano. According to my dad, the warranty person said it was a very common problem.

Take whatever lessons from this story you'd like.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-sf: same thing happened to me. Ordered some touring ski boots for my wife, but had to ship it to a friend's house because we were out of town. I told him it was coming but he completely forgot.... somehow (idk) in his excitement at getting an unexpected package he just went to town with scissors opening up the box, and I guess thought the boa lace was part of the packaging?? He then texted me to say that the boots arrived.... and that he might have ruined them.

Same though, I just tied the two ends together and it's still holding up years later.
  • 29 1
 For the people who don't think ventilated shoes are that important, consider yourself lucky. You obviously live in a much more mild climate than some of us... I visit Colorado quite a bit, and I just laugh when the locals warn me about the heat and it's in the upper 80's or low 90's but no humidity. Sometimes back home it's like riding under the food warmer lamps at a buffet line and breathing through a wet towel. And the tops of your feet feel like they have hot coals lumped into them. So yeah, ventilation is VERY important. These are the most exciting shoes I've saw in a long time
  • 13 0
 We don't warn you about the heat because it *feels* hot, we warn you because you'll sweat out a ton of water without realizing it because you still feel cool and dry - sweat actually evaporates here (unlike in the south, where you get the 'wet towel' effect). Super easy to feel great, push hard, then suddenly feel dehydrated and bonk.
  • 5 0
 Agree - in the deep south I need ventilation
  • 5 0
 @bkm303: Yeah, living in Colorado I have to force myself to drink water as I go because of this.
  • 2 0
 It's even more funny when you live in the Southwest and are used to drinking a ton of water, then take a trip to New England or wherever and you end up needing to pee like every 45 minutes because your "normal" water intake is WAY too much.
  • 22 1
 Hopefully there isn't too much flex in the shoe. Nothing worse than a shoe that feels likes it's going to fold in half landing a drop or riding rough terrain. Otherwise, I like Addidas trail runners, so it could be a good combo.
  • 4 3
 To each their own I guess. I've always found Five Tens to be too stiff. I like to be able to feel how my feet are positioned on the pedals, so I usually ride in Vans. Proper skate shoes generally have plenty of cushion for big drops too. They're literally made for jumping off of big stuff onto concrete.
  • 1 0
 Yeah the soles of my feet hurt and the feet muscles start to cramp on platform shoes that are too soft, especially on long descents.
  • 9 0
 Aussies rejoice. A breathable summer shoe! No more feet feeling like they are like a yabby in boiling water!
  • 6 0
 I use the trail cross from Adidas for almost 3 years now. Super comfy shoes that I can wear even for hiking, the ancle protection is also spot on, have saved me many times. Not everyone rides in wet cool conditions so this shoes are very welcome. I wonder why other brands are not offering similar shoes.
  • 4 0
 I'm still rocking my trail cross, it's freaking great! So glad to see them coming back. with the 5-10 sole.
  • 4 0
 Yea the Adidas trail cross has kind of had a cult following. I have the low top version and always loved them much more than 5.10's. It's nice to have a real upper (not skate shoe) and have 5.10 sole. I also liked the triangulated pattern over circles. Bonus mine say 420 on the back of them...
  • 2 0
 Agreed! I replaced my five tens with the first trail cross as well and never looked back, I have been waiting for them to release the new generation, love these shoes!
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one who found the stealth sole on the trail cross less grippy than the that of the 5.10s?
  • 1 0
 @SoDiezl350: No, but TBH i was on the old old Impacts (for ~5 years on the original sole!!) that didn't have any glue issues yet before moving to the 2nd gen Trail Cross (first gen SL).

The insoles of those got... 'damaged' by *someone* (a "good samaritan" trying to dry them out, cooking and melting the Otrholite insole), so i had to buy the latest version. A bit different, some things are better but i still kinda miss the old ones :/
  • 9 3
 Cool features but I'm getting eye cancer from looking at them.
And how come the clipless crew is getting all the ratchety/boa goodness and us flat guys are always left with cords?
  • 7 0
 Those high tops look awesome for trail building. With Freeriders, my routine is dig, dig, dig, dump dirt out of shoes, test feature, repeat.
  • 4 0
 For sure! And over here a lot of trails aren't completely rideable, plus they tend to require hike-a-bike to get to the top, these would be ideal, actually gonna try some.
  • 7 0
 honestly been wondering when this type of thing would come out. I only ride in hot dry conditions so ventilation would certainly be nice
  • 6 0
 A lighter built 5-10 with even more seams and stitches than their skate style models that fall apart in one season. Ooo, I think I’ll use them for trail building too. What could possibly go wrong?
  • 6 0
 "...also a gatored high top version..." had me expecting something completely different (and a little worried tbh).

Gaitered perhaps?
  • 7 0
 Fantastic idea. even in a TX winter, summer gear is completely appropriate. Not being sarcastic.
  • 3 0
 I like the design of the trail cross. Some sort of ankle protection and support would be nice as neither my freeriders or district clips have it. I don't hit my ankles often... but I've had a few moderate crashes where even a layer of leather could have prevented some scrapes/abrasion. The hiking sole is also a welcome addition.
  • 4 1
 So lets see
Pros:
1.breathable mesh upper
2. aggressive sole thread pattern

Cons
1. narrower toebox
2. toe spring
3. arch support insole
4. Mesh upper

I like the idea but the final product needs more work
  • 5 0
 What’s wrong with arch support midsole? I think it is quite personal, I want quite a lot of midfoot support. I am tired of watching “functional foot training” video because I can’t walk. I am honestly admiring all the BMXers riding in Vans, I did one park session in Vans and thought I will fricking die after I landed to flat. Also wider toe box, yeah, cool for walking, but Impacts VXii had it and I don’t remember having so much pain after strikes with shoe into the ground because my toe was too loose. On the other hand I like it in Clipless shoes because strip holds prevents shoe to slide backwards. I get pains from too tight clipless shoes holding foot sideways, putting too much pressure from the sides
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Arch support is a crutch. It will only help your foot get weaker. The shoe industry is built on the false idea that our feet are weak and need to be protected. Millions of years of evolution proves the reverse. I forgot to add that the shoe should also be flat with no heal drop (that is what causes knee pain). As for smashing your toes I'd recommend tightening the laces so the foot doesn't move so much within the shoe.
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: well I am almost 40 I am not going to reverse this process for my feet and suffer for 3 -5 years to develop “healthy” feet
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I got into minimalist shoes in 2011 and it didn't take long to develop healthier feet (not that my feet were that unhealthy before since I already walked around barefoot alot). I'll be 40 next year and can tell you that it is worth the transition. Less back and knee pain. The only pair of normal shoes I own are five ten freeriders and freerider pros with flat the insoles and some modified snowboard boots. All my other shoes are minimalist and super comfortable.
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: my problem is that my feet are hurting a lot from riding in soft sole shoes. For that reason I could never use Vans, 5.10 Freeriders or spitfires
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I get that. I run stiffer shoes for pedaling and softer ones for bikepark. You can run a stiffer sole shoe with flat insoles. Arch support is unnecessary and does your feet no good.
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: you may be right. After all if someone want arch support they can buy insoles with it
  • 5 1
 What’s with all the Adidas branding? I thought they kept the two companies separate with Adidas having its on range of riding shoes?
  • 1 0
 Not anymore... They moved the whole operation out of the US, laid off all of the employees, and then let their R&D go to shit. 5.10 is dead.
  • 1 0
 @singletracksurgeon: whoa rly?? I thought Adidas was "letting 510 be 510" or some nonsense like that.
  • 1 0
 @singletracksurgeon: when did this happen?
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: They did for while, then they moved all operations overseas to Germany.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I want to say like 8 months ago... Which would explain why they are just now coming out with new designs.
  • 2 0
 I'm curious about the last. I liked Adidas's Trailcross but in the newest model the forefoot was just a tiny bit too narrow for my forefoot Soni had to return them for Five Tens. We'll see how these fit. I loved my previous Adidas for biking, trail building, and any mixed activity even if the Stealth on them wasn't as sticky as the stickier Five Ten compound.
  • 5 2
 These are literally just the addidas versions?


For anyone who doesn't know, addidas already make and sell these exact designs. I've been using the hi top version for half a year and it's f*cking amazing.
  • 3 0
 The only thing similar to the Adidas is the ankle scree guard, literally every other aspect about this shoe looks different than the Trailcross and Trailcross protect.
  • 3 0
 I have had 3 pairs of the old adidas trailcross protects, they have been my favorite mtb shoes ever. Recently, I switched to the ride concepts wildcat and extremely unhappy, cant wait to try these.
  • 2 0
 Good news: Ankle protection is finally back in the Five Ten lineup after the Karver was discontinued.
Bad news: Virtually no mid-foot protection.

There's a niche use when I take the kids out to practice small jumps on a summer evening.
  • 4 0
 these look really great!
Please be ‘brave’ enough to make a shoe without traditional laces!!! Dare to dream!
  • 1 0
 I've had some Adidas Terrex Trailcross shoes for 2 years and also a pair of Five Ten Freerider Pros for a year. Both are excellent; but the Adidas pair is heavier and not quite as grippy as the Freerider Pros.

These look good from a ventilation/drying perspective; but the fit and midsole composition are very much personal preferences.

Any shoe with a "waterproof" membrane (most are actually called "water-resistant") will sweat out from the inside and cause both foot issues and drying problems. Talk to any thru-hikers (Andrew Skurka is an acknowledged expert for example) and they DO NOT wear waterproof footwear. Ditto Army troops and Special Ops people.

Will look forward to seeing these in person next Spring.

I'm betting on a $140 USD price for the lowcut versions since these will be "new and improved". Place your bets, folks! :-)

Also curious about the selection of the Phantom compound outsole vs. the other Stealth compounds.
  • 1 0
 Hey Five ten, we're your consumer base. We love to sit and talk foot sweat! These are perfect for armchair criticism. My feet are so cozy right now. They go perfect with a margarita and trash talking on pink bike! Thanks guys! You nailed it.
  • 1 0
 Anyone know what’s going on with sizing between 5.10 and Adidas? My 5.10 Sleuths fit perfectly, but I got the Adidas/5.10 Sleuth DLX in the same size, and they were way too big. According to the tags inside the shoes, they were both US 13, but none of the other sizes (UK, EU, etc.) lined up.
  • 1 0
 what size are your original sleuths in EUR size?
  • 1 0
 Ive found that 5 ten always run small by at least 1/2 size depending on the style.
  • 1 0
 The originals were size 47, and the new ones were 48. @danielfeary:
  • 1 0
 You should go by size in cm as that is always constant. Different models sometimes have different lasts and thus different lengths for the same size.
  • 1 0
 You want me to buy your products but I can't get past how ugly these shoes are - I get it, aesthetics are subjective but can't you have innovation and style? These shoes look institutional like something found in a corner of an occupational therapy room.
  • 1 0
 Place called Millom, maybe there is some truth in the age old myth, to do with inbreeding. One in particular, that wallows in her own pathetic and trashy bullshit, day after day. She's so fucking dumb man. So sad, and hilarious that someone has to sit there posting pure bullshit on social media for attention. Life owes her one huge curve ball haha. Standing up for women when she's like a 13 year old!!!
  • 1 0
 Looks like a fishing boot?? Perhaps Adidas should stick to making soccer cleats and running shoes. Saw these in person at Crankworx Whistler and was NOT impressed. Felt light, flimsy, and would be blown out in 1 or 2 rides.
Please bring back real mountain bike shoes for real mountain bike riders.
  • 1 0
 I've been riding flats with Five-Ten Impacts for years and years, and recently switched to the Freeride model, which is the most 'ventilated' Five-Ten shoe. I hate the hot, and hot feet I hate too. Going from the Impact to the Freeride, I can actually feel air enter the toebox when I spread my toes with the Freerides - I like that there's actually some ventilation possible. I don't care about waterproof at all, which is why I'll no doubt be buying the new Trailcross LT when it comes out. I am a little concerned that they seem a little 'light' on the forefoot side protection (where the flex points are in the sole), but you cannot deny they'll be breezy - finally!!!!
  • 4 0
 This looks like the perfect shoe in hi top
  • 2 0
 I wish Adidas would make some shoes with stealth rubber that look like the old toe clam shoes. I'd buy 3 pairs of those beeyatches.
  • 1 0
 I bet a good shoe repair shop could put stealth rubber on a pair of shell toes for you.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: Could probably find a climbing shop that would do it. Climbing shoes get resoled with stealth rubber all the time, it can't be that hard.
  • 1 0
 @Austin014: my friend had a pair of sportiva approach/running shoes resoled with stealth dot rubber by our local climbing resoler; The Rubber Room, but it wasn't what I would consider cheap.
  • 2 0
 I'd like a shoe with a hard plastic toe box - tired of banging my toes or just kicking crap off a trail and womping my toes. Is this hard to ask for?
  • 1 0
 I feel like my Freerider Pro shoes do well at protecting my toes.
  • 1 0
 Check out Ride Concepts, their shoes are way better quality than anything else out there at this point.
  • 3 0
 Sole is bonded, not stitched. I give it 1000km maximum before they start falling a-part
  • 1 0
 not very skookum if you ask me..
  • 4 0
 Cant wait for the 5.10 yeezy trail boost! -No One
  • 1 0
 I see a huge market for this. For my bikepacking adventures, where I almost always hike-a-bike, I'd love a shoe that has a bit more purchase when hiking. I wonder what the Phantom rubber is like and if it'll grip well.
  • 1 1
 Dear Vans, This is the current state of the flat pedal shoe market. Please bring back the gravel or design something new. I'm pretty sure it will be better then anything that 5-10 is bringing us. Sincerely, The unserved audience.
  • 6 3
 I Am digging the trailcrew shoe
  • 6 0
 because they have style in spades?
  • 2 0
 @terribleone1982: yes! excellent shaping.
  • 1 0
 Release your inner slav
  • 2 0
 Not bad. My wife tells me I am too old for skater style shoes (even though I still ride park with my kids).
  • 28 0
 Dump her.
  • 1 0
 Does she want you to wear blundstones?
  • 2 1
 So adidas gave 5 10 the reigns with the terrex trailcross SL and they fucked it. I'll be snapping up a few pairs before they go the way of the Teva Links
  • 1 0
 I live out west where it is always dry and I whole-heatedly welcome a lighter and more breathable shoe. I like my 5.10s but they get super-hot during the warmer months.
  • 1 0
 My last Trail cross looked like this after a year, looks like they may have addressed the issues.. www.pinkbike.com/photo/15832685
  • 1 0
 How in the hell did you do that??
  • 3 0
 about fucking time!
  • 2 1
 Correct me if I’m wrong, Is that a hole in the ‘waterproof inner sole’?
  • 3 0
 Neeeeeeeewp
  • 1 0
 I figured some company was going to high tops with integrated ankle support and protection.
  • 1 0
 Good looking shoes. I love my 5.10’s Big Grin hopefully they will release an SPD version in 2021 tup
  • 2 1
 I'm a fan. Put a cleat on it and I'm in.
  • 1 2
 So will these actually dry out in less than a week if they get wet? Current range takes ages to dry out, especially in winter
  • 2 0
 I’ve got a pair of the adidas Terrex Trailcross protects which are very similar to these. Whenever they have gotten wet on a ride they have generally dried but the time the ride is over. The hi top freeriders that they replaced would be water logged and squelchy for days.
  • 1 0
 I miss my Helly Hansen Jaegers...
  • 1 0
 OWN 5.10s

***or whatever that company was called ***
  • 1 0
 OWN FR-01. Got some. Awesome shoes, but expensive. Outer shell with both light breathable and winter waterproof liners. I don't think the company lasted unfortunately
  • 1 0
 High top with a cleat please
  • 1 0
 Impact high with a cleat problem solved
  • 1 0
 This is much like a jungle boot, I like the idea of breathability, ,
  • 1 0
 I like the high top. Please give us a stiff sole and waterproofing.
  • 1 0
 They look awesome. I want them. Smile
  • 1 0
 Perfect California shoe. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Ugly but I’d be interested for these super hot days
  • 1 0
 How about making some big man sizes? 14us or 50eu.
  • 1 0
 Where’s the Boa??? I’m sick of laces!!
  • 1 0
 SHORTER SHOE LACES PREEEE
  • 1 0
 yeezy on the drawing board for those kicks.
  • 2 0
 I want these.
  • 2 0
 R.I.P. Five Ten
  • 1 0
 You will not have a "dri-feet" after it.
  • 2 1
 I'm liking the high top
  • 2 2
 Those are nothing but Ugly!!! Sam Hills, Best and Sexiest 5Ten ever made
  • 4 1
 Sam Hills, Too old school for me.....and I'm old
  • 1 0
 @rockyflowtbay: Ya I'm up there as well( 44) and i still ride a 26" Operator Hahaha. I just find the Sam Hills pertect the foot better.
  • 2 1
 FUGLY.

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