First Look: Ghost's Lightweight Riot Path eMTB & Riot AM

Sep 22, 2022
by Matt Beer  

The German-based brand, Ghost Bikes, isn’t a common name you’ll see in North America, but we did include the previous version of their trail bike in the Field Test last autumn. For the 2023 lineup, Ghost have revised the Riot Trail/AM and have built a Riot lookalike eMTB, aptly named the Path Riot that uses the slim packaging of the Fazua branded motor.

Ghost was able to sneak the no holds barred Path Riot in under the 18-kilogram (39.7 lb) mark with the lightweight motor by utilizing carbon-only frame models. The line that previously distinguished the standard and motor-assisted bike segments is blurring quickly. At the same time, the price points are not, because the Path Riot LTD build will cost an even 10,000€, versus the top end, un-assisted Riot build which is nearly half that amount at 5,599€. The non-motorized versions weighs in at 2.5 kg (5.5 lb) less than its electric counterpart.

Path Riot CF Details
• Intended use: Trail riding
• Travel: 140mm rear, 160mm front
• Frame material: carbon fiber
• Motor/battery: Fazua Ride 60
• Wheels: 29"
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Reach: 435 - 522mm
• Chainstays: 446 (S-M), 455 (L-XL)
• Weight: 17.5 - 19.8 kg / 38.6 - 43.6 lb
• Price: 7,000 - 10,000 €
ghost-bikes.com
Both bikes roll on 29” wheels and offer 140mm of rear wheel suspension. Exceeding that travel amount at the front, a 150 or 160mm travel fork is raked out to a 64 or 63.5-degree head angle, depending on the build kit. They also use an interesting component that you don’t see on a lot of other bikes - the Eightpins integrated dropper post with an oversize stanchion.

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Path Riot Frame and Motor Details

Spurred on by the growing “SL-style” e-bike segment, the Path Riot uses Fazua's motor and battery, like Pivot’s recently launched Shuttle SL and Transition's upcoming Relay. Distinguishing the Path Riot from the standard Riot is tricky at a glance, not only due to the sleek drive system, but because they use the same dual-link suspension design and also have identical geometry.

The minimalist motor provides 60Nm of torque, the same amount as the Orbea Rise that unofficially kicked off this trend. Clearly, the carbon-only frame construction helped to keep the weight down to just 17.5 kg. Ghost was able to recess a heads-up display into the top tube and reduce the chances of damaging the screen.

All of the Path Riots use the integrated Eightpins dropper post, requiring a frame built specifically for the mounting style. The amount of drop from the hydraulically actuated dropper post can be adjusted between 141-212mm by flicking a switch near the saddle rail clamp.

Path Riot Spec

The nomenclature of Ghost's bikes is a bit clumsy, but basically there is one frame and two types of build kits: one with a 150mm travel fork and those with burlier 160mm options. The fork lengths are what set the head tube angles of each build apart. At either end of the price spectrum, you have the Advanced and Full Party builds with the longer travel Fox 38s and in the middle is the lighter duty LTD build.

For 7,000€ the Advanced build kit gives you a Fox 38 Performance GRIP fork and a Float X2 shock with low speed adjustments. Rounding out the rest of the specifications is a unique mix of parts. Shimano XT/SLX shifting, while WTB takes care of the rims that are laced to DT Swiss 370 Classic hubs and topped off with Maxxis EXO+/DoubleDown tires.

On the 10,000€ LTD kit, the components are quite a bit fancier with DT Swiss XMC 1200 carbon wheels and a lighter suspension package consisting of that 150mm-travel Fox 36 and Float X, both in the Factory Kashima coated finish.

The Path Riot Full Party reverts the suspension to acquire more muscle in the form of a 160mm Fox 38 and Float X2 Factory. Rolling on alloy rims, the Syntace W33i wheelset does the trick to tally the pricing to 8,500€.

On all of the Path Riot builds, Ghost specs Rotor alloy cranks to mate to the Fazua motor spindle and choose Formula Cura 4 brakes with 203mm rotors front and rear across the board.

Ghost Riot
Ghost Path Riot Advanced - 7,000 EUR

Ghost Riot
Ghost Path Riot Full Party - 8,500 EUR
Ghost Riot
Ghost Path Riot LTD - 10,000 EUR

The Ghost Riot Trail and Path Riot LTD eMTB share the same geometry and use 150mm forks. The longer travel Riot AM and Path Riot Pro/Full Party bikes use the same frame as the later bunch, but come equipped with a burlier 160mm fork to alter the frame angles.

Geometry

Let's get this one out of the way first. The Path Riot eMTB copied and pasted the geometry from the unassisted Riot. They are nearly identical, plus or minus a millimeter here and there due to spec changes. Ghost calls it "Super fit". What's a more fitting label to slap on your bike's geometry?

Regardless, there are four sizes to choose from in the Path Riot series ranging from a reach of 435mm on the small size, all the way up to 522mm on the XL. These numbers are a touch longer than most brands, following the longer, lower, slacker trend. However, if you did choose the LTD model, the reach will increase by 5mm due to the shorter 150mm fork. As mentioned, this will increase the head tube angle from 63.5 to 64-degrees.

Two sets of chainstays are used at the rear end of the bike in consideration for the range of rider heights. Size small and medium frames use moderately long 446mm chainstays, whereas the two larger size frames' rear centers grow to 455mm. There were no details on whether or not the change in kinematics or travel is accounted for due to the longer swing-arm, but we've reached out to inquire about that possibility.




Riot Trail/AM CF



When we tested the Ghost Riot AM last it was an all-aluminum affair and weighed far too much for a 140mm travel bike. The dual-link suspension design stays, but gone is the coil sprung shock and hefty frame. Now, not only are the frame's front and rear triangles built from carbon, but the geometry has seen massive revisions too. The lightest build weighs in at 15.5 kg and the head tube angle now kicks back to a slack 64-degrees.

Although the intentions of the Riot Trail and AM are almost a mirror image of the Path Riot eMTB, the price is nearly half that of the electrified version. Whether that motor is worth the extra thousands of euros is another question, but it seems like a deal in comparison considering the component list is nearly a copy as well.

Riot Trail/AM CF Details
• Intended use: Trail/Enduro riding
• Travel: 140mm rear, 150mm (Trail) / 160 (AM) front
• Frame material: carbon fiber
• Wheels: 29"
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL
• Reach: 440 - 527mm
• Chainstays: 446 (S-M), 455 (L-XL)
• Weight: 15.5 kg / 34.2 lb (Full Party build)
• Price: 4,999 - 5,599 €
ghost-bikes.com

Frame Details

Aside from the absence of the motor, the Riot Trail and AM mimic the electrified version. The full carbon frame uses the dual-link layout with 140mm of travel and features the Eightpins dropper. Even the geometry is identical, sparing a gnat's whisker due to some component variations. We've come to expect standard equipment like internally routed housing, top tube accessory mounts, and plenty of rubber to protect against chainslap.

Similarly to the Path Riot, Ghost has chosen to avoid the use of flip chips here. The geometry is tweaked by the fork travel that separates the bikes into two categories - Trail at 150mm, and a 160mm length for the AM spec.


Spec
Ghost Riot
Ghost Riot Trail Pro: 4,999 EUR - RockShox Lyrik Select 150mm and Super Deluxe Select+ RT Air, Shimano XT/SLX/Deore drivetrain, WTB rims/DT Swiss 370 hubs, Formula Cura 4 Brakes, Maxxis EXO+/DD tires.

Ghost Riot

Ghost Riot Trail Full Party: 5,499 EUR - Fox Factory 36 150mm and Float X, Shimano XT/SLX/Deore drivetrain, Syntace V30 wheels, Formula Cura 4 Brakes, Maxxis EXO+/DD tires.


Ghost Riot

Ghost Riot AM Pro: 4,999 EUR - RockShox ZEB 160mm Base and Super Deluxe Select+ RT Air, Shimano XT/SLX/Deore drivetrain, WTB rims/DT Swiss 370 hubs, Formula Cura 4 Brakes, Maxxis EXO+/DD tires.

Ghost Riot

Ghost Riot AM Full Party: 5,599 EUR- Fox Factory 38 160mm and Float X2, Shimano XT/SLX/Deore drivetrain, Syntace V30 wheels, Formula Cura 4 Brakes, Maxxis EXO+/DD tires.



115 Comments

  • 71 1
 Nothing says gnarly like "Path"
  • 8 0
 lol... so gnarly
  • 5 0
 At least they didn’t name it the Happy Trail Riot Full Party. That just sounds painful.
  • 24 0
 I don’t know, it sounds pretty gnarly when Mike Tyson says ‘Pass’
  • 1 0
 Looks gnarly.
  • 1 3
 Some of the "gnarliest" people in the US military are Pathfinders. Just sayin'.
  • 1 0
 Path: Adobe Illustrator or Rail-Trail?
  • 5 0
 Pretty Path-etic...
  • 2 1
 unironically thinking your are "gnarly" is more cringe than "path"
  • 3 1
 @mariomtblt: cringe police weeoo weeoo
  • 2 0
 @me2menow: I deserve that
  • 55 3
 That rear triangle... did the designer sneeze when drawing it and it made it to production?
  • 11 2
 Very obviously trying hard not to infringe on existing patents while coming as close as they can to infringing on existing patents.
  • 2 0
 I’d like to see the kinematic graphs.
  • 5 0
 @jclnv: if this is accurate, it does things... differently: linkagedesign.blogspot.com/2022/09/ghost-path-riot-2023.html
  • 3 0
 @xy9ine: wow, those curves are certainly unique. Would be interesting to hear how it rides.
  • 1 0
 Why should innovation look like the past?
  • 2 1
 @xy9ine: Wow. That's so wild in so many regards it makes me wonder if Antonio missed something in how one of the pivots/links moves.
  • 11 0
 @hbar314: I think I didn't miss anything, all the new Ghost models with the Traction Link are very similar.... Vertical axle path, rising AS curve and linear to progressive LR. It's a reinterpretation of the old Lapierre X160 system and that one worked that way too.
  • 2 0
 @mtmc99: axle path is precisely what vpp was about when it came out. fugly, but interesting bike
  • 1 0
 @Antoncor: Oh cheers, good to know. Its just so crazy looking on the graphs.
  • 1 0
 @Antoncor:
Interesting.
This arrangement is quite sensitive to small deviations due to the position and short design of the levers. How accurate was your geometry model on which your analysis was based? Even minor deviations have an enormous influence on the leverage ratio and the antisquat curves. Thx.
  • 3 0
 @Namrek: The pictures on the website are not photos, are renders with components photoshoped on top of them. The pictures are huge (6000x4000), all the pivot points are visible and the render has no distortion, that's a really good starting point and anyone can do a good model with it.
  • 2 0
 @Antoncor:
Thx. Your kinematic analysis and especially your comment under your blog reads extremely positive and promising. Your assessment that the kinematic is ideally suited for natural trails and implements the benefit of the upward axle path of high pivot bikes without the need of an idler pulley shows how unique the approach might be. The correct setting seems crucial here, precisely because of the significantly rising antisquat curves. Have you ever ridden a bike with Traction-Link yourself?
  • 1 0
 @baca262: Ah yes the old "make our bike like the old VPP that didn't really ride that good" approach.
  • 31 14
 wow that really does not look like a session. again an easy win for ghost in the category ugliest bike of the year. the aluminium bikes from last year were so damn ugly but they really stepped up their game again and made it even uglier. by using carbon the design process underlies less restrictions so reaching antoher 10 points on the ugly-scale was an easy task for the design team.
  • 42 0
 Haibike has joined the conversation…
  • 5 0
 @jezso: now that you mention it pinkbike never reviews Haibike
  • 7 0
 @Dogl0rd: Probably noone can get them through US customs. They are unidentifyable objects.
  • 1 0
 @jezso: I was seeing a lot of them in SoCal for a while actually
  • 1 8
flag Namrek (Sep 22, 2022 at 13:58) (Below Threshold)
 Poor Boy, stop whining. What a cheap bullshit.
  • 17 1
 Say 'riot full party' in a german accent lol
  • 13 0
 I actually was thinking it looked pretty good until I read the comments lol. Certainly unique looking kind of looks like a Spec Enduro in the front.
  • 14 3
 The previous generation looked so much better... And apparently these new ones don't ride so good either.
Ghost has left my list of favourites and gone to "wow, why would I ever buy these"
  • 4 7
 Even if i did not see my friends bike snap like a paper just by riding down a sidewalk i wouldnt want any of those....
  • 24 3
 @cool-bro: "Snap" like a "paper"?
  • 5 0
 @gooded: fold like twig
  • 2 0
 @littleskull99: Smoke and a pancake?
  • 1 0
 @gooded: ah yea i mean fold. Excuse my english skills.
  • 12 2
 I'd honestly like to know what happened to Ghost as a brand in the last 10 years.

Go back some time and they were an innovative bike company that seemingly valued high-quality engineering and made kick-ass bikes. They were among the early adopters of 29" and 27.5" wheels, X12 through-axles, dropper posts and 1X drivtrains. They also had a super interesting approach to kinematics, with extremely low leverage ratios and smooth curves across the board. They had (relatively) modern geometry before modern geometry even was a thing. They even had a (kinda) long and slack DH bike with high-pivot suspension and an idler. In 2012.

And look at them now. Making an overpriced carbon trail bike with middle-of-the-road geometry and no outstanding design features to speak of.
  • 4 0
 Their idea of innovation these days seems to be insane kinematics
  • 2 0
 I think it had to do with them trying to sell in the USA. They introduced as a semi-private label in REI, but I'm not sure they were successful. REI introduced the co-op mountain bikes around the same time that the Accell Group NA CEO Chris Speyer moved from Accell to REI.
  • 2 0
 I have a 2017 Ghost Roket 5.7 plus bike and I quite like it. Speaking of neat/innovative, they also had the Roket X Pinion gearbox plus bike and a line of custom bags for the bikepacking/adventure crowd. Would have been cool to take that for a spin.
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart:
can not be compared, because it has nothing to do with the common geometries. Ghost is one of the very few brands that integrate the dropper seatpost of Eightpins and thus depending on the installed Eightpins dropper post, frames allow up to 228mm stroke in L and even 248mm stroke in XL. Ghost do not communicate that properly at all…

www.eightpins.com/en/isps/Das
  • 2 0
 @Namrek: I wasn't trying to compare, I was just trying to say they've made some good and neat stuff in the past as @Muscovir mentioned. I was not trying to slam Ghost now, but I do think the general perception of Ghost since I bought my bike (in Canada when MEC was the exclusive distributor, a la REI) has become more that they're bargain or cookie cutter with less options than they used to. It seems a big drop off from their race bikes to what the rest of us could acquire.

As an average end-user, I feel a lot of "innovation" these days translates into how good a "package" a product manager can assemble, as it feels like no one is making a truly poor frame anymore. And personally, I'm not into the integrated seatpost as I read that as "proprietary" and you only have to be in a shop for a short while to start hating on "proprietary" (tools, parts, service, whatever).
  • 2 0
 @iammarkstewart:
Sorry, I messed up my comment with one hand on my smartphone by putting it under yours, so my comment didn't really match your post. You caught it well though! Smile
I understand your point of view. I understand your approach, much of what is sold to us as innovation (downhill meets crosscountry meets...) completely misses the needs. Less is more sounds simple, but first we have to do our homework to know what's good for us.

It's cool to hear that the ROKET served you well, bikes like that are rare these days. Would be a nice base for a proper, "upcycled" gravel bike Smile .

By the way, the seatpost is not proprietary, you can install any other 34.9mm seatpost in those frames.
  • 14 0
 I Wonder if the freehub goes whooooooh
  • 8 0
 The wheels are made with spooks
  • 7 0
 Looks aside, much of that spec is amazing: fox factory suspension, Cura 4 brakes, the right mix of XT/SLX/Deore (Except shifter...), combo of Exo+ and DD tire... if only more bike brands took notice.
  • 2 0
 They also have or had a bike with Formula shock and fork that was at a ''good'' price for all the fancy goodies it had!!
  • 8 0
 If you murdered a ghost could it come back as a human?
  • 14 0
 No. It becomes a dead ghost that haunts regular ghosts
  • 9 1
 38s on a 140mm travel trail bike? Seems like overkill.
  • 4 0
 More like 38 on a 17.5kg bike
  • 3 0
 I'll be honest - I think the 38 is overkill for most people, even on 170mm bikes. I say this as someone who spec'd a 38 on their recent build. Even at 190 lbs., I'm reasonably confident I'd get nearly identical performance from a 36.
  • 6 0
 I can still see a reasonably sharp line between standard and motor-assisted bike segments.
  • 8 0
 I've never seen a ghost.
  • 1 1
 I'm not even sure they are even a thing outside of Europe. Like Cube, they seem to have a metric ton of stores here in Germany but basically nowhere else.
  • 4 2
 You cannot prove they even exist.
  • 2 0
 We now just need UFO/Alien, Bigfoot, Loch Ness, and Vampire brands to round out the mix.
  • 3 1
 @Muscovir: Whooushhh!

But yeah you're right, two people I know have Cube bikes but they are the only ones I ever saw and they bought it from Europe. Never saw a Ghost bike in real life except in a MEC shop which used to sell a couple of models.
  • 2 0
 @Timo82: Back in 2017 when I got my Roket for a relatively excellent deal at MEC (probably beginning the phase out), they had quite a few intriguing models. I wanted to try a plus bike and still love that thing, both for the plus part and the hardtail part, and I thought it was an excellent build for the price. Before I moved I had started to see a lot more Cubes around the Calgary area.

Shame about MEC's situation now, and some of their in-house bikes seemed like solid options if you're a commuter/tourer. They also get a high five for being able to recycle their logo.
  • 4 2
 The suspension kinematics on these bikes is like the original Grim Donut design, or worse:
linkagedesign.blogspot.com/2022/09/ghost-path-riot-2023.html
180% anti squat at max travel (double similar bikes)
sharply increasing pedal kickback deep in travel
regressive-linear kinematic in the midstroke
forward->rearward axle path
  • 6 2
 What are you talking about? You can fault the bike for many things, but those kinematics are actually quite good.

Linear to progressive leverage rates work extremely well on technical natural terrain (99% of what people usually ride) as it creates a really responsive beginning to midstroke section. That's not only very comfortable but also increases traction. For that reason it's also very benefitial for E-Bikes in particular. This system should also have a very supportive feel in the midstroke and deep in the travel as the leverage rate drops quickly and even has enough end-stroke progression to work well with a coil.

"Pedal kickback" is pretty much not a thing. It doesn't exist, at least not in the way people think. There's a really good study by the University of Pforzheim in which Gerth et al have shown that above a (relatively low) critical velocity, pedal kickback has next to no effects on the suspension system. link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12283-019-0315-4

180% anti-squat isn't a problem but a benefit, for the afformentioned reason. Also, no one pedals the bike that deep in the travel anyways.

If you don't believe me, maybe you believe Antonio, who runs the blog you cited, or Stefan, who runs the Insanity of Gravity blog. They both commented (under the article you cited) on their reasons why they really like Ghosts' approach to geometry.
  • 3 3
 @Muscovir: The leverage ratio for this bike starts out progressive up until 25mm (17%), then goes regressive into roughly linear until mid-travel at 70mm (48%) then it becomes progressive again. This will cause the bike to sit deep in it's travel (in the 40% range), rather than at sag(30%). The opposite of "very supportive feel in the midstroke." Furthermore, it becomes very difficult to set spring rate, as the regressive kinematic will be making it easier to go deeper in travel near the sag point. I have ridden other bikes with a regressive kinematic near the sag point, and could vary air pressure by 30 psi and still get the same sag reading, with a very different feel on the trail. A very frustrating trait for setting up a bike's suspension.

Pedal kickback is a thing. If you've ever ridden a bike with low PK, either through an idler or O-chain, the amount of feedback to the feet on repeated hits is dramatically less compared to a similar travel/suspension design. Myself and many other riders don't care what some armchair engineers say to try and claim it doesn't exist - the feeling is demonstrably there. Less PK leads to the bike feeling calmer in fast rough sections of trail.

180% anti-squat deep in travel will feel terrible. That will manifest as the chain tension creating a large amount of pedal kick on deep compressions. Again, not at all a trait that is desired enduro bikes (ebike or otherwise).

Geometry is different than kinematics. Most bikes being released these days share very similar geometry, so the kinematics become hugely influential on whether they feel good to ride.
  • 6 1
 @andeh23: The characteristic you're describing as regressive is happening between ratios of 2.7:1 and 2.75:1 and thus is so miniscule that in all practical terms it doesn't matter and isn't going to affect the way the bike rides. For all intents and purposes, the early midstroke has linear progression before starting to drop off significantly at the 80mm mark. It's thus going to feel active in the very beginning, supportive in the midstroke and ramp up hard towards the end, provided your spring rate is correct.

The only way this could want to "sit deep in its travel" is if you set it up wrong - which Mike Kazimer and Alicia Legget did when reviewing the Riot Trail. They were on a size Medium which Ghost deems too small for both of them. And thus the bike came with too soft of a spring because Ghost matches the spring rate to the size. Their bike had too soft of a spring rate and that's why the kinematics felt off.

Regarding pedal kickback you must be imagining things. You say you can feel PK and you don't care about the science. Well, tell you what. The science doesn't care about your feelings either. If anything, your feelings are demonstrably false.

And calling people armchair engineers? Look whos talking. Guess what. I for one demo'd the alloy version of the Riot EN, which has practically the same kinematics. And sure enough, it doesn't behave anything close to what you described, because mine was set up correct. Who's the armchair engineer now.
  • 1 1
 While pedal kickback isn't a thing while freewheeling over a certain critical velocity, if you manage to hit a significant bump with any tension at all on the top run of chain, kickback is very much a thing. This is the crux of the entire AS debate, and is studiously ignored by both sides. (The o-chain gang insinuating that the chain is always under tension, the high pk gang insisting that all bikes are constantly freewheeling at 20mph)


Anyway, in the case of this Ghost....Whats the best way to increase the likelihood of the chain being under tension during impacts? Add a motor... 180%AS at full travel is a terrible idea, no matter how you look at it. Especially on an e-bike.

Add to that, crazy lever rate curves always feel like shit. They may make sense on paper, but on the trail fairly linear curves are best as this provides the most predictable and intuitive amount of feedback, rather than giving you a wildly different response depending on where you were in the travel when you hit a bump.
  • 5 0
 When you have ghosts, you have everything
  • 1 0
 With reservation for me being wrong....But the last test was with Riot Trail and not AM. The AM(old one) and enduro shares the same frame. On the enduro the long, 455mm, chainstay might be a bit much for shorter reach but for me (6'3") it would be great in size L (498mm reach). The Enduro Universal for 3000€ looks like a good deal. But I have not yet seen a real review other then enduro-mtb.com's "first ride".
  • 6 2
 winner of the ugliest swingarm of the decade competition
  • 2 0
 There's a typo in the overview section for the Riot AM. I'm pretty sure the reach for the largest size only goes up to 527mm not 572mm. Would be cool if it did though.
  • 4 1
 Someone needs to let the Ghost frame designer know that CAD has an eraser tool
  • 4 0
 wow, a 2 wheel fiat multipla!
  • 2 0
 But at least the multipla is ugly in an interesting and quirky sort of way. This is ugly in a deformed mutant sort of way.
  • 5 1
 Am I the only one who thinks that it doesn't look too bad?
  • 1 1
 I love the high top tube, it’s so manly
  • 3 0
 Just as haunting, but unfortunately not as invisible as its namesake.
  • 1 0
 I’m disappointed it didn’t have a cooler name like their riot full party, or whatever that ridiculous name was on the non-ebike.
  • 1 0
 I'm surprised you don't see integrated droppers more. Yah you are limited to the brand but if the internals are good then you get the maximum drop possible.
  • 2 1
 I like the concept but the idea of being locked to a specific seat post is worrying. I guess if reliability is through the roof its fine, but Id be worried about having it break down and no replacements are available.
  • 4 0
 @mtmc99: you can of course install any other dropper as well.

See the Ghost XC team being sponsored by ROCKSHOX for reference
  • 2 0
 Congrats to Ghost on finally making a bike with the seat tube shorter than the reach (still a bit long though).
  • 1 0
 Now at the right spot…
Seat tube length can not be compared, because those frames have nothing to do with the common geometries we usually compare and know. Ghost is one of the very few brands that integrate the dropper seatpost of Eightpins from Austria and thus depending on the installed Eightpins dropper post, frames allow up to 228mm stroke in L and even 248mm stroke in XL. That’s what matters. Ghost do not communicate that properly at all…

www.eightpins.com/en/isps
  • 2 0
 Can't wait to see pilgrim flip no hander it off an MTB hopper somewhere on a grassy hill in Colchester
  • 2 0
 Ghost in the machine.....
  • 1 0
 Although funny and clever, I don't think the joke is worth buying that bike.
  • 2 0
 If Pilgrim can send these hard then should be fine for the rest of us
  • 7 0
 Well Pilgrim can rip on a shopping cart with 3 wheels, so it doesnt really say much about the bike ^^
  • 2 0
 i would only ride an Orange Patriot
  • 3 1
 When they make an ebike, they should call it the Ghost E-Wrection
  • 1 0
 "For the ebike"
  • 2 0
 Why not just call it eRiot? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 1 0
 there is allready another GHOST Model called E-Riot (Bosch Drive unit)
  • 1 0
 I am genuinely curious if a short time from now you won't be able to even buy a non-ebike
  • 2 0
 I think worst case scenario is normal bikes become like hardtails, where they’re still available, if you want cheaper or are more “hardcore”
  • 1 0
 @Lumenous1 based on what i saw on IG, it appears doerfling has made the move to ghost from knolly
  • 1 0
 That rear linkage at the top of the shock is starting to lean towards Ellsworth type ugly.
  • 1 0
 I really didn't think you could make a dual link bike look fugly, and then I saw this.....
  • 1 0
 Ghostly reminder the skeleton is in the closet….
  • 2 0
 RIP Formula spec.
  • 1 0
 To be seen on a path near you soon.
  • 2 0
 Nice brakes
  • 1 0
 Nope, needs a bigger battery and motor.
  • 1 0
 Doesn't Sam Pilgrim ride a Ghost?
  • 1 1
 Today is going to be epic! Can't wait for Pilgrim to get his hands on this.
  • 1 1
 What's happened to the Fad Mullet setup? Fads dead!!
  • 2 1
 Wat de fak is dat bruh?
  • 5 6
 YOUCH ! LIKE A FAT BIRD IN A BIKINI.
  • 5 0
 sir mixalot you aint
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: ha lol thanks brooo
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