First Look: Giant Manufactures Its Own Range of Suspension Forks

Oct 19, 2019
by Richard Cunningham  


Giant announced this week that it launched its own range of single-crown suspension forks. Reportedly, "Crest" forks will offer performance and reliability that matches or exceeds present offerings from the likes of RockShox, Fox, and SR Suntour.

Giant won't be the first bicycle brand to develop and sell its own suspension components, but it may be the first to succeed. Cannondale, Specialized, Trek, K2, AMP, and Scott headline the list of bike brands that went out surfing and crawled out burping after launching their own fork or shock. Giant's bid for a piece of the suspension market, however, could stick.

Manufacturing Advantage
Giant Crest 34 Details

• Use: Trail / XC (not e-bike approved)
• Construction: Air-sprung, aluminum steerer, crown and stanchions, magnesium lowers.
• 34mm stanchion tubes
• Cartridge damper
• Travel: 100/120mm
• Adjustments: Low-speed compression & low-speed rebound, air-spring tokens
• Self-adjusting negative spring
• Remote lockout option
• Weight/Price: NA
• Contact: Crest landing page

Giant Bicycles is internationally recognized as the most vertically integrated manufacturer in the cycling industry. In layman's terms, that means raw materials like plastic, steel wire, bare carbon fiber, and aluminum ingots enter at one side of the factory and bicycle frames roll out the other side. Giant's brand is a global powerhouse, but their manufacturing division also makes and assembles bicycles for a number of prestigious names.

Crest 34 fork
The tubular element in the arch is interesting.

To meet those production demands, Giant Taiwan consumes volumes of components - numbers that defy imagination. Much of those are purchased from notable suppliers like SRAM, DT Swiss, Shimano or Maxxis. Larger numbers come from lesser known, more economically friendly sources, but over time the Giant factory has taken over much of that business, using its manufacturing expertise and economy of scale to further pad its bottom line. Now, it seems, Giant is ready to fold a significant portion of the forks it has been purchasing from the big three suspension makers into its in-house manufacturing machine.

After you've made a ten million elite level carbon and aluminum suspension bikes and a gazillion dropper seatposts, a single-crown suspension fork should seem like a piece of cake. Unlike the aforementioned bike brands, Giant actually makes their own stuff, so they have the ability to control their quality, evolve the technology, and make incremental improvements as production moves forward.

Consider also that suspension for technology has reached a point of stability, The greatest leap forward in the past five years has been the addition of a rubber bag on top of the damper cartridge. This is a perfect time, then, for a large, vertically integrated manufacturer like Giant to enter the suspension business with a lower priced, equally performing product that is targeted to OEM customers. For the right deal, that "Crest" logo could just as easily become "Trek" or "Specialized."

Crest 34 fork
Every indication points to a massive commitment to future production.

Can Crest Suspension Succeed?

We know very little about Giant's Crest fork, beyond the tech that is sparsely peppered into their press release and video. What we do know it that follow-through, not vanguard technology is the key to success in the suspension arena.

If Giant demonstrates a manufacturing program of continuous improvement, and can successfully navigate global customer service, warranty returns, and technical support, they could easily become a
Lefty fork
Why the Others Failed

The reason bike brands failed is that they don't make their stuff and their overarching concern is selling bikes. Five engineers whose main duties are designing and trouble-shooting bikes are tasked with coming up with a suspension fork. They work with a reputable manufacturer and eventually, one appears and it's probably good, but then the team goes back to work on bikes.

Forks arrive and get sold and that continues until a problem arises. At that moment, the fork is usually out of date anyway, so it's easier and more economical to drop the program entirely rather than to start over. Bikes are your bread and butter, not suspension - if you're a bike brand, you always have a fall-back position. The exception here is Cannondale, who established a separate suspension division for their Lefty and made a valiant, long-term commitment.

If you are a suspension maker, that's what you live or die for. The reason that Fox and RockShox are still around is that everyone from the top down lives and breathes suspension, and that creates the environment of constant improvement and the stream of micro-innovations that make their products both durable and trustworthy. Arguably, follow-through and customer support makes or breaks suspension companies, and this will be Giant's greatest challenge.
key player - especially in the emerging e-market, where customers are less brand motivated when it comes to key components like wheels, drivetrains, and, um, suspension. If I were Fox, SRAM or SR Suntour, I'd be concerned about this.

Crest 34 fork
Crest 34 fork







348 Comments

  • 251 52
 1 step closer to selling them at walmart
  • 29 11
 Right. Maybe that's their plan.
  • 54 43
 #Rebrandedsuntour
  • 42 5
 Fox, rs and Suntour make the most off the low end forks via OEM volume. Giant is capitalizing on that. Making suspension for their mid to low end. Lowering overhead and costs as well as price to consumer. I'd be interested to see what they dev. For the race teams
  • 41 45
flag meandros (Oct 18, 2019 at 15:41) (Below Threshold)
 can't be worse than Suntour, can it?
  • 80 10
 @makripper: Ha. Lowering the cost to the consumer, good one.
  • 21 2
 @meandros: My Rux fork is great!
  • 22 2
 @endurocat: you’d be surprised which of your favorite forks are essentially that
  • 105 10
 Does it matter where a bike is sold if it does the job? Or is it just peoples egos that counts?
  • 11 1
 @endurocat: The whole point is for the fork to be their own, it came to be so that it isn't a rebranded suntour
  • 1 0
 Perhaps not. Maybe make millions of lower end OEM forks for themselves and all the big bike companies, AND high end line (USD $1000+) that gets the marketing dollars for the mtb illuminati.
  • 20 6
 @enduroNZ: I'd argue that it doesn't matter where it's sold, but let's be honest, do you want some 17 year old with no experience assembling your bike? Maybe it's not a concern for you, because you have the mechanical aptitude to tune and repair your ride. But for a vast majority of consumers they can't and they need the support of a quality shop to make sure their ride is safe and properly set up.
We see so many bikes brought in from big box stores that simply aren't safe.
  • 5 0
 hardly lol clearly you don't know Giant
  • 28 5
 @meandros: my Suntour Durolux is by far the best fork I've ever owned.
  • 9 1
 @moose-tastes-good:
Same factory
DVO is made there too.
  • 16 2
 @TimRidesBikes: Perhaps you missed the fact that GIANT somehow managed to lower at least one of their carbon full suspension offerings to just $3,350 USD this year? Check out their 2020 Trance Advanced Pro 29 3 to see what I'm talking about. I can't wait to see how low they can go next year with the Crest forks!
  • 4 1
 @endurocat: it's not the same factory it's been explained before.
  • 10 0
 @TimRidesBikes: They dropped almost all their prices from 2018 to 2019 by 500$. For 2020 they have some great price points. They can afford to drive down prices and keep them below the competition.
  • 2 0
 @richulr: That's good news, I bought mine because it was like half the price of the competitors.
  • 6 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: every big box bike I have ever bought, the first thing I did when I got it home was disassemble it, clean and reassemble and then adjust . More for peace of mind.
Even my 3yr old boys' bikes were taken apart and reassembled when i got them home.
  • 11 6
 went straight to comments hahahahahahaha
  • 3 0
 @opetruzel: check out the 27.5 as well. Carbon wheels and front triangle for a similar price, with the sweet carbon warranty if you mess something up riding
  • 3 0
 @Unweptjoker: ha. I even did this with my S Works Enduro. Found some drier than I’d like bearings in the process.
  • 2 0
 @enduroNZ: while we all know that the answer to you first question should be 'no', in real world egos drive the whole thing, sadly.
  • 3 0
 @endurocat: the reason they are manufacturing their own is due to the lack of QC and poor warranty support from Suntour. Definitely not rebranded.
  • 3 1
 @TimRidesBikes: you get it. You're not a lemming.

So...watch your back. They're coming for you. Heh
  • 4 3
 @Chuckolicious: everything on Process 153 SE backed out, spun loose or was so dry it disintegrated within 6 months. Feont & rear wheel would de-tension every other ride, headset turned to dust. BB died, rear axle backed out, front pivot and swingarm bolts backed way out, derailleur hanger came loose, ATE SHlT when my stem bolts holding the bars loosened, headset got loose. Not a single thing was tight. Irony was I checked a lot of the stuff but also the shop said they'd went over it.
I've since learned the mechanical skills of that guy only exceed mine because he has a phone# to warrantyWink
  • 1 0
 @richulr: me too.....currently have all major's, ST are my favorites
  • 2 0
 Doubt they'd sell Giant at Walmart. Walmart would just make their own brand and have Giant manufacture them, such as Northrock at Costco
  • 2 2
 @enduroNZ: depends, if you are ok with people being exploited and mistreated by corporates like Amazon then no it doesn't matter. Personnally I prefer to avoid any big corporates as much as possible so I won't buy my bikes at a superstore. Now it just depends what are your personal values really.
  • 2 0
 @juansevo: can you elaborate? I'm genuinely interested
  • 3 0
 But Giant are a big corporation @Balgaroth:
  • 2 0
 @Chuckolicious: kid of had the same thing.
  • 3 0
 @B650wagon: giant wouldn't go there, they are the top tier manufacturer of bike biz, there are many low cost options for walmart.
  • 3 0
 I’ve been on Santa Cruz tall boy , fs superfly, c-dale scalpel(s). I sold a 2017 Trek Top Fuel and “downgraded” to an old 2012 Giant XTC Carbon for $800 as an intermediary bike. Super comfy and fave behind only the tall boy. Giant makes great stuff.
  • 12 25
flag crazy9 (Oct 19, 2019 at 18:17) (Below Threshold)
 My nan could assemble a bike. I hardly acknowledge bike mechanic as a proper job.
  • 2 2
 @sdaly I think they would be heading direct to consumer before Walmart.
  • 2 1
 @crazy9: the majority’s I’ve come across are just kids who have a Saturday job, some of the career guys/gals are excellent but it takes dedication to commit to a poorly paid job like that, so they’d better make sure they’re good or they’ll be even more broke!
  • 2 0
 What tool comment.
  • 3 0
 @richulr: Same here, I have a Auron PCS RC2. You couldn’t make me trade for any Fox or RockShox trail fork for it
  • 2 0
 @makripper: turning aluminum and magnesium ingots into a product they’ve never taken to market is expressly the OPPOSITE of lowering overhead.

It’s an attempt to capitalize economies of scale, but (again) it’s also the exact opposite of lowering overhead.
  • 2 0
 You would be surprised as to what companies arose owned by giant and what brands get their stuff made at giant owned factories including a lot of your favorite carbon frames
  • 1 0
 @endurocat: its like you didnt even read the article
  • 3 0
 @crazy9: Can your nan lace a wheel? How about properly load a cup and cone hub? Straighten a bent derailleur hanger?
Didn't think so.
There are definitely skills involved in being a good bicycle mechanic. There's no need to piss on someone else's job.
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: to get completely off subject but one of your favorite trails is PAlm canyon epic? You come to the valley often?
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: Preach!

I've been working (part-time mainly) at a shop for the last 25 years. I've been selective in which shops have employed me, but for the most part the folks I've worked with have been pretty sharp. Typically you have one kid that assembles bikes, but their work is checked and criticism is applied. If they can't get it they get the boot.
I've worked with some knuckleheads over the years, but the vast majority have been smart hardworking people.
  • 1 0
 @makripper: Giant owns 40% share of the factory that produces both Rock Shox and Fox Smile
  • 1 0
 @superlightracer: I didn't know that but not really surprised haha.
  • 1 0
 @TimRidesBikes: well i think they will do more margin on it. maybe they will lower the prices, but still at a level which will make it super profitable to them. I really don"t expect any massive price drops on their high end specs bikes
  • 1 0
 @Krzymndyd: I wish! No, most of my time now is spent closer to the lower mainland of BC, with a few forays down to Moab and Hurricane. When my son gets older we'll get down to PS to stay with my snowbird parents. PM me if you're ever up this way to go riding
  • 1 0
 @enduroNZ: But if you don't buy your bike at a bike shop, how are you going to be friends with the shop employees?
  • 1 0
 You probably own a diamondback too!! @bmied31:
  • 1 0
 @chrisrut: yup...really confused what lead you to that conclusion and if it's a good or bad thing haha. I've been incredibly happy with my Release. It didn't come with an Auron, but I replied my Yari with one after I won it from Singletracks.com
  • 2 0
 @makripper: Fox owns their own factory, they don't outsource manufacturing like many bike industry companies.
  • 114 2
 Don't get any f*cking ideas @trekbikes you don't need anymore things on your bikes that get removed the minute they are purchased.
  • 47 6
 Don't you worry, all Treks (yes, even Project Ones now) come out of Giant factories.
  • 11 4
 srsly. even their re:activ fox stuff comes off right away
  • 3 9
flag takeiteasyridehard (Oct 18, 2019 at 16:53) (Below Threshold)
 @mnorris122: I'm not so sure about this statement. Any evidence other than what some guy in the industry told you?
  • 16 0
 @mnorris122: Incorrect. While Giant still makes most of the OCLV and higher models, Trek dropped Giant from their lower end/aluminum offerings and shipped it off to A&J in Cambodia (one of OEMs for Scott). Trek has said they were to be hit by over $30 mill from Trump's tariffs.
  • 2 0
 @Jamminator: I believe Malaysia too.
  • 10 0
 @Jamminator: funny, i heard Giant was punting any low margin accounts to make up production time/volume of their own bikes. basically the only stuff they are making now is for companies that are willing to pay top dollars for their world class manufacturing technology and capabilities.
  • 1 0
 abc
  • 10 4
 @TheBearDen what are you talking about? In the volume of their bikes maybe 1% of people are taking their suspension off their brand new bike, tires maybe sit at 2%.
  • 2 14
flag dthomp325 (Oct 19, 2019 at 2:37) (Below Threshold)
 @TheBearDen: why anyone would buy a mountain bike from a company headquartered in Wisconsin is beyond me. I know they probably do product r+d elsewhere, but it just seems weird.
  • 2 4
 @mnorris122: Incorrect. All project ones are still assembled and shipped from Waterloo in the good ole U S of A. Icon paint jobs are still hand painted.
  • 6 1
 @dthomp325: ever ridden Jim’s Trails on the land across the street from their Corp HQ? They are insanely good trails with north shore wood features, jump lines, flowy singletrack, tech gnar, pro lines etc Local R&D testing is not a problem, at least when it’s not winter.
  • 1 11
flag dthomp325 (Oct 19, 2019 at 5:58) (Below Threshold)
 @Stampers: no I have not, but how much elevation could they possibly have, a 200ft hill? How could you test descending on am enduro or DH bike and how could you test climbing on anything?
  • 9 0
 @dthomp325: You clearly haven't ridden any of their bikes. They aren't exactly slouches at the MTB game.
  • 2 1
 @bonfire: Relax my friend just having some some fun poking at the other big bike brand making its own suspension.
  • 2 0
 @jmc361: yes
The production is being shifted away from Giant Manufacturing's facilities in China. Giant Manufacturing's Irene Chen said she would not comment on Giant's OEM business, but noted that the company is focused on e-bike and high-end traditional bike manufacturing and is seeing growth in those areas.

"The overall global economy and market poses many uncertainties due to the trade war between U.S. and China," Chen said. "Giant will continue to take leverage of its Asia and European production facilities, focusing on short supply lead time and global positioning to maintain its growth opportunities in this challenging market."

basically they only have capacity for their own bikes as they are gaining market share worldwide.
  • 4 0
 Not everyone needs a brand name to be whole.
  • 90 0
 Will this Giant fork fit in my tiny head-tube?
  • 57 2
 I'll fit, you just need to believe and take it easy.
  • 23 2
 Use a lot of lube
  • 12 4
 Its called a neck.
  • 15 2
 I hear u need to exhale slowly and stare straight ahead...
  • 1 14
flag vonb (Oct 18, 2019 at 18:36) (Below Threshold)
 @ecly13: Throat, deep throat
  • 1 10
flag BikeTrials (Oct 18, 2019 at 20:03) (Below Threshold)
 @oscartheballer: Lots of lube, and put it in and out until the lube spreads
  • 10 13
 That’s what she said.
I couldn’t help myself sorry
  • 1 0
 They had a messy breakup with DVO??
  • 1 4
 @titan1um: someone had to.
I appreciated it.
  • 3 0
 @jorgeposada: no DVO just doesn't make lower end forks.
  • 3 1
 @mhoshal: isn’t that all they make?
  • 56 0
 This is an easy move for a large, captured market (their own). They are solving a real problem. There is no problem with higher spec bikes. There is a huge problem with the really cheap model stuff that RS and Suntour put out. And Giant isnt making money on it. If you are buying a 1500$ bike (and know a thing or two), the Giant with a decent fork vs everything else with a Recon is just a no brainer. Should be good.
  • 13 1
 ^^^
The only comment in this thread worth reading.
  • 19 0
 As you say, it really makes no sense to spec any part from another manufacturer at the low end if you can make it yourself. At the top end people want brand names. At the bottom end people want features and quality.
People have long accepted it with bars, stems, saddles, grips, pedals. It’s only a matter of time until they also accept it with suspension.

We all know the performance difference between a Renthal Fatbar and a Giant Contact SL bar is pretty much nonexistent at the level most of us ride.
  • 3 0
 People constantly compare MTB to MX, this move is a big step toward that actually being true. Assuming this goes well shocks will be next.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: I cant speak for giant bars but there is hands down a difference in feel between a nice set of alu bars (like renthals) vs cheap ones. The bars spesh bikes come with are particularly bad. low grade alu and lots of it which means harsh ride feel & they weigh a lot. Look at the end of a good set of alu bars vs cheap ones, there generally a big difference in wall thickness of the metal
  • 2 0
 @robwhynot: giant already makes rear shocks
  • 2 0
 vertical integration
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: cool, didn’t know (sounds like majority of commenters on this thread don’t know this either)
  • 1 0
 @robwhynot: ya they come on the lower end fs bikes like the stance. I have one on my old giant yukon fx.
  • 2 0
 @zyoungson:
So 7050 series aluminium is a low grade aluminium? That's what my specialized Alu bars are made of
  • 1 0
 @emptybox: it doesn’t matter the grade. If it’s the right length and size, you can use it to steer with. Not a lot of performance diff between that and a top notch bar, which can also be used to steer with. There is a big difference between suspension or not, disc brakes or not, dropper or not. That’s what I was meaning.
  • 57 2
 Sorry guys - Giant packs a tonne of value into their bikes and they ride really well. One of my all time favourite bikes was a late model reign that is still being ridden by my buddy today. Can’t hate on a brand for consistently just getting it done.
  • 52 0
 Will this fork help my teeth stay white all day?
  • 5 0
 Ha, you can show yourself out.
  • 8 1
 9/10 dentists agree
  • 25 0
 Doubtful. It already has a cavity.
  • 1 0
 @noapathy: well played.
  • 51 2
 Across the board, MTB forks are fairly expensive items. Here's hoping Giant can bring out reliable, good-performing forks at lower prices than the established players.
  • 11 4
 High performance dampers are expensive, period. Hi-po off-road dampers from Fox, King or Radflo can easily cost 1k a corner.
  • 14 0
 @mungbean: Retail cost VS. manufacturing cost. Even if they just save additional $20 a bike vs specing a RockShox fork, that adds up to a lot of $ with the amount of bikes Giant makes.
  • 7 1
 More competition/better for consuner obviously...forces innovation/comp pricing
  • 5 15
flag vjunior21 (Oct 18, 2019 at 16:51) (Below Threshold)
 If it is anything like there wheels it is going to be heavy and suck.
  • 5 0
 I’m surprised it took this long
  • 8 6
 @mungbean: w
What's expensive? Few machined aluminium parts, some washers, rubber bladder and a couple of seals? With modern manufacturing and design process it's not a problem at all. I believe Giant has more than enough know-how and manufacturing capabilities to make MTB suspension which, frankly isn't a high tech product like some brands would lead you to believe.
It's far cry from automotive suspension (which ironically is actually less expensive!) and has to deal with far less stress, slower speeds and doesn't have to meet safety standards. Not to mention it's "expected" to be serviced annually or even more often whereas suspension on most motorbikes and cars goes on for years without service.
  • 4 0
 It's almost hilarious that a full FOX Kashima suspension setup for a snowmobile is four shocks and probably the same cost as a 40 and DHX. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Remote resi shocks for a truck are expensive AF.
  • 2 0
 You had me at Adam Craig!
  • 5 1
 @msusic: Machined, tumbled, anodized, assembled, bled AND tested. In a FIT/GRIP/CHARGER damper there are many parts that can only be produced with multiple ops or multi-axis machines. Shafts are ground to strict tolerances. Springs are custom made.
This isn't stuff you can do in your garage.
  • 3 0
 @seitenryu: The guy from I tend does exactly that. And his stuff is definitely made to much, much stricter tolerances than anything made by Fox or Rockshox.
  • 1 0
 *Intend (autocomplete strikes again)
  • 27 0
 I'm a huge fan of Giant for the bang for buck model... I have had 2 defys and a trance. All were superb value and current, if not, leading technology. I had 2 warranty claims and they were dealt with promptly without questions.
When the trance comes in for almost $1k less than the competition how can you knock it?
For some reason they have a bad reputation for not being elite, boutique, or what...? cool enough?

Carbon frames...? damn ya
Carbon wheels...? yes please
Dropper posts...? sure

Single crown trail forks... ? hell yes bring them on Smile

Thanks Giant for letting us old guys buy awesome bikes for mid grade prices
  • 3 0
 Exactly. It’s about image and nothing more.
  • 1 0
 I want a custom road bike. But my TRC Advanced was such great value I’ll have no choice but to replace it with a Defy when the time comes.
  • 3 0
 @gonecoastal: I'm quite interested in Giant bike for my next road bike. The Defy likes like a great ride.
  • 2 0
 @jojotherider1977: it is, fantastic value and great performance.
  • 1 0
 @jojotherider1977: great value. My TCR was the only complete Ultegra Di2 equipped bike at close to that price point. I believe a comparable Trek would’ve been 1000+ more.
The new TCR/Defy come full carbon,Di2 for around what Naked or Dekerf frame/fork go for.

I should’ve went Defy. But I let my ego get in the way. The new TCR uses geo numbers very similar to the Defy geo from a few years back.

I will say that Trek Domane in Celeste with gumwall tyres is drool worthy.
  • 2 0
 @gonecoastal: and is that Trek made in the Giant facility too?
  • 1 0
 @jaame: probably. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
  • 16 0
 No mention of Maverick brand. Though they were never mainstream, they did some cool stuff with there own suspension and even one of earlier dropper posts.
  • 6 0
 I remember how much MBA loved the ML7 back in the day. I never got to ride one, was always curious if they were as good as claimed.
  • 3 0
 @Jamminator: I wanted a DUC36 fork for my Yeti 575 so bad
  • 2 1
 @Jamminator: Nope - horrible things.
  • 1 0
 Maverick! Ive owned a Matic frame, Sc32, and DUC 32 fork.ocer.the years. Wish I still had the Sc32 fork
  • 20 2
 Giant news
  • 3 0
 A big hit to the main suspension manufacturers, they were selling lots to Giant, now not so much
  • 15 0
 I'm more of a Colgate person.
  • 13 4
 i'm starting to think that Giant is becoming one of "those companies" that'll produce everything on their products exclusively. like Salomon, and TNF. i remember TNF being a real "outdoorsy" brand and now they've got streetwear, city wear and things that aren't like TNF and its become so commercialized chintzy.
  • 8 8
 Funny you use TNF and Salomon considering they are leaders in their fields. But if it makes you feel better to have a brand that less people use then go for it...
  • 2 11
flag lehott (Oct 18, 2019 at 15:57) (Below Threshold)
 @NorCalNomad: you don't notice how commercialized those companies are? Multi-million companies and multiple global headquarters. Sure their leaders in their fields, because they capitalized on globalization, it's cheaper to make everything within the company and to import it to the desired country
  • 28 1
 @lehott: is this actually a criticism of the products they make or just a rant about big businesses succeeding?
  • 11 5
 @Socket: He's probably just mad that his stuff from there is no longer "niche" and "cool enough" to prop up his own self image.

@Lehott, go and work for years with goretex, vibram, or one of the other companies that licenses tech to everyone and let me know how you feel after that. Or name another company that can make products that have seen and continue to see more Everest and 8000m summits than anyone else, but is also lusted after by the same people who want $300 Nikes.

You don't know what you're talking about Tyler Lehoux.
  • 1 0
 @NorCalNomad: yea north face may be a mainstream brand now but they still make some good shit. I have multiple pieces of high end winter gear from them and it’s as good as anything else out there.
  • 1 1
 @Socket: A little bit of colum A and a little bit of colum B
  • 2 2
 @NorCalNomad: how do you know my name? and why do you assume i'm mad that the products i purchase aren't cool enough and that they no longer preserve my self image?(hypocritical much? considering you seem like "the police of everything right" judging by the way you correct people and products/reviews/other commenters, thats listed in ur profile) i'm just a dude complaining about how giant is beginning to make their own suspension forks and complained about the big business. you brought in your "elitism" and snobby egotistical ventures to affirm that yes, you are right, you only want to see those upvotes and your smart, "witty" intellectually regurgitated information that you so relentlessly read up on
  • 2 0
 @NorCalNomad: has TNF been niche and cool in the last 20 years? I dumped them for llbean and Columbia years ago.
  • 4 0
 @lehott: if you type in "@" followed by the user name here (replying to someone on a news article comment section) it pops up whatever you entered in your profile section for first and last name. #datasecurity ...

Kinda a shitty thing for @pinkbike to do considering when you enter it in your profile it says "Your email and name is NEVER displayed publically to anyone on the website. It is only used when you send a friend request email in order to identify yourself clearly."
  • 9 1
 I feel Giant really screwed up by sticking with the Giant branding for accessories. Trek do it well because their accessory brand is Bontrager. Although many people will associate Bontrager with Trek, many will still buy Bontrager components and fit it to a non Trek bike. Giant have just released Cadex as a stand alone high end road brand and it will probably do quite well because of the lack of brand association. From a performance point of view it makes zero difference and hopefully it will be a great fork at a good price, just maybe a limited market. But when your brand is as big as Giant, cost cutting on your own bikes is enough to call it a commercial success...
  • 11 3
 Not sure. People happily put Specialized components (tires, pedals, saddles etc) on different brand bikes.
  • 8 0
 @vinay: As someone who worked for Trek and Giant, I can safely say it is the case. Obviously your average consumer who buys a hybrid isn't going to care too much but when you're talking more about a dedicated cyclist, it comes more into play. Think road cyclists are a little more precious about it hence the release of Cadex. Specialized are a marketing powerhouse, and they somehow manage to convince customers that their products are unbelievably incredible when this isn't always the case, Giant are definitely a function over fashion kind of brand.
  • 4 0
 @Grealdo: it’s a good point. Santa Cruz has done it with the Reserve brand too.
I’m quite surprised Giant hasn’t done it now that you mention it.

Specialized... I have two Power Arc saddles. I love them, but if there was another brand making the same shape for the same price or less I would not buy Spexialized. I’ve had a few Butcher and Slaughter tyres which I only bought because they were half the price of Minions.

As for Giant’s home brand name, other than Cadex, any suggestions?

I like the product range progression that Gorilla, Gibbon and Baboon would provide. Baboon for the lower end, mostly alloy parts. Gibbon for the mid range and Gorilla for your no expense spared, XTR level kind of finishing kit.
  • 9 0
 I'm sure these would match entry level mtbs really well and hopefully make our great sport more approachable for new players.
  • 9 2
 Richard...do you need me to send you twenty five years of old MBA magazines (consecutive no less) for you to have to re-read and remember that Giant has done suspension forks before... just like Trek, Scott, K2, Specialized, Amp, and Cannondale ? They had their own forks appearing on bikes in 1993-94 and had partnered with what is now SR Suntour to produce them. Scott USA made their own suspension forks in-house and had the guys at Clark-Kent Racing design them for them. Trek partnered with Showa (a leading motorcycle suspension manufacturer). Amp Research and Cannondale did things in-house themselves and Amp did suspension frame design work for Specialized. Specialized had their early forks made by Rock Shox. K2 Bought out Noleen USA, who you should remember as that's who you used for your rear shocks when you still owned and made Mantis bikes.
  • 2 0
 I would love for Showa to come back into the market. I knew they did some stuff overseas but I never saw them in the America’s.
  • 2 0
 @Xenon303:

They did attempt something a decade ago but I think they confine themselves to OEM production for other brands as far as bicycle suspension goes. The bicycle world really isn't a big enough market to warrant their attention really. That's also why Amp Research got out of bicycles to focus on automotive / motorcycles.
  • 3 0
 This whole article stinks. What kind of credible ‘journalism’ positions the article with a pandering “here’s why x will succeed where others failed”? Not even an opinion piece would use such sketchy language. Normally a fan of RC but this just sounds like $$$.
  • 9 3
 I am sold on Giant. I own Santa Cruz, Transition, Ibis, Rockey bikes and my Trance 2 kills them allin so many ways its stupid and its aluminium. I am also done with carbon frames. I am thrilled they are trying to make their own Rhythm fork for a low cost. Fuck dentistry.
  • 3 0
 My bikes are 2014....I tend to not change much, Trance may be my next bike though. Stack, Reach, Value, all line up. And like you everyone I know who has one loves it. Only 3 but all 3 love their trance's.
  • 2 0
 @kaibabylon: I was really worried about wheel sets and post as I always use top dog items like Crossmax SX, Chromag, Thomson, Renthal, etc and discovering that I didn't have to swap out the bar/stem, seat post and wheels was a shocker to me. I expected a great SLX drivetrain with the Fox shoxx and Giant items to kill the buzz. This is year 2 and I need a seat post repair from Jamaica crap like mango getting in the sleeve/seals and ruining the tube.
  • 4 0
 @madmon: LOL last sentence made no sense to me, I think I thought your flag was Brazil, then I looked up Jamaica flag.....makes total sense now! Learn something everyday.....
  • 5 0
 "The greatest leap forward in the past five years has been the addition of a rubber bag on top of the damper cartridge." So Grip 2 and Trust's carbon linkage fork mean nothing? This article seems suspiciously enthusiastic about a generic Taiwanese 120mm travel fork. If I wanted to get excited about a cross country fork it would be the Lefty Ocho.
  • 7 1
 Good looking affordable fork that will make mountain bikes more affordable. Why are we bitching? It’s good for competition and pricing folks.
  • 2 0
 The more affordable part probably isn't going to happen. This fork won't even offset the new tariffs.
  • 4 0
 since I saw no lefty-bashing in the comments to this point: I don’t agree that cannondale tried and failed (surfed and burped) in developing and releasing their own suspension fork/strut. The Ochoa obviously didn’t hurt the factory XC team this season. My Supermax and Lefty 2.0 have been trouble free and perform better than every other fork I’ve tried in XC and trail/enduro. I did put a cane creek helm on my new trail bike and plan to A/B test against the supermax. I expect the supermax will be stiffer but slightly less supple. But a failure? Totally disagree. That said, always wondered why clementz didn’t race on it… Was that just a sponsorship conflict?
  • 7 1
 Doesnt Stan's already have a "Crest" wheelset?
What if Stan's had a Trance wheelset?
Lawsuit no?
  • 14 2
 Rims aren’t forks. Case dismissed.
  • 2 2
 @yzedf: perhaps, but still lame
  • 1 0
 @yzedf: but they might crack in similar way Smile
  • 5 0
 You can throw data and science at me all day long but until i hear that Josh Carlson is "frothing" about these forks all other information will be ignored.
  • 3 0
 Shops who carry Giant keep it going forever. Your starting out with a thousand service locations who are familiar with the product and will have parts on hand. The rep will have spares in his garage. More better bikes cheaper, right on. Will there be kid sizes?
  • 2 0
 Well another issue is that they limit themselves to equip only Giant Bikes. I don't see anytime soon a Specialized, Trek or Santa Cruz with a Giant fork. There is lots of advantages at being to sell volume to a variety of customers. They might be able to have enough volume with their entry-level bikes but not for premium products. It's unlikely they will gain any brand awareness as a suspension maker without well spread premium suspension. BTW it does make sense now why they switch to DVO on their high end/factory bikes.
  • 17 1
 Treks are made in Giant's factories, who's to say Giant wouldn't slap a Bontrager logo on that fork in exchange for some coin?
  • 5 0
 Giant switched from DVO because Fox made a deal too good to refuse. Fox didn’t want DVO represented on the World Cup Circuit.
  • 4 0
 @mnorris122: And at most price points - who would care? Until you get past $1500USD I don't think that more than 5% of consumers would care as longas the fork was competitive features wise.
  • 1 1
 lolzzz
  • 4 0
 @nouseforaname: as bad as the entry level Rock Shox forks are, it'd be a welcome change to have a decent quality mid level fork for the bikes that have Recons currently. The plastic damper internals self destruct.
  • 3 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: this...big time. That low end trash is so bad. If these guys can make that one part better for the same price...that's a significant upgrade.
  • 2 0
 Why are DVO forks such a love/hate thing? Isn't that argument of the guy at specialized designing the e150 and never looking at again a bit of a strawman? Surely It was unpopular because of its inevitable teething issues, different axle size and the fork not being rs/fox so they canned it; rather than just not being interested in doing a rev B
  • 3 0
 Well, the e150 was a piece of crap. It wasn’t solely unpopular for the “teething “ issues, it was unreliable first and foremost, but it also came out during a time where the bike manufacturers were looking for a solution for stiffer forks. Specialized created a dual crown 150mm fork for 1 1/8” headsets, everyone else went with tapered, and...that was a wrap. I bought a 2008 Enduro SL, and wanted to love that thing, but nothing on it worked. To be fair, the proprietary rear shock wasn’t worth a damn either. The real sting was how bad Specialized was the only authorized mechanic, and had to be done in-house. That meant having the part sent back via LBS and waiting...forever- while the good riding season passed by. Giant, are you listening? Yah, don’t do that sh*t.

As far as DVO goes can’t speak to that but they do have a loyal following. And it would appear that they are receptive to their customer base.
  • 1 0
 @vw4ever: Spesh have been doing the same thing with ohlins suspension, only allowing it to be serviced thru the main distributor, here at least anyway. They have proven to be a right pain in the dick to deal with, even on top of all the problems. I had a fork chew out its stanchions in just over a year (probably due to tight bushings) & the steerer tube moved in the crown. Luckily was all replaced but their service has been pretty awful on more than one occasion & quality of work lacking. I was hoping to see ohlins catch on when they started doing mtb gear but it looks like the opposite has happened.
  • 2 0
 @zyoungson: That’s too bad. I haven’t bought a Specialized bike in a while, so had stopped paying attention to their woes. I mean, at least with all the complaints about RS and Fox, there’s a manual online and most things can be accomplished at home with those brands (unless it’s a nitrogen charge thing, but now even Fox is authorizing some local bike shops to do that work- we have one here in Bellingham now that is authorized to do such work).

It’s kind of a shame- they (Spesh) have some innovative bikes. The new Enduro and the SJ Evo are interesting to me, and it seems to me that the move to a regular mount rear shock is that there is someone beginning to get it at the top of the food chain. So maybe there’s hope yet.
  • 3 0
 Do you even ..... ever....enve....giant forks bro. Seriously, why not. They know what their doing and giant bicycle purchasers will get a great fork for less moola. Better to buy more shit than more expensive shit.
  • 4 2
 "The greatest leap forward in the past five years has been the addition of a rubber bag on top of the damper cartridge"
For rockshox at least! Fox was using a bladder in like 2004. Manitou was already using a spring backed IFP, then Air IFP.
Even Marzocchi gave it a go before RS finally caught up.
"constant improvement and the stream of micro-innovations" Constant stream of 'How can we copy that without copyright infringement?'
  • 2 0
 It looks like this targets entry level bikes. I see boost thru axles and tokens being used though, if these features are made available on their cheaper bikes it will be a win for the buyers. If you get RS Recon performance at Suntour XCT/XCM price, again it's awin. All you want as a beginner is components that simply work so you can focus on tackling the trail.
  • 2 0
 Vertical integration is a great way to lower the costs. I can't see if their forks are just ok, why a lower-mid level bike buyer would swap them. Designing and building a decent fork does't require black magic, just some good engineers and some time.
  • 2 0
 "Reportedly, "Crest" forks will offer performance and reliability that matches or exceeds present offerings from the likes of RockShox, Fox, and SR Suntour."

what does this even mean? reportedly? at the $400 price point maybe. no qualification in that statement at all. LOOK OUT SUPERBRUNI & OHLINS! Giant's in the game now!
  • 7 3
 Well, it's worth a try. Now if Giant could update their bike models, that would be nice.
  • 3 1
 While I doubt it will happen, this could lower prices and push models like Trance to below 2k mark, which would be fantastic.
  • 5 0
 @phops: They actually have a sick under 2k line. The stance is bad ass
  • 14 1
 You mean update models beyond the new Trance that came out last year, new Reign that came out this year, new Defy that came out last year, Propel the year before that, Contend and Escape this year...OK sure, the current Glory is 5 (6?) years old and the 27.5 Trance was updated for 2017...but seriously, what more do you want?
  • 1 0
 @phops: I think this one is 100-120mm so probably wont be on the Trance for bit. Hopefully a next generation will do that. It would be sweet to have a low end Trance that comes with a fork like this for an affordable price to get in the door. And then things could be upgraded later on by the customer. $2000+ is a lot to ask for someone new to the sport so if they could get down to $1500 or below I think they would print money.
  • 3 1
 @mnorris122:

What he means is change their suspension design every 2-3 years just because.....

Maestro works fine....has been for a decade now. Look at how many bikes change and end up looking like a Session again anyway.
  • 2 0
 @FurryCrew: maestro has been around since 2003. That's a good run. Not as good as fsr but still.
  • 2 1
 @makripper: eh...I have a low price point stance. It's far from great. The suspension design is pretty poor and the fork is horrible. They would kill it if they put Meastro on the Stance and a decent Giant fork.
  • 3 2
 until someone is willing to take the risk to design something completely from the ground up completely free of 'industry standards' that says X component need to fit Y component in said fashion we'll continue to get very incremental improvements. While this is hardly that guessing Giant would be one of the few to have the resources to do that. looking forward to the next Honda DH bike
  • 13 3
 you mean like the Trust fork?
  • 4 0
 @friendlyfoe: Or the Maverick bike with it's proprietary strut shock and dual crown travel adjust bolt through fork designed by one of the MTB industries pioneers and innovators? How is that company doing by the way?
  • 3 1
 An artist, huh. Sounds about right.
  • 1 2
 @friendlyfoe: Trust sticks to industry standards just fine, doesn't it? It takes a regular axle and fits a regular headset. Brands have been willing to be free from industry standards. Curnut took a 30mm front axle and Specialized (with their E150 DC fork for their enduro bike) took a 25mm axle. The original DC Cannondale lefty fork also takes a special hub and I thought it also required a very specific headtube length. But other than that the Trust fork may change the dynamic geometry of the bike, it will fit industry standard component interfaces (hub, brake and headset) just fine.
  • 1 0
 I can't really see how using a different diameter hub would somehow be a bigger departure than what trust has done with their fork. The biggest departure anyone has been able to dream up is a telelever front suspension and they have never caught on. To depart any farther than that and you would be riding something other than a bike.
  • 1 0
 @friendlyfoe: There may be some misunderstanding but what I took from the original post is that it was about "industry standards" and we only need standards in component interfaces. Which in the case of a bicycle fork are the headtube, axle and brake (and maybe tire clearance/size and aftermarket fenders). Everything in between is not bound by standards. Unless of course you take into account that bike designers design their geometries around a certain wheel axle path and a fixed axle offset. Call it brave or stupid, at the end of the day to take full advantage of this nonlinear axle path the frame designers will have to design their frames around this concept. Which is a bit of a risk because it would make them hugely dependent on a single fork supplier. It is much wiser to then take it all in their own hands and make something like that Structure bike where the front suspension linkage is integrated in the frame and they are free to pick any rearshock from different manufacturers. And then of course, the linkage fork by itself isn't new either. The German A Kilo has been around for so long! As far as thinking outside the box, German A also has a dual arch Magura like XC fork (36mm stanchions for 100mm of travel) and a lightweight USD fork (with air damping).

I know lots of people here on PB bitch about the looks of the Trust fork but I don't mind that at all. Still to me the Trust fork isn't revolutionary either. It still seems like a middle ground transitional product between the common telescopic forks (which have the advantage of being compact and of being easily interchangeable by a competitors product) and having the front suspension linkage actually integrated in the frame where you still have the option to replace the standard shock without messing with the intended dynamic geometry.

But yeah, I guess we had some misunderstanding where I interpreted "free from industry standards" as interface standards and you took it as a departure from the most common bicycle front suspension. Fair enough.
  • 1 0
 "The reason bike brands failed is that they don't make their stuff and their overarching concern is making bikes."

Indeed, I've noticed that a lot of entry-level Syncros (Scott) stuff is sourced from the same manufacturer(s) as Brand-X. That's probably the way to go about it, rather than trying to reinvent commodity parts.
  • 2 0
 Syncros rims are Alex. I found that out trying to replace a rim for one with the same ERD.
  • 11 0
 Bless Brand-X. That's some quality budget gear that have all the old and bizarre diameters covered.
  • 5 0
 "The tubular element in the arch is interesting"
Brilliant I think
  • 6 0
 would be nice for mounting a headlight
  • 10 1
 @matt-15: Weed stash point.
  • 13 0
 @sherbet: both can be used for getting lit
  • 5 1
 Good wordplay dude, hella good.
  • 1 0
 @matt-15: I've never tried mounting a light to my fork lower but I expect the moving shadows because of the moving light will make me sick when riding in the woods.
  • 2 0
 @sherbet: rool it phat n neat for a snug fit
  • 1 0
 The real benefit: lower price. I think this adventure will succeed.
The video was about as informative as a grade five book report from a kid who didn't read the book, but honestly if giant can make an average fork to put on their entry level xc bikes they will be able to drop the price even further. That's their niche; lower prices for good bikes. This opens up the low end even more to them.
  • 1 0
 "Arguably, follow-through and customer support makes or breaks suspension companies, and this will be Giant's greatest challenge."

^^ This will be key.

Giant have the skill, might and brand penetration to make this work on the shop floor, especially at the budget and mid-level markets but if they don't follow through with servicing and parts backup they will fail. Here in the UK there are loads of specialist suspension tuners and servicers that will take pretty much any fork and tune it to you, if Giant can get these service houses a ready supply of spare parts and technical manuals they will have that backup covered. Do this worldwide and you get yourself in the market. BOS failed at this stage and a lot of YT Capra's now have Fox or Rockshox kit now to replace them as not being able to service your expensive suspension for nearly 18 months was a deathknell as far as reputation was concerned.

Mind you Fox dropped the ball here too when they switched from Mojo to Silverfish as their official importer/service centre. Mojo took great pride in supporting the product for over 20 years, sponsoring riders and giving them discounted/free setup clinics and servicing. You'd go to any race and see Fox on well over half the bikes and it would be top end product too. Now that Fox have switched importer the fields have much more of Rockshox and the rest, Fox is still around but nowhere near as much as it used to be. I know this is top-end racer stuff but if Giant have any ideas of going further upmarket they need to get that side right too.

As a plus, we might see entry-level forks go up in quality as Giant will have to make their offering demonstrably better than the incumbents. Forks getting praise in £1k hardtail shootouts etc. Could be good for us as consumers.
  • 1 0
 I agree. I think they will manage it. The most similar product to a suspension fork that Giant has produced recently is their dropper post. They managed to produce a reasonably priced and reliable post that in many ways is preferable to the higher-end products from the competition. So I have high hopes for these forks.
  • 1 0
 Cannondale did not fail. Head shock is a good system. On structural strength and steering precision, not even dh triple clamps get close. Small bump sensitivity is amazing. Frame compatibility, travel, servicing and cost were big hurdles to over come. I raced DH for Fox (mojo) for a few years, but I still love my head shock for stoppies and precision riding. I took one of mine to the 1996 world DH champs and I ride one today too, but also run xfusion, and rockshox on other rigs for compatibility, travel and servicing reasons. But cannondale didn't fail in my view.
  • 4 0
 I support this because Taiwan is an independent nation. Fuck the Chinese Communist Party.
  • 1 0
 Giant MPH brakes (V1)s were just rejigged Hope C2s, and were great. Current MPHs are very similar to deore, and absolutely fine.
When i bough my 2004 XtC, nothing else on the market was offering hydraulic brakes at the price.

They already make their own shock, which in reviews i seem to recall is the preferred shock for the suspension platform, over the float.
i suspect the fork will be nothing to write home about, but there will also be no reason to change it either. Itll operate correctly and without fuss for the lifetime of the bike. Servicing it might be its downfall, if it doesn't use generic parts. I suspect the high spec bikes will still get the named brands fitted, but the extra cost wont necessarily be worth it.
  • 1 0
 No need to get so excited about a low tier fork.100-120mm of travel I see this going on cheap hard tails. Not a bad idea, either bring the price point down or bring a bit more money in house. I can see Giant changing their minds when they realize there will be more back end work, maintenance, warranty and parts work than they realize.
  • 5 1
 Will they come in overdrive?
  • 8 8
 I would not be buying a Giant that comes with a Crest fork. Over my 30 years of MTB of have seen several models of fork fail for everyone that bought the new thing. Some companies disappear quickly and some take a few years to get the product right. And some established companies redesign their product to create a model that is terrible.

Warranty is no good if you are off your new bike for two months. Or a year because they have to remanufacture every single fork and you are in a queue of thousands. And, having had six Giants crack, I can hear them saying "We've never seen that before!" or "This time we've fixed the problem." Which is why I won't buy another Giant.
  • 3 1
 Giants gimmicks they do suck like the half hydro road brakes and stuff these forks will be hit and miss.

But after 25 years in the trade giant has the best wty hands down rarely do they not wty a bike even if you say I don’t think it’s wty they come through with a freshie for the customer
  • 8 0
 sounds like a regional problem, Giant Canada is amazing in their warranty dept!
  • 1 1
 @lifted-d: I'm happy to hear Giant takes care of some regions. Unfortunately Giant USA sucks wanker in service where I'm at. I've had 2 LBS's including myself not be able to make consistent contact, if any at all with them regarding replacement parts. Both the shops I went to are Giant shops and openly admitted that they have issues with them as well. I used to love Giant. I've owned 3 and still have 2.
  • 3 2
 I don’t think a company that makes the most tragic
Dropper post ever should be specing there own forks!

Maybe the fork is made from two warranty giant contact posts With an arch between
  • 2 0
 Fox and RS are no more concerned then Santa Cruz is when Giant releases its latest "trail" bike that looks like a full suspension road bike
  • 1 0
 This move can only be good hopefully, Giant can start selling bikes in a shopfront with the same spec and price as a direct-to-consumer brand like yt and commencal, they aren't far above in price as it is
  • 1 0
 I personally don’t like giant bikes I hope they succeed with this but since it’s their own brand fork prices will definitely drop lower I wonder if they will make a shock also
  • 1 1
 I'm going to apologize in advance. I don't care how good they ever build any product. Until they learn how to get their customer support together, I'll never buy another product from them. Rant over... Sorry about that everybody. Enjoy your weekend!
  • 2 0
 So Giant announces this and Mark Fitzsimmons leaves Fox - www.instagram.com/p/B3yHwYfnHhv/?utm_source=ig_web_copy_link - coincidence?
  • 3 1
 Props on giant for putting them selves in the suspension game but I don’t if its gonna turn out so great...
  • 3 0
 Will it be stiff enough for a giant?
  • 4 0
 Well not at first but I'm calling it now, next year they will make a DH fork called the Stiffy. Just imagine it, a Giant Glory with a Stiffy
  • 5 0
 @BrigadierBuege: lol this isn’t Cove
  • 1 1
 edit - delete
  • 2 3
 The fork design elements point to the same manufacturer as DVO, Sr SunTour. So I guess much of the low end stuff by Giant will have the same internals as DVO and the old Marzocchi forks.
  • 14 1
 The more I read about Dave Weagle, the more I begin to think that he is a businessman more than an engineer.
  • 2 0
 After reading the judgement ,it seemed his patent application was deficient @phops:
  • 10 0
 @endlessblockades : Not that again. Giant paid DW $600k to help them design Maestro from the start (after Giant ran afoul of Specialized after Giant paid heaps for Renault to design NRS). It wasn't until they parted ways over designs issues that DW got his knickers in a twist. He lost the court case. End of story.
  • 2 0
 Dw lost
  • 3 0
 @iamamodel: Yes, thank you. This myth will Just. Not. Die.
  • 2 0
 The reason you know his name is that he’s both!
@phops:
  • 2 2
 I'm pretty sure Giant owns DVO and Suntour so there is nothing to steal outside of potential profit.
  • 1 0
 @Ghostifari: I wasn't meaning Giant stole anything, I was merely pointing they surely benefited from SunTour's experience. And they surely aimed to cut production costs by using some off the shelf parts already in production in SunTour's actual lines. Bringing a whole production line up from bare ground isn't just extremely costly, it also doesn't make sense if you want your products in the market in a reasonable time frame.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: It never gets old.
  • 3 0
 The question is ....is it as good as Their dropper post??
  • 2 0
 And that's exactly why you wouldn't buy the first generation of Crest forks. Their Switch improved over time, but still, even with constant maintenance, you can't stop the stanchion coating from rubbing off.
  • 4 1
 "went out surfing and crawled out burping"
  • 2 0
 Woah this came out late. Giant posted this on their ig and dropped the webpage yesterday morning
  • 3 0
 They were likely under and embargo until Giant got their stuff posted.
  • 2 3
 It’ll be a Suntour for sure no doubt in my mind. But as we move forward bike builders will move away from standards & keep making stuff exclusively for there bikes & no one else’s just like car manufactures or motorcycles keeping all profits In house smart for the penny counters bad for us
  • 3 0
 Here's to hoping they make a cheap and reliable DJ fork.
  • 4 0
 Manitou Circus
  • 1 1
 @CullenHerring: I guess I should've added "aesthetically pleasing" as well.
  • 3 1
 @AWDxTY: I can't see how having a spring roll as the lowers bridge is an aesthetical improvement over Manitou's reverse arch.
  • 2 3
 GIANT makes everything and most of it is good stuff but I have a problem with mega companies like them...its the "World according to GIANT"....29ers aren't going to last and Fatbikes either... they lost a bit of revenue on those two faux pas Smile
  • 1 0
 What? No! Reminds me when the Specialized enduro had it's own in house Spesh branded double crown fork. That lasted about 1 year...
  • 1 0
 I think the tubular section in the arch of the fork is for there in house Swat/EDC weed vaporizer coming out next.
Full integration!
  • 2 2
 These forks are made of cheese. The design engineer just said so! “The cheeses are the most important part”. “Without good development of the cheeses the product would not work”.
  • 1 0
 Folks - Giant was FORCED to make a fork after Levy went DOWNCOUNTRY with that Trust linkage fork on their test bike... Lets wait for the actual test!
  • 1 0
 Well like all discount brands it's a race to the bottom Giant has been a discount brand in discount retailers in New Zealand for a number of years.
  • 1 0
 LSC knob was drawn by a trainee on his/her first day at work. However, I hope they enter the no-toy-real-full-suspension-kids-bike-with-proper-air-sprung-suspension...
  • 1 0
 Oh my Eek This is very interesting. I’d like to see what a long term review says about it. How will it hold up against the big suspension names?
  • 2 0
 rather have a maverick duc, marzzochi rac or halston inversion fork fo shure....
  • 1 0
 Halston?
  • 1 0
 "went out surfing and crawled out burping". I like it RC. Might not resonate with everyone, but definitely a rite of passage.
  • 3 0
 Am I the only one that cringes when they see a SM-RT56 rotor?
  • 3 0
 I cringe whenever I see a shimano rotor of any kind.
  • 1 0
 @pinnityafairy: That's crazy but glad you found a good way to make it work. I hate my new specialized post. Might switch soon
  • 1 0
 Their dropper post is decent, a fork might be too. What if you can get an Anthem with decent suspension, brakes, a dropper post and 11 speed for under $2k?
  • 3 2
 ...because that 2008 specialized enduro dual crown fork experiment went so well for them...
  • 3 2
 Bike companies make Hubs. Rims. Grips. Bars. Tires. Seats. And stupid Electric Motorcycles. Why hate on suspension?
  • 1 0
 If these turn out to be any good they'll be an amazing value on the used market, at least until word gets out.
  • 2 0
 They gonna use that fork to eat a Giant piece of market cake
  • 2 2
 Giant, I like to buy your product but I also like to Make America Great Again. Can you please have white children make these forks?
  • 2 1
 More proprietary junk...This means Trek and Specialized aren’t far behind.
  • 2 0
 I’m really digging that tubular arch.
  • 1 0
 When someone like Sam Hill wins on a Giant fork the rest of the brands will disappear.
  • 2 0
 Add this to the list of things I will never buy!
  • 1 0
 Giant had already made their own win fork but just junk. This RST made fork won't be good I bet.
  • 2 0
 Great stash spot!
  • 1 0
 Only time will tell. Matched performance that's a giant statement.
  • 2 1
 Can't wait to see if they come out with a shock
  • 1 0
 Remember the 2016 Trance 27.5 4?
  • 2 0
 they have made terrific coil and air shocks for decades, not fancy but functional price point units, better than fusion, or dnm other oem spec shocks for sure. similar to old basic vanilla r (no piggy back)
  • 3 2
 9 out of 10 dentists will not recommend this fork.
  • 3 5
 This is the parent company Giant not Giant bikes. Notice they make parts for Sram. Like maybe forks?
These won't have the name appeal of Fox and RS but I'm certain the quality will be the same .... Or better.
  • 1 0
 Giant makes forks for three different companies. Wow!
  • 1 0
 Be careful, it is a fraud! It is not e-bike approved!
  • 1 0
 100-120 mm... where you sposed to put a fork that small?
  • 1 0
 Advertorial piece if ever I've seen one!
  • 2 0
 rigid is the future
  • 1 0
 Tubular arch hollow , great for....storage
  • 1 0
 Why not? If they can make a decent product it means much cheaper bikes.
  • 1 0
 Who wrote this nonsense? God it's over the top.
  • 1 0
 Hopefully the fork isn't as bad as their garbage carbon rims!
  • 1 0
 That’s what she said!
  • 3 2
 But why?
  • 1 1
 I would bet money that it is actually made by SR Suntour
  • 1 0
 *ocho
  • 1 1
 Apirl fools?
  • 1 1
 No.
  • 1 1
 um no.
  • 4 7
 140-160 is the biggest market. Figured theyd start there. Could be some great prices on the already well priced line up
  • 20 2
 No, it really isn't the biggest market. 100-120mm hardtails definitely more than quadruple the sales of enduro bikes. I'm sure if this works out for them they'll branch out to more models.
  • 5 0
 @sherbet: yes, i guess i was thinking of the pb market
  • 3 6
 @sherbet: For serious riders it's the biggest segment.
  • 8 1
 No, it really isn't. XC and trail still outsell enduro bikes by a fairly wide margin. I've worked in Ontario and BC and the same was true in both shops. 140-160 is by no means the biggest market.
  • 2 3
 @sherbet: Trail is up to 160. Where in BC? Also you are off the mark. Mid to low end bikes sell the most and are the backbones of the shops I've worked in. Margins are worse but the volume makes up for it.
  • 1 0
 Kelowna. Sold more trail and mid travel bikes than 160s. Things might have changed in the three years, but I can say here in Ontario, it's vastly skewed towards XC. I'd imagine most markets (aka not in the mountains) would also reflect that. Mountain cities will obviously be the other way by and large, but most of us unfortunately don't have silverstar around the corner.
  • 1 1
 @sherbet: figured 140 was in the trail bike category but then i was also thinking mts and west coast
  • 3 0
 Sorry but some of this elitist shit is painful to read. So "serious" riders ride mid/long travel forks and "mid/low end" bikes take shorter travel? Long travel may have gotten more and more expensive over the years but high end short travel bikes never went away. And in the context of this article, it isn't even all that relevant. The choice in good 140-160mm travel forks is abundant at the moment so it is by no means like they urgently need another alternative for their bikes (or for that of other OEM manufacturers). I can imagine though that the supply of good shorter travel trail forks (so not pure XC race) is lacking so that's where opportunities lie.
  • 1 1
 @vinay: serious subject is serious
  • 1 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: He does have a completely reasonable point. Serious riders pick the right travel for the job, which by and large isn't 140-160mm.

Vinay, there are tons of good 100-120mm options right now. The new RS Recon is a pretty awesome fork for $300 CAD or whatever. There's a new Revelation as of a few years ago. RS redid the Sektor recently. Fox has the Rythm forks which are pretty damned good, but really only an OEM option. The market is good my man!
  • 3 3
 @sherbet: in my original post all i said was i figured theyd start with a 140-160 fork. A simple harmless unoffensive comment. You fkn morans claiming to be the experts on all things take it to "serious riders pick the right fork for the right job". How in f would you know that a 140-160 fork isnt "the right fork for the right job" for my consideration? Your a bike shop snob from ontario. Pretty much explains it all. Stick to your hardwood hills uber gnar bud. Youre a hack
  • 2 0
 You realize we're not replying to you in context to that post, right? Makripper said that and people are replying to that sentiment.

Thank you for the needlessly shitty reply. I've been nothing but civil with you, but here you are swinging your dick around because someone dare disagree/correct you. Grow up you child.
  • 2 3
 @sherbet: you condescending shop douches suck and you wonder why people buy online. Check yourself
  • 1 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: In what way have I condescended to you?
  • 1 0
 @sherbet: i guess it was vinay that intrerjected w the "painful read" comment. My apologies
  • 2 0
 @won-sean-animal-chin: All good my dude. Ride on!
  • 2 0
 @sherbet: Nope still the same. The average RV driving boomer wants a cheap but cool hardtail still.
  • 1 0
 @makripper: Huh? Did I disagree with that?
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