First Look: Giant's New Carbon Glory 27.5

Feb 15, 2015
by Mike Kazimer  
Last year's launch of a revised aluminum version of Giant's venerable Glory DH bike, complete with 27.5” wheels, a longer front center, and a longer stroke rear shock, immediately led to questions about the possibility of a carbon fiber option. Those questions have been answered in the form of the Advanced Glory 27.5 0 and the Advanced Glory 27.5 1, two new models to Giant's DH lineup, both featuring carbon fiber front triangles and aluminum rear ends. With a claimed weight of 3008 grames for the frame without a shock, Giant says this is the lightest downhill bike they've ever produced, coming in at 245 grams lighter than the full aluminum version.

The bikes share the same geometry as their aluminum counterparts, with a 63° head angle and 439mm chainstays. The 8" (203mm) of rear travel is achieved via Giant's Maestro dual link suspension layout, which uses a rocker link mounted on the seat tube and another link that curves over the bottom bracket to join the rear swingarm to the front triangle. Cartridge bearings are used in the linkage in an effort to increase the rear end sensitivity by reducing the amount of force needed to activate the shock. Like the aluminum version, the Advanced Glory has integrated fork bump stops, and has the brake and derailleur housing routed externally along the top of the downtube.


Giant Glory 2015
The Advanced Glory 27.5 0 comes spec'd with a race-ready parts kit, including SRAM's new X01 DH 7-speed drivetrain, a RockShox Boxxer Team fork, Vivid R2C rear shock, and a set of DT Swiss EX 471 rims laced to DT's 240 hubs. MSRP is $8,500 USD.

Giant Glory 2015
At $5,355, the Advanced Glory 27.5 1 is competitively priced, with a RockShow Boxxer RC, a Vivid Coil R2C, and SRAM Guide brakes to keep everything under control, while Schwalbe's Magic Mary tires should provide plenty of traction for the most technical tracks around.

Giant s New Carbon Glory 27.5 specs

Geometry
glory 27.5 geometry


www.giant-bicycles.com


213 Comments

  • 135 12
 All this new hotness and you couldn't put a Boxxer WC on your top of the line DH bike? Why? It's already expensive. Why not go all out and shoot for the stars.
  • 61 13
 some people just prefer coil
  • 16 8
 @Hobo1337 nah Giant puts weirdly lower-level forks on some other bikes too. Like on the carbon rimmed, X01 level XTC 1 they put on a Sid RC with Poploc remote. Why they didn't at least do an RCT3 made no sense to me.
  • 13 7
 @Hobo1337 That's true. But air springs are easier to set up the sag and it's a lot less messy than taking a spring out and then greasing up another one to put back in the fork.
  • 4 1
 yeah i had no idea about this trend in other giant bikes. They do have the same adjustments though so making that change at the sacrifice of weight and easy spring rate setup is a quick way to drop almost 500 bucks off the price
  • 86 10
 the 9700$ 2015 demo comes with the team edition as well, the reasoning behind that is that most pro riders prefer the feel of coil, and rich dentists want what the pros ride.
  • 17 76
flag VPPFREEDOM (Feb 15, 2015 at 0:46) (Below Threshold)
 you're parents must have dropped you on your head a couple to many times there snoopy
  • 17 1
 you can put a solo air cartridge into a boxxer team if you dont use it first. the spring scours the inside of the stanchion and stops it from sealing. but from new the staunchions are identical.
  • 7 17
flag pjeeta (Feb 15, 2015 at 2:13) (Below Threshold)
 It would've been better if they had put a BoXXer WC on it
  • 9 11
 So then in theory @Hobo1337, to purchase the new Boxxer WC by itself should be cheaper than buying a brand new team fork.

I know if I was dropping $8500 on a new bike, I would want a boxxer WC on it.
  • 9 0
 The new solo air kit is only $188, which doesn't make much sense as the WC and the Team have a $425 price difference in MSRP. I'm sure the manufacturers have a higher profit margin with the Team VS. the WC and figure if people want to upgrade to the WC they only need to drop $188 extra.
  • 68 17
 If I was purchasing an $8500 bike, I wouldn't want a boxxer on it at all haha
  • 9 7
 @sdiz. If it's capable enough to win World Cup DH races then it's worthy of a high end spec.

@digr. Nice tip there.

@Dan255. Yeah, higher profit margin on high end forks. That's how they pay for the marketing, ha.
  • 2 0
 Specialized did the same with the Demo 8 line. (maybe with other models as well)
They like to do this to us, it is a torture Smile
  • 3 1
 The sworks demo that's 9k has the coil as well
  • 7 8
 @protour... I don't care if it's capable or not, I just don't like it. That's all I'm saying
  • 8 2
 At that price point without a world cup, who cares about carbon id take the new wilson SL. Costs a grand less and has a world cup.
  • 6 0
 The irony in that is as the prices up up on higher end stuff, your bike shop margins typically go down..
  • 10 2
 at 5300$, the transition TR500 comes with a Boxxer WC...
  • 8 12
flag almostalx (Feb 15, 2015 at 9:48) (Below Threshold)
 @zede And an alu frame and Zee groupset...You are not serious are you? @JackMazury The Wilson Sl is alu....You should compare it with the alu glory 0 witch is 5700$. You people are making me laugh. Giant has got the best quality/price on the market. I'm not asking you to like them. I'm just saying if you don't know you should.
  • 3 0
 @emeriska yeah, transition are quite expensive bikes, but the TR500 1 has X0 and Saint parts ; I understand that its 700$ more expensive than the alu glory 0, but my point was to show that's it's probably a mater of brand preference.
  • 7 0
 $8000 and the carbon operator has a wc on it.
  • 1 1
 what about the Giant Carbon weight...??????
  • 5 0
 Aluminum Giant Glory - 245g = Carbon Glory Weight.
  • 6 0
 that's all...? thanks Dan! i was expecting a revolution!!
  • 10 3
 @snoopy24777 quit the rich dentist BS under every mention of a high end bike, it's pathetic. Also, just look around, there's at least as many pros in the top spots that ride the air, so it's not like trying to ride the same as the pros or not. I do understand there's people who prefer coil, but I agree that on a top spec bike should come a top spec fork, and I'm rather bummed by it. And yes I think I am a target market for these, although I'm not a rich dentist, nor lawyer nor anything like that. I just like riding bikes.
  • 5 1
 If there is dentists that do DH, props to them. They should have a 10g bike. Because most dentists would avoid doing anything risky because they do not want to injure their hands.
  • 3 0
 the revolution is that giant Al is really light, as is trek. thin walled in low stress zones etc. as stated, carbon is stiffer and reduces vibrations so its not all about grams. that red bike! finally some good looking, non flo colors. now if giant could find a better blue to use.
  • 3 6
 I would just like to enlighten a lot of you, this year rockshox is killing it !Their new damping is sweet! all of the forks with the new cartridges.The fox products and quality so far this year have went down a lot, sad to say.
  • 7 0
 Rabid anti-dentites and homophobes? You think that they are so different from me and you? They came to this country just like everybody else, in search of a dream.
  • 4 0
 hahaha anti-dentites
  • 2 0
 Hope you caught my Seinfeild reference. Comment about nothing.
  • 2 0
 @snoopy24777 Arent the pro's running Zocchi 380's????
  • 2 0
 some people just want the world to burn
  • 1 0
 The Head Giant WC Mechanic along with there riders Prefer the Boxxer Team over the World Cup which is most likely why it is on there. Also I have to say what is the advantage of a Carbon frame? I thought most people wanted them because they are lighter. I can put a Ti spring on a Aluminum Glory 0 and it is just as light as the Carbon one saving $1800.
  • 58 3
 is anyone else suprsied by the mere 240 gram weight reduction, i mean thats half a pound, i know the aluminuim bike was light but that seems like a pretty negligible weight difference.
  • 8 0
 i had the same response
  • 8 0
 went a bit safer so with the layup so it should be a lot stronger than the alu version.
  • 58 1
 There are other advantages to carbon than weight...stiffness for example...or so PB tells me.....that's why I spent an extra 2k on my frame.....fuck
  • 17 3
 The GT Fury is heavier in carbon than it's aluminum frame.
  • 7 1
 Yeee, as @medievalbiking said, there's PLENTY more advantages to carbon then weight. I'll be one hundred percent honest, when I first rode my carbon frame (with plenty other carbon components) it definitely felt slightly better. But I really notice it when I go back and ride aluminum, then I can really feel the difference in the carbon, then on top of all that I suppose you can factor in weight.
  • 1 0
 Yeah and I ve always heard that the switch from Alu to Carbon was making a '1kg' différence- lol
  • 11 7
 There are also more disadvantages to carbon than just the price. In some applications it is too stiff (handlebars) and while in most cases it's hit resistance may be bigger than alu, it is still surrounded by many sea stories. Some get paid to ride it and they keep quiet about failures, Journos open their mouths lately and majority of people who can afford it, ride max twice a week, so they don't really expose it to serious testing. So if you happen to be a man who can use the advantage and is willing to pay for it, you may be surprised that carbon is not a Godsend for those with fat wallets, nothing is.
  • 6 3
 240 grams is actually pretty substantial. If you figure the rear triangle is still made of aluminum, that means they lost more than a 1/2 pound to of the front triangle alone.
  • 6 0
 If DH riders keep obsessing over weight its gonna become like road biking:

velonews.competitor.com/2015/02/news/sram-recalls-zipp-88-hubs_360785
  • 3 7
flag notenufbikes (Feb 15, 2015 at 7:13) (Below Threshold)
 Only front triangle in carbon and alloy rear? I see they've been hanging around with Specialized! When they expect customers to pay the price, at least give them full carbon bike! :S
  • 37 2
 That's the weight of poop...meaning, if you want to be lighter at no cost, poop before the ride!
  • 3 0
 Having a carbon rear triangle might make it heavier because they have to reinforce it more than they would with the aluminum. The rear triangle takes a ton of pressure with every hit, so they have to make sure it won't crack. But, the front triangle can take some damage too. 25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_mauy8ypu0V1qz5udno1_1280.jpg
  • 7 3
 carbon rear end makes no sense. The further out you go towards the wheel the more weight saving matters, too bad the less meet there is to save weight on. You ned to make alu inserts and wrap them with lots of CF weave so it makes no sense. Chainstays will be heavier in CF due to necessity of making them hit resistant. If you have construction like spec or trek, then you can easily make carbon seat stays, but in case of this Glory or V10 it is absolutely pointless and only marketing department can make sense of that, not engineering.
  • 6 1
 Sorry Waki but my carbon DH has held up far better than the multitude of Alu and steel frames I have cracked over the years. And carbon can be repaired (locally)as easily as Alu which needs to be welded, heat treated and re-aligned, but obviously not as easily as steel. My frame has seen 4-5 days a week year round for several seasons on The Shore with a bunch of Whistler days thrown in. Really can't find a harsher enviro to test durability. I agree there is no sense in building a carbon chain stay though.
  • 9 4
 kathwill - I have little problem with carbon front triangle and main link, just as with separate seat stays in designs which have them, as they are simply carbon tubes with a bit of wrapping around alu inserts, which are easier and much cheaper to make than a whole bunch of molds for a VPP, Maestro, DW-link, Banshee kind of bike. I have no probs with carbon uppers/steerer for RS-1. I am parted on rims, unless it's 29" rims we talk about, I see little point of going there, but stuff like handlebars, seat rails, pedals, stems, hubs, brake levers, chain guides, brake rotors (for the love of God), shifter covers, derailleurs, is just pushing the edge... and that is not the racing edge. It's an edge of how much can you push up man's ass so that he still finds pride in being a part of the FIAFOM (effed in arse for own money) club
  • 1 0
 Giants Advanced carbon frames use t-600 grade carbon, which as seen here is not much different in weight to their alu frames, no doubt they will be releasing an "advanced sl" frame that uses a t-700 carbon instead meaning a lighter stiffer frame so that would no doubt make a bigger difference. of course there would be another cost increase

Santa cruz do a simlar thing with the v10 carbon and the v10 carbon c
  • 2 1
 also just noticed that this is another example of a company that produce a "carbon" bike with an alu rear triangle, claiming that there is not a justified weight increase and then bring it out with a carbon rear end in a year or two..... its just the big bike companies trying to get you to buy the same bike as many times as possible
  • 10 0
 What if your competition poops also!? Then their bike will still be one poop lighter than yours!
  • 7 1
 @WAKIdesigns, well I suppose it's no question who is not a fan boy of carbon here. Where I totally agree that for MANY people, carbon pedals (not a thing?), hubs, brake levers, chain guides and such aren't necessary, the handlebar and stem statements you make are way off. The thing I love about my carbon components, the stiffness, more direct pedal feedback and snapiness, especially in and out of corners. Now earlier you said it can be too stiff, specifically for handlebars? I would assume you mean in bump feedback to your hands or what not. Which would be a totally false statement, considering carbon fiber is less dense than any metal used in bikes, it transmits less incidental bump feedback. Go ride Whistler (the braking bumps specifically) for half a day with the non carbon bars of your choice, then get on a pair of SixC bars and Renthal soft grips and you'll be thanking me. You might actually be too hard headed for that but your hands and forearms will at least be thanking me.

In a general sense, how about we lay off what other people decide to spend their money on? I'm sure PLENTY of carbon owners ride more than twice a week FYI. It's their hard earned money, and no other man (or women, except wife and such...) should be commenting on ones money and how they spend it.
  • 3 0
 Carbon handlebars too stiff? Wut?
  • 2 0
 @Freerideguy14 please PLEASE make this something like a sticky in the sky or something, so that everyone can read that. Mostly the last paragraph really.
  • 1 0
 Kona does it also with the supreme operator. They have a carbon front with a aluminum rear
  • 1 1
 Mate, I'm getting one. It's not about the weight, it's about what it looks like and there are a lot of aging wankers with too much money to spend who demand carbon. Giant's aluminium tube forms are unreal, but if it's not carbon, we old farts simply aren't interested.
  • 1 1
 @Freerideguy14 - ok I went too fa with telling people what they whould or should not ride, I hate pople doing such prejudgmenst myself, sorry, sorry... initially I meant to say that it is the industry that proposes golden toilets and sees no probs if someone wants to buy them. Like a dildo for a 3 year old - vote with your dollars! But at the same time... you must decide whether carbon is responsive or compliant, stiff or flexy, because the only thing that can make that work in physical world is the power of money. Carbon DOES absorb smallest chatter but definitely not DH hits. Stiffness is cool in berms, on dirt jumps, pump track but in a rockgarden, I don't like to be tossed around by each planted rock or root, because responsiveness of carbon does not mean that it is nice where you want it, how quickly bike reacts to what you do with it, then suddenly as if by magic you don't get it transfered back to you. Yes it does kick back more than alu.

If you are really precise in handling your bike, ride so relaxed through roughest bits that bike dances under you and then you can use the advanteg of acceleration of light yet durable wheels, by pedalling out of stuff, pumping the last sht of every berm or backside, then for such case my argument is truly invalid.
  • 1 3
 If it's too bumpy, just slow down
  • 5 2
 jaame - you brute! It's about matching the frequency of your mind and body, with frequency of the bike and then with frequency of the terrain. There is a certain sine wave when riding through the stuff - it takes you to a place called "Flow" and you meet God there.
  • 1 0
 Giant no longer use T-600 carbon, it used to use it on their entry level carbon bikes (composite models. The Advanced carbon bikes use T-700 their advanced SL bikes use T-800 carbon. The problem is Giants alloy bikes are really light so when you go carbon weight savings are minimal, as mentioned above up you do gain elsewhere but I'm not sure if it's worth it.
  • 1 0
 isn't it that higher the number the lighter, stiffer yet more brittle it gets?
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns, okay okay, I see your argument, and I suppose we can both agree (respectively to everyone else as well) that it all comes down to rider preference. I personally prefer a much more responsive, playful, and (to my belief) ultimately faster ride. Like motos on the track, granted DH racing isn't track racing, stiffer suspension is faster. I can't fathom racing a DH bike, or Enduro bike with soft suspension set ups because I feel so slow when taking each hit I personally feel speed is lost when it's all absorbed. So yeah I personally prefer the super responsive and snapiness that carbon has, (as well as stiff suspension) for all types of riding purposes including DH tracks. With that, many others will be in complete disagreement and that does make a very valid case to carbon being obsolete (in the most practical ways at least). That view of carbon or style of riding is 100% OKAY. And truth is, some of those riders may still want carbon because it's the "newest" technology, it looks cleaner, or just to fit in. Which is also totally fine, but to your part, carbon has several applications within the bike industry, many functional and many not functional. At the end of the day, you can't hate on a company for trying to push more expensive products up our ass, they're big corporate business' what else should we expect? As much as we'd love to believe they're in it 100% for us, it's a business and it's how they make their living as well Smile
  • 2 1
 I guess everything is ok as long as people don't present their personal preference as God given, science blessed, physics proven fact, that everyone should acknowledge, especially when these days it is nearly impossible to not be suggested by easily accessible theories on everything. In this way tinies crap gets magnified to being a game changer. I don't think carbon is obsolete, but it definitely isn't as "clean" as people like RC try to convince us. I am weird, for instance I don't like Ti bolts, they creak and seize too easily Big Grin
  • 2 0
 I concur with alazamanza. When Santacruz decided to go carbon on their V-10, they started off with a carbon front frame and after a while came out with carbon rear triangle. I wouldn't be surprised if Giant follow suit and release a full carbon DH bike later down the line.
  • 1 0
 I think so too. It's all about selling units.

I thought the whole point of carbon was that the stiff.ess profile is different to aluminium. Small chatter is absorbed but bigger loads result in a stiffer response. Is that not so?
  • 2 0
 @kathwill, although the skinny stunts and constant drops on the North Shore are pretty abusive to the bike frame it is probably not harshest trail environment. Something like riding threw a moraine boulder field at speed is probably the worst.

So the benefits of a carbon frame are that it is lighter (not by much) and stiffer. But stiffer for how long. I always make a carbon frame analogy to a carbon hockey stick. Carbon hockey sticks are great when they are brand new. And if you keep using it and it does not break, you will still eventually have to replace it because it flexes too much. So why would this not happen to a carbon bike frame people? Honest question.

Meanwhile back at the ranch: I will keep buying top end bikes, and I will only stop complaining if I feel my money went to a worthwhile place and the bike is truly better than it's aluminum counterpart.
  • 1 0
 Amazing how much argument over materials for a machine to chuck you down a hill one sarcastic comment can spark. I love PB 3
  • 3 0
 @sithbike I did not know that about hockey sticks. thanks for the education.
  • 2 0
 it is not the carbon that goes soft it is the resin it uses, the resin absorbs water over time and so becomes heavier and softer, this is basically how carbon fatiuges and cannot be avoided but can be reduced by storing dry and putting a propper coat of paint on it, two things that do not happen as often as they should, however this happens at the same sort of rate as alu fatigue, but faster in applications where water emmersion happens, so hockey is quite a nasty enviroment for carbon sticks hence replacement frequency
  • 1 0
 The carbon hockey stick usually starts to flex at the blade when it needs replacement the shaft is more or less good. The blade of the stick is really the only part that gets a little wet. So yesterday (after playing hockey) I went to heed this new advice and remove the fabric hockey tape of the blade and make sure it was dry. I never even needed to remove the blade tape because it was completely dry to the touch. Unlike the skate blades which are covered in frozen slush. But a carbon bike is usually in a more wet environment for a longer period of time, when people ride in the rain. Or worst case scenario, which almost always happens. It's getting soaked with road grime and water when the bike is on the bike rack and you are driving threw a rain storm. Apparently, now I have to worry about more than just the chain rusting. I'm going to have to dry my bike whenever it's wet, and you guys all know how hard that is after a tough ride.
  • 1 0
 Especially when your hands have the skeleton grip because they are so cold, and all you want is a cup of tea and a 45 minute shower
  • 22 3
 Did anyone else not see that coming?just me? sick bike!
  • 16 7
 I saw it coming, just didn't expect it so soon. Although, with the way I ride aluminum is my friend.
  • 11 4
 Carbon is stronger than the aluminium frame
  • 16 2
 Comments like this make me laugh, assuming you prefer aluminum because you think it can withstand more abuse. There's a reason the stuff is used to make Formula 1 chassis. Watch this video, may change your mind

www.pinkbike.com/video/243228

Fwiw, I ride a 07 aluminum iron horse and a aluminum dw dhr ;D
  • 25 7
 not when you bash carbon against a rock... not many rocks on F1 tracks super genius.
  • 5 14
flag neil51 (Feb 15, 2015 at 4:20) (Below Threshold)
 My aluminium framed bikes got dents n the paint flaked of when they hit rocks n my carbon bike had scratched n small areas where the paint had came of so carbon is stronger than aluminium
  • 5 1
 I don't think too many formula 1 teams are working on a tight budget either. If they break it they can fix it without thinking twice about it.
  • 1 0
 Formula 1 would not implement carbon fiber into their chassis if it was not 100% sound secure and safe for the driver. They are hitting upwards of 200mph when they hit the track. I also understand that the physics of the differing applications may call for different structural designs to meet the needs of the sport you apply it to. As they are also thinking about weight, they are thinking about safety first. I would hope most mtb manufactures have the same thing in mind. Yet there will always be more failures when pushing the envelope to reach absolute perfection. In a manufacturing process, there will always be a defect somewhere down the line, just pray that you aren't the one to come across it. You still have to wonder, if guys are dropping bikes off of 40 vertical foot drops at rampage and getting away with their lives, why don't street bikes or motocross bikes apply carbon to their frames? I'm no genius and I couldn't begin to calculate the comparisons in forces any of these machines need to withstand. I've seen the SC video showing both Alu and Carbon being stress tested and was amazed, yet people still somehow crack and snap carbon frames left and right (says anonymous PB users). If I had the $ to pony up for a carbon bike I probably would, but I would always have doubts in the back of my mind. On my aluminum chassis it never even crosses my mind.
  • 4 13
flag b1k35c13nt15t (Feb 15, 2015 at 9:04) (Below Threshold)
 Carbon can be repaired, aluminum cannot.
  • 2 5
 Formula 1 cars almost never hit 200mph even though their top speeds are a little higher. Just not enough room on the tracks.
  • 4 1
 Honestly my only problem with carbon is that it diesnt show stress. Now I dont know about frames, but I will never run a carbon bar.
  • 5 0
 The threshold to which carbon can withstand a certain force is higher. However, carbon snaps. Aluminum at least has the quality to bend. I would rather have my frame bend than snap.
  • 2 1
 You cant be serious about this comparison :-S
  • 2 2
 The coment was for neil51
  • 1 3
 How not carbon is stronger is rather have a carbon framed bike over aluminium
  • 1 2
 You guys don't get it. The cost to fix aluminum is a lot less than it is to fix carbon. And it's easier assuming you can fix it. Yes carbon is better overall, but aluminum is better for DH people like me that crash a lot. Now for trail bikes, I can see carbon as an option for almost anyone new or experienced. There are a lot less sharp rocks that you fly over on a trail ride.
  • 2 1
 I believe the carbon F1 cars does a pretty good job at absorbing energy in crashes as well. As far as carbon handlebars, it's really gonna boil down to design and how well they are made. I would NOT run any Chinese eBay bars but I trust my Enve Sweep. Always inspect them regularly.
  • 1 0
 bronco you obviously dont know much about frame repair
  • 2 0
 And you're an expert too? Epoxies and special tools for carbon, or a tig welder, grinder, and maybe some extra aluminum to reinforce the damaged part. Seems like aluminum would be way easier and cheaper. Plus you don't have to worry about carbon splinters, I've heard they're a bitch to get out compared to metal or wood splinters.
  • 1 1
 ^do you realize how much a good tig welder costs? and never mind the fact it takes a long time to get good enough to be confident repairing a frame. they both suck to fix.
  • 1 1
 Not talking about buying one. That's why you have friends that like welding. Would be pretty nice to have my own tig welder though. I'd have to sell my fury to buy one.
  • 2 0
 And this is also why we have warranty's. Then we just have to hope it's covered.
  • 14 2
 Did I miss the part where they tell us how much it weighs?????
  • 6 2
 well i now realized the bike was allready at 36 pounds, so its actually pretty darn light. Especially compared to the new and in my opinion overpriced sepcialzed s works demo, witch weighs like 37 pounds.
  • 1 1
 If the S-works demo weighs 37 pounds that makes me have a little chuckle to myself. My custom alloy operator weighs 37.6 haha and I am most certainly under the total cost of an S-Works.
  • 4 0
 stock mondraker summum carbon is 32.8lb, bit of room for people to catch up
  • 3 0
 @jo1212man you mean the insanely overpriced demo which costs the whole of 400 dollars more than this?
  • 3 1
 The Boxxer Team is cheaper in price and works great. As other said, many riders prefer the feel of a coil spring.

The cheaper alternative is to buy a Boxer Team and a solo air cartridge. By doing such, you save yourself a net $250 over buying a the "real" WC....
  • 3 1
 They keep releasing DH 27.5 8" race bikes but why don't they remake the Faith?! The Faith is their best bike they ever made!! Perfect for freeride. 26" wheels and 7" of travel... perfect.
  • 1 0
 New Reign has taken over that mantle really.
  • 1 0
 Them 27.5 wheels tho....
  • 1 0
 Giant have categorically dropped 26"
  • 1 0
 Except their STP. They need a dirt jumper which they have (STP), a downhill racer which they already have (Glory), and a 26" free ride machine (Faith). You don't see rampage riders using 27.5 wheels.
  • 1 0
 meh... the bike that has excited me lately is the Canfield Brothers Jedi... even the name is cooler. This is coming from someone currently running a V10C.. and dont want the new V10 either...V8.5 doesnt quite have the same ring to it.
  • 1 0
 Having worked with carbon fibre I know first hand how toxic it is, So it may be stronger than aluminium but it is destroying the planet
Think of all the Chinese people scratching them self's stupid from working with it!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Remidnds me of poison oak/ ivy when you get it on your skin
  • 9 4
 This is gloryous...
  • 2 0
 Are they specing the top of the line build with enduro rims? I googled them and the dt Swiss website says they are.
  • 1 0
 I prefer the Aluminium versions of the new Glory... Thought this was a Marin at first, I dont like that big solid bit at the seat tube/top tube junction....
  • 3 1
 Glory-ies!!! That must be a sub 35lbs OEM build... sell you less for more!
  • 5 3
 What a bloody rip off !!!!!!
  • 2 0
 Well they took their sweet time with this.
  • 2 0
 hope they will have a frame only option to buy when they are released
  • 2 1
 I always wondered when they would release the carbon glory. Looks kick ass!
  • 5 3
 Go direct and get a YT! Why not save 4gs??
  • 2 0
 So is this a 2015 or 2016 MY?
  • 2 1
 :O :O :O Perdy!!! I like red....But is any bicycle, really worth that much????
  • 1 0
 Just ordered the Glory 0 alum 3 days ago! Wouldnt have been able to afford the carbon version anyways, $5699 VS $8500!!
  • 1 0
 That is one sweet looking ride, almost as cool at the 2015 aluminum one I just gotWink Love Giant bikes!
  • 7 6
 haha i know soo many people who just bought alu ones
  • 33 2
 So? The alu ones are just as rad and way cheaper, saving a few pounds won't make you much faster, riding will...
  • 2 2
 i agree , but wouldnt you be pissed if you bought your new bike and they came out with a better version a few months later? just sayin, personally i think glorys are too jumpy and high off the ground anway but hey , each to their own
  • 1 0
 I suppose for some people that would be annoying, even if they couldn't afford the carbon one. The glorys seem ok, although I have never gotten the chance to try one, i'll stick with my transition.
  • 1 1
 Pretty small LG my trail bike is almost as long W/B but has a longer T/T...
  • 3 2
 could have put internal cables on it as well
  • 3 0
 Internal sucks donkey dick
  • 1 0
 yet all there other bikes run them
  • 3 4
 That's one nice clean lookin' machine there Giant. Put a DVO or a Manitou on there along with 26" wheels & yagotcherself a winna! Smile
  • 1 0
 Very Good! Excelente! Beautiful! Nice!
  • 3 2
 I want one.... Now...
  • 4 1
 Just remember, you only need one kidney to function properly and kidneys can go for good money if you find the right person.
  • 4 4
 27,5 FUUUUUU
In general nice looking bike with non awesome bar diametr; )
  • 1 1
 Giant makes nice stuff, I'd just never even think about buying one...
  • 3 0
 I always thought like that, till my LBS changed from Specialized to Giant. I now have a 2015 trance SX after 9 yrs on a SBC Enduro. And I won't be changing back either, very impressed with the SX!
  • 2 3
 The trance is a great platform. The Glory looks super boring. I'm just barely holding back from saying it sucks the big one. Oh crap!
  • 1 0
 dat black chain
  • 1 1
 Why don't they say it's the most expensive one also?
  • 1 0
 Meh.
  • 1 1
 It's Carbon.... WOOPIDY DOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
  • 1 1
 2016 model: Glory Whole 1.0 Wink
  • 2 1
 Bike porn for sure
  • 1 0
 Glory Hole Boner
  • 1 1
 oh look another carbon
  • 1 3
 Fajna, choć cena troszkę zaporowa, no i mogli odbijaki gumowe na amora zrobić w ramie.
  • 1 2
 Bored to see all these 27.5" bikes....................
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